Featuring a small scale neck, the Squier by Fender Mini Strat Electric Guitar comes with three single-coil electronic pickups, with solid and intuitive master volume and tone control. The neck of the guitar is made of C-shape maple wood design, whiles the rosewood fretboard holding the strings and containing dot markings is designed in a manner that makes it easy to strum.
Explorer-style guitars dropped off the radar after the mid 1980s, but were revived again under the influence of late Pantera guitarist Dimebag Darrell Abbott toward the end of the ’90s. Weird shapes were back, if anything can ever be said to be “back.” What goes around comes around. There’s clearly an algorithm going on that originated back in 1958!
Hi Torch, appreciate the work gone into this , fantastically informative piece. Good to see such a following as well , too many Gibson / Fender fanatics out there that dismiss Jap / Asian guitars as inferior. Having played god knows how many guitars over 50 years I've had good and bad in both top and lesser known brands. Started off at 15 years old with a Tiesco ( cost me £15 S/H at the time. lol ). Admittedly it was a piece of junk, but hey it got me started. Just picked up a Strat copy made in China for £10 ( as new condition) Branded Excell , out plays my Aria by a country mile. I have an old acoustic here about 40 years old, cost £62.50 at the time. No place of origin , serial No or anything. Imported by Rose Morris with the brand Avon on the head stock. This baby out plays any acoustic I've ever played, including a couple of Martins, As any guitarist should know a guitar is how it feels and plays not it's name. Nothing wrong with Jap / Asian guitars , could be made in Iceland for all I care it's the guitar that counts. Keep up the good work. Regards and thanks.

The Fender Stratocaster is the iconic counterpart to the Gibson Les Paul. The smoothly contoured body is very comfortable to hold and play, and it’s one of the lighter popular guitar models. Usually produced from alder wood, they have a particularly rich, warm tone. Unlike most Gibson models, Fender Stratocasters make use of a floating tremolo system, which allows the player to produce a vibrato effect with a “whammy bar”.


Paul Simon, the great wordsmith, speaks as vividly through his guitar as his lyrics. Weaned on early doo-wop and rock & roll, Simon got caught up in the folk revival during the mid-Sixties, traveling to England to study the acoustic mastery of Bert Jansch. He has continued absorbing new influences, as on "Dazzling Blue," off his most recent album, So Beautiful or So What: "All that folk fingerpicking is what I did with Simon and Garfunkel, but [here] it's on top of this rhythm with Indian musicians playing in 12/8." At 70, he's as nimble as ever.
The beauty of the Yamaha FG800 Acoustic goes way beyond skin deep with its solid Sitka spruce top complemented by a Nato back and side. The mellow, well balanced tone offers excellent note definition, worthy of dreadnoughts costing far more. Quality materials such as a rosewood bridge and fingerboard, black and white body binding and more make FG Series acoustics sweet buys with a great reputation.

You should visit a local guitar shop to purchase your first guitar. You will benefit immensely from their experience, and they will be able to support you after the sale. Avoid places like Walmart, Best Buy, etc., because all they can do is sell you a guitar, and a poor one at that. Most local guitar shops have gone to great lengths to select guitar lines that are serviceable, and play and sound good. As a beginner, you will appreciate their service and commitment to you, even though a local shops pricing may be a touch higher. Most local shops offer lessons, as well.


Are you running it through a cab simulator? That or proper eqing. Turn up the mids and drop a high pass filter on that sucker. If you're finding it still lacking check out the KeFir cab simulator and then just use the preamp you have now. I've had wonderful results with that. If you're not liking your preamp try out The Anvil by Ignite amps. Best clean tone I've had out of freeware.
Capacitors are typically used as filters to control tone. In most cases, they are used to filter out very high frequencies before being sent to ground (the output jack) which controls the warmth of your guitar’s tone. Capacitors vary greatly and come in a range of materials from ceramic, film, paper and electrolytic (mainly used with active pickups).
Why would that be “magical thinking”? Unless you play a sine wave with a synth, the timbre of every instrument is made of a set of freuquencies, a dominant frequency plus a ton of harmonics (which is, I take it, the overtones people talk about). Woods, like every other material, resonate at particular frequencies, and consequently might emphasize a particular subset of these frequencies rather than another subset. Hardly magical thinking.
The Omen line is made for everyone, but perhaps leans just slightly toward the shredding crowd. This guitar features a maple bolt-on neck which features a rosewood fretboard with pearloid inlays. The inlays are a nice touch at this price, if you’re into that sort of thing. The pickups are Schecter Diamond Plus humbuckers and offer a well-balanced tone that can also be aggressive when needed. Twenty-four jumbo frets means this is good for speed.
Silk strings and Steel strings are described as a mixture of classical and steel strings, and are also called “compound strings.”  They have a mellow sound and lower tension that provide the feeling of a classical guitar, while still providing the brightness of the metal of a steel stringed acoustic.  The term silk is referring to the nylon used to make classical guitar strings, which we will learn about next.
There's more to being a musician than what you do on the stage: while that's the perfect place to turn it up loud with a standard guitar amplifier, sometimes you don't want anybody but yourself to be listening in on the tunes. That's when headphone guitar amps come in handy. There's a solid variety of these little amps to choose from, so you can get yours with as few or as many features as you like. Then, all you need is your favorite set of 'phones and you're ready to rock.
I personally use Vegas, Sonar, and REAPER. I would not recommend Vegas or Sonar for live playing, if for no other reason than both have crashed on me during recording sessions, and I do not easily forgive that. REAPER (Audio Production Without Limits) never, ever crashes. It’s not as full featured as some DAWs, but what it does, it does well. I use it for all my recording.
Last and not necessarily least, consider the ever-popular closet and sound blanket trick. This involves a speaker cabinet, a closet or large cupboard, and at least a pair of the thick, padded blankets normally used professionally for sound insulation or by moving companies (quilts and regular bedding blankets are ineffective). You'll lose some speaker "air" and room interaction, but you'll be able to crank the amp and avoid unwanted noise complaints. Assuming the blankets are properly placed, the volume level should seem no louder than that of a distant stereo system blaring at someone's party.
The guitar features hand-rubbed solid Sitka Spruce top supported by Martin's incredibly reliable mahogany HPL (high pressure laminate) back and sides, essentially similar to the configuration found on many of Martin's mid-priced acoustics. If you're looking for an affordable starting instrument that has big-brand backing, or you are looking to get into the parlor-style guitar trend, check out the LX1E Little Martin.
This Charvel is the signature model for Guthrie Govan, widely regarded as one of the finest guitarists around. Its caramelized ash body model is also up there with the finest bolt-ons we’ve ever played. The neck is extremely tight-fitting and held in place with four screws, each recessed into the contoured heel. Like any HSH set up you have huge choice on exactly how you wire it - this is no different. While the outer positions select the full humbuckers, position two voices bridge (slug single coil only) and the middle single coil; position three gives us bridge and neck (both slug single coils); position four offers the screw single coil of the neck pickup with the middle pickup. A ‘secret’ two-way mini toggle that simulates a coil-split via an old-school passive filter (a 0.1 microfarad capacitor). In many ways this feels more like high performance rifle, not a guitar. It gives off a tuned-to-perfection vibe that’s like an instrument you’ve owned for a while, gigged, modified and tweaked. Which in reality is exactly what it is only Charvel and Guthrie Govan have done it for us. But don’t dismiss this as a virtuoso rock shredder axe. Yes, if your technique is up to it, you won’t have a problem there and using just the bridge pickup you’ll probably have all you need: big and ballsy, a hint of a cocked wah-like high end it’s certainly in the JB area. But it’s offset by a pokey PAF-like neck voice, tube-y and soupy but far from one dimensional. If that was it, we’d be smiling. But there’s plenty more... Guthrie Govan’s vision for an all round workhouse that’ll stand up to the rigours of professional touring is superbly realised in this signature. Every detail is wonderfully considered. It’s not a cheap date, but it’s an astonishing guitar: a player’s tool of the highest calibre.
The most basic, original pickup design is a single-coil pickup. It’s composed of a single magnet with fine wire wrapped around it, creating a magnetic field that captures the strings’ vibrations converting them into an electronic signal. Single-coil pickups tend to be bright and crisp sounding. The tone they produce cuts through dense band sounds well, but they are also prone to generating hum and are subject to magnetic interference. Many great artists play guitars equipped with single-coil pickups. Eric Clapton, Stevie Ray Vaughan, John Mayer, Merle Travis and many others are famous for their use of single-coil tone.
But in general, there's nothing wrong with Decca electric guitars, especially for indie musicians today who are looking for a vintage guitar with some character to it. Since most vintage guitar fans have seen every model that Gibson, Fender, et al, have ever made, many of the Japanese guitars of the '60s have a fresh look that stands out from the crowds. In 20 years, the M-i-J electric guitars of the '60s are going to be worth 4 or 5 times what they sell for now, and smart collectors who either can't afford Fenders, Gibsons and their ilk from that period, or who are interested in something more unusual, are already snapping them up.
Guitar culture was pervasive, whether in movie houses (“Karate Kid” Ralph Macchio outdueling Steve Vai in the 1986 movie “Crossroads”; Michael J. Fox playing a blistering solo in “Back to the Future” and co-starring with Joan Jett in 1987’s rock-band drama “Light of Day”) or on MTV and the older, concert films featuring the Who and Led Zeppelin on seemingly endless repeats.
Flanger – a time-based effect likened to the sound of an aeroplane taking off and landing. The “whooshing”effect is created by feeding the output of the guitar tone back in on itself with a very short delay (usually less than 20 milliseconds) causing comb filtering (boosts and cuts along the frequency range). The delay time is then varied which causes the comb filter to move up and down the frequency range.
Initially inspired by his older brother Jimmie, Stevie picked up the guitar at an early age and was playing in bands by the time he was 12. By the time he formed his legendary trio Double Trouble in 1980, Stevie Ray Vaughan was already a legend in his adopted hometown of Austin, Texas. After hearing and seeing Vaughan playing at Switzerland’s Montreux Jazz Festival, pop icon David Bowie invited Stevie to play on his Let’s Dance album. Vaughan’s career took off form there.
Although there are now several digital guitar recording preamps which model amps and cabs, the Roland VG88's split pickup system allows you also to experiment with modelled guitars and pickups.Digital noise removal plug-ins (again best used before delay effects are added), produce even fewer side-effects and so may be the best option when recording into a computer-based system. However, you can often achieve a worthwhile improvement using simple low-pass filters — before I moved over to working almost exclusively on the computer, I often used the side-chain high-cut filter in my Drawmer DS201 gate to remove hiss from guitar tracks. The sharper the filter, the less the wanted sound will be affected, so a plug-in with an 18 or even 24dB/octave slope should be even more effective than the 12dB/octave filters the Drawmer uses. The trick when setting them up is to pick the lowest shelving frequency that doesn't materially change the original sound, other than to take the edge off the hiss. Using filters in this way also helps reduce finger noise and squeaking on acoustic guitar parts and can even help disguise moderate clipping distortion caused by recording at too high a level.

In fact, these units were specifically designed to be used by the novices that want to learn the particularities of playing the guitar.Nevertheless, they are also purchased by veteran players because of their quality and maneuverability. As cost-efficient units, these guitars are a great investment, and you should consider them before placing any orders.

Regardless of the invention debate, it is clear that former radio repairman Leo Fender was the first to mass-produce and sell a successful solid-body Spanish-style electric guitar. His company’s simply constructed 1950 Fender Broadcaster (renamed Telecaster as the result of a trademark dispute), with its flat body and a neck bolted onto it, was initially derided by competitors as too simple and lacking in craftsmanship. Gibson’s president Ted McCarty dismissed it as a “plank guitar.” Yet everything about its patented, practical design was optimal for mass-producing an inexpensive solid-body guitar, earning Fender the moniker “the Henry Ford of the electric guitar.”


This guitar comes with an undersaddle piezo pickup system and a ¼-inch output. You also get a detachable lap rest so you can comfortably play this miniature guitar. The rosewood fingerboard has 22 medium frets, while the D’Addario EJ15 steel strings ensure superior playability. This compact guitar is small enough to fit even in airline overhead compartments.

Our Parlor size guitars are approximately 25% smaller than our full size guitars but what really makes them special is they have a 2 inch shorter neck design. This means children and small adults (under 5 ft tall) don’t have to reach as far holding certain chords making playability even easier. Most of our customers buying our Parlor guitars are coming from little Martins and Taylors.  They say the Easy Play Parlor has 30-50% easier playability and sound is slightly richer and deeper.  Shipped from our workshop in Lincoln, Nebraska.  100% money back guarantee, lifetime warranty.


Some combo amp and speaker cab manufacturers sell fitted amp or cab covers, to protect the equipment from dust and inclement weather. Professional touring bassists may place their amp heads, combo amps and speaker cabinets into foam-lined road cases to protect them during transportation. Rackmounted road cases typically have recessed handles on the sides for carrying the case. Touring professional bassists may have roadies who carry their amps and cabinet on and off stage.

Sorry on my previous post - I meant to add that the waveform test should be done using guitars of same distance between bridge and nut so the vibrating string length is identical, and of course using identical pickups. You can then vary the woods, the hardware, the body type (hollow, semi, solid) etc. I think it would be interesting to use guitars with different overall string lengths depending on the stop piece used, whether the strings or through the body, and the arrangement of the tuners on the headstock.
As Jay Verkuilen, has already noted here (no pun intended!), be careful not to hammer too hard on the unplugged guitar as you can be fooled into thinking you have to play much harder that you really do. Fretboard exercises & scales, practicing chord forms, and the like while unplugged is beneficial to your playing, "muscle memory," and aids your relationship with your housemates and neighbors.
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An amazing electric guitar player pack that is suitable for use by beginners. It has a mahogany body, with its fret board having been made from rosewood. The neck is also made from mahogany. Most interestingly, it comes with passive fienzo pickups, and an exclusive guitar player pack with gig bags, strap, cord, tuner, and an instructional DVD. It is well design to assist the beginner to better access the frets and practice through to perfection. Prices range from INR 12,650. Find it on the link below:
When you're in the market for an instrument, whether it's brand new or new-to-you, our impressive selection gives you plenty to choose from and we'll be happy to help you find the right fit. Maybe you need some equipment for a few gigs or a short tour? Our rentals department can hook you up. There are even lessons and free workshops here to discover, so you can always learn more about music no matter your skill level. For all the details, you can drop by to visit us in-person or give us a call.
No reference materials are available to me for this early Unicord period of Univox amplifiers, but there was undoubtedly a line. These American-made amps featured tubes and use high-end Jensen speakers. The Univox logo was on the upper right corner of the grille on a large piece of plastic. The cabinet was covered in charcoal-flecked tolex with white beading, with a grey grillcloth. Front-mounted controls included two inputs, volume, tone, tremolo with speed and intensity, plus footswitch jack with footswitch. The jewel light on these early Univox amps was a little red square.
As a new learner, the biggest reason for you wanting to begin with a full-sized guitar as opposed to a slender Stratocaster or a stylish Les Paul, has to do with your love for classic heavy rock tones. In this day and age, when you have scores of guitars with dizzying combinations of single-coil and humbucker pickups, along with complex toggle options, the Davison Full Size Black Electric Guitar keeps it really straight and simple. This is one of the few electric guitars that I’ve had the pleasure of reviewing straight out of the box, with hardly any setting required. And lest I skip the most important purchasing criteria here, you are not just buying a 39” electric guitar but a full-fledged Davison Guitar Beginner Starter Package. So you have a lot more going for that hundred bucks you spend, with a cool gig bag, strap, guitar picks as well as a compact amplifier and cable.
I bought this guitar about 1 month ago. I am a small girl 5'2". I just strap this thing on and walk around the house playing. The pickup sounds freaking great hooked up to my Marshall amp. I have several other guitars including a Taylor 210ce which I also love. But this guitar is great for traveling, camp fires, and just plain old jammin. I chose this over the baby Taylor because the Martin had a full heel on the neck where's the taylor baby did not. It also sounded better when I play both the Taylor and the lx1e side by side. I thought that the Martin had a better "feel" to is as well when holding it. It is a travel guitar so it doesn't balance as well when you are standing with the guitar strap but I don't mind that at all. I love this little guy
Hardly any mention of female players, why is that? I’m a bloke, not a chick, yet this is like the UK 2011 sports personality of the year awards based on press coverage – not performance or results but drunk journo’s who only like watching blokes – but not Pat Metheny LOL – SO… No Jennifer Batten then? Rightly tho’ someone thought slide player Bonnie Raitt should get a mention – Derek Trucks got a look in (what a slide player) – had to look hard to find Larry Carlton – and Lee Ritenour – and John Scofield! Yet no Nile Rogers? And Keith Richards should be up there but why not Ronnie Woods? Nice to see Tom Scholtz remembered yet no Steve Miller who learned at the feet of Les Paul and yet no Les Paul either? Such a narrow list limited by populism not necessarily ability, tone or compositon. Not really much of list was it?
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Martin makes classic guitars that have been featured in countless hit tunes. While they are best known for their top-of-the-line $2,000+ models, Martin also makes great guitars for any budget. Martin guitars always honor their tradition while continuing to strive for a better instrument. Give Martin’s new 17 Series a try if you want to see that theory in action.
The Playability of the guitar is outstanding, and has a thin, nicely rounded fast neck. It has a very musical tone, with a particular sweet spot in the upper end. The bluegrass G chord in the 1st position with G/6th string, D/5th strings sounds tremendous on this guitar. Both fingerpicking and strumming are effortless, and jazz chords are well articulated. The volume of the guitar is Loud, and should only increase over time as the top opens up.
One of the most over looked and shockingly good guitars I have ever played in my 23 years of chopping wood. In their rich history there have been little misses, but over all Aria guitars are supreme to their competitor especially at the price point. My 1977 Aria les paul copy has at leased twice the balls as my buddy's 6 year old Gibson and tons more playability. Forget about comparing to epiphone, seriously. eBay yourself a Aria electric and you WILL be pleasantly surprised. Aria acoustics; If your reaching for a nylon, Aria makes some of the best classical guitars with a history of employing some of the most well noted artisans of the craft, such as Ryoji Matsuoka. Fine craftsmanship all around, built with quality woods and have a tendency to get better with age, laminated or not. As for steal strings, I've only played one to be honest, but this Martin 'lawsuit' was a work of art. Thank you.
Gilmour was made famous by his haunting guitar scores in Pink Floyd. This “replacement” guitarist surpassed expectations and helped shape Pink Floyd’s unique sound. You can always expect hairs at the back of your neck to stand whenever you hear one of his solos – be it for the first or hundredth time you’re listening to it. All the emotion that Gilmour’s poured into his guitar work lives on in the music and is channeled through anyone who’s ever wanted to cover a Pink Floyd song. I know several guitar players (myself included) who whenever playing the Comfortably Numb solo – whether they are alone in their bedrooms or on stage – have always been unwillingly brought to tears, near the point of crying. How could you not expect things to get esoteric and mystical when it comes to music?

My epi is very nice (Almost like a gibson for 1/3 of a gibson price) and obviously, my Jackson is far superior than my other guitars. But I'm just have mid end ibanez guitars and they are very good guitars. The high end ibanez are awesome and worth less than high ends of other brands in most cases having with the same quality (or superior in very cases).


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Hello. This is a great article. Does strymon have a user fourm group anywhere. I own the g system, i love it for its effects, but it cant do everything i want. I found strymon, and instantly bought a timeline. I have also ordered big sky and mobius. Is there a way to connect the strymon up to the gsystem, and haveva patch on the g pull up a bank on the strymon, and also be able to choose one or multiple strymons.
But when combined with those Dean humbuckers, this thing full-on rocks! It’s full of gain, fuzz, buzz, but still articulate enough thanks to the strong middle frequencies, reeling in that Dime sound to cut any mix and in style. Additionally, the price is lower than many of the models on the rundown, making this puppy a safe choice for cheap good guitars.
As you will see, our list embraces outsiders, trailblazers, outliers, and Eugene Chadbourne playing a rake. We don’t worship “guitar gods,” but prefer our axe-wielders to be resourceful, egalitarian, flawed, and human. We’re not drawn to Olympic feats of fleet-fingered athletics, unless they’re used for unique and exploratory ends. We see the mewling histrionics of Jeff Beck as tyranny instead of catharsis. The name Derek Trucks is practically alien to us.
“Rock guitarists are incredibly conservative and traditional,” says Dr. Millard. “We like to think of ourselves breaking all the bonds and we go back to the fifties when rock and roll was revolutionary. It is not revolutionary. It is very traditional, very conservative, and musicians are really stubborn to change. We have a cultural understanding that old is better than good.”
High frequency tweeters, typically horn-loaded, are included in some bass instrument speaker cabinets. Vox's 1960s-era "Super Beatle" amplifier was an early enclosure that used horn tweeters. During the late 1960s Acoustic's 260 Series guitar amp used a treble horn in the dual 15" loudspeaker 261 guitar enclosure, and Kustom's nearly 5-foot-tall (1.5 m) 2J + 1H guitar enclosure used two 15" speakers and a 15" diameter treble horn. Horn-equipped cabinets were not available for bass players until much later.
The goal is to find the body shape and configuration that appeals the most to your eyes and ears. The most straightforward choice for beginners will be the solidbody for its durability. Players who are looking to expand their sonic palette are usually the ones who will take interest in semi-hollow and hollow body guitars. For more information on this topic read The Different Types of Electric Guitars Explained.
The vibration of the wood isn't in question at all. It does indeed vibrate and if you put a microphone up to the wood of the guitar as it's being played (and if you can manage the feedback) you'll no doubt hear the tonal qualities of the wood. You can knock on it to hear that. It's like knocking on a door. ANY wooden door or any processed wood for that matter.

This guitar comes with an undersaddle piezo pickup system and a ¼-inch output. You also get a detachable lap rest so you can comfortably play this miniature guitar. The rosewood fingerboard has 22 medium frets, while the D’Addario EJ15 steel strings ensure superior playability. This compact guitar is small enough to fit even in airline overhead compartments.
I'm trying to determine the worth of a korean made fender telecaster. Solid ash,butterscotch blonde,maple neck,abalone inlays,seymour duncan pick-up(the other 1 is silver?)classic bridge.It's probably about 5 or 6 years old,it seems nicer than any mexican I've seen. Serial # 04041144 I paid $500 and I want to sell but don't want to be unfair to self or buyer.Help please-QUICK.

Most delay pedals have controls for the number of repeats (called “feedback”), the volume of the repeats and the time between each repeat. Some pedals have what’s called “tap tempo”, where you can tap your foot on the pedal and the delay unit will match the speed of the effect to your foot, allowing you to match the delay time to the tempo of a song. Delay pedals are often used to thicken up heavy lead guitar sounds, or to subtly add more to a simple rhythm guitar part.


OK, I’ve put a new set of strings on now. We’re now going to carry out the following steps, just like we did in the general electric guitar setup post. 1. Check and adjust neck bow (how straight the neck is) 2. Check and adjust saddle height 3. Check and adjust the intonation (how far back or forward the saddles need to sit at the bridge to keep your guitar as in tune as possible no matter what fret you’re playing)
The model designations of the archtops are unknown. Later these guitars would have either a PE or EP model designation, so presumably the ones in the photo did, too. One appears to be a full-sized, thick-bodied archtop with a rounded cutaway. Not much is visible in the photo, but it apparently had a single, white-covered pickup at the neck, block inlays and a white pickguard. The other guitar had a single pointed Florentine cutaway and was slightly smaller than, say, a Gibson ES-335. It’s impossible to tell the depth from the photo, but it looks as though it’s a thinline. This, too, had a single white pickup at the neck, moveable adjustable bridge, trapeze tail, large white pickguard (not modelled on a typical Gibson shape, by the way), a little plastic plate on the lower bout with volume and tone, with white knobs. The fingerboard has large white dots, with double small dots at the octave. The f-holes are three-part; the headstock Teisco three-and-three.
This includes guitar tutors and coaching software, guitar & amplifier emulators, reference tools and more. You will find tablature software in the Tablature category and software to slow down guitar solos in the Slow Down Music category. Software to tune your guitar can be found in the Instrument Tuners category and specialized chord software in the Chords category. Software designed specifically for bass guitar players can be found in the Bass Guitar category.
The Model EP-17-T was a regular-sized thinline with a single round cutaway, bolt-on neck, non-dipped three-and-three head, dots, three pickups, adjustable bridge, plain trapeze tail, elevated guard, three rocker switches plate-mounted on the upper shoulder, and controls on a rectangular strip on the lower bout. All three were offered in shaded mahogany finish.
Unlike most new wave guitarists at the dawn of the Eighties, Honeyman-Scott had impeccable fashion sense. He always maintained a timeless detached rocker look, and his aviator shades, medium-length shag haircut, suit jacket and jeans attire never really went out of style, unlike the geometric haircuts and DayGlo suits that many of his contemporaries wore. He always played the coolest guitars onstage as well, from classic Gibson Les Pauls and Firebirds to custom-made Hamers and Zemaitis metal-front guitars.
In the 1970s and ’80s the sound of the electric guitar was stretched in heavy metal music. As one of its leading practitioners, Van Halen pushed his self-built “Frankenstein” (based on a Stratocaster but with a mish-mash of other guitar parts) to the limit, experimenting, for instance, with “dive-bombing,” which uses the tremolo arm to drive the guitar’s lowest note ever lower. Hendrix had done this but forced the guitar out of tune as a result. However, by the mid-1980s, inventor Floyd Rose had improved the tremolo system, allowing players like Van Halen to dive-bomb repeatedly. The guitar sound was now not only loud but also really raucous, flashy, and a bit dirty—just the way musicians, and their fans, wanted it.
The smallest bass amps, which typically have 10 to 20 watts of power and a small 6.5" or 8" speaker, are known as practice amps. They amplify the instrument enough for individual practice in a small room, such as a bedroom. Practice amps do not typically produce enough volume or low-frequency sound reproduction to be used in a band rehearsal or show. As such, they are mostly used by beginners or, when used by professionals, for warm-up or individual practice. They are more likely than full-size combo amp cabinets to have an open-back design, like an electric guitar combo amp. The use of an open back cabinet in small practice amps makes these models different from most bass combo amps and speaker cabs, which are closed-back (often with bass reflex ports or vents, or less commonly, with passive radiator speakers, both of which are designed to boost the low-frequency response). Some buskers playing on the street for tips may use battery-powered practice amps, a feature available on some models.

Used as a send effect, a resonant filter can be used much more creatively than as an insert.You get very different results from your filtering depending on where you put the filter in the signal chain. To introduce some real movement into delay lines, for example, place sweeping low-pass filters before the delay. You then get the movement of the dry sound contrasting with the movement in the delay line. If both the filter sweep and the delay lines are tempo-sync'd, you can create interesting effects where the filter appears to be moving up and down at the same time.


Guitar chords songs refers to songs that sound great when played using nothing but chords, whether on acoustic guitar, electric guitar, or both. These songs range from simple arrangements of rock, pop, and country favorites to more songs using more complex guitar chords. The arrangements you decide to play will probably be determined by how advanced your knowledge of chords is.
The first trick I will show you is very simple: you only need to add a bit of distortion to the signal so that the bass line stands out from the mix without making it too heavy. To achieve that, and as awkward as it seems, guitar pedals seem to be more fitting than bass pedals, at least for recording and with this particular technique. Indeed, "crunchy" guitar distortion pedals are usually pretty "poor" in the low end of the frequency spectrum, which makes it easier to mix the distorted signal with the original one. In the following example I used the famous Ibanez Tube Screamer:
For a guitar that sits comfortably in the mid-range segment of the market, Yamaha RevStar RS420 packs a decent punch. Body shape is more reminiscent of a PRS than anything else, but Yamaha definitely infused it with their unique details. The sound is tight, very flexible, and I had no issues dialing in the type of tone I was looking for. A well rounded model, that’s for sure.
An effect made popular by guitarists like Hendrix, Jerry Cantrell, Slash and many more, the Wah-Wah effect is a pedal-controlled Q filter. The ultra-recognisable vocal-like effect is obtained by having a Q parameter going back and forth, thus “opening” your guitar voice or narrowing it down removing treble frequencies. Words cannot really describe it, and since its inception the Wah was featured on countless records. The Dunlop Crybaby is by far the most popular wah pedal, built with trusty analog circuitry. Despite Dunlop’s fame, many other manufacturers built beautiful pedals that have left their mark in music history due to their slightly different sound, such as the VOX 84x series, the Fulltone, and the super modern optical Morley Wah.

There were marked differences between the other Les Paul models and the Les Paul Junior. For instance, although the Junior’s body outline was clearly reminiscent of the original upmarket Les Paul guitar, the Junior issue was characterized by its flat-top “slab” mahogany body, finished in traditional Gibson Sunburst. The Junior was touted as an inexpensive option for Gibson electric guitar buyers[citation needed]: it had a single P-90 pickup, simple volume and tone controls, and the unbound rosewood fingerboard bore plain dot-shape position markers. However, as a concession to the aspirations of the beginning guitarist buyer, the Junior did feature the stud bridge/tailpiece similar to the second incarnation of the upscale Gold-Top.
The Sex Pistols, Steve Jones' brutish power chords and flamboyant gutter-glam solos were a perfect mirror for the taunting bile of Johnny Rotten – and a yardstick for every punk-rock noise-maker that followed. His legacy was set with indelible riffs on one record – 1977's Never Mind the Bollocks… – that inspired guitarists from Slash to Billie Joe Armstrong. It was an attitude as much as a sound. As Jones told a journalist during his days with the Sex Pistols, "Actually, we're not into music. We're into chaos."
There are many options in this price range that will suit the beginning player. Musician’s Friend offers an extensive selection of Electric Guitar Value Packages that include an electric guitar, amplifier, and many of the accessories mentioned above. The components in these packages have been carefully chosen to work well together and can eliminate guesswork when choosing the right gear. Many also include instructional books, DVDs, and online beginner’s lessons, plus other resources to keep the new player motivated to keep learning.
Epiphone's offering in the low and mid-range segment has been pretty strong for years. The Epiphone Hummingbird Pro is their take on a legendary Gibson model and it brings much of the same qualities. What really makes this acoustic-electric stand out is the overall level of quality you get for your money. You can trust it as an accurate emulation since Gibson now owns and produces Epiphone's guitars.

The previously discussed I-IV-V chord progressions of major triads is a subsequence of the circle progression, which ascends by perfect fourths and descends by perfect fifths: Perfect fifths and perfect fourths are inverse intervals, because one reaches the same pitch class by either ascending by a perfect fourth (five semitones) or descending by a perfect fifth (seven semitones). For example, the jazz standard Autumn Leaves contains the iv7-VII7-VIM7-iiø7-i circle-of-fifths chord-progression;[80] its sevenths occur in the tertian harmonization in sevenths of the minor scale.[81] Other subsequences of the fifths-circle chord-progression are used in music. In particular, the ii-V-I progression is the most important chord progression in jazz music.

Compressors are available as footpedal controls and can be used as an effect on electric guitar signals, for example. They can be used to obtain greater sustain for a string by setting the gain high and allowing the compressor to keep the output signal at a more-or-less constant level until the natural sustain of the string drops the signal below a certain threshold.

My Carvin SH575 is a semi-hollow body electric. The size is similar to the Gibson 336, but sounds totally different. When you play this guitar you can't put it down, Carvins are made with computer aid wood carving CNC machines the proto-type of the guitar is measured with lasers and programed into the computer so every guitar they make is to the 1000th to the original. The finish and the detail is awesome. It also is wired with hum bucking pick-ups, piezo acoustic pick-up and Roland GK synth guitar. You can get some beautiful hybrid tones from this thing and I never can stop finding new ones. Try one of these out if you ever go to California I think there is like 5 stores around the L. A. / San Diego area, you will see what I mean.


This electric guitar style has experienced surges and lulls in its popularity, but has never fallen off the scene, due to the number of great players who have chosen to use the Flying V, such as Jimi Hendrix, Dave Mustaine, Kirk Hammett and Michael Schenker.  The Flying V offered many of the same benefits as the SG with a much more distinctive body shape.  It is now a very common guitar among heavy rock and metal guitarists and will achieve its destiny of being a guitar of the future!

That wraps it up folks! We hope you found some inspiration from our chart and managed to get a little closer to finding your best guitar for jazz. Now it’s simply a matter of reading some reviews, watching some videos and making a decision! Don’t forget, if this is your first guitar, you’ll need to buy a good amplifier to go with it. If you liked our stuff, you can subscribe to our newsletter for more sensational guitar deals.

Another issue is the fact that, in this circuit, the tone pot always has a cap engaged. You could use a really tiny value for the smaller cap so there’s little perceptible cut at the minimum setting, but that can make a substantial part of the pot’s range a little too subtle. So my plan is to combine this with a Ned Steinberger-designed JackPot as the volume control. This part has an “off” setting that bypasses the tone circuit entirely for a maximum-bright sound. That way, I’d choose for the smaller cap a value that provides the minimum treble cut I’m likely to want. (I suspect I’ll wind up with something between .0022µF and .0047µF.)
List of bass guitar brands that include the most popular and reliable models available. There is a lot to consider when looking for the perfect bass guitar for you. The body style, neck, scale length, tuning machines, intonation, fingerboard, number of frets, pickups and type of wood all make a difference in how your bass guitar sounds and feels in your hand. The most popular bass guitars include those from major manufacturers of musical instruments, including Fender, Yamaha, Warwick and more. Use this comparison of bass guitar brands as a guide when researching the best bass makers.

Inspiring, light, and upbeat corporate background music with motivational and optimistic energy. Positive and sunny tune for technology and business presentations, travel inspirational Youtube videos, success stories, unforgettable journey, slideshow, TV, radio. Featuring muted electric guitar, piano, synth pads, acoustic guitar, drums, bass guitar, piano.

While you can play one through an electric guitar amp, an acoustic guitar will sound its best if it is played through a dedicated acoustic amplifier. While similar in structure to electric guitar amps, acoustic amps are primarily designed to offer transparency. In other words, it strives to reproduce the tone of your acoustic guitar’s natural sound as closely as possible. Interestingly, they almost exclusively come in a combo format, while most acoustic amps will have two channels – one for the instrument and the other geared towards microphone use. The AER Compact 60 represents what a great acoustic guitar amp looks and sounds like, with enough power for stage use as well as a high-end organic tone.
Like trapeze tailpieces, top mounted vibrato bridges transfer the string tension to a guitar’s side, offering more natural string resonance. Embedded units like the Vibrolas found on Gibson Flying Vs transmit the tension to the guitar’s body. Through-body units do neither, employing strings to absorb the string tension. Another system, the TransTrem, developed by Steinberger in the ’80s, has locking positions that allows players to transpose their tuning to other keys.
It's always hard to rate amps when mixing high gain with vintage, boutique amps and the mass produced monsters, but including S.S. and digital technology seems to be a unrealistic stretch. That being said, this manufacturer is making some of the best sounding vintage type tube amps I've heard to date. their lineup of vintage Fender style amps are all excellent, and considerably more affordable and reliable. If you are a fan of the tweed, black and silver faced gems, you have to give Victoria a try. If you prefer something with a unique spin they make their own unique creations as well and they are all serious tone machines. In so far as tube amps go, these guys are definitely in my top five. Speaking of boutique, where is Carr?
My cousin Mike had a red Lotus LP Custom copy that his mom got for him, it was a bolt-on one, looked just about like the one you have in your pic. It played pretty nice, but the tuners and pickups sucked. We added a set of Grovers and a pair of (then popular) DiMarzio super 2 pickups. Mike used this Lotus guitar for 3 or 4 years until he got a Guild s-100. He sold the Lotus for 125.00 after taking off the DiMarzios and Grovers. He gave me those parts and I installed them on a stripped and mutilated 71 SG Standard that I painted with auto enamel (a nice Candy red). I later sold the SG to Mike. The lotus had a plywood body and was pretty cheap, I wouldn't pay a 100 bucks for one today, if anything. But, back then, it was as good as any, we worked with what we could get. I know we played some excrutiating unison leads (ala Blackfoot, Molly Hatchet,etc) he with his souped up Lotus, me with my Memphis Strat copy, both plugged into my bitchin solid state Crate (looked like a real wooden crate!) amp.

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Through the late 1960s, Westheimer offered a wide range of Kingston instruments including electric basses and hollowbodies (and even amplifiers). By the mid-1970s, it was becoming increasingly expensive to build guitars in Japan, so Westheimer shifted production to Korea by building a factory there, which became Cort. Kingston guitars existed in one form or another through the 1970s and even in the early 1980s, but Westheimer was finding great success building budget and entry-level guitars in his Cort factory for big U.S. guitar companies such as Kramer, B.C. Rich, and Epiphone.
2) Use a line-out box (I use the Suhr Iso Line Out box) between your amp and dry speaker cab to take a tap off the dry signal. Run the line-out signal into a small mixer, and run the outputs of the mixer into a stereo power amp and two guitar cabinets. As with the previous rig, use the mixer sends and returns to patch in effects—which you will set at 100 percent wet (no dry signal) and blend to taste. In this setup, you can blend the dry signal into your “wet” cabinets. For live applications, mic all three cabinets, and pan the wet cabinets hard left and right in the PA. This is the setup I use, and I was inspired to go this route by guitarists such as Steve Stevens and Eddie Van Halen. I like to blend a significant amount of dry signal into the wet cabs. In the PA, the sound is absolutely massive! I also use an expression pedal to control the amount of effects in my wet cabs, so I can tailor my delays and reverbs on the fly.
This. There's genuinely nothing good about it. It makes a Squier Starter Pack and a Daisy Rock look like a PRS Private Stock. Pretty sure the description isn't even true. An old roommate of mine had one and it was the worst guitar I have ever played in my life and I'm not just saying that. Very seldom do I say that a guitar is just plain terrible. Even with other guitar brands that I hate (like Squier) I'll say, "well, everyone has their own preference," but this guitar is just inexcusable. http://www.indianaguitar.com/products/Scout-acoustic-electric-967.html#.VZNeJ1L3bCQ
The extra-versatile twin-channel layout with independent controls delivers a wide variety of tones from clean to overdrive. The Sonzera 20—which we recently reviewed—packs a hell of a punch for players who need a versatile workhorse amp that pairs well with pedals and sounds incredible on its own for any style of music. While the Sonzera 50 Combo is well suited to the stage, the 20 is easy to haul to gigs, has a lower output that’s better suited for the studio—and its “American style” voicing thanks to its 6L6 power tubes (the Sonzera 50 features EL34 tubes).
There’s a bolt-on thin U-shaped maple neck, with a rosewood fretboard, and 24 extra-jumbo frets, which makes fast playing and string bending a breeze. As we highlight in our full review, the EC-10 is voiced by two ESP-designed passive LH-100 humbuckers at the neck and bridge positions, which are loud enough to cope with rock and metal lead playing, although articulate and warm when playing without distortion.
The Wire. You'll see a lot of vintage spec wordings bounced around here and that pretty much boils down to the aesthetics. Those early Fenders and Gibsons we all know were wired at the original factories with a cloth covered 'push back' wire, whereas as some modern factories, far east predominantly use standard plastic coated wire today. But the important detail is the 'AWG', or American Wire Gauge. Widely used in the guitar world for optimal results, is 22AWG wire. I would go into detail on this, but THIS site has some superb facts about AWG, which if you'd like to find out more I'd recommend a read of! So back to the cloth/plastic thing. Personally, the 'push back' cloth wire is much easier and tidier to work with and I fully hold my hands up to saying it looks much better too. I always use this for any guitar wiring, the results are always great and it's a pleasure to wire up with. I personally use 22AWG copper, solid core wire, great to work with and consistent. 
This guitar master is actually a custom guitar builder. He started building guitars in 1993. "I've been doing this a long time," Paul says. "It's just really natural to me. I'm weird. I just look at stuff and know how to fix it." When he younger, Paul was good at woodworking, and besides picking up the guitar at 14, he needed another hobby. But learning the craft of guitar repair didn't require a master, simply a book. "Imagine that, great book." He then converted his garage into a shop, and in two years, his custom guitars became commercially viable. "It's the real deal, all high-end neck set stuff." Today, Brian Paul's Guitars are some of the finest guitars on the market. Some of his clients include Susan Tedeschi, Derek Trucks, Jim Suhler, Warren Haynes and Texas Slim. Even Dallas blues legend Bugs Henderson owned one of his guitars.
Keep in mind that the year the guitar was built is no guarantee that any individual guitar is in the optimum condition required to handle steel strings. Any Martin should be evaluated with care, and a top that lifts significantly in the bridge area or this is not firm, is a sign that lighter strings should be used. Or that the guitar is in need of attention by a qualified repair person.
The two piggyback guitar amps included the 1010 Guitar Amplification System ($605), which offered 10 tubes, 105 watts, two channels, four inputs, volume, bass, middle and treble controls for each channel, presence, reverb, tremolo, variable impedance, and a cabinet with eight 10″ Univox Special Design speakers with 10-ounce ceramic magnets and epoxy voice coils. The cabinet grille had eight round cutouts. The 1225 Guitar Amplifier System ($435) had eight tubes, 60 watts, two channels with the same controls as the 1010, and a cab with two 12″ Univox speakers with 20-ounce ALNICO magnets and 2″ voice coil. The grille had two large round cutouts with two small round cutouts on the sides. The amps had handles on the top, the cabs handles on the sides, to make life easier for your roadies.
A 5 way selector is commonly found on guitars with 3 pickups , a humbucker in the bridge , single coil in the middle and a humbucker in the neck. So the 5 way selectors job is to select only one or more pickups at a time to offer different sounds on the guitar. The way the selector is pointed will tell you which pickup is selected and this is common on guitars from all brands. The bottom position is your bridge pickup which is closest to where the strings begin , the middle position is all 3 pickups and the top position closest to the neck is your ....you guessed it neck pickup. The bridge pickup will offer heavier sounds if you play the right notes and the neck for soloing as the output (intensity) of the neck pickup isn't as powerful as the neck for a reason. The more you play the more you'll see uses for switching pickups on the selector. The tone knob on the other hand it depends on how you use it I know a lot of guys who are endorsed and so forth who never touch the tone knob or have guitars built without it , but used properly it can do a lot of stuff from Eric Clapton to Carlos Santana type stuff. you will also see a 5 way selector on guitars with two humbuckers this feature is called a mega or super switch depending on brand. It makes the pickups do different stuff but this feature is usually found on expensive guitars and keep in mind a 3 way blade switch looks like one but only goes in three positions. Bridge , middle and neck.
One of the most important things when choosing your guitar is of course the sound - read the study on electric guitar sounds. It’s best if you’re able to try different guitars out in a music shop, and the staff there will most likely be happy to present you with different options that are good for beginners. There you will also have the chance to see how the different guitars feel to play, and have the opportunity to ask the staff if you have any questions or need any advice.
Martin is an American guitar company specializing in acoustic guitars. Most of their instruments are still built at their facility in Nazareth, Pennsylvania, and their legacy dates back all the way to 1833. Martin, in many ways, has helped to shape the look and sound of the American acoustic guitar. In fact, they invented the now-classic dreadnought shape in an effort to help American country musicians who wanted more projection out of their guitars onstage.
Variable caps used for radio tuning have about 1000 times smaller capacitance than needed for guitar tone controls. The advantage of a variable cap, could one be made in the right range for guitar, or those many-caps-on-a-rotary-switch, is that the resonant peak is maintained regardless of setting. With Joe’s “cap fader”, that peak gets flattened out in the middle of the pot rotation. Doesn’t mean it’s a bad sound, but certainly different.
Clear and easy to follow instructions. I re-wired my Gibson Les Paul 60's Tribute for new pickups after removing the easy connects and circuit board that came stock. I ended up re-using the 3 way switch that came in the guitar instead of the one in the kit since it was shorter and the guitar didn't have room for the full length switch in the kit. They were both Switchcraft so same quality. I'm very happy with the results. After shopping prices, the kit is very reasonable versus buying the components separately.
When sliding or rolling your amplifier into the boot of your transporting vehicle, ensure that the controls are not damaged. When transporting your combo amp or cabinet, make sure that the face is downward so that the controls are not put under stress. If you cannot transport these face down, it is better to place the combo on its side and not on the castors. If you are a frequent traveler, you might want to invest in a flight case for better protection.
It’s important to remember that these setups are not set rules that must be followed.  You can get a variety of unique sounds by placing your effects in unorthodox locations.  It’s common to run into that special sound that came about as a ‘happy accident’ when setting up your effects.  Using these suggestions, you can build up your own pedalboard to suit your individual taste.
Taylors have a "happier" sound and I like the feel of them. I am a novice but from what I have seen for a beginner with an acoustic guitar, they felt and sounded warmer and less tinny than the laminated wood ones. A good rosewood taylor isn't on the cheap side of things but it feels like you can play better than you can. And the model I looked at had strings that were nice and close to the frets so you didn't feel like you were pushing in deep like the keys of an old typerwriter. Go into a Guitar Center or somewhere you can actually feel what you are getting before you buy anything. I got a cheap Gibson online less than a month ago and got what I paid for when it came with the bridge completely missing and a brassy sound when it was played. Buy your stuff in person. I think that Gibson is probably still a good brand, but the quality control of the cheaper models they put their name on is something I might question from my first experience with them...
From beginners to seasoned professionals, most guitar players will experiment with effects at some point in their musical journey. While learning to play your instrument well should be a top priority, messing around with effects can be a fun way to engage with your instrument and start learning its sound possibilities without a lot of hard practice. There's a huge variety of stompboxes out there, many with very low price tags that make great gifts and can add a new dimension of fun for beginning players.
The best choice for ambient miking is most likely to be a good condenser – probably a large-diaphragm type, though a small-diaphragm type will work. Plenty of ribbon mics give good service as ambient mics also, if you have a clean, high-gain mic pre-amp to track them through. And where do you put it? Well, three or four feet back from the speaker will start to get a significant amount of room sound into the mic, but for more-ambient placements, try six feet or more, and experiment with different heights from the floor, far corners, and so on. One nifty way to find a cool ambient placement is to use your own ear like a mic, and stick the mic at the position in the room where the guitar tone sounds the best to you. This is ideally done with another person playing the guitar; cover one ear and walk around the room listening to the sound in different positions. When you hear a sound that really nails what you’re trying to capture, set up the mic right there. Done.
Although Led Zeppelin disbanded in 1980 after drummer John Bonham’s death, they have reunited on a few occasions, most recently in 2007 for a tribute concert in memory of Ahmet Ertegun, who had signed them to Atlantic and launched their career. Page continues to go strong. After reissuing the band’s catalog in 2014 and 2015, he’s promised a new project to come in 2016. We couldn’t be happier, and more eager to hear what he has.
There were differences between the pickups as well – the National had slanted units under enormous covers, while the Supro featured 8-string versions of the Alnico V pickups found on many Spanish-style guitars. The difference in tone proved to be minimal. The Supro has a more refined sound than its cheaper cousins with the famous string-through pickup, but it can still be raw and biting when required. Although it is a single-coil pickup, it has excellent hum rejection and sounds wonderful either overdriven or clean. The guitar has plenty of sustain and a surprising level of output, making it an excellent instrument for rock and roll as well as country music.
The size and power rating of the amp, as well as the size and type of the speakers within the cabinet, will have a significant impact on the recorded sound. Obviously, huge stacks will produce a very different sound from small combos. That said, many recording engineers have found that a small, low-powered amp cranked right up can sound more exciting than a big powerhouse. Even cheap transistor amps with tiny speakers can sound great in the right context. Don’t be precious and don’t rule anything out; it’s all about the end result!
A friend lent me this banjo and I got it working and sampled it. Its a 5 string closed back banjo. The fifth string being tuned to a high "g" note (half the length of the neck). Its this string and the closed back that helps give you the bluegrass sound (the high string ringing the "g" note throughout each of the chords with syncopated fingerpicking patterns). This has a standard mapping with variations of long release (to hear the whole sample) and reverb.
The 85/15 “S” humbuckers here—again, they’re affordable versions of the Custom’s 85/15—are transparent, ‘hi-fi,’ articulate and high-output. Lush while clean and thick when clipped, the pickups have also been coil-split to take you into glassier, single-coil territory. However, you can’t coil-split them individually to form HS or SH combinations, for instance.
Now, you said that most people you see just crank the tone knob to the maximum and leave it there. That’s fine, and some genres of music actually have no need for a tone control. Heavy metal and hard rock and their derivatives have almost no need for tone control. Guitarists either keep the tone knob wide open and never touch it, or they just buy a guitar that don’t have a tone knob (nor a neck pickup). Guitars made and designed for metal are built this way. I think a lot of country musicians also keep the treble wide open to get that biting shimmery single coil tone.
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Just so you know, if you’re not a big fan of black electric guitars, Davisson has rolled out several colors like blue, vintage sunburst, red and pink for you to choose from. My choice was classic black, though! Now, my first impression of the 39” guitar as I unpacked it, was of sheer wonder. I mean, it was really tough to visualize the sturdy construction in terms of the menial cost. Of course there are letdowns, such as the body that is made of basswood instead of maple (that is used in premium guitars), which gives you sort of a mediocre feel. Even the material used for crafting the chrome bridge, humbucker pickup, pickguard and strings, is pretty average. But if you look at the overall feel, design and ergonomics, this model definitely deserves a round of applause!
A thermally engineered centre block and bracing make this 335 acoustically louder, open and with more clarity. The 'burst top and back also look more modern than vintage, while the translucent dark brown/ almost-black sides and neck-back finish add contrast that creates a classy appearance, along with the nickel hardware. We also get a lightweight aluminium stop tailpiece with locking studs, but this is all-very-classic ES-335 fare, such as the small block inlays and the small fleur head logo. Again, Gibson's build specs tell us we have MHS 'buckers and here the 'Memphis Tone Circuit' includes matched pots with a tight five per cent tolerance, with the same 'orange drop' tone caps as the ES-275.  Plugged in, it's like all our Christmases have come at once. There's a more solidbody response here, as you'd expect, and it really pushes out the sound. It's expensive, but as an investment, this is one of the best electric guitars on the market.

Very large cabinets, such as 8x10" cabinets, may have both wheels and a long "towel bar"-style handle to facilitate moving the equipment. Some 8x10" cabinets have handles on the top and bottom to facilitate two-person carrying of the cab. Some combo amplifiers have wheels and a retractable carry handle, to enable bassists to walk while pulling their bass amp; this can enable bassists to walk onstage with their bass and amp or walk to a venue with their gear.
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Les Paul was an extraordinary pioneer of music and instrument development, and he also paved the way for popular music today from blues and jazz to rock, country, and metal.  The Les Paul electric guitar stems from one of the best electric git brands to date – Gibson.  This came to be with Paul’s and Gibson president Ted McCarty’s collaboration to find the best electric guitar with resonance and sustain but with less distortion.  Since they couldn’t find one, they had to make one.
The fuzz pedal is one of the earliest stomp boxes on the market. A very simple circuit the fuzz box altered the guitar’s signal by transforming it into a square wave. The first widely available fuzz was the Maestro Fuzz Tone by Gibson. The Fuzz Tone pedal was released in 1962 and didn’t really catch on until Keith Richards used one on the opening riff of “Satisfaction” and the floodgates opened. Another definitive fuzz pedal of the late 1960’s was the Sola Sound Tone Bender made famous by Jeff Beck and Jimmy Page.
Joe Perry is the American distillation of the good-old Keith Richards/Jimmy Page recipe for sideman/lead guitarist cool. He’s got the look and the licks, and he’s maintained both over the course of three or four decades—despite all odds. Jagger and Richards are the Glimmer Twins, but Perry and Aerosmith singer Steven Tyler went down in history as the Toxic Twins.

I don't understand why everyone is so "Gibson is the best". They have been going downhill for years. Unless it's a custom shop job, it is hit or miss. the same with Fender. Everyone likes them because of the mystique of the players that played them over the last decades. It's a "lifestyle cult" with name recognition. If you want a guitar that plays and sounds like a Gibson of Fender is supposed to but want to be guaranteed of the quality you are receiving and spend for a fraction of the money, then get a used USA Custom Shop made Washburn. You will never look back. I say used because the Chicago custom shop has apparently closed. Anything made there from about 1993 - 2008 that looks like a competitors guitar will outmatch the competitors version every time. You will notice that it is hard to find a used custom shop Washburn around. That's because they are the guitar worlds best kept secret. The people in the know get them - at a massively reduced price - and keep them. People hang onto their USA Washurns for the most part and there i a reason for that. They are that good.
Need a portable pedalboard for fly dates? Tech 21 has the answer in the form of the Fly Rig 5: a small but perfectly functional pedalboard, powered by an auto-switching adaptor, so it can be used anywhere in the world. What you get is the equivalent of five stompboxes. The SansAmp is at the heart of the Fly Rig. Stomp on its footswitch and its six mini control knobs light up blue. You get level and drive knobs, three-band EQ and a spring reverb emulation based on the Boost RVB pedal. In front of the SansAmp, you get the Plexi section, based on Tech 21's Hot-Rod Plexi pedal. One footswitch emulates the natural overdrive and distortion of a late-60s Marshall, with sound dialled in with level, tone and drive controls. A second 'Hot' footswitch brings in up to 21dB of boost and can be used independently of the Plexi distortion. Last in the signal chain is the DLA, a delay with tap tempo. The Fly Rig 5 is an extremely functional unit that contains arguably the most essential effects - you can plug it into a guitar amp or straight into a PA or mixing desk. It's also a life-saver should your equipment go down at the last minute, as well as being the answer to the prayers of guitarists who need to travel light.

In his informative, yet relaxed style, Sean takes us on a complete guitar recording journey starting at the vibrating strings and ending at the DAW. You'll first learn how to tune and prepare a guitar for recording. Next you're off to investigate the world of the electric guitar. You'll see microphones and mic placement techniques followed by a deep look at amplifiers and what to do when you're working with combos and stacks.
Here, in this mini guide to acoustic guitar body types, we’ll aim to show you some of the key differences in size, shape, sound and suitability between the major variations of guitar. We’ll look at the history of some of the better known body types, and make recommendations according to the sound you’re going for and the style in which you play. So whether you’re a wispy finger-picker or a hearty strummer, we’ll explain some of the more intricate details of acoustic guitar body shapes.
Make sure to check out my other 100 guitars!!! shipping to the lower 48 states.I will not ship anywhere else,Make sure to check out my other 100 guitars at my ebay store "Axes Bold As Love Guitars". I have added a new part to my ending statement.I now recommend that all the guitars I sell be set up to your preferences. ALL GUITARS MAY REQUIRE SET UP!!! Players have such varied opinions that I no longer want to hear about it. Here is a very cool SX "Custom Shack Strat". The maple 21 fret neck is from a SX VTG Series and was removed from a brand new guitar.These are very nice necks. Zero fret wear . The very cool Gloss Sunburst body is an aftermarket Body made of very light and resonant Paulownia wood. It was new when I built this guitar,has no dings,or indentations,just light surface scratches.
The ultimate rock/metal electric guitar instrument is here! Shreddage II covers the entire range of lead AND rhythm playing – every fret, every string, and tons of articulations. A powerful interface allows for easy playing and deep customization. With the included Kontakt Player and ReValver HPse, you’ll have everything you need to SHRED. Now includes Shreddage 2X update!
It mostly comes in black color. it is a right handed 6 string electric guitar. The body is given a polyurethane finish whereas the neck is given a satin finish. The fret board is composed of 24 frets and has a master white tone. The guitar is relatively affordable, with prices ranging from around INR 15,642. For stage performances, this guitar will give you a nice experience and a classical feel.
The same no-compromise attitude that gives the Newporter Player its uniquely killer vibe extends to every aspect of its construction. It features optimized bracing for reduced mass and superior resonance, a Graph Tech - NuBone nut and saddle for greater sustain and a Fishman preamp system that makes it easy to plug in without sacrificing the guitar's natural sound. Its lightweight mahogany neck features a comfortable, easy-to-play, slim-taper "C"-shaped profile suitable for any playing style, and its walnut fingerboard and bridge further augment this instrument's vibrant tone.
I have my Dad's '68 Kent guitar and am looking to have it restored..any info on parts would be helpful...I think all it needs is the spring for the vibrato (whammy bar)...everything else is there...the rubber piece on the bridge looks quite worn or perhaps brittle (rightfully so). Does anyone know what this guitar is worth? It's in orange sunburst ...It's a left handed guitar
Distortion sound or "texture" from guitar amplifiers is further shaped or processed through the frequency response and distortion factors in the microphones (their response, placement, and multi-microphone comb filtering effects), microphone preamps, mixer channel equalization, and compression. Additionally, the basic sound produced by the guitar amplifier can be changed and shaped by adding distortion and/or equalization effect pedals before the amp's input jack, in the effects loop just before the tube power amp, or after the power tubes.
For any venue, it's important to bring along the right amp. A huge amp in a tiny club is not only overkill; it's also extra setup work that you can avoid altogether with a smaller combo amp. On the flipside, a little amp in a big theatre could mean that some of the audience won't even hear you. Take your time deciding what the best option is for you.
A DPDT (2PDT or 2P2T) on/on switch has two channels (poles), each having three lugs. This is like having two SPDT switches in one. It’s the standard configuration for most push/ pull or push/push pots, and you can use it for almost all mods, including the seven-sound mod (if you leave one pole unconnected), coil-splitting a humbucker, out-of-phase mods (by adding some jumper wires from pole 1 to pole 2), a direct-through mod, and countless others. Let’s see what’s going on here.
Featuring a tremolo tailpiece, the player is guitarist is guarantee weeks of sustain. In terms of playability, the Jackson JS22 features a rosewood fingerboard that is ultra fast with breathtaking jumbo frets, giving the player a comfortable chording experience and high speed runs with little or no effort. The basswood body features an arched top armed with dangerous looks to compliment its incredible sound, an ideal choice for you.
The Ace Frehley (KISS) signature model, released in 1997 and re-released in 2012, has three humbucking DiMarzio pick-ups, a cherry sunburst finish (AAAA), a color image of Frehley’s face in his Kiss make-up on the headstock, and mother-of-pearl lightning bolt inlays, and Ace’s simulated signature on the 12th fret. There was a limited edition, Gibson Custom Shop run of only 300 guitars that were built with DiMarzio PAF, Super Distortion, and Dual Sound pickups. The production run model was only built with DiMarzio Super Distortion pickups. This was one of Gibson’s best selling artist runs. These guitars are now valued at between $US4,000–12,000.[citation needed]The more recent 2012 “Budokan” model features mother-of-pearl block inlays (no signature at the 12th fret), a Richlite fingerboard, Grover machine heads with pearloid banjo buttons, and a grade A maple top.[44]
it is four solders on a guitar on say a les paul needs electricty so two wires pass the electricity through the other two wires are for your pickups the pickups electricity goes through the wires of them , into a potentiometer which is the technical name for the thing under the knob (or two depending on the guitars wiring) .... than into the 3 way and than finally passes out of the guitar and into an amp , pedal or tuner
Understanding how to read electronics schematics is the key to being a successful DIY pedal builder. A schematic will show you what components are needed for the build, as well as how these parts are hooked together to create (in this case) an effect pedal circuit. At first glance, a schematic may look like a bunch of hieroglyphics, compiled of various symbols, numbers, and letters (see below). Don’t fret! – After a bit of practice, you should develop a basic understanding of how a schematic works, and you will be putting together DIY effect pedals in no time!

Depending on the components used in the delay pedal, delays can either sound exactly like the original source sound, or the delays can sound like they have a modulation effect on them. In fact, some of the most popular delay pedals apply a phaser modulation effect on the repeated delay sounds. Stacking different effects on top of one another in a single pedal is not uncommon at all, and delay pedals typically have some other effect added-on.


With an amp rated at 15 watts and an 8-inch speaker, the Spider Classic 15 is more or less in the same power class as the Champion 20. Like the Fender, it also has a 3.5 mm line input for connecting a smartphone, so guitarists can play along with recorded music or a music instruction app, plus a ¼-inch headphone/recording output, a built-in tuner, and a jack for an optional footswitch that switches between clean and distorted tones.

The ghost Hexpander MIDI interface system adds MIDI capability to almost any guitar or bass.  Plug your guitar into pitch-to-MIDI converters by Roland or Axon and enter the MIDI sound universe.  The Hexpander MIDI interface provides responsive and accurate tracking unequaled be any other system on the market today.  Check out how affordable and easy it can be to make MIDI part of your music making.
Alvarez has always been an under-rated brand. Beautiful workmanship, great sound- an excellent value for the money. I have one of the old six string "dove" guitars and a Yairi 12 string: both are close to forty years old and both still sound and look great and have never needed any repairs. I also have an old Martin six string. I have done the "blindfold" test with friends to choose the best sound between the alvarez and the martin - alvarez wins every time.
Producing one of the most popular clean sounds in rock, you’ll rarely see a solid-state amplifier with as much notoriety as the Roland JC-120. The amp was introduced in 1975, offering pure “JC Clean” sound with 120 watts of power and a built-in Dimensional Space Chorus effect. The JC-120 features dual 12” speakers plus dual power amps that drive the speakers to their full potential for a stunningly clear sound. As a result, the amplifier became a favorite among players like Andy Summers, Robert Smith, Johnny Marr, Jeff “Skunk” Baxter and more.
Of course, as with most signature guitars, it’s the looks that really steal the show. You do of course get the beautiful diving bird inlays that PRS are known for, and then the top has this beautifully clean look to it that just screams quality. The sound is still gorgeous though, with a really nice crisp feel to it that lends itself to more technical fingerwork that you’d expect of Lifeson.
Complete information is not available, but guitars included the GC-2 with two humbuckers and GC-3 with a humbucker/single/single layout. It’s not known if there was a single-humbucker model, but there may have been if the Ultra Hard Body series pattern holds true. One twin-pickup BC-2 was offered, presumably Fender-style, with one P and one J-style pickup. Possibly a single-pickup bass was also offered. One source also lists a CG-21 with a humbucker/single/single pickup arrangement, but no other information is available.
I just noticed that no-one has mentioned Robben Ford – another master of both technique and taste and a certain contender for my top ten list, fighting for a place in the same space as Larry Carlton and John Scofield. (John Mayer can certainly play, but for me, any of those three offers at least as much technique, and a wider range of accomplishments, than JM – check out their various versions of “I don’t need no doctor”).
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Valco manufactured Spanish acoustic guitars, metal-bodied resonator guitars, electric lap steel guitars, and vacuum tube amplifiers under a variety of brand names including Supro, Airline, Oahu, and National. They also made amplifiers under contract for several other companies such as Gretsch, Harmony, and Kay. In the 1950s they began producing solid body electric guitars.
Let’s start off with a real classic for a classic player! This Fenders vintage modified style Strat hss has captured the happy way of the 50’s, available in Surf Green, Daphne Blue and Fiesta Red and it’s a guitar that just makes your life a litter bit more worth living. The design is very much like the 1950’s electric guitars, from the soft V-shaped neck, maple fretboard and 8-hole pickguard down to the smaller things, like the knobs and the switch tip- everything just brings us back!
My interests are in the Kents with the script logo on the headstock, body, and pickups. The headstock is Gibson-ish with tuners on both sides. The pickup nearest the neck is tilted, regardless of how many pickups are on the guitar. One model, the 742 has four pickups with switches, volume and tone knobs for each. Overkill, to say the least, and I have read somewhere that they don’t sound very good. However, I have seen some youtube video where a 742 sounds pretty good in live performance. A lot of the sound comes from a proper setup and the hands of a skilled player. Hopefully I’ll be able to find out for myself someday. Regardless, the 742 is one funky-looking guitar.
Theory - These sessions will be devoted to investigating how the fretboard works, how strings and notes relate to each other, what chords are made up of etc. A lot of theory time will be spent reading and analysing diagrams and your guitar's fretboard. This aspect is for understanding how music works on the guitar, to map out the fretboard in your mind so you can later apply the physical techniques with confidence. If you're serious about getting good on guitar, you need time devoted to theory.
Bending: Bending is a pretty common element of Tab. You can tell that you are supposed to bend a note by an upward pointing arrow next to one or more numbers. The distance you are to bend the note will be defined by an indicator next to the arrow. It might be a “full” bend or a “1/2” bend. Once you are exposed to a couple of bends you will quickly catch on to the basic idea.
EQ placement is similar. Some players prefer to mold and shape their guitar’s primary tonal character before it is processed by other effects, but others prefer to adjust the EQ of the finished sound (again, placement in front of delay and reverb is preferable). Or maybe your distortion pedal’s EQ controls just don’t have enough bass or treble and you need to tweak its tone a touch more. If you own an EQ pedal, have fun and try placing it in different locations to see what works best for you.
The use of overdrive distortion as a musical effect probably originated with electric guitar amplifiers, where the less pleasant upper harmonics created by overdriving the amp are filtered out by the limited frequency response of the speaker. If you use a distortion plug-in without following it up with low-pass filtering (or a speaker simulator) in this way, you may hear a lot of raspy high-end that isn't musically useful. This is why electric guitar DI'd via a fuzz box or distortion pedal sounds thin and buzzy unless further processed to remove these high frequencies.
The Myth: Most amp manufacturers were conservative from a previous generation with a background of country, jazz and religious music. They were horrified by the anti-religious, drug driven, sex crazed rock musos of the 60s’ diving their amps at full power into hard distortion for sustain. When these amps were first designed in the 50s, it was inconceivable they would be used in this way.

It's a basic rule of physics (called Faraday's law) that a changing magnetic field produces electricity. So a guitar string will produce electricity only for as long as the magnetic field is changing—in other words, for only as long as the metal string is moving. Once the string stops vibrating, the sound stops. In that respect, an electric guitar is just like an acoustic one.
No matter your vision, SparkFun's products and resources are designed to make the world of electronics more accessible. In addition to over 2,000 open source components and widgets, SparkFun offers curriculum, training and online tutorials designed to help demystify the wonderful world of embedded electronics. We're here to help you start something.

Figuring they know what they want in an amp far better than I do, I gave our panelists no instructions, other than to keep in mind that these amps were primarily for beginners and secondarily for more experienced players looking for a cheap portable amp. After each panelist tried all the amps, I asked their opinions of them. We didn’t discuss the prices since they were all so similar, but we did discuss some other practical considerations such as weight and size.
Most guitars will have at least one TONE knob - a way to adjust the frequency spread of the signal going to the amplification system. Similar to a TONE adjustment on radios, stereos, other things; it usually is a means to adjust how much of the higher frequencies are sent to the output. Rolling the knob “back” will reduce the higher frequencies and can help make the guitar sound less “shrill” if it exhibits that tendency.
The fit and finish are as amazing as one would expect, and the general aesthetics of the guitars are just awesome to look at. They aren't gaudy or try-hard, but refined and subtle in their expression. Strumming a single cord will tell you all you need to know about the tone quality of this guitar, which is what really matters. It has that Martin twang and a lot of it.
The Les Paul SL from Epiphone is a great choice for a beginner guitarist looking for classic LP vibes. With two single-coil ceramic pickups and a lightweight body, this model should be able to cover a variety of musical styles and genres while coming in at a very attractive price point. The Les Paul SL is available in 6 distinct styles including Heritage Cherry Sunburst, Pacific Blue, Natural Yellow Sun, Turquoise, Vintage Sunburst and Ebony.
This product was not working and parts were defect. I don't know how some people made it works. The instruction was terrible and seller's wires description photos are more worse. I did not expect much for this little toy. Just piece of the junk. I was tried to return, but the seller said that I had to pay return shipping and he gave me a fake return shipping address.
Sooner or later you may want to experiment further: What happens if I use a different opamp here, or change a capacitor value there? Specifying your own components is the next step. Two of the specialty jobs in building a typical effects pedal are the design of the circuit itself, and the production of the printed circuit board (PCB) on which to install the components. The next logical step from a kit is to order a pre-built PCB and then customize the component and enclosure choices yourself. AMZ effects, is the go-to place for a huge variety of pre-designed PCB’s. The cost is quite low and the projects include clear documentation providing guidance on different options and components.

Is there any particular reason you're opposed to Kontakt libraries? All of the plugins you mentioned are sample-based themselves, with the notable weakness that you would not be able to change the mapping, grouping, programming (etc), unlike with Kontakt. As someone who uses a lot of virtual instruments, I'd say it's always preferable to have a sample-based instrument in an open sampler plugin since you can see what's going on under the hood and change things like envelopes as needed.
This site is for information only - we don't sell vintage guitars - but do check out our Vintage guitar collectors pick list: a regularly updated selection of rare guitars, vintage catalogs, or unusual items currently that we've found for sale on the web. We especially like to feature Vintage guitars with a story! If you're selling something interesting yourself, get in contact and we can help promote your item.
The ‘HSS’ refers to the pickup combination, with a humbucker and two single-coils, which is a versatile arrangement for both clean and distorted playing, especially when coupled with two tone controls and a five-way pickup selector switch. An excellent price for a good brand, and perfect for newbies. Make sure to check out the full review of this guitar.
This book comes from the former editor of Guitar One magazine who has been playing since he was 14 years old, so he has a reputation of knowing a his way around a guitar neck AND knowing how to write. Let’s face it, when you are trying to learn guitar through reading a book, the author's ability to write and communicate is crucial. Anyway, this book delivers a “workout program” for your fingers, giving you a technique driven approach to learning the guitar and actually improving in record time. The exercises are designed to help with dexterity and accuracy.
The focus has always been to start with sound and top it off with a bold, boutique-inspired appearance. When Michael Kelly launched, we, in fact, only offered mandolins and acoustic basses. These two markets had been under served and consumers could not buy a great sounding instrument without breaking the bank. The Michael Kelly Dragonfly collection of both acoustic basses and mandolins quickly became popular and hard to get. Musicians were drawn to their decidedly custom appearance and then fell in love with their sound and performance.
Collings Guitars is an Austin, Texas based stringed instrument manufacturer. The company was founded in 1973 by Bill Collings who is “one of the most recognized and respected names amongst aficionados of modern acoustic instruments.”[ Their acoustic guitars have been highly regarded for decades.[2]In addition to acoustic guitars they also make electric guitars, archtop guitars,mandolins, and ukuleles.
When Eric Clapton plugged his 1960 Les Paul into a Marshall Bluesbreaker in the mid 60’s (the set-up used to record Blues Breakers with Eric Clapton, the “Beano album”) he created a new rock tone that immediately became a standard.[15] Clapton played a 1960 Standard as a member of John Mayall & the Bluesbreakers and in the early days of Cream. The guitar was said to have been stolen while Clapton was preparing for the first Cream tour in 1966, following the recording of Fresh Cream, and was long considered an iconic instrument by Clapton’s fans and Les Paul guitar admirers. Gibson announced production of the Clapton 1960 Standard, also nicknamed the “Beano Burst”, in 2010. Gibson says the instrument “accurately represents what Eric Clapton personally feels his 1960 Les Paul should be”, with Clapton consulting on the design of the guitar. Production is limited to 55 hand-aged instruments signed by Clapton (who was allowed to keep the first five of these instruments), another 95 hand-aged instruments, and 350 Vintage Original Spec instruments, but all five hundred instruments feature period-correct hardware, two Gibson reproduction PAF humbucking pickups, and subtly figured “antiquity burst” maple tops.
Durability: Unlike individual stompboxes where you might use some sparingly, since your multi-effects unit contains all your effects you’ll be using it frequently. As such, it’s important that the build quality is up to par. This is where brand reputation comes into play as well, since you want the brand to stand behind their product in case anything bad happens. Rest assured the pedals we recommend in this guide are all from very reputable manufacturers with long histories of good customer support.

To learn how to practice correctly, you can sign up for a FREE No B.S. Guitar membership below. I’ve created this free course to teach you everything you need to know on how to practice correctly (Pit-Stop Practicing). I go much more in depth on the “how to learn” side of things, and you’ll avoid making all the same mistakes I made when I got started.


These two articles show us how me can manipulate coil winding direction, electrical phase, and magnetic polarity to achieve hum-cancellation between two coils. Having this knowledge allows us to create hum-cancelling combinations of coils over and above than just using humbuckers. A good example is using a RWRP pickup in the middle position of a Strat.
Chrome ES-335 diamond trapeze tailpiece. This is a short version of the standard ES-335 style tailpiece which was also used on many arched top instruments. Overall length of Tailpiece not including hinge = 3 1/8 inches. Side to Side width at bar = 3 9/32 inches. Width of string bar = 47/64 inches. String Spacing at Bar = 1 61/64 inches. Important Hinge/Mounting Specs: Mounting Area of Hinge length = 1 1/2 inches. Mounting Area of Hinge Width - 2 inches. Mounting hole location bottom center = 11/32 inch from bottom edge Two Mounting hole locations from side edges = 5/16 inches. Two mounting hole locations Apart from eachother = 1 25/64 inches. Upper side of hinge length = 1 1/8 inches. Upper side of Hinge width = 1 25/64 inches.
For better or worse, by 1982 the taste for natural-finished, neck-through guitars with lots of switches and active electronics had begun to move on. On the horizon were the brief affair with weird-shaped “heavy metal” guitars and the impending first Strat-mania and the rise of Superstrats which would pretty much define the remainder of the decade. 1982, and the 18 and 28 Series, marked the end of Martin’s direct manufacture of electric solidbody guitars.

Three CraViolas were offered. These had a strange asymmetrical shape with a pear shape, no waist on the bass side and sharp waist (and almost cutaway taper) on the treble. Soundholes were D-shaped with fancy rosettes, with a pointed tortoise guard on the steel-stringed versions. These had slotheads with a Woody Woodpecker-like peak pointed bassward. The bridges were similar to the mustache version on the Country Western. The CRA6N Classic ($150) had a yellow spruce top and full-grained Brazilian rosewood body, no inlays or pickguard. The CRA6S Steel String ($160) was a similar steel-string with pin bridge and diamond inlays. The CRA12S 12 String ($175) was the 12-string version.
Bill Collings dropped out of medical school in the early 1970s[3] and instead worked in a machine shop for five years.[4] At the same time he built his first guitar. In 1975 he moved to Houston, Texas, where he worked as an engineer with a pipeline and oil field equipment company by day and a guitar builder by night. Three years later he met renowned musician Lyle Lovett and built him a guitar.
I don't have enough good things to say about this shop. Are you used your music shop being being run by snotty musicians who judge you based on the skinniness of your jeans or number of piercings? Well, this ain't that shop. James, the owner, is super helpful and knowledgeable, and stocks his shop with really top quality gear. I'd recommend this place primarily for pedals and amps, as well as for checking out some small batch electric guitar manufacturers (like their gorgeous Asher collection). That being said, they have a really nice selection of Breedloves, Rain Songs, Guilds, Martins, Gibsons in the acoustic section as well. They also do top-notch repair on equipment. I brought in my Princeton Reverb for a speaker swap, and the work was completely cheaply and flawlessly. They definitely have a loyal customer in me going forward!
Gibson’s drive to recapture the magic of the original “Patent Applied For” humbucker pickups of the 1950s culminated with the introduction of the Burstbucker line in the early 1990s. In 2002, Gibson followed up this innovative accomplishment with yet another breakthrough in pickup design—the Burstbucker Pro, designed specifically for the new Les Paul Standards. The Burstbucker Pro features an Alnico V magnet (instead of the Alnico II), which offers slightly higher output and allows preamps to be driven a little harder to achieve a more natural break-up. Like all Burstbuckers, the Burstbucker Pro has asymmetrical coils—true to the original PAFs—which supply a more open sound. The Burstbucker Pro Neck is wound slightly less than the original PAFs, while the Burstbucker Pro Bridge is slightly overwound for increased output. The Burstbucker Pro pickups are also wax potted to allow loud volume pressures with minimal feedback.
The BOSS ME-80 gives you all of the effects needed to create that elusive signature tone. The multi-effects unit is a great way to learn how different effects interact with each other to provide you with crystal-clear tones to fuzzy, thick walls-of-noise. If you have an ME-80, download BOSS Tone Studio for an easy way to experiment and learn these effects, have fun and use your ears to build your best guitar sound.
First off, I would like to say I had a lot of fun building this. Also, my hat goes off to the person that hand wrote all the tiny labels on the parts. With that being said, I couldn't get it to work. No sound at all, and only the light came on when I hit the switch. Now the fact that it didn't work could totally be an error on my part, but who knows. Now what I didn't like about this product is this: the casing is pretty small, so everything is pretty cramped (which may also contribute to why I wasn't able to get this to work, although, if you read other reviews, which I recommend for further useful information, some managed just fine), some pieces were mislabeled (There is a review that sorts this out), and the directions aren't very clear...well I thought they were clear enough, but look where that got me, so be ready for that. So 3 stars for fun, good price, and faster than expected delivery.
Pickup selectors can wear out over time. The lugs and the rotating switch can loose their tight connect with years of use. Also, many inexpensive guitars made today use cheap electronic parts. You may just want to upgrade your switch for more control and better selections. It is fairly easy to install a new pickup selector. Here are a few simple steps to replacing your pickup selector.
Description: Body: Mahogany - Top Wood: Maple - Quilted - Neck Attachment: Neck-through - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 5 Piece - Fingerboard: Maple - Frets: 24 - Inlay: None - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 27" (69cm) - Headstock: 7 In-Line, Reverse - Bridge: Floyd Rose Style Locking Tremolo - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Black, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, Grover Tuners - Circuit Type: Active - Pickups: EMG 707 - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Tribal Purple, Black flame, Tribal Green, Blue Quilt, Satin Natural, Blue Flame
Ibanez is considered to be one of the best-selling electric guitars and bass guitar brands. But, they also produce a quality acoustic guitar for acoustic guitar players. The V series is really popular for newbies, making it one of the best acoustic guitar brands for beginners. Their guitar uses mahogany wood on the neck, and back and sides of the guitar. It also includes a rosewood bridge and rosewood guitar fretboard.

On guitars with bound fingerboards, shrinking of the binding can produce a gap large enough to catch the treble E string when pulling it over the edge. If only a few our present I will fill the gap to eliminate the problem. If the binding shrinkage has introduced gaps at every fret, the board should be re-radiused to eliminate all gaps and re-fretted.
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