Early electrics weren’t built for distortion. The idea was to create a loud, clean sound and, with a few notable exceptions, that’s what players who utilize this type of guitar are looking for today. But even without overdrive this design has one inherent problem: As the volume goes up, hollow-body guitars become highly susceptible to feedback. The next level of electric guitar evolution, the semi-hollow body, made a few strides in dealing with this issue.
Pyle Pro’s PEGKT15SB package is the next step up. This guitar has more of a vintage feel thanks to its sunburst finish. Like the Silvertone above, it features 3 single coil pickups, two tone knobs, a tremolo bridge system, and a full-scale neck complete with a 22nd fret. Also included in the package is a Pyle Pro gig bag, a small 10-watt amp with cable, 3 guitar picks, a strap, and extra strings.

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I have a Vox Shadow that's sunburst, white pick guard that surrounds 3 solid chrome face pickups and the middle pick up has "VOX" engraved in it. 3 seperate volume controls and a master volume control. Tuning keys are all chrome, and the green decal on the face of the headstock reads Shadow, JMI Dartford, Kent. Neck is attached withthe help of a chrome plate, on the back side of the 'plank' body is an access plate for the jack that states made in England. Guitar also has the original roller/tremelo tail piece with palm lever. The numbers of 64728 are stamped on the back side of the headstock just below the tuning keys. Finish is beginning to crack a bit but it's all original, right down to the volume pots that have to be cleaned from time to time. It must be a rather unknown line that Vox had as I can't find out much on it either. Had this guitar for many years. Was handed to me in pieces in an old 'cardboard' case, (that has since gone away) put it back together and added it to my "music room".
An amazing electric guitar player pack that is suitable for use by beginners. It has a mahogany body, with its fret board having been made from rosewood. The neck is also made from mahogany. Most interestingly, it comes with passive fienzo pickups, and an exclusive guitar player pack with gig bags, strap, cord, tuner, and an instructional DVD. It is well design to assist the beginner to better access the frets and practice through to perfection. Prices range from INR 12,650. Find it on the link below:
The Matsumoto Musical Instrument Manufacturers Association was the organization responsible for Fresher guitars. Little is known about this association, other than it did not have larger guitar manufacturers Matsumoku or Fujigen Gakki as members. Nakai Gakki was a possible member of the association. Fresher guitars began production in 1973 by the Kyowa Shokai Company, an association member, which was also responsible for the Camel badge. It's interesting to note that Fresher guitars were eventually being produced by Chushin, which leads me to believe that they may have been an Association member along with Kyowa. The beginning production year was considered a low quality benchmark for the company. The Fresher brand continuously improved in quality until 1980.
This is an American brand of guitar that is available in India. It was created in the year 1873. After a few years, it was bought by Gibson Guitar Corporation. Epiphone has a compact non-cutaway body made entirely from laminated mahogany. The neck features smooth slim taper profile, fretboard made of rosewood and 20 frets. Epiphone guitars India price starts from 14,000 INR approximately. This is the brand of guitar that is nylon strung and offers highest standards in acoustic and electric guitars.
If you’re looking for a unique sound that delivers an exaggerated twang, than the Gretsch G5422TDC Electromatic is the best electric guitar to offer these features. Designed with wider frame and a hollow body, this guitar utilizes “Black Top” Filter’Tron pickups to deliver a dynamic sound that is both bright and focused in its tone. The toggle has three positions that allows the user to customize the balance of the tone, and all strings on the guitar are able to deliver strong intonation due to the Adjusto-Matic bridge. The vibrato tailpiece adds resonance and depth to the sound quality, and by utilizing maple for the body frame there is a clarity provided within the tone that is unique to that design. With a three position pickup, open-back tuners, and a rosewood fingerboard, this retro style guitar provides a high-quality option for musicians alike. Here’s a great G5422TDC video for some samples of that warm hollow-body sound.
Marshall are king when it comes to stacks and rock where fender leads with combos. Marshall offer a wall of sound with punchy lows, strong mids and aggressive highs. But it's not all shrill highs,dial back the trebble a little and you can also get really nice cleans and some real grunt as the crunch sets in. The classic Marshall sound is so coveted that there the market is saturated with imitators. - Antmax
We’ll talk more about the sound quality shortly. To give you a gentle introduction, Line 6 has been in the amp and effects modeling game for a long time. Their POD line of guitar effects processors has been around for a while, and you might be familiar with their Pocket POD. Some of you might also know them for their extremely popular digital delay pedal and looper, the DL4 (an absolute mainstay on pedalboards everywhere). Line 6 makes several multi-effects units, and according to the research we did the POD HD500X (from their POD HD X series) is the one mentioned and recommended most often. They make a rack-mountable version of it, but we’re more interested in the floor pedal unit. This is a multi-effects pedal, amp simulator, incorporates an expression pedal, tuner and looper, and doubles as a USB audio interface, just to name the basics.

I have an old Montclair that my uncle modified. He told me that is a '52 but the info here dates it as '60-62 if I remember correctly. I just registered over at the forum, I thought you guys might get a kick out of seeing this guitar. My uncle stripped almost all the paint, there's a bit under the bottom of the neck just to show how it was. He added a hand carved bridge and custom binding on the backside. Also there are a few other unique mods. I really am interested to see what you think about this guitar. It is my main player and has been for years now, an amazing sounding punchy guitar. Hopefully I'll be able to post up some pics at the forum. Cheers! -Gabriel-


Playing the guitar is no joke. To be honest, not all who bought a guitar end up playing. Maybe it’s just hype from friends and family or along the way found something else more interested on. You have to remember that you will spend countless hours practicing and the time you spent to it is impossible for you to get it back. This is not meant to discourage but to challenge you to succeed.


Let’s start off with a guitar’s signal. As the driving force behind the entire effects chain, a guitar’s signal (more importantly, it’s voltage) must travel through the input cables and all of your effects pedals before it can reach the amp. As you can imagine, by the time a guitar’s signal finishes making its way all the way to the amp, the signal will undoubtedly suffer from a bit of degradation, losing its tone and body in the process. It's not your guitar's fault, it's simply the nature of electricity.
Pitch shifter and harmonizer: A pitch shifter (also called an "octaver" for effects that shift pitch by an octave) raises or lowers (e.g. "transposes") each note a performer plays by a pre-set interval. For example, a pitch shifter set to increase the pitch by a fourth will raise each note four diatonic intervals above the notes actually played. Simple, less expensive pitch shifters raise or lower the pitch by one or two octaves, while more sophisticated and expensive devices offer a range of interval alterations. A pitch shifter can be used by an electric guitarist to play notes that would normally only be available on an electric bass. As well, a bass player with a four string electric bass can use an octave pedal to obtain low notes that would normally only be obtainable with a five-string bass with a low "B" string.
The Vox brand was also applied to Jennings's electronic organs, most notably the Vox Continental of 1962, whose distinctive trademark "wheedling" tone was immortalised by Alan Price on the Animals' track "House of the Rising Sun". In 1962 the Vox Continental was given to The Echoes to trial on stage and use on records they cut with Bert Weedon and Dusty Springfield as well being featured on their version of "Sticks & Stones" 1963 as well many other records, and later used by Paul Revere of Paul Revere & the Raiders, as well as Ray Manzarek on most songs recorded by The Doors and by John Lennon on The Beatles' track "I'm Down", both in the studio and live at their 1965 Shea Stadium concert. Doug Ingle of Iron Butterfly used it on "In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida" and other songs of the group. Mike Smith of The Dave Clark Five and Rod Argent of The Zombies also made frequent use of the instrument. Peter Tork of the Monkees can be seen playing the unusual looking Vox organs several times during the Monkees TV series (1966–1968). In newer popular music, the organist Spider Webb of the UK garage band The Horrors can be seen using a Vox Continental. A famous Vox organ riff can be heard on "96 Tears" by Question Mark & the Mysterians. Benmont Tench of Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers has frequently used his vintage 1965 single Continental in the studio with the band since 1976 and still uses the instrument today. Another famous signature Vox organ sound was created by Augie Meyers when playing with the Sir Douglas Quintet, as heard in the songs "Mendocino" and "She's About a Mover."
The Salamander Grand made by Alexander Holm (details above) who sampled his Yamaha C5 Grand and is quite well known for having a great sound. Most sf2/sfz versions seem to be lacking the proper dynamics, have latency problems or have been oversimplified. This sf2 version has addressed these issues yet retains its essential character including optional resonance but removes other non-essential sounds such as pedal noises.
Got this beautiful guitar less than a month ago and played a couple of solo acoustic gigs. People were wowed by the way the sound of this guitar fills the space ( I played it through a Bose tower). Loved the feel of the fretboard. Though the body is a jumbo, it doesn't feel like a dreadnought. The guitar looks very attractive too and I had one person come over during a break just to admire the guitar. So now here's why I have given it 4 stars. The electronics were faulty on my guitar. The tuner switch didn't turn off automatically after I hit them to tune the guitar. The light stayed on till the batteries were drained out. This happened twice to me after which I decided to send it back. I also noticed a big hum building up during my second gig with the guitar - I

Hartley Peavey built his first amp in 1957 and decided to establish his own company in 1965. Ever since, he has been the head of one of the biggest audio gear companies in the world. Eddie Van Halen collaborated in the design of the famous 5150 amp, a legendary amp that is still heralded by today's enthusiasts. However, the collaboration stopped in 2004 and the brand had to rename its amp to 6505. Born in the 1970's under the name Vintage, and with a completely different style, the Classic series is still very popular among blues, jazz and rock guitar players. The brand has also developed solid-state amps (the Bandit series) and, more recently, some modeling amps (the Vypyr series).

Because of the miniaturization of all things electronic, you can now get full-sounding, authentic guitar sounds from a unit the size of a disposable camera — as long as you listen to it through headphones (meaning that it has no speaker or power amp of its own). These battery-powered wonders come with belt clips for untethered practicing (great for checking your stage moves in the mirror).
Just in early Red Lable Nippon Gakki FG150 in excellent Vintage Condition CLEAN!.............. rare to find one pretty, then to be straight, then sound deep and loud like this one sounds but to have great action too its intonation is dead on upgraded nut & saddle & strings to Martin Marquis 80/20 - 12s This is a pleasure to play with wonderful tone its like 45 years old and the tone woods always sounded great but even better now its the one!!!... serious collectors guitar and is Recording worthy... shes somthing special. to buy it contact Joe: JVGuitars@gmail.com .
Description: Body: Basswood (Tilia, Linden, Lime) - Body Construction: Solid - Neck Attachment: Bolt - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 24, Jumbo - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 7 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Bridge: Tune-O-Matic - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Chrome, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch, Grover Tuners - Pickups: Dean - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Metallic Cherry, Metallic Black, Transparent Red
I myself own an Ashton and I think that they are overall really great guitars. I own an Ashton SL29CEQLTSB Acoustic Electric and it is simply amazing. It comes with a built in tuner and the strings last for quite a very long time. I have owned a couple guitars in my time and I am happy to say that the sound is impressing. So all of the other people who put down this guitar either know nothing about guitars, are super spoiled and want the best of the best, or just had bad luck with them.
Top 4 in my opinion. Countless guitarists have played them on some of the best albums ever written. I've owned numerous vintage guilds and still own a vintage f50 and d55. Recently Fender bought guild and I bought a new d55 which was a bit over rated and over priced in my opinion. But Fender has sold Guild and I sold my fender owned guild d55 only to buy a brand new by the new owners who moved Guild to a California facility and I must say it holds its own with the vintages I have. Guild is back! A great name in acoustic guitars. A great build (thank God once again), and the quality has always been with the best. Long live guild and it's a top 4 brand just behind Martin, Taylor and Gibson.
On 2007’s self-titled effort and the new Nightmare, Avenged Sevenfold have continued to expand their sonic template, leaving Vengeance and Gates plenty of space to explore a range of different styles. At the end of the day, however, metal is metal, and at its essence that means killer riffs and shredding solos, which the duo unleash in abundance. A7X staples like “Bat Country,” “Almost Easy” and the latest single, “Nightmare,” are chock full of blistering rhythms and finger-twisting, speed-of-light leads, while they tread that sweet spot between catchy melodicism and all-out aggression.
The Step Ladder is a passive input attenuator using high quality components for excellent reliability. True-bypass mode provides the maximum signal level. The attenuator pot and two toggle switches allow for flexibility in the amount of signal attenuation when not in bypass mode. Treble bleed capacitors in the circuit retain crisp high frequencies even at maximum attenuation. The Step Ladder is ideal for anything from getting a slight boost while playing single-note acoustic guitar leads or for jumping from clean to overdrive in a high-gain electric guitar amp.
With analogue delay (and simulations thereof), each subsequent echo is not only quieter, but also more distorted. Dub reggae tracks often make prominent use of this effect -- look out for the effect where the engineer momentarily turns a knob so that the echoes get louder instead of quieter, surging and distorting before he turns it back down again so they can die away.
The guitar builder for the giants of jazz, Ibanez now introduces the Artstar AS153 Semi-Hollow Electric Guitar, to answer the needs of the working professional player. Crafted from specially selected tone woods, this guitar features a bone nut, ebony fingerboard, hand-rolled frets and Ibanez's famous Super 58 pickups-capable of tone magic any place...  Click To Read More About This Product

Like any other electronic products, the amp as well has already gone into notable changes and updates over the years. However even the changes in amp technology happened, many still prefer a tube powered amplifier over a solid state and modeling amps. This is mainly because the sound of a valve is considered the organic or natural on how an amplifier should sound. While the other two is engineered to sound like a tube amp especially the modeling amps.
Fernandes Guitars is a guitar and accessory manufacturer, that originated in Japan in 1969, building flamenco guitars. As the company grew it expanded production to include more acoustic guitars, electric guitars, bass guitars, amplifiers, and accessories to become one of the biggest guitar manufacturers in Japan. Fernandes also owns Burny, a brand for Gibson replicas.

Here we have the very highly respected ... Alvarez Yairi dy91 ... This very unique and beautiful guitar is in AMAZING CONDITION and is based on the RARE exotic Hawaiian Koa tone wood and is one of more ornate & fancy D-45 Martin Drednaught Acoustic the Martin retails for well over $7,500 and this guitar offered here at JVGuitars is the Alvarez Yairi answer and is quite a HIGH END JAPANESE HAND CRAFTED GUITAR by one of the greatest Luthiers in Japan.... Reserve your Rare & Exotic Koa Yairi DY91 Today...this baby is in excellent vintage condition... This is THE DY91 to own... any questions please email me gr8bids@comcast.net All the best! General specs:About the DY91: These High End Yairi acoustic guitars are Handcrafted for outstanding projection, this example offers enhanced bass response and an articulate high-end register performance. As with this one many are Sculpted from some of the most precious rare sought-after tone woods from all over the world. This example is Hawaiian WoW! Here are the Specs: Handmade in Japan Saddle & Nut: Bone Neck Joint: Hand Fit Dovetail Finish: Gloss Body Style: D-45 Style Slope Shoulder Dreadnought Back & Sides: AAAA Figured Koa Top: Solid German Spruce Neck: Premium grade Mahogany Fingerboard: Bound Ebony Scale: 25 3/8" (645mm) Width at Nut: 1 11/16" Fingerboard Inlay: Large Diamond Bridge: Ebony-Inlaid Body Binding: Ivory & Abalone Soundhole Rosette: Abalone Head Overlay: Figured Koa Pickguard: Black Tuning Machines: Original Yairi Gold Die Cast Finish:Gloss Natural Electronics: None Original Semi-hard shell case: Case candy Included .
Around ’77 or so (since the new shape was similar to the Magnum basses), with sales embarrassingly bad, Ovation took some Deacon bodies and added new contours, carving a dip into the top curve and adding angles. It didn’t help. The Breadwinner was officially axed in ’79, with the Breadwinner loosing its head in ’80, although the market had long passed them by.
Stratocasters also feature tremolo systems, where the Les Paul, SG and Telecaster have fixed bridges. Epsecially in the budget price range, tuning is typically a little more stable for fixed-bridge guitars. If you really want a Strat with a tremolo it’s nothing to be super concerned about, but newbies should be aware of the difference. A good guitar tech at the local music store should be able to set your Strat up so it stays in tune just fine.
In 1962 or 63 (possibly as early as 1959) Guyatone guitars began arriving in the U.S.. If you look around the internet you will see that they could be found under a variety of brand names and were sold in drug stores, department stores, even auto parts stores, as well as music stores. There were two lines of Kent guitars: a Standard series and a “Pro-series”. They were made by Teisco and Guyatone. I haven't been able to get my hands on any of these early solidbodies so I don't know if "the Professional Group" guitars are actually worthy of the "professional" designation and slightly higher pricetag or if it was all about marketing.
The Matsumoto Musical Instrument Manufacturers Association was the organization responsible for Fresher guitars. Little is known about this association, other than it did not have larger guitar manufacturers Matsumoku or Fujigen Gakki as members. Nakai Gakki was a possible member of the association. Fresher guitars began production in 1973 by the Kyowa Shokai Company, an association member, which was also responsible for the Camel badge. It's interesting to note that Fresher guitars were eventually being produced by Chushin, which leads me to believe that they may have been an Association member along with Kyowa. The beginning production year was considered a low quality benchmark for the company. The Fresher brand continuously improved in quality until 1980.
Variable 2: Speaker configuration. In Clip 2 you hear cabinets with varying numbers of speakers. First comes the 1x12 sound of a midsized Fender combo amp. Next is a 2x12 Fender-style cabinet. After that is the distinctive sparkle of a tweed-era 4x10 Fender Bassman. The last phrase is a classic 4x12 Marshall stack with 25-watt Celestion Greenbacks. These sounds represent a single mic on a single speaker, yet you can differentiate single- and multi-speaker cabinets due to leakage from adjacent speakers.
But having at least a very basic foundation to build upon - such as learning some basic chords, will allow you to learn more songs faster. My best advice is to abandoned any idea of instant gratification and commit to the idea that learning guitar is a slow process in the beginning. It gets exponentially easier to improve your skills after you get past the huge hurdles you encounter in the beginning.

The term piezo refers to the use of piezoelectric crystals that transfer vibrations into an electric current. Piezo pickups are inexpensive to produce, and as such are the most commonly found pickup in acoustic-electric guitars. Piezo pickups generally have a bright tone and strong mid-range response, thankfully they are bundled with preamps that help make the sound more like an unplugged acoustic guitar. While there's nothing better than a true miked acoustic tone, sound quality of piezo preamp system's have steadily been improving, which is good for both guitar players and manufacturers.
Not to mention the difference tones created when two pure tones (sine waves) are produced at the same time (which, important to mention - pure tones only exist in theory, every sound we hear is comprised of overtones...) - then the additional difference tones created by the interaction BETWEEN difference tones - it's basically a fractal relationship. Anybody who has spent a significant amount of time studying the physics of sound knows that the interactions that occur between sounds are so complex and immense that it's almost silly to assume that just because "wood isn't magnetic" that the natural resonance of the wood wouldn't in turn accentuate certain overtones over the fundamental tone coming off the string. You can't say that the note "has already left the string," when the note takes place over time - even a staccato note has an attack, sustain, decay, and release envelope much in the way that a synthesizer does (this is where the idea for artificial dynamics envelopes came from anyway).
Ibanez, a guitar and bass manufacturer, came to prominence as a result of music legends like Steve Vai and Joe Satriani using this brand. These guitars provide an exceptionally uniform neck action, a highly versatile tone, and top of the range pick up configuration. One of the main reasons that this brand gained popularity was the effective tone from cheap and mass-produced instruments. Heavy music is what they excel in, and metal enthusiasts have been loving Ibanez for decades now. They manufacture guitars for every style and genre. The most iconic model is the RG, but S series is also loved by all. They are also the makers of the 7-string guitar, with the first model Universe being made in the year 1990.
Every guitarist seeks to produce an expressive and distinctive tone. Unfortunately, figuring out what kind of gear you need can be a baffling proposition. Here are the three main equipment categories that comprise your music-making rig: your electric guitar, guitar amps, and effects pedals and units. These components all work together to create your sound. And because you can swap out equipment and change settings, the creative possibilities are virtually limitless.
A common acoustic body style that makes use of a very large soundboard is the dreadnought. Dreadnoughts are distinctive for their square bouts, wide waists, and 14-fret necks. The first dreadnought was developed in 1916, and it has been gaining in popularity ever since. Dreadnoughts are very popular among bluegrass guitarists due to their powerful, driving sound.

Excessive distortion homogenizes guitar tone. You want enough gain to get great sustain and an aggressive sound if desired, but you don’t want to lose the punch, dynamics, and immediacy of a semi-dirty tone. Malcolm Young is my benchmark—a perfect sonic barometer to go by when talking about incredible rock-guitar tone. His playing proves you don’t need a ton of distortion to rock with total authority.


There’s a lot of knowledge here to digest, so the best advice anyone can give you is not to sweat it too much. You aren’t going to become a pedal encyclopedia overnight, and even if you could, you’d be missing out on the fun experience of trial and error that comes with figuring out your first pedals. The truth is that some of the most distinctive guitar and bass effects ever recorded have been the result of artists experimenting with effects units they’d never used before – especially in the 1960s, when pedals were brand-new to everyone.
There was a time when Yamaha were thought of as just a guitar maker for students and beginners - but those days are long gone and Yamaha now produce quality acoustics that compete favorably with the best in this category. The LL16 is a great example, with it's all-solid wood body and built in pickups with preamp, this is a true workhorse instrument. Having premium level specs at mid-tier pricing is like a dream come true, the main reason why we consider the LL16 as the best value for money acoustic in this section.
Coming in as the fourth-most recommended multi-effects unit is the Boss ME-80, which is the upgrade to the older Boss ME-70. This is probably most comparable to the Line 6 POD HD500X in terms of having an all-in-one, full-featured multi-effects and amp-modeling unit. But the great thing about the Boss ME-80 is that it costs nearly half what the Line 6 does! Furthermore, the Boss is a very different animal in how you interact with it, which you can pretty much tell just by looking at the two pedals side by side.

Most commonly associated with classic rock, the Les Paul lives up to its reputation as a rock ‘n’ roll machine. However, the guitar is actually capable of a lot more. Something many don’t recognize about the Les Paul is that in the right situations it actually has a gorgeous clean tone. Les Paul, the famed inventor and namesake of the Gibson Les Paul, used the Les Paul extensively in his career. The famed jazz guitarist did go on to use a highly modified version of the Gibson Les Paul, but he did use the original variant of the instrument when it was initially released. Bob Marley also used a Les Paul to great effect.
I have a almost identical one in front of me, but mine has 3 pickups. It has the same color white guard and sunburst pattern. The back of the guitar has the redish sunburst pattern on the neck like yours but also has the red on the main body, unlike yours that has a colored neck and solid color back. I can’t find a picture of a 3 pickup that is like this. Any info would be nice to know.
The written history of the classical guitar can be traced back to the early 16th century with the development of the vihuela in Spain. While the lute was then becoming popular in other parts of Europe, the Spaniards did not take to it well because of its association with the Moors.[citation needed] Instead, the lute-like vihuela appeared with two more strings that gave it more range and complexity. In its most developed form, the vihuela was a guitar-like instrument with six double strings made of gut, tuned like a modern classical guitar with the exception of the third string, which was tuned half a step lower. It has a high sound and is rather large to hold. Few have survived and most of what is known today comes from diagrams and paintings.
The Legacy’s vintage-spec CLF-100 Alnico V pickups have that unmistakable chime and quack reminiscent of the best examples from the late ‘50s, thanks to the work of Paul Gagon, G&L VP Engineering. Gagon found his inspiration reviewing original prints stored in Leo’s private laboratory at G&L, but that was just the start. About 30 years ago, Gagon was an R&D engineer at another company when he was tasked with finding out what was so special about the early bolt-on guitars many players raved about. Gagon tirelessly analyzed many examples of what were considered holy grail guitars, spending time out on the shop floor talking to builders still working in the pickup department since the ‘50s, all on a quest to discover where the real mojo was – and wasn’t. What he learned from the builders matched his own engineering analysis. You see, back in the day, the actual spec of pickups coming that down that old production line varied considerably. That meant coming up with the right specs for the Legacy pickups was more challenging than simply following the prints. Gagon’s persistence paid off as the Legacy garnered rave reviews from both players and magazines like Guitar Player and Guitar World.
Having perfected the modelling amp concept, Line 6 have become experts at delivering a huge variety of great sounds in a convenient, affordable package. Experiment with 12 different amp models, from classic 1960s Fender tone to the “Insane Red”, inspired by the mental Mesa/Boogie Dual Rectifier, and sculpt your tone further with the seven built-in effects.

Every guitarist who bends or vibratoes a string to make it sing owes a debt to B.B. King. With influences as diverse as T-Bone Walker, Charlie Christian and Django Reinhardt, the late guitarist turned the blues world upside down in 1952 with “3 O’Clock Blues.” Almost overnight, the harmonica was supplanted as the primary solo instrument in blues, as guitarists scrambled to imitate B.B.’s soloing style, especially in Chicago.
O WOW!...I love...Fallout 4 is a great game like the rest of the fallout series but if your a fan of the series u will be kinda of down that the choices u make don't affect the outcome of the game because they made more of a story they wanted to tell but don't lose hope still a good game and they might make a sequel to new Vegas and there just might be a Multiplayer for new Vegas 2....The world is so large and the gameplay non linear (which is good and bad), I find if I walk away from the game for a while, I have to spend a lot of time figuring out where I was and where I stashed things when I come back to it later.
Along with repairing instruments, we do complete restorations. Restorations often come in the way of family heirlooms and antique finds. After acquiring these instruments, you may think of them as only keepsakes, or something to put a shelf. We want to take these old instruments and restore them to their full use. There's nothing like playing on a violin or guitar that's been in the family for generations, and we want you to experience that.
While this seems like you’d be stuck on either extreme of the guitar industry, don’t panic. There is a compromise between the two. You can get a guitar with a solid top and laminate back and sides like the LX1E Little Martin Acoustic Electric Travel Guitar. Martin shows you that guitars with this construction tonewood combo doesn’t always mean it’s going to be a poorly-made guitar. However, it does provide enough jump up in quality to improve sound performance while still keeping costs within the affordable range.
Tremolo – Not to be confused with a tremolo bar (which is closer to the Whammy pedal), this effect works on volume. You can think of tremolo pedals as being like strumming a note, and then wiggling the volume knob on the amp while it’s ringing. Usually, the pedal will have controls for speed (equivalent to how fast the volume is “wiggled”) and depth (equivalent to how far the knob would be turned).
Straight out of the box you have over 68 on-board digital effects, 75 custom designed factory patches for iconic sounds, 5 amp emulations and 5 cabinet emulators, so you’re not going to run out of choices on stage or in the studio. In addition, you have access to the Guitar Lab software app that allows you to download new stomp boxes and patches regularly.
I had a similar problem and went with a similar solution - the Vox Tonelab amp modeler and multi-effects unit. Has a headphone out that works fine for practice. Plus it is working well for gigging as well. I can practice tunes with the exact amp and effects that I'm going to use. When I get in front of the guitar amp, I just need to get a clean sound and give it a little color in the tone. It isn't perfect for gigs, but it is SO easy to practice with and can sound like a Fender, Marshall, Hiwatt, Mesa - whatever. This is starting to sound like an ad, so I'll stop. :-) – Anonymous Jan 18 '11 at 10:47
For 70 over years, Kiesel Guitars has been building the highest quality guitars, basses, pickups, replacement necks, kits and accessories for pro and hobbyist musicians alike. We offer a complete lineup of instruments, including carved top guitars, multiscale fanned fret guitars & basses, MIDI synth access guitars, headless guitars & basses, extended-scale baritone guitars, acoustic/electric guitars and basses plus signature models from Jason Becker, Allan Holdsworth and more. Our Custom Shop builds instruments in the USA from the highest quality materials, at a direct price that can't be beat, along with build times of around 10 - 12 weeks. Hundreds of options, including exotic woods, inlays, fretwire, hardware, pickups & electronics and more allow you to order an instrument perfectly suited to your playing style and personal tastes. click for more...
Dont buy too cheap. The cheaper the guitar, the harder to play and the less quality the sound. You want a rewarding feel and sound or you will get discouraged. Buy a better guitar used than a new one cheap. Are you going to learn chords or fingerpicking ? Some guitars are better sounding for one than the other. Some like Taylors are versatile and provide good sound for both. Be smart. Good luck.
Being in the entry level section of the market, the Blackstar ID:Core Stereo 20 V2 is meant to be an all-in-one practice rig complete with amp modeling and effects. But what makes it stand out is the use of two 5" speakers for a fuller stereo sound, which complements the amp's versatile voicing features. Speaking of voicing, this amp is loaded with 6 essential tones to play with, two variations of clean (warm and bright), crunch (normal and super) and overdrive (OD1 and OD2), which by themselves are enough to play most musical styles. But being from Blackstar, this amp is equipped with their ISF (Infinite Shape Feature) knob that lets you fine tune the voicing of the amp to your preference. In addition, the ID:Core Stereo 20 V2 comes with 12 built-in effects, covering essential modulation types, delays and reverbs, all of which add up to a portable amp that gives you a lot of tone options.
If you are looking for a specific guitar wiring diagram, I would contact the manufacturer of your guitar. Most guitars have similar style wirings. If you have a Stratocaster style guitar that is made by another company, I would go ahead and just use a Strat wiring diagram. I have listed a few books on electric guitar wiring in my book section. Go to the electric guitar pickup wiring section for more information.

I have owned a Mesa Boogie Dual Rectifier for 5 years now and couldn't be happier! Granted, the amp took a long time to dial in my perfect tone, but it was a good way to familiarize yourself with the amp. If you want cleans, crunch, distortion, and a wall of gain that is big enough to destory small islands than this is the perfect amp. Not to mention, the customer service is out of this world! About a month after purchasing the amp Mesa Boogie called to make sure everything was okay and I was enjoying the amp. They also ask you to take a questionnaire on how the sales person performed. Great company, Best amps.

As a general rule, I'll set up the 57 right against the amp's grill cloth, pointing it directly in to the speaker (sometimes at a slight angle from the outer rim of the speaker pointing toward the center). I'll usually place a condensor about two to three feet in front of the amp (at the same level as the amp) and point it at one of the speakers, and if I have another condensor available, I'll place it about five or six feet away, in front of the amp. I'll also raise the "far" mic to a height of approximately five or six feet off the ground.


One of the oldest guitar effects, vibrato changes the pitch of the signal at a constant shifting rate. Vibrato adds motion to your tone, but without the “choppy” feel of a tremolo. Vibrato adds a more fluid movement. The slightly detuned, slightly chorus-ey modulation emphasizes bends and makes chords more interesting to the listener. Jimi Hendrix was a visionary user of the Uni-Vibe, which at its core is a vibrato pedal.

The first signs that the times they were a-changin’ began to appear in 1960 with the debut of the T-60 and the EB-1. The T-60 (named for the year) was a more-or-less Jazzmaster-shaped guitar with an extended upper horn and backward-sloped lower cutway. Even the pickguard was similarly shaped, although not tripart, bearing three pickups, the bridge pickup angled slightly like a Strat. Controls included one volume and one tone and a chicken-beak rotary selector. This had a covered bridge/tailpiece assembly. The headstock was a long, extended variation on a Fender Strat head, with six-in-line tuners, with a round sticker Teisco logo on the round tip. Fingerboard inlays were the soon-to-become-signature rectangles along the upper edge. However, the most striking detail was the so-called “monkey grip,” a handle-shaped cutout on the top of the lower bout. This design would continue through the ’60s (two decades before Ibanez would introduce it on its JEM guitars!).
Russell is not only one of the hardest working technicians in Dallas but also a classically trained guitarist with a degree in classical guitar performance from SMU. To supplement his income playing classical guitar, he joined the Brook Mays team before finding a home at Charley's Guitar Shop. "Having a background as a player helps with cutting through the issue," he says. "I think the real part of guitar repair is being able to observe what's going on with the guitar but also understanding what the player is going through."
This is a very general question, but I will attempt to answer. I'll not get into brands, buy what "feels" right and has a good tone. If, a beginner, a good acoustic can be bought new for $200.00 - $300.00. If, you are an experienced or professional player, "The Sky is the Limit" only limited by how much you want to spend. My first guitar was used, and I paid $50.00. Now, I play a Gibson Song Writer, $3500.00. Hope this helps.

The guitar measures 41 inches in length, and it comes with a 25.75-inch scale and 20 frets for various playing techniques. You also get strong D’Addario strings for reliable performances every time, as well as enclosed die-cast gold tuners, so you never play an off note. This dreadnought guitar features a cutaway so you can easily practice finger techniques on the higher frets.

Bracing affects the way the guitar sounds because it changes the pitch or tune that the guitar produces out of the sound hole. Personally I think X bracing is the b est because it produces a more even and better more balance for mids and high notes and just enough bass on the E and A strings that gives a brighter more even tone. Blinded or pessed bracing gives a much deeper sound than x bracing which =less versatility but if you bought a pressed dread knot or anything else you'll still be okay just remember strings make a huge difference and running your guitar to the right amount of tone for any song will work it's just that Taylor produces the best over all guitar itself by better quality woods and they go through ver strict and rigorous testing and inspections before they are sold to retailers and customers. Higher grade parts attention to detail and style of music versatility is why one guitar can cost 3 times as much. Most companies like Taylor is know give warranties or $ back

I have a Palmer P 33 acoustic (hand-crafted etc), that I bought second hand about 20 years ago for £80. It still sounds and looks superb and rarely loses its tuning. (Probably better than my newer Tanglewood.) I can't find out anything about it. However, somebody out there must have made it. Surely that somebody knows something about them! Do they never go on the internet! Pete.
: Just in a vintage excellent beauty with a fresh JVGuitars set up is ,New Martin strings bone nut & saddle and solid ebony with brass ring and Abalone inlay bridge pins, all old plastic cheap tone robing parts are tossed out for the JVGuitars TONAL UPGRADE to 2017 specifications otherwise she's ALL ORIGINAL see for yourself She's pretty darn clean and in better than 40 years old average vintage condition For a song. The Takamine F360 was DISCONTINUED decades ago This is the Lawsuit version Specifications Top Sitka Spruce Back Rosewood Sides Rosewood Finger Board Rosewood Electronics None Finish Natural Gloss Faithful D-28 style Dreadnought The most popular body shape of the past half century, the Dreadnought delivers a strong low end with plenty of volume. Structural integrity is excellent as is neck applignment its action is very good low and it plays with ease, new strings and sounds great this fine vintage Japanese instrument is ready for another 40 years of enjoyment. She is not new its actually 40+ years old and has been played, frets are still excellent and have been JVG dressed and she has a few minor and insignificant doinks or scratches and nothing to detour from its vintage patina beauty she's a true vintage quality instrument and is faithfully based on the great D-28 a playable work of art you can hear and enjoy for decades to come. Well taken care of California one adult owner that took really good care over 40 years just for you! Get her before she's gone. any questions or to purchase now contact Joe at JVGuitars@gmail.com .
-Would be nice to edit the string colors, add training modes telling you which finger to hit the note with, how many times to play through a sequence (so you learn/memorize the song, vs just respond to the game - i.e is the chorus sequence repeated 4 times before moving onto the next part of the song?),indicating strumming patterns to help with timing (newbies tend to down pick everything and just pick faster when the notes are closer vs switching to an up-down strum) etc.
The output transformer sits between the power valves and the speaker, serving to match impedance. When a transformer's ferromagnetic core becomes electromagnetically saturated a loss of inductance takes place, since the back E.M.F. is reliant on a change in flux in the core. As the core reaches saturation,the flux levels off and cannot increase any further. With no change in flux there is no back E.M.F. and hence no reflected impedance. The transformer and valve combination then generate large 3rd order harmonics. So long as the core does not go into saturation, the valves will clip naturally as they drop the available voltage across them. In single ended systems the output harmonics will be largely even ordered due to the valve's relatively non linear characteristics at large signal swings. This is only true however if the magnetic core does NOT saturate.[45]
The most musically satisfying types of distortion tend to be progressive, where the audio waveform becomes more 'squashed' as the level increases. Hard clipping, by contrast, tends to sound harsh. All these types of distortion introduce additional harmonics into the signal, but it is the level and proportion of the added harmonics that creates the character of the sound. Harmonically related distortion can be added at much higher levels than non-harmonically related distortion before the human hearing system recognises it as such, so there is no way to define a percentage of distortion below which audio is acceptable or above which it is unacceptable. The reason that digital distortion has its own character, which most people find less musically pleasant, is because it is not usually harmonically related to the input signal. For example, quantisation distortion, which results from sampling at too low a bit depth, sounds quite ugly, though many dance and industrial music producers have found a use for it, and some plug-ins deliberately introduce it.
Others are perfect for getting started. In fact, the Epiphone Les Paul Special II is the electric guitar I most often recommend for beginners. This is an instrument that’s modeled on the legendary Gibson Les Paul, with many of the same attributes such as a single-cutaway body, dual humbuckers and tune-o-matic bridge. It is a simple yet versatile setup.
While Fender specialize in the single-coil pickup, it’s Gibson who are masters of the pickup in general – and it shows when you browse the chart in our dedicated Gibson pickup article. However, you’ll quickly discover that there is no ‘one Gibson pickup’, as the brand offer a wide range including single-coils and humbuckers, medium and high outputs, and vintage and modern tones. You’ll find different pickups on all of Gibson’s famous models, including the Les Paul, Firebird, SG and Flying V. Perhaps they are best-known for their PAF-style humbuckers – an awesome vintage tone that is well-replicated in their famous Gibson ‘57 Classic Plus.
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Chorus is an effect that doubles and detunes your signal. It can add an otherworldly effect to your tone, as well as add emphasis to your playing. Chorus adds shimmer and depth to your signal. While it shines in making clean playing more lush, many players, Zakk Wylde included, use chorus to add a doubling effect to their solos, which really will bring it to the forefront of a song. When used carefully, you can even approximate the sound of a 12-string guitar.

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I love this shop. I have spent a good amount of $$$ at quite a few guitar shops in Seattle. I won't name them, but I swear to god there's one that I walk into and every time I walk in I'm a new customer. No one remembers me there, I mean fuck, one dude is from the same city as me on the east coast. But the guitar store? They always remember me and treat me like a guest even if I'm not there to buy shit. Everyone there is a genuinely good dude. They're all honest too, which can be hard to find in this industry. I took my guitar in for a check up and they told me doing anything to it would be unnecessary. They could have easily charged me $80 for a set up and taken my guitar. They definitely made a loyal customer out of me. Will definitely be going there for anything from new picks to a new amp.

PRS guitars are among the best on the market. Their style, tone and design are unique, giving them a pretty good chance against much more established brands. PRS Custom 24 has been my go-to choice, and will remain so in foreseeable future. If you are looking for good old American craftsmanship combined with a killer tone, PRS is definitely worth checking out.
While it definitely looks unique with its four sharp edges and sculpted cutaways, this guitar follows conventional super strat design, starting with a basswood body that is joined to a maple neck. For its price, its quite surprising to find that this guitar features a neck through design, which is normally only found on more expensive electric guitars. The 25.5" scale neck is topped by a 24-fret rosewood fingerboard with a nut width of 1.65", providing a familiar shred friendly feel. Giving this guitar its metal friendly voice are two LH-150 Humbuckers that are hot enough for mean high gain metal tones.

Just SOLD OUT: here is a great sounding wonderful 43 year old Vintage Japanese OOO guitar in excellent vintage condition. We have already set her up with our Martin Bone Nut & Compensated Saddle and action is dialed in to Martin specs. We also upgraded the original plastic bridge Pins to SOLID Ebony with Abalone dot with brass ring and of course a new set of Martin Strings 80/20 Bronze 12's.. and this guitar Sounds like a true vintage classic if not familiar with the Morris brand thats ok many are not, I have know of these for 2 decades now many of these were made in the Terada factory in Japan... another name you may not have heard of none the less they are know to make the highest end guitars in Japan in those days and also today, for makers like Ibanez virtually all of their top end guitars like Musicians - Artists - George benson GB line and the old Aria L-5's and Ibanez L-5's and many others continuing on today in that great Custom Shop tradition. This is one of them and is very well constructed with top workmanship and fit and finish build quality is comparable to a Martin- Taylor_Gibson and so on... that is to say no worries this guitar Morris has an excellent pedigree. Guitars of great playability and great sounding what more do you need?.... This guitar was built from wods aged at least 20 years at time of build that was over 40 years ago and just look at its condition to this day... it has truly stood the test of time. See for yourself... it this price range a wonderful classic 000 style Japanese true Vintage guitar in its own right. Great Value and great fun Japanese vintage collectible. For a song. .
I found a Decca guitar lying in my woodworks shop at school, and my teacher let me take it home. My friend and I have been restoring it, and we nearly have it finished, the only thing missing is the tremolo spring. However the model of the guitar is kind of odd as we have not found any record of what type of guitar we own. Its a double cut-away archtop, with a tobacco sunburst and 3 single coil pick ups. We have looked everywhere and haven't been able to find any record of a 3 pick up Decca guitar. We're still looking...

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You will come across many people who'll give you different opinions regarding different brands, and also, there are several other reviews on the Internet too. Keep your research simple, experiment, and keep frequenting guitar shops and secondhand musical instrument stores to check out the different kinds of brands. Play as many guitars of different brands as you can, and one day, you will find your 'guitar-soulmate' (sic.), the sight and sound of which will make you go 'wow!' So, if you're new to the guitar world or have recently developed an interest in it, this Melodyful article will surely sort out your doubts. Here is a brief comparison of different guitar brands along with detailed descriptions of the tone and sound. Take a look!

I was just old enough to catch the tail end, but many folks remember the days of the record store.  Large vinyl albums, huge artwork, leafing through the stacks….it was a cool time that lasted longer than the days of cassettes, 8-tracks, and CDs.  Nowadays, most music buying is relegated to the online variety.  But there was a time during the 1960s where record stores were THE place to get your music, and musical instruments!That’s right, in window displays or hanging above the stacks of vinyl, guitars like these were waiting for teenagers.  Again, just a cool time!  This Decca guitar was sold through Decca Record stores.  In early 1966, Decca Records jumped into the electric guitar frenzy.  This was around the same time when CBS has bought Fender and only a few years away from MCA buying Danelectro. Curiously enough, Decca Records was a subsidiary of MCA.Anyway, Decca and many other companies saw the potential profits of electric guitar sales and quickly tried to capitalize.  There was a whole line of guitars, amps, and accessories, all imported from Japan.  The entire instrument line was handled through Decca’s 21 branches and distributors throughout the USA, but the company seemed to concentrate on the east and west coasts.  There was also a Decca subsidiary in Canada as well.This particular guitar was made by Kawai, and featured a design that was semi-exclusive to Decca.  Kawai was producing and exporting thousands of guitar to the USA at this time, and Kawai’s prices were very competitive, but Decca decided to go with an (as of this writing) smaller, unknown Japanese company to produce the guitars.  Many of the Decca electrics featured non-adjustable truss rods and just seemed to always be on the “cheap” end.  But some of the them did sound very good.  Sometimes you’ll see some really odd Decca electrics that literally copied the Teisco look from the same time period.  There were also some cool hollow bodies with set neck designs as well as the late 60s  line of guitars, like the DMI 231 pictured below.


Fender has a long history of building amplifiers, so much so that many of the amps we see today still mimic the look and aesthetics of the amps that they built many decades ago. You could also say that many of the amps we have today can trace their roots to the classic Fender amp design. Also impressive is the long list of Fender amplifier users which include Eric Clapton, Jerry Garcia, Brian Setzer, Neil Young, Stevie Ray Vaughn, Eddie Van Halen and many more. For a company with a long legacy and a massive line up of amplifiers, maintaining high rating across the board is quite the feat, but then again, this is to be expected from the company that helped shape the electric guitar sound that we know today. These days, Fender is well represented in the entire amplifier market, from entry level models with amp modeling, to premium modern reproductions of their iconic tube amps.
Once you’ve gotten your needs squared away, you’re still going to need to pick an amp. And even if you’re certain as to what you want, it can still be difficult to choose. But that’s where we come in: we’ve rounded up the following 10 amps we believe are the top-tier options for beginner guitarists. So skip the hassles and heckles of guitar store salesmen and choose from one of these superb starter amps.

Dean Guitars is an American manufacturer, founded in Chicago in 1977. They build their guitars for speed players, and are famed for their eye-catching models, including the iconic Razorback. Signature models are also a specialty and they produce guitars for the likes of Dave Mustaine and Michael Angelo Batio, as well as huge line of Dimebag Darrell signature models.


We spent 39 hours on research, videography, and editing, to review the top selections for this wiki. Although none of them go up to 11, we are pretty confident that one of the guitar amps on our list will deliver the perfect level of sound and quality of tone for whatever venue or style you need to play. We've ranked them here by their tonal expressiveness and flexibility, durability, control options, and ease of use. When users buy our independently chosen editorial picks, we may earn commissions to support our work. Skip to the best guitar amp on Amazon.
Acoustically I own a Martin for the living room. Best sound but I won't let it leave the house. (Taylor people are so defensive, but lets face it Martin owners never have to say "Oh it sounds just like/as good as a Taylor") I own an Ovation, the thing is bullet proof, a little thin on sound but can take it anywhere. If I plug it in, it has amazing electronics and sounds 10X better. I own an Ibenez exotic wood, pretty but a stiff box that just does not resonate, hate it.
Thats a major bend of opinions! It all boils down to..the style of music that you play and what you expect out of the guitar! Is playing only a hobby or are you trying to make a living bangin that Ax? The price of a guitar is not as important as the ability of the person strumming the strings! If your abilitys suck,and you have a expensive guitar..You Still Suck..No matter how good the guitar may be! I have owned cheep and expensive guitars of all different brand names..some very good..some very bad..bottom line is..if Your happy with the AX,thats all that matters! Screw the Name or the Price!!
Many of the modulation type effects pedals are made to approximate some aspect of the original rotating speaker.  That’s correct, you heard right.  The Leslie Cabinet was made as a companion to the Hammond B3 Organ and literally had a rotary speaker that could produce all of the common modulation effects depending on the speed setting.  Many companies now offer digital pedal versions that mimic the Leslie sound very well, so lugging around a huge speaker cabinet isn’t necessary, unless you are a purist or have a crew of roadies available.

The dynamic mic’s strengths for close-miking constitute some of its weaknesses in distant-miking, and you’ll more likely want to use a ribbon or condenser mic for this job, if you have one. Distant miking really begins at 10″ to 12″ out, where many condenser and ribbon mics start to bloom. As a rough guide, start 12″ to 18″ from the speaker in order to record an electric guitar sound that is still pretty solid and direct, but captures some sense of air and space and natural room reverberation. You can aim the mic straight at the center of the speaker for a bright and detailed tone, as described in our close-miking techniques above, or move it around in the field, trying different direct and off-axis placements. Any position that achieves a desirable tone is valid, and you don’t have to remain on the same plane as the speaker itself. Moving the mic out adds more space to the sound (while potentially compounding phasing issues – see below). Raising the mic above the speaker and aiming it down slightly to fire toward the upper edge of the cone can let the sound bloom as it reaches the mic. In a room with a carpeted floor, you can position the mic lower to the ground (even below the speaker itself) to cut out some of the reflected sound. Positioned as such, an end-fire mic can be shooting either toward the amp on a plane that hovers above the floor or at an angle toward the speaker, while a side-fire mic can be aimed either way or fire straight at the ceiling with the amp sound washing over its capsule.
This bass guitar amplifier features a 20-watt amplifier and an 8-inch driver. It reproduces frequencies from 70 Hz ~ 10 KHz with a total harmonic distortion of 0.5% (typical). It also has a built-in, switchable active compressor. It features a 3-band EQ, with the bass EQ centered at 100 Hz, mid-range EQ at 800 Hz, and a treble EQ at 6 KHz. It features a 3.5mm line output with an impedance of 1 kilohm, for directing the output signal to a mixer, recorder, or another amp. The 3.5mm stereo headphone output will defeat the internal speaker for quiet practicing.

Three full steps down from Drop D. Utilized by Dead by April (on some songs), Metallica in the song "Invisible Kid" from St. Anger, Asking Alexandria (G#) on their self-titled album, Damien Deadson, Love and Death, Architects and The Acacia Strain. Staind also uses this tuning (but with the 2nd string tuned up 1/2 step to emulate a 7-string guitar), as well as several other modified variations of this, such as one in which the 5th string is also dropped from D# to C#.


I’ve played Martin D35 and O18 for decades and fooled around with Maton and Cole Clarke’s for a bit, but switched to James Goodall’s ( 6 and 12) which are simply stunning instruments. Why they’re not mentioned here is a mystery to me – especially if it’s quality of woods and craft and tone you’re chasing. I love the Martin’s but Goodall stole my soul.
Hidesato Shiino (1947–). Music-Trade.co.jp. Dai-Show Corporation. — The person who involved with a lot of remarkable Japanese guitars including: Yamaha FG, Fernandes & Greco models, Morris & H.S. Anderson (named after his son; well known as Prince's Hohner Telecaster), early ESP, Vesta Graham & Vestax (now known as DJ brand), Akai Guitar 1997 series, D'Angelico, etc.
I'll start off by saying I am a novice guitar player. I've been playing off and on for 30 years, but more off than on. I've been playing on a hand-me-down Yamaha acoustic that was once a great guitar, but through many years of moving, poor storage and not doing anything other than the occasional set of new strings, that Yamaha just did not play well. One reason I was so off and on is that I could never get a clean sound from the Yamaha. I just thought I was not capable of learning guitar. Then, about a year ago, I tried out a friend's Fender acoustic and, after apologizing in advance for my poor playing ability, found that the same chords I struggled with on the Yamaha sounded crisp and clean on my friend's Fender, and I didn't have to make my fingers bleed
A simple, inexpensive amplifier may have only two tone controls, a passive bass and treble control. In some better quality amps, one or more midrange controls are provided. On the most expensive amps, there may be shelving equalizers for bass and treble, a number of mid-range controls (e.g., low mid, mid and high mid), and a graphic equalizer or parametric equalizer. The amplifier's master volume control restricts the amount of signal permitted through to the driver stage and the power amplifier. When using a power attenuator with a tube amplifier, the master volume no longer acts as the master volume control. Instead, the power attenuator's attenuation control controls the power delivered to the speaker, and the amplifier's master volume control determines the amount of power-tube distortion. Power-supply based power reduction is controlled by a knob on the tube power amp, variously labeled "wattage", "power", "scale", "power scale", or "power dampening".
A multi-effects device (also called a "multi-FX" device) is a single electronics effects pedal or rack-mount device that contains many electronic effects. In the late 1990s and throughout the 2000s, multi-FX manufacturers such as Zoom and Korg produced devices that were increasingly feature-laden. Multi-FX devices combine several effects together, and most devices allow users to use preset combinations of effects, including distortion, chorus, reverb, compression, and so on. This allows musicians to have quick on-stage access to different effects combinations. Some multi-FX pedals contain modelled versions of well-known effects pedals or amplifiers.
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