Here’s my intuitive explanation to why we are hearing what we are hearing: What makes a guitar sound like a guitar, as opposed to for example a piano or a harp, is the spectrum of overtones that are generated when the strings are plucked. This also makes two guitars sound different from each other, despite having the same make/model of pickups. Any component that is involved in how the vibrations in the string is created (this is kind of what the myth debunking video refers to as “timbre”, but then goes on to equate to amplitude and frequency, as if the tonewood would alter the notes, as opposed to the tone) affects the sound. For example:

A very stylish black guitar by ENCORE with a great 'Humbucker' pickup.......The simplicity of this instrument makes it a joy to play and It sounds as good as it looks! Used....but in great condition and showing only minimal signs of use (no scratches, chips or dings) and is in full working order. The scale is full length (not 3/4 or 7/8)...but the body size is smaller and lighter than a typical stratocaster (see image for comparison), which makes this guitar perfect for a younger / smaller person or anybody who might like a very robust but lighter instrument. All reasonable offers considered.
The idea behind a piezoelectric pickup is more or less the same as with any regular electric guitar pickup. Guitars which utilize this system have a piezoelectric pickup located under the bridge. Once you pick a string, the sound vibration from the string is then interpreted by the pickup, generates an electrical signal, and is then fed into the preamplifier to be boosted to line-level.  You can think of it like a microphone's diaphragm.
One look at its distinct bowl-back body, and you already know that the Ovation Applause Elite AE44II is not your average wooden guitar. This distinct back is crafted from Lyrachord, the same material which is said to be used in helicopter blades and more. This results in a lightweight instrument that's not as fragile as wood. Still it does come with a solid spruce top and other wooden components, so it doesn't sound or look too out of the ordinary. Finally, the guitar comes equipped with an undersaddle piezo and preamp system, which features a 3-band EQ and built-in tuner.
Yamaha Company is known as the largest music instrument production firm in India. It offered huge variety of guitars at starting prices around Rs 8,000.The topmost guitar models of this firm are SG 7, RGX, SG 5 and Yamaha RGZ. This brand is earning good reputation by offering high quality guitar to its customers. So, if you are a new learner, then may buy this best guitar at fewer prices.
For an experienced guitarist, the choice of amplifier is personal and a major part of the guitarist’s sound. But most of our panelists thought that, for a beginner, it’s most important for an amp to offer a variety of good sounds so that they can find what works for them and make adjustments as their style and taste evolve. As Ken Rosser put it, “If a kid’s starting out and they’re really into Pantera, they’ll love an amp that gives them that sound, but next year they might discover Eric Clapton and want a different sound.”

Most lo-fi amplifiers in the 40s and 50s produced unexpected distortion or overdrive tones at higher volumes. Guitarists quickly discovered that the Fender Tweed Champ (originally marketed to beginners as the Champion 800 in 1948) produced a distorted sound at high-volume levels thanks to the Champ’s low power output and simple circuitry. Many of the classic guitar solos in the 1950s were recorded through a Champ, which resembled a wide-panel TV cabinet covered in tweed cloth. Leo Fender even went so far as to manufacture the first 100-watt amplifiers for surf guitar pioneer Dick Dale, who had blown hundreds of Fender amps and speakers from regularly turning up the volume.
Distortion is a feature available on many guitar amplifiers that is not typically found on keyboard or bass guitar amplifiers. Tube guitar amplifiers can produce distortion through pre-distortion equalization, preamp tube distortion, post-distortion EQ, power-tube distortion, tube rectifier compression, output transformer distortion, guitar speaker distortion, and guitar speaker and cabinet frequency response. Because many factors beyond preamp distortion contribute to a particular guitarist's sound, recording engineers and PA system techs typically put a microphone in front of the guitar speaker, rather than only use the guitar amp's pre-amp out signal. A sound engineer or music producer may send the DI out signal from the pickups to a separate track at the same time, so they can re-amp the signal later. In contrast, it is fairly common to use a DI box with electric bass.
Chabot Guitars - Paul Chabot used to offer quality hand made Classical guitars (Colorado, USA) "Paul first apprenticed und er guitar maker / repairman Robert Buchanan, where he became familiar with the aspects of guitar repair, and guitar refinishing. Furthering his ability and knowledge, Paul attended Roberto-Venn School of Luthiery where he learned the basics of wood, instrument design and guitar making. Not long after graduating from Roberto-Venn, Paul was fortunate enough to apprentice under world renowned Master guitar maker Augustino Lo Prinzi. Through Augustino Lo Prinzi, Paul was able to learn some of the most proven methods and advanced techni ques of fine guitar making."
Hollowbody guitars feature full hollow bodies much like acoustic guitars do, and are used often in jazz and mellow style music as exemplified by Jazz greats that include Joe Pass, Pat Martino to name a few. It is however not limited to just that as exhibited by Brian Setzer and his Rockabilly style, along with Chet Atkins and his iconic country guitar playing.
When Rolling Stone founder Jann S. Wenner asked John Lennon how he rated himself as a guitarist, Lennon replied, "I'm not technically good, but I can make it fucking howl and move. I was rhythm guitarist. It's an important job. I can make a band drive." It is, and he did: Lennon was the Beatles' spark plug and bloodletter, often adding rawness to pristine pop songs. Listen to the airborne strums that power "Help!," the circular riffage of "Day Tripper" or the deceptively sloppy "The Ballad of John and Yoko" – where, with George Harrison away on holiday, Lennon turned rudimentary lead and rhythm lines into sharptoothed magic. He was also capable of generating a truly ferocious tone: In the live promo clip for "Revolution," Lennon makes his hollow-body Epiphone Casino screech like a very angry lawn mower. Still, he didn't get his due as a guitarist in the Beatles' heyday. "They call George the invisible singer," Lennon said. "I am the invisible guitar player."
The C3M comes with Savarez Cristal Corum high-tension strings, but you can always change them out for something different if you prefer. Aesthetics-wise, the guitar has a matte finish (the “M” in the model name), but it really has no bearing on the way the guitar sounds.All the same, you’ll want to protect your guitar from nicks, cuts and other damage.
The very first thing to remember about pickups is that the active option is not necessarily better than the passive choice, and vice versa. Each type brings its own set of drawbacks and benefits. Passive pickups might be limited in terms of signal strength and tone shaping, but they are much more expressive in comparison to the active pickups in terms of picking and strumming intensities.
Some of the first Kents to have been imported into the U.S. were made in Sweden by Hagstrom. (Some sources, or maybe just one source quoted all over the net, states that they may have actually been Czech-made and sold by Hagstrom.) The Hagstrom HI, HII, and HIII (those are the letter H with roman numerals representing the number of pickups the guitar had) were branded Kent for sale in the U.S. and as Futurama for the U.K. They had the Kent name on the headstock and sometimes the upper bout. They were similar to Fender Stratocasters. They also made some Strat-shaped basses. There are several photos on the net showing David Bowie in his Ziggy Stardust days playing a red Hagstrom with Kent branding on the headstock.
Hi Chris. That doesn’t ring any bells I’m afraid. If your customer wants a new scheme I wouldn’t be afraid to replace the stock switch with a standard 5-way and then you know where you are. There’s always a chance that the Vigier switch is doing something funky and it started with slightly different pickup selections so the sound might change with a new standard switch. Obviously make sure you’ve got notes and photos so you can revert back to the stock wiring! Have you tried to buzz out the Vigier switch with a multimeter to see how it works? Alternatively, have you tried touching the pickup magnets with a screwdriver to see which pickups/coils are on in each switch position, that might give you some clues?
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Up for sale, a 1961 Fender Super in excellent condition and in perfect working order. And of course this is the most compact Brownface-era amp to feature the "Harmonic Vibrato" circuit. The circuit has just been thoroughly tested by our techs here at Mike & Mike's Guitar Bar and almost all of the original blue Ajax capacitors in the preamp are intact.
Let's face it: Big, high-powered guitar amplifiers full of sizzling tubes capable of frying an omelet are fun, and the sound of an electric guitar playing through one has been pervasive in popular music since the 1960's. They're sometimes very loud as well, and sustaining the volume levels required whilst attaining those majestic, exotic or extreme guitar tones for any appreciable length of playing time in one's house or apartment without interruption from family, neighbors or the police is generally impossible. Don't fret over it. We'll discuss a variety of solutions for the volume problem later on.
The Les Paul Custom single cutaway was discontinued in 1961 and replaced with the SG (as we know it) designation for “solid guitar”. This model featured a thin 1-5/16″ body and a double cutaway. Confusion abounds to this day over the name Les Paul Custom. Since the single cutaway was discontinued, Gibson transferred the name Les Paul Custom to the new models.
I didn’t use any guitar effects. I just used a straight into the amp, and I put the amp up pretty hot, though. The tweeds go up to 12 usually, and this one I had on 10 on the bridge pickup on the Strat. I was using a glass slide. Here’s the slide I was using. It’s like an old medicine bottle. I put some felt in there to make it a little bit of a tighter grip on my finger, but it’s the same slide that Dwayne Allman used.
I've had a Sunburst pattern Ventura when I was a teenager.. it was a nice guitar and played well. recently i saw a really well made Oscar Schmidt gs-1 . not expensive at all. My main guitar for many years was a Gibson howard roberts "artist" dove style. wine red and mother of pearl inlay and gold plated. I eventually sold it to a lady in alaska that plays a lot of blue grass and pop. I got full money out of it. I had it 25 years, so it was vintage by now.
One of the best known Kay electric guitars during the 1950s was the K-161 "Thin Twin", most visibly used by blues artist Jimmy Reed. This instrument debuted in 1952, and featured a single cutaway body, a distinctive "fire stripe" tortoiseshell pickguard, and a pair of thin blade-style pickups that gave the guitar its name.[citation needed] Kay used this type of pickups on various Kay electrics dating back to the 1940s.

Guitar pickups are quite heavily affected by the impedance of whatever they're plugged into. If it's a low impedance input, you'll end up with a muddier, flatter sound going into your amp sims. Ideally you want a high impedance input, and if the 6i6 isn't doing it a cheap-ish D.I. box will be the thing to go for. Behringer's got some that get the job done.
The Teisco J-1 was a natural maple-topped guitar with a single pickup near the adjustable wooden bridge, a large affair with a metal cover with six slots parallel to the strings and two round bulbs on either side, very space-age! The stop tail was probably rounded, allowing strings to pass through the body, and was covered with a square metal plate. A small pickguard sat between the pickup and the neck. A volume and tone control sat on another little piece of plastic down on the lower treble bout. Knobs were white plastic knurled with a silver ring around the top.
Most of the time, a chord diagram will not show you the finger numbers. They will leave that up to you, because different people sometimes play chords differently. Some people cannot play an A chord like this, because their fingers are too big, and this fingering is very cramped for them. Instead, they play an A with a mini-barre, using the same finger for more frets. For example, I could bar my 1st finger across the 4th, and 3rd strings at the second fret, then place my 2nd finger on the 2nd string, second fret (see image on the left). This gives me more room between the frets, and also frees up my 3rd and fourth fingers to pick out melody and bass notes. It’s just a preference, you can play the chord how you prefer.
While tone and volume should be your foremost considerations, you should also determine what extra features you really need. Built-in effects are great if you want a no-hassle, all-in-one package, but they may not be as flexible as external effects pedals and processors. An effect loop is useful for effects like digital reverb and delay, but it’s not essential if your effects consists of a few stomp boxes. Line outputs with speaker emulation are helpful for home recording, and external speaker outputs are great for expanding your live rig.
On August 21, 1965, during a Beatles concert tour, Randy Resnick of B-Sharp, aMinnesota music store, presented Harrison with a second model 360/12 FG “New Style” 12-string electric guitar, distinguishable from Harrison’s first 12-string by its rounded cutaways and edges. There was a television documentary produced by KSTP TV in Minneapolis documenting this event.
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Different forms of manipulation of similar bucket brigade delay chips were also at the center of the more advanced chorus and flanger pedals that emerged in the late 1970s. With ICs that themselves were capable of creating a controllable time delay in any given signal, the job of harmonically modulating part of a split, delayed signal to produce a warbling chorus or swooshing flange sound became a lot easier.

But the avant-garde din of Velvet Underground rave-ups seemed a genteel curtain raiser compared with the full-bore cacophony of Lou’s 1975 solo opus Metal Machine Music. The noise-guitar side of Lou’s legacy set the stage for cutting-edge genres like industrial, art damage, dream pop, grunge and present-day noise exponents, like Wolf Eyes and Yellow Swans.
Route the body. You’ll need to make a cavity (a hole that goes partly through the body of the guitar) in the back of the guitar to fit the electronics for the volume, tone, pickup selection controls. You will cover it later with a bit of material (usually hard plastic). You’ll also need one cavity in the front of the guitar for each of its pickups. Rout the pickup cavity (or cavities) to the depth recommended by the manufacturer.[9]
Solid-state amplifiers incorporating transistors and/or op amps can be made to produce hard clipping. When symmetrical, this adds additional high-amplitude odd harmonics, creating a "dirty" or "gritty" tone.[37] When asymmetrical, it produces both even and odd harmonics. Electronically, this is usually achieved by either amplifying the signal to a point where it is clipped by the DC voltage limitation of the power supply rail, or by clipping the signal with diodes.[citation needed] Many solid-state distortion devices attempt to emulate the sound of overdriven vacuum valves using additional solid-state circuitry. Some amplifiers (notably the Marshall JCM 900) utilize hybrid designs that employ both valve and solid-state components.[citation needed]
“The tone thing is amazing because you can have one rig, have three different guitar players, and each guy can play the same exact thing and it’s going to sound different,” says L.A. Guns guitarist Stacey Blades. “It’s all in the hands.” Waara from Line 6 agrees. “Any guitar player will tell you, at the end of the day, it’s in your hands and you will sound like you will sound,” he says. The percentage of influence the hands wield is shockingly high.

There are two main types of controls on bass amps: switches and rotary knobs. The simplest, least expensive practice amps and combo amps may only have a few switches and knobs, such as an "on/off" switch, a volume knob, and a bass and treble control knob. Mid-priced models may add additional tone controls (e.g., one, two or three "midrange" controls and a "presence" knob for very high frequencies) and/or add a second type of volume knob called a "gain", "preamplifier" (or "preamp"/"pre"), or "drive" (short for "overdrive") control. A good selection of equalizer knobs and gain stages is standard on expensive amplifiers. If an amp has one or more preamp or gain knobs, the second volume knob may be called "master", "volume" or "post".

What makes the RG421 particularly interesting is the neck. The Ibanez Wizard III neck used is thin, fast, and very comfortable. These aspects makes it suitable for shredding as well as playing rhythm guitar. The bridge is a simple fixed unit that is paired with an above average set of tuning machines on the headstock. Overall, the RG421 is capable of holding a tuning even if you go a bit wild with string bending.

Blueridge Historic Series BR-160 Looks good, sounds even better. Blueridge’s BR-160 celebrates the company’s rich history, which is reflected in the guitar’s vintage dreadnought design. The warm, mellow sound it produces also takes you back to the good ol’ days way before the internet came along. Having this guitar is just like having a piece of history in your hands.
The original dreadnought shape was launched by CF Martin, one of the big names in acoustic guitars, and was named after an old English warship. It features rounded shoulders, and the neck typically joins the body around the 14th fret. The dreadnought strikes the most even balance between volume, size and ease of playing, and for this reason it has been used by just about every big-named player you can think of.
Ash is a common body material in solid body guitars. It is harder than mahogany and very resonant. This gives the guitar ringing sustain and bright tone with a well-defined mid-range. A light colored wood with attractive grain figuring, it is often given a transparent finish. Swamp ash is a particularly appealing, detailed wood used on higher-end guitars.

But it might be the ESP LTD Series that has really vaulted this company into contention as one of the top brands, and certainly one of the best for heavy metal. These are more affordable version of USA-made ESP guitars, along with some innovative designs. The EC-1000 in particular has earned a strong reputation as more wallet-friendly alternative to the Gibson Les Paul.
If you’re looking for a unique sound that delivers an exaggerated twang, than the Gretsch G5422TDC Electromatic is the best electric guitar to offer these features. Designed with wider frame and a hollow body, this guitar utilizes “Black Top” Filter’Tron pickups to deliver a dynamic sound that is both bright and focused in its tone. The toggle has three positions that allows the user to customize the balance of the tone, and all strings on the guitar are able to deliver strong intonation due to the Adjusto-Matic bridge. The vibrato tailpiece adds resonance and depth to the sound quality, and by utilizing maple for the body frame there is a clarity provided within the tone that is unique to that design. With a three position pickup, open-back tuners, and a rosewood fingerboard, this retro style guitar provides a high-quality option for musicians alike. Here’s a great G5422TDC video for some samples of that warm hollow-body sound.
For example, if you plug into a .7V power amp and you get good sound – great! However, if you plug into a 1.25V power amp and find the signals are weak, it’s not the tonal lack of the power amp that’s the problem. The preamp signals are too weak to be driven to the powerful 1.25V power amp. The issue is the sensitivity input of the power amp is too high for the preamp to be driven well.

X-Series: Back and sides constructed from compressed wood fibers (high-pressure laminate or “HPL“) and solid Sitka spruce or HPL top. Due to this construction these guitars are more environmentally-friendly.[citation needed] Models include: DX1, DX1-R, DXM, DCX1E, DCX1R3, 000CXE Black, and 000X1. Some earlier models used ‘Ebonite’ (black Micarta) fretboards, later models use koa or striped ebony. Necks on all models are constructed from Stratabond, a laminated wood product used for decades in gun stocks and hunting bows. Some of the more recent models are made in Mexico.
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So you've decided to purchase a new axe? Well you've definitely come to the right place. Todays line of intermediate electric guitars are so superbly crafted right down to the smallest component, you don't have to worry about sacrificing quality for a reasonably priced instrument. In fact, this catalog is exploding with intermediate electric guitars for every taste and style. Like any expert guitarist will tell you, the learning process speeds up considerably when you have a guitar that's an ideal balance of comfort, playability and tone. Thankfully, popular guitar companies like Ibanez, Epiphone, Jackson and countless others are passionate about giving everyone the opportunity to play an electric guitar that's meticulously constructed. You'll even find intermediate electric guitars that are endorsed by professional artists, including Dave Mustaine, Brian May and John Petrucci. Since its earliest beginnings, the classic sound and feel of a Strat has found its way in the hands of icons, and the Fender Deluxe Player's Stratocaster will be sure to continue that legacy. Consisting of a noiseless pickups, gold hardware and loaded with advanced electronics, this Strat plays effortless, and the push-button pickup switch provides you with seven pickup combinations for a wide range of tones. This section also features plenty of intermediate hollow-body guitar choices, such as the Gretsch Guitars G5420T Electromatic. This eye-catching single-cutaway contains a Bigsby tremolo and Filter'Tron pickups to give you a lethal combination of vintage twang and vigorous punch. Searching for a brand new electric guitar is an exhilarating experience, and with so many stunning options to choose from on today's market, there has never been a better time than now to get your hands on an instrument that perfectly represents your own personality. Whether you're a '60s garage turkey or a technically-skilled metal shredder, you can bet that you'll find what you're looking for.
One of the most important attributes of boost pedals is their transparency. In other words, they need to able to boost the signal without changing the signal itself. As easy as it sounds, achieving good transparency is pretty hard and not many pedals are capable of doing so. With that said, a good booster pedal is a pretty powerful tool in the right hands.
There are several string configurations available with electric guitars, including 4-string, 6-string, 7-string, and 12-string configurations. Although each configuration can make a slightly different sound, the differences are mostly down to personal preference. Nontraditional configurations include 5-string, 8-string, 9-string, 10-string, and 18-string versions.
Stratocasters also feature tremolo systems, where the Les Paul, SG and Telecaster have fixed bridges. Epsecially in the budget price range, tuning is typically a little more stable for fixed-bridge guitars. If you really want a Strat with a tremolo it’s nothing to be super concerned about, but newbies should be aware of the difference. A good guitar tech at the local music store should be able to set your Strat up so it stays in tune just fine.
A real hall-of-famer from Ibanez, which displays true rock style and lightning-fast playability in an affordable beginner-friendly package. With the classic Superstrat body in a range of colors, this RG is made of solid basswood and features a slick, thin Wizard III maple neck, with rosewood fretboard and 24 jumbo frets, making it superb for chugging powerchords and fast soloing.
If you are feeling lucky, you can purchase any one of these guitars online. I personally like to sit in a store and play the actual guitar I’ll be taking home. That way I can see if the action is set too high, how it feels, and most importantly how it sounds. You can without a doubt find a great acoustic guitar for under $500. Don’t rule out the option of buying used. You can find a guitar that retails for $900 for maybe $500 used on sites like craigslist.org or reverb.com.
Some delay pedals also come with full looping abilities, allowing you to play detailed multi-part melodies completely by yourself. A few artists to look to for great examples of delay pedal use are Angels and Airwaves, U2 and Muse. Reverb pedals are an entirely different animal. It brings its own unique type of sustain to a note, infusing the sound with strong texture and character through its distinctive echo. Creating a sound not quite like any other effect, reverb calls to mind the energetic surfer rock of the 1960s, such as Dick Dale's version of "Misirlou." You can stay true to those vintage roots or take the effect in a new, modern direction—it's up to you. With the added dimension they bring to your tone, you'll want to use your delay and reverb effects pedals at every performance. They make a unique contribution to the sound individually and even more so when you use them as a team.

Description: Guitar Type: Bass - Body: Carbon Fiber (Graphite) - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Cocobolo (Nicaraguan Rosewood) - Neck Wood: Walnut & Bubinga - Neck Construction: 5 Piece - Frets: 24 - Inlay: Custom - # of Strings: 5 - Headstock: 2+3 - Bridge Construction: Carbon Fiber (Graphite) - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Black - Pickups: Bartolini - Pickup Configuration: Dual - EQ/Preamp: 3 Band - String Instrument Finish: Stained Red, Transparent Flat Black


While anything with decent gain could be used for metal, a dedicated metal amp is the only thing a dedicated metalhead would want to use. These amps are actually very similar to other styles of amp, with one big difference – they are loaded with massive gain, which is essential for metal. A perfect example of what makes a great metal amp is the EVH 5150III. Designed with Eddie Van Halen, this all-tube amp head is an absolute beast in term of power and gain, with face-melting distortion and 50 watts of power.
Your skill level on the guitar is another factor that should be taken into consideration while shopping for the perfect instrument. It is generally wise to start out with a lower quality model when you are first beginning to study the guitar, whereas a veteran player with a trained ear will likely require the bells and whistles of more high end gear. If you’re a beginner, it’s a great idea to start out with a Yamaha or a Fender Squier, for example, as you get plenty of quality to learn on without breaking the bank. It’s wise not to go overly basic, however, as cheap guitars will have harsh playability that will leave a beginner with painful calluses that may scare them away from the instrument.
With so many guitar manufacturers hot rodding the Stratocaster, it is refreshing to see brands like ESP going after the other popular guitar shape, resulting in the "Super LP" guitar like the ESPT LTD EC-1000FM. This souped up version of the classic single cutaway body combines traditional looks with modern tones and playability, resulting in a fast playing axe that's easy on the eyes, and not too edgy.
If you really like to cover all options, record using any of the above methods but also take a straight DI feed with no effects and record that onto a separate track so that you can process it later. Some engineers have been known to use a recorded DI guitar track to drive a guitar amplifier, which is then miked up and re-recorded, but you could take the easier route of using a hardware recording preamp or a guitar amp emulator plug-in to process the track.
Ooooohhhhh.... I used the Firebird 12 for two weeks on sessions in 1973.... I STILL solo the tracks I used that on... it's the BEST BEST BEST BEST OF ALL TIME !!!!!!!! FOR ANYTHING !!!!..... in fact, as I remember, the octave strings were wound different than the way Ric does it (high-low) and that even added to the incredible sound.....wanna sell the Firebird 12?

What about Derek Trucks? Mark Knopfler? Trey Anastacio? Chuck Berry? Even Eddie Van Halen deserves some credit–more than John Mayer does for guitar playing. John Mayer's fame as a guitarist piggybacks on his commercial success, which is a result of targeting a demographic of 13 year old girls. He's no doubt a skilled guitar player, but over-rated as a guitarist relative to guys like Van Halen, Knopfler, etc.


Fuzz bass effects are sometimes created for bass by using fuzzbox effects designed for electric guitars. Fuzzboxes boost and clip the signal sufficiently to turn a standard sine wave input into what is effectively a square wave output, giving a much more distorted and synthetic sound than a standard distortion or overdrive. Paul McCartney of The Beatles used fuzz bass on "Think for Yourself" in the 1966 album "Rubber Soul"

i'll be 50 yrs old in a few days. i started playing guitar at 8. this is my 30th guitar. i started ordering various guitars from amazon a year and a half ago and have not been displeased at all with any of my orders. i get some for young people who cannot afford to get one for themselves and so have started exploring the guitars in the price range of 80 to 140 dollars. at first glance, it would seem pretty much impossible for any guitars in this price range to be of any worth, but the factories are set up to put out fine instruments now in this price range. i can't recommend this guitar highly enough to convince you what i think of it but i am astounded at the quality, playability and sound of this guitar. it has really good tuners and rings out like a

Chorus: Though it can be overused, light distortion works well as a filler for choruses in Christian worship and most other genres.Verse: You won’t typically hear a distorted verse, though at times a two guitar group can make this work. Generally, you’ll want to leave distortion for the higher intensity portions of a song.Bridge: A lot of Christian songs tend to lower intensity during the bridge, which means light distortion becomes a little less usable. Though for bridges that keep the tempo up, it can work pretty well.
Gibson now restricts the use of the name Dobro to its own product line, but care should be taken in interpreting documents written before 1993 or from outside the US. In these cases, the terms “Dobro” and “dobroist” may not necessarily refer to a Gibson Dobro. For example, consider the references to the use of a Dobro guitar on songs like “The Ballad of Curtis Loew” by Lynyrd Skynyrd, “Valium Waltz” by the Old 97’s, “When Papa Played the Dobro” by Johnny Cashon the Ride This Train album, or “Gold Dust Woman“, a song by Fleetwood Macfrom the album Rumours which features a Dobro. Mark Knopfler of Dire Straitsis famous for his guitar of this style, featured on the cover of the album Brothers in Arms.[2]
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