If you’ve decided to make the neck from scratch, rather than purchasing it, you will want to cut that at this point. Make sure you are following specifications for how it will need to connect to the body. It’s best to cut the basic shape first and then refine.  You also need to hollow out space for the truss rod. Finally, for a rosewood fretboard, you will need to laminate the board to the neck.


We tried adding treble to the acoustic guitar.. It sounds like a xylophone, only the highs are heard. Panning is a good idea. I remember doing it with several synthesizer tracks to make more space. Unfortunately we already have a compressor in the pedal-board and it doesn't help much. The dynamics are flat but the electric guitar is still screening the acoustic one even at a quite low volume. I guess it will still be so... whatever we do. I wonder how people manage 4 or more guitars all at once. – SovereignSun Jan 10 '17 at 9:28
Make sure that only the notes you deliberately play actually sound. Guitar strings aren't isolated systems like the tone generators of a synthesizer; if you simply leave them open they may ring even though you've never actually played them. Always watch out carefully for such “rogue sympathetic vibrations” and make sure you properly stop strings that sound in unintended ways.

Bass cabinets are more likely to have thicker wood panels than regular electric guitar amps, and to have stronger internal bracing. These design features help to lessen the likelihood of unwanted cabinet buzzes or rattles, which are more likely with bass cabinets than electric guitar cabs because of the low-frequency sounds that bass cabs have to reproduce.
Whatever budget you’re on, you will always be able to find a suitable guitar. Even in the $100 price range you can find some models that play nicely. However, in that super-budget market there is a lot of garbage, so be careful. There’s a difference between ‘affordable’ and ‘cheap’, so do your research before buying something that may offer no value.

The body of the instrument is a major determinant of the overall sound variety for acoustic guitars. The guitar top, or soundboard, is a finely crafted and engineered element often made of spruce, red cedar, redwood or mahogany. This thin (often 2 or 3 mm thick) piece of wood, strengthened by different types of internal bracing, is considered the most prominent factor in determining the sound quality of a guitar. The majority of the sound is caused by vibration of the guitar top as the energy of the vibrating strings is transferred to it. Different patterns of wood bracing have been used through the years by luthiers (Torres, Hauser, Ramírez, Fleta, and C.F. Martin being among the most influential designers of their times); to not only strengthen the top against collapsing under the tremendous stress exerted by the tensioned strings, but also to affect the resonation of the top. Some contemporary guitar makers have introduced new construction concepts such as "double-top" consisting of two extra-thin wooden plates separated by Nomex, or carbon-fiber reinforced lattice - pattern bracing. The back and sides are made out of a variety of woods such as mahogany, Indian rosewood and highly regarded Brazilian rosewood (Dalbergia nigra). Each one is chosen for its aesthetic effect and structural strength, and such choice can also play a significant role in determining the instrument's timbre. These are also strengthened with internal bracing, and decorated with inlays and purfling.
Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Semi-Hollow (Chambered) - Top Wood: Maple - Flamed - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 24 - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Headstock: 6 In-Line - Bridge: Tune-O-Matic - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Chrome, Diecast, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: HoneyBurst, Green
Recent amplifiers may include digital technology similar to effects pedals, up to the ability to model or emulate a variety of classic amplifiers. Some modeling systems also emulate the tonal characteristics of different speaker configurations, cabinets, and microphones. Nearly all amp and speaker cabinet modeling is done digitally, using computer techniques (e.g., Digital Signal Processing or DSP circuitry and software).
Launch price: $4,081 / £3,029 | Body: Caramelized ash/flame maple | Neck: Caramelized flame maple | Scale: 25.5" | Fingerboard: Caramelized flame maple | Frets: 24 | Pickups: 2x Charvel Custom MF humbucker, 1x Custom MF single coil | Controls: Volume, tone, 5-position selector switch, 2-position toggle with multiple switching options | Hardware: Recessed Charvel locking vibrato, Sperzel locking tuners | Left-handed: No | Finish: Natural
Even with tone control maxed some high frequencies get cut. To let all the frequencies through you can either get a no-load pot or make one. CTS makes them for Fender and what they do is simply break the connection between the wiper and conductive element when pot is maxed. Additionally, they have an indentation so once they reach maximum setting they “click” and it’s not that easy to turn them back. To make your own just cut (or cover with nail polish) the element near the end, so that resistance between the wiper and the opposite lug reads infinite when maxed, at lower settings it should read as usual.
Oh man.......... back to that Firebird 12. It is luscious. I have several tracks from 1973 where I used metal finger picks when tracking that thing and playing high up on the neck with a bit of compression.... heaven!!! I then did some standard chaka chaka rhythm parts with the 12 through a Marshall 50 watt.... heaven x 100. The guitar is SO comfortable to play, sits in ANY mix perfectly and dominates the "oooohhhh" factor with its sound. Please please please sell it to me!!!!!!
Here, Rocksmith has a major challenge: It must provide considerably more information onscreen than competitors like Guitar Hero and Rock Band. Those games got off easy—they only needed to relay which of the colored "frets" to play. Because Rocksmith is teaching you to play a real guitar, it has to tell you which fret and which string to play simultaneously. That requires a more complicated visual setup.
I have to say I'm an Impact Soundworks fan. I haven't listened to the Archtop demos, but another one from them is Django Gypsy Jazz Guitar. The sound is stunning to me, both lead and rhythm. However, it depends on what style you're going for. It's not going to be as versatile as some other acoustic options, but what it does it does very well. I don't have it but it's on my buy list. I own Shreddage II SRP and it's my favorite electric because of the interface and playability.

The Tone knob is basically a filter to cut highs. And, once again, the pickup will sound best when turning it all the way up. With the ever-growing amount of effects amps have to offer and those available in pedal format, we often forget that this setting even exists. This basic control allows you to, for example, smoothen a jazzy sound or choke a way-too-shrilling fuzz, or anything else in that line that comes to your mind. Only your ears can tell if the sound is convincing or not!
This depends on personal preference; changing the order of drive pedals changes how they sound when used together. For instance, a clean boost placed before a heavy distortion or fuzz will result in a louder boosted signal hitting the heavier distortion circuit which in turn works that circuit harder and you get heavier distortion. If you place that clean boost after the heavy distortion, it will just make the original distorted sound louder. Experiment with different placement order and you will find your own preference.
The origins of the modern guitar are not known with certainty. Some believe it is indigenous to Europe, while others think it is an imported instrument.[32] Guitar-like instruments appear in ancient carvings and statues recovered from Egyptian, Sumerian, and Babylonian civilizations. This means that the contemporary Iranian instruments such as the tanbur and setar are distantly related to the European guitar, as they all derive ultimately from the same ancient origins, but by very different historical routes and influences.
A multi-FX unit is a single effects device that can perform several guitar effects simultaneously. Such devices generally use digital processing to simulate many of the above-mentioned effects without the need to carry several single-purpose units. In addition to the classic effects, most have amplifier/speaker simulations not found in analog units. This allows a guitarist to play directly into a recording device while simulating an amplifier and speaker of his choice.
There are a very large number of acoustic guitar manufacturers in the world. However, not all are among the best, but this American brand specializes in acoustic guitars. You will find Martin guitars among the top 10 acoustic guitars in the world. It has greatly influenced the look and shape of the American acoustic guitars. Martin guitars are made from highly seasoned wood, which produces some really melodious tones. Mind you, these guitars can be expensive and taking care of the instrument is extremely important. It makes some extremely beautiful models like D-28 and D-45; however, they also manufacture budget-friendly models.
Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 22 - Inlay: Block - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Tune-O-Matic - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Diecast, Gold, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Black
For most applications, all you really need is a guitar input, and an output that you can plug to an amplifier or PA system. Still, it doesn't hurt to have extra input/output options, like a mic XLR input (for vocalists who play guitar), an aux input (for practicing with your favorite tracks), headphones out (for quiet practice and tweaking), stereo output, and many more.
I’ve tried some guitars for beginner, being beginner myself! And let me tell you… around 500 USD and under 1000Usd they are plenty BUT. Avoid Epiphone. I got one and let me tell you, the material is weak. I’m mean the construction material. Some time after buying my Epiphone standard pro (lespaul) I tried a PRS SE245, it is a single cut too but… man, the playability and the quality of construction are absolutely not comparable. For the price I think it is the best single cut you could find! And to say the truth, now I started to play correctly. I’ll sell my first one and I’m going to buy a PRS McCarty 594. PRS is really high quality material. From bottom line to high end models!

If you just want one or two instruments from a large SoundFont then follow this procedure.  Open the large multi-instrument SoundFont in Polyphone, then select File, New, Name the new SoundFont.  Go to the Presets of the original SoundFont, Left-Click the Preset you want and then holding down the Left mouse button then drag it to the Presets of the new SoundFont and let go of the button (the preset is now inside your new SoundFont).  Right-Click on the main heading of the original SoundFont and choose Close File.  Now simply choose File, Save (or Save As), Close.


This is just what a guy or gal needs to help him or her make an informed decision on making a electric guitar purchase. All the topics and explanations of the given topic, pick-ups, machine heads etc… were easy to follow and understand. Not a lot of tech talk that would either confuse or intimidate a perspective buyer, that is a feat in its self kudos to your writers. keep up the good work.
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Much like ESP, Schecter started out as a parts company which decided to start building their own guitars. Right from day one it was apparent that their mission was to deliver ultimate metal guitars. Everything from their design, to the choice of electronics pointed in this direction. It didn’t take long for Schecter to become one of the go to brands that has reached the elite level.
James Marshall "Jimi" Hendrix was an American guitarist, singer, and songwriter. Although his mainstream career spanned only four years, he is widely regarded as one of the most influential electric guitarists in the history of popular music, and one of the most celebrated musicians of the 20th century. The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame describes him as "arguably the greatest instrumentalist in the history of rock music". Born in Seattle, Washington, Hendrix began playing guitar at the age of 15. In 1961, he enlisted in the US Army; he was granted an honorable discharge the following year. Soon afterward, he moved to Clarksville, Tennessee, and began playing gigs on the chitlin' circuit, ...more on Wikipedia

Adjust the volume and tone and engage the gain when you want to bust out some distortion riffs or throw your headphones in via the 6.3mm Jack headphone output which also doubles up as a preamp out. Enjoy silent practice anywhere or hook it up to your audio interface for studio recordings. A powerful little amplifier relied upon by guitarists when inspiration strikes. At under £30 it’s actually an essential purchase for musicians and one of the best music gifts ever – it’s certainly cheap, but it certainly doesn’t suck! Available in a range of different colours and as a double stack for extra volume.


Martin flat top guitars were made in various sizes. The bigger the guitar body, the better and more collectible the guitar. This is why guitar body size is so important to identify on a Martin flat top guitar. Starting in October 1930, Martin stamped the guitar body size right above the serial number inside the guitar. This makes identifying body size on October 1930 and later guitar very easy. For flat top guitars made before October 1930, the easiest way to figure out the body size is to use the flat top guitar body size chart below. Body sizes, pretty much from smallest to biggest, include O, OO, OOO, OM, D.
My first electric was one of these (1962, I was 14) . My mother bought it by mail order, probably from the Bell's catalogue. I remember coming home from school every day for what seemed like weeks hoping it had arrived! It was very crudely made with a plywood body (mine was in a red finish). The neck was wide and flat (think that was ply too!) and the action appalling! I remember the original strings were copper wound and left you with green fingertips! I remember the price was around 14 pounds, quite a lot at the time! Even at that age I wasn't impressed for long and soon traded it in for a Hofner Clubman. Wish I still had it now though!
If you know how to play an E major chord, then you know how to play an A minor chord—just move the chord whole shape over a string. Make sure your first finger is curled, so the open first string rings clearly. Avoid playing the open sixth string when strumming the A minor chord. There are situations when it makes sense to reverse your second and third fingers when playing the A minor chord.
Launch price: $2,419 / £1,943 | Body: Alder | Neck: Maple | Scale: 24" | Fingerboard: Rosewood | Frets: 22 | Pickups: 2x Bare Knuckle Johnny Marr single coils | Controls: Volume, tone, 4-way pickup selector switch, 2x 'bright' slide switches | Hardware: Jaguar bridge with Mustang saddles and vintage-style floating vibrato | Left-handed: No | Finish: Olympic White, Metallic KO

Some guitarists design or modify their own pedals. Others use a combination of off-the-shelf effects. Kurt Cobain stomped on Electro-Harmonix Big Muff and ProCo Rat pedals to create his classic loud-soft-loud, "Nevermind"-era sounds. John Mayer kicked off his 2003 hit, "Bigger Than My Body," with see-sawing, arpeggiated sounds from his Roger Linn AdrenaLinn III pedal. There are hundreds, if not thousands, of different stomp boxes. Although there's a certain amount of gray area and overlap, pedal effects can all be divided into four general categories:
Another great option if your budget for an acoustic is $500 or less is the BG 40 from Blueridge. It has a sitka spruce top with mahogany back and side. It features scalloped bracing for a clean and crisp tone. Owners describe it’s tone as loud and bassy, and compared the neck width to that of an electric. This could be a plus for those with smaller hands. This guitar also features a bone and nut saddle and East Indian rosewood fingerboard for smooth playability. Based on customer feedback, this is a great budget choice that won’t let you down.
As a long time player conveying the skill, craft and passion of this art, which is as much as a science, players of ANY and every instrument can unanimously agree that there are no “best” players. Some have great moments that were captured and regurgitated in the media time and a get which put them in a permanent vista. This is greatness? Hardly. I’ve seen A LOT of players, some included in the article and the majority chanted by the readers on this board screw things up beyond repair–some during the opening of their first song of the performance. OUCH that hurts…but it happens. Some completely lost track with what they were doing during a show casing of their solo work…oops. Yep it happens, like sometimes happens to singers who forget their lines–it doesn’t matter that they have written the song they were performing. Yea, we hear about this stuff every now and then, however at the end of the day, this doesn’t matter. The truth is, people hear only what they want to hear and will by their very disposition, ignore the negatives and embrace the positives of their work–alas this is why this supportive listeners are called FANS.
In the ’80s, with the advent of new digital effects units, the “refrigerator racks” appeared on the scene—custom rigs built for the studio and touring pros of the day. Effects loops in guitar amps also became commonplace—allowing guitarists to insert line-level effects after the distortion generating preamp stages of their amps, and before the power amp stage—a big tonal improvement when using time-based effects like delay and reverb.
Some of the most impressive pieces of equipment come in small packages and in the shape of an item you would not expect to be as good as it is. The proof of this is the deceptively simple looking Mugig Portable Amplifier for Electric guitar, with 10W of power. This piece of equipment is on the big side of small, but is perfect in every single aspect of it, other than the size. The design is simple and understanded, the ease of transport is guaranteed, while the sound takes over the mind and heart of the musician and the crowd instantly. It is possibly the best electric guitar amp that I have gotten to mention on this list.
Imagine someone telling you about an old-time music store that had a huge stash of unsold guitars from the 1960s, plus some guitar effects from the ‘70s lying around in its upper floors in Newark, NJ. Well, you can bet it didn’t take long for me to beat a path to the door of Newark Music City (calm down; this was a long time ago and, while the company still exists, it’s long gone from Newark). Even though I was late in the game, there were still unmined treasures to be had. A real Temple of Doom!
It seems strange that we’ve come so far into an article about acoustic guitars without mentioning the ‘other’ big name in this world; Taylor. The American company has been duking it out with Martin since 1974 for the title of top dog in the world of acoustic guitars, and has come up with a few unique iterations of its own along the way. Nowadays, you could point to the GS Mini and Big Baby as examples of Taylor leading the way in acoustic guitar innovation, but back in the day it was the Grand Auditorium style which really put them on the map.
Clean or replace switches. To clean switches use solvent such as contact cleaner in a spray into the toggle itself, you may also use other solvents such as WD-40, always work the solvent around by using the switch as indented. To replace switches first obtain a proper switch that applies with your guitar, then soldering in accordingly. Work in a well-ventilated space to avoid harmful fumes from solder or solvents.

At the core of this pedal is the Line 6 HX technology, which emulates the behavior of actual amp and stompbox components. This means that instead of merely copying the sound, it recreates the entire pedal or amplifier in digital format, allowing the models to respond to guitar tone and adjustments much like the real thing. While it originally had 70 effects, firmware updates have raised this number to 104, which is more than enough to keep you busy for months, if not years. Amp, cab and mic models were also increased to 115. Since Line 6 is well known for providing updates, it is reasonable to expect more expansions in the future. It does everything that the Helix LT can, with some extras, most notable of which is the LED scribble strips for labeling each footswitch. The Helix Floor also comes with expanded input/output options to work with mics and other instruments.


MusicPCB.com – offers PCB projects to build guitar and bass effects, and synth modules. All PCBs are professionally manufactured, and include soldermask, a silkscreened component legend, and plated through holes and pads. They are designed to be easy to build, provide simple and clean wiring, to work well with your other pedals, modules, and instruments, and most of all to sound great and provide sounds and features not available in commercial designs. Each PCB comes with a PDF document with wiring diagram, schematic, build notes, and large modding sections with details on how to perform a variety of mods to tailor the design to your needs/taste.
Compressors also have the ability to increase the sustain of notes beyond sounds that are normally usable on the instrument; yet another reason the effect is a popular tool in the soloist’s arsenal. The tiniest signal can be normalized to the same amplitude of a fierce pick attack, and a trailing note will resonate at the exact same volume until the string stops inducing a signal on the pickup.
Slightly ahead of the curve, in 1980 Ibanez revived its Destroyer as the Destroyer II Series. Indeed, the Destroyer’s “goosebeak” headstock shape would soon become the company’s trademark head. These first Destroyer IIs came in a variety of options and included bolt- and set-neck models that evolved over the next four years. The set-neck models had bound flamed maple tops over mahogany bodies and are exceptionally fine guitars. In ’84, the series introduced the high-end set-neck DT-555 Phil Collen Model, named for the fiery Def Leppard lead guitarist and modeled a little more after the Dean ML that had debuted in ’78, a kind of hybrid of the Explorer and Flying V shapes – basically an Explorer with a V notch in the butt.
There are literally hundreds of potential models we could show you, including a wide range from Martin themselves. But, as an example, we’ve chosen to share this rather attractive number called the Martin 00-18V. This guitar is a great demonstration of the top end of the price range, and features a host of show-stopping additions. Martin has great pedigree in the world of acoustic guitars – more on that later – and the Songwriter Deluxe is a great yardstick against which other dreadnoughts can be measured.
Although the book contains some good information, it is not well written. In particular the use of poor grammar makes reading annoying. There is also incorrect reference to measurement units. She makes reference to measuring 1/32 or 1/64 of a millimeter. A millimeter is metric, measuring 1/32 or 1/64 are fractions of an inch, not a millimeter. I'm glad it was a free book.

Pre-delay on the reverb can help separate it out from the source sound. If your reverb has no controls for pre-delay, you can simulate this using a simple delay on an aux track before the reverb. Decay Settings: Choosing the most appropriate reverb treatment for a song can be surprisingly difficult, especially if you have hundreds of presets to choose from. So, instead of regarding reverb like the glue that holds the mix together, try adjusting its parameters (and in particular the decay time) while listening to the reverb return by itself. If the decay time is too long you'll hear a continuous mush of sound; if it's too short you'll scarcely hear it unless its level is turned right up. Somewhere in the middle you should find a setting that adds rhythmic interest to your song, without overpowering it, making the reverb work for its keep. This is also a useful technique when using several reverbs in a song, to make sure they complement each other. Martin Walker
Flanger – Before digital recording was the standard, a common trick used by artists was to touch one of a tape recorder’s reels to slow it down, then let it go so it would catch up with the main track. The result was a sound that could be subtly thicker or downright unrecognizable, and it’s the effect that flangers are designed to reproduce. You can hear Jimmy Page’s use of a flanger on Nobody’s Fault But Mine and Kashmir, by Led Zeppelin.
It does sound intimidating when you read platitudes like "There is no official rule on how to do it, and you should break the rules and experiment because that's what art is, and you'll invent something new." Some people even tell you to figure it out yourself, which is equally absurd. It developed over decades. No one person is going to just sort it out by themselves over night.
In the fall of 1954, Daniel started production of solidbody guitars for Sears, under the Silvertone name. He also produced the same guitars under the Danelectro name, sold to other jobbers. These early models didn't have truss rods but had a 3/4" square aluminum tube beginning at the peghead and through the body to the bridge. The bodies were constructed of solid Poplar wood. The Silvertone models were covered with a dark maroon vinyl covering, while the Danelectro models were covered in a whitish tweed material. Both lines came with either 1 or 2 pickups, concealed under a baked melamine pickguard. Concentric stacked tone and volume knobs were used on the two pickup models only. Notably, when both pickups were used together, the tone was much stronger. This was due to wiring the pickups in series, instead of parallel like most other maker's two pickup guitars.

When sliding or rolling your amplifier into the boot of your transporting vehicle, ensure that the controls are not damaged. When transporting your combo amp or cabinet, make sure that the face is downward so that the controls are not put under stress. If you cannot transport these face down, it is better to place the combo on its side and not on the castors. If you are a frequent traveler, you might want to invest in a flight case for better protection.
The Squier Vintage Modified Jaguar is a beauty on it’s own. Back in the days the jaguar was used for country music, early rock ‘n roll and jazz, but eventually it has found it’s way onto the stage of surf, funk, alternative, grunge and rock music. The guitar features include a basswood body, maple neck, circuit selector and tone circuit switches, pickup on/off switches, skirted black control knobs (lead circuit) and black disc knobs (rhythm circuit), vintage-style bridge and non-locking floating vibrato with tremolo arm, vintage-style chrome tuners and chrome hardware. A real good guitar for the price. If you want decent and different, this is it!
Fender’s open-back combo tube amps have been used on countless hit records in practically every genre of music in the past half-century. They can deliver both warm bell-like clean tones and gritty overdriven snarls. The Blue Junior III is a relatively inexpensive way to get into Fender tube amps, and it’s the perfect size for studio and small venues.
If you know how to play an E major chord, then you know how to play an A minor chord—just move the chord whole shape over a string. Make sure your first finger is curled, so the open first string rings clearly. Avoid playing the open sixth string when strumming the A minor chord. There are situations when it makes sense to reverse your second and third fingers when playing the A minor chord.
I went to my local guitar store, and tested every one on the wall (under $1,000). I narrowed it down to two (the Ovation acoustic-electric of the same caliber, and this Yamaha FGX800C). In the end I ordered this guitar because of the excellent price on the "package" deal (hard case, strap, tuner, etc.). It sounds fantastic, stays in tune very well, is comfortable to play, and no "buzz". My limit of 4 stars is due to; 1) The strap is garbage...get a new one if you play with a strap. 2) The guitar only has a strap post on the rear of the instrument (it also doubles as the connection for the amplifier cord), and there is none on the front. You have to tie a string ahead of the nut. That gets in the way of the tuning and fingering of
Another way of creating a huge sound is to split the signal from the guitar – most easily achieved via a stompbox with stereo outputs – and send it to two or more amps. All sorts of combinations of sound can be achieved, especially when panning techniques are employed. Of course, each amp can also be multi-mic’d if desired, and some truly three-dimensional results can be obtained. Different effects can be applied to the various amps, while using combinations of clean and dirty amp sounds can be really effective for delivering overdrive with definition, or grit and
I have been playing guitar for over 40 years and purchased Taylor's, Gibsons and Fenders as well as many others. This Godin company understands value and passes that along to its customers. Fine tone when played acoustic or threw an amp. The wood tone and workmanship are awesome for this or any price point. You will not be disappointed with this guitar, it is a great value.
Every guitarist would love to have a place all to themselves to play their heart out, but the reality is that we can't all be so lucky. Family, neighbors and roommates are usually a factor, and they're not as likely as you are to appreciate that you finally nailed that tough passage at two o'clock in the morning. Here's another situation where headphone guitar amps come through for you: since you're the only one hearing it, you can focus on your sound completely. With a headphone amp, there's no more curfew on shredding.
While there is absolutely no reason to go with "standard" if that's not what you prefer for a given instrument, I think it's safe to say that 10s (usually 10-46) are standard, since nearly every string manufacturer that uses such descriptors for their electric sets refers to their 10s as "regular." Ernie Ball Regular SLinky? 10-46. Fender Regular Whatevers? 10-46. D'addario Regular Light (note that there is no other, more REGULAR sounding name)? 10-46. Dean Markley Regular Blue Steels? 10-46...
Replace or upgrade your guitars volume and tone controls with the best quality pots available from CTS, Bourns, Fender, Alpha, Alps and more. From full size to mini pots, long shaft and short shaft pots, blend pots and stacked concentric pots, push/pull pots and more, we have the pot you need! Not sure which pot is right for your project? Then check out the Guitar Electronics FAQ Page for more info on pot values, pot tapers and more.

It has a solid poplar body with a maple neck and rosewood fingerboard, and based on the early reviews of the Epiphone Les Paul SL, the fit, finish and general playability are all pretty good. It’s loaded up with Epiphone’s reliable tune-o-matic bridge, a volume and tone knob, as well as a three-way selector switch to toggle your pickups and dial in tone. The hardware does feel admittedly cheap, but the general consensus is that this guitar ships well-made, well-setup and more than appropriate for a first-time player.
The Dean Custom falls right in the middle-range for guitars under $500. For around $350, this guitar has some great perks such as the Floyd Rose locking tremolo. The beauty of the Floyd Rose is in its ability to keep the guitar in tune even during crazy changes in pitch. Greats like Steve Vai and Eddie Van Halen are just a few notable artists to rock out using the Floyd Rose. With a carved flamed maple top and a lightweight basswood back, this guitar has the looks, the sound, and the ability to keep rocking in tune no matter what you throw at it.

In the earlier days of My Chemical Romance, Iero mainly used Gibson SG's & Epiphone Les Paul guitars (most notably his white Les Paul nicknamed 'Pansy' which proved popular amongst his fans but has since been broken while onstage) and Marshall amps. He has since switched to using Gibson Les Pauls (with the Neck Pick-up removed) and occasionally uses a Gibson SG. He also used a Fender Stratocaster in the Desolation Row video. He has recently collaborated with Epiphone to design the Wilshire Phant-O-Matic guitar which he used onstage for the My Chemical Romance 'World Contamination' Tour, the Honda Civic Tour and for the Reading and Leeds festivals.
You have so many effects on this that you’ll find it difficult to get bored, all of which have been modelled on some of the most iconic sounds in effects pedal history including Boss, Line 6, Electro Harmonix, Z Vex and more. You have a huge amount of distortions, delays, reverbs, modulations, pitch/synth/filters, compressors/limiters, EQs, wahs, and even a looper to sculpt your sound with, all of which have been meticulously modelled to include the subtlest qualities and sound abnormalities that made these effects and their respective pedals so revered.
There is dust or corrosion in the potentiometer behind the knob. You need to turn the volume knob between 1 and 11 over 9000 times to wear the track clean again. . If that does not help taking the electronics tray out of the amp (don't break the wires and don't electrocute yourself) to check if the volume potentiometer has any holes. Using a can of compressed air or non-reactive solvent from an electronics store with the thin nozzle tube supplied, blow or flush out the dust. . If it really annoys you and you can't get rid of it, replacing the potentiometer(s) with new sealed ones will overcome the problem forever. or use standard ones and remember to turn the knobs every week to stop dust from settling. . PS. if it is a high powered amp there will be capacitors inside that can seriously hurt you even when the amp is unplugged.

Generic PC audio cards often don’t have ASIO drivers. However, there is a freeware thing called ASIO4ALL - Universal ASIO Driver that can turn some of the low-level game friendly Windows audio interfaces (WDM streaming) into an ASIO driver, which is better than nothing. So if you’re going to start with your guitar going direct to the PC sound card, get this next.
Welcome to KayBassGuitar.com.  We're a the online Kay Vintage Reissue web site of Rock N Roll Vintage Inc., a Chicago based internationally known vintage guitar dealer.  Kay currently offers the "Street Series" and a "USA Recording Studio" lines.  Kay plans to offer reissues of 12 popular models including the Barney Kessel and the Jazz guitar and bass lines.   The Street Series are authentic reproductions of Classic Kay guitars and basses.   The Recording studio series will offer models with exceptional hand built custom shop quality.  We offer the complete line of Kay Vintage Reissue Basses and Guitars.   These Kay reissue guitars and basses look amazing and play even better.  Currently the Kay K161V Thin Twin and K775V Jazz II guitars and K162V Pro and K5970V Jazz Special basses are available.

The Effect: Flangers belong to the modulation class of effects and are among the most unusual tools you can have as a guitar player. Being similar to phasers, flangers are often the subject of numerous controversies. At the end of the day, this effect is a different kind of beast. One of the best examples of a good flanger is the Electro-Harmonix Stereo Electric Mistress. This pedal was based on an older design that’s credited with pushing flangers to the mainstream. Another thing to know about flangers is that they can make or break your tone. Due to their aggressive nature, one has to be careful how much of this effects they use. It’s easy to get overwhelmed and lost in it.


Stephen Ray Vaughan, known as Stevie Ray Vaughan, was an American musician, singer, songwriter, and record producer. In spite of a short-lived mainstream career spanning seven years, he is widely considered one of the most influential electric guitarists in the history of blues music, and one of the most important figures in the revival of blues in the 1980s. AllMusic describes him as "a rocking powerhouse of a guitarist who gave blues a burst of momentum in the '80s, with influence still felt long after his tragic death." Born and raised in Dallas, Texas, Vaughan began playing guitar at the age of seven, inspired by his older brother Jimmie. In 1971 he dropped out of high school, and moved ...more on Wikipedia

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Over the years, the Gibson Memphis factory has become synonymous with creating some of the most accurate recreations of timeless classics. From the ES-335, ES-345 and ES-355 to the compact magic of the ES-339, the Gibson Memphis factory has built legendary instruments that pay tribute to the vintage masterpieces of yesteryear. To up the ante, the Gibson Memphis factory is now offering Limited Edition runs, showcasing the creative talents of their phenomenal crew, while boldly moving forward into a bright future. From unique models to exclusive colors, features and options, Gibson Memphis Limited Runs are redefining the concept of what makes a Gibson so unique, taking things a step further. With limited availability and an incredible demand for these unique instruments, Gibson Memphis Limited Runs have become highly collectible, sought after instruments with features us unique as the players who own them. Wildwood Guitars is honored to present our selection of these prized instruments to our exceptional customers. We invite you to find your own unique treasure among our inventory, just don’t blink… you might miss it!
Indeed, pros can be picky. Of course, they’ve heard, played and tried out innumerable electric guitars over the years and often have a high standard when it comes to the build, tone, playability and overall quality of the instrument. Many professional guitar players already consider themselves collectors, taking pride in what they have in their guitar arsenal.
7 String 8 String Accessories Acoustic / Electric Guitar Acoustic Guitar Alvarez Amplifier Bass Guitar Blackjack Celebrity Classical Guitar Combo Amp D'Addario DN-2411 Dreadnought ebony Effects Electric Guitar Epiphone Fender Floyd Rose Gigbag Guitar Strap Hard Shell Case Hellraiser Ibanez Jackson Larrivee Les Paul Levy's Leathers Maple Lake New Ovation Refurbished Schecter Schecter Guitar Research Signature Solid Body Solid Top Strings Tacoma Takamine USA Used Wechter

It also comes in a colour that is unique and leaves most other guitars in the dust - their OPB colour, or Open Pore Black finish. It’s a matte black guitar. Matte (or a satin finish) means that you won’t have the grubby finger marks or oil stains that a glossy finish would have. Plus, if you play for a while and your palms get sweaty, this matte finish won’t be slick and slipper - unlike guitars with a glossy finish.
I too have a similar Alvarez made in Japan, 4 digit model no. etc. Mine is a 5059 autumn heringbone model and there is actually a production date on the tag in the sound hole of 1978. The tag is identical to yours as is the headstock logo inlay. Tuners are different however. Based on the similarities to yours I would date it around the same years, '77-'80. I know the model name due to an Alvarez advertisement clipping that depicts the model I have. I too am getting ready to do some much needed TLC to mine as it has been my most loved acoustic for 20 years now. It was a gift from my mother who used it in a country band way back when. These are great guitars that can be bought very cheaply when you can find them. Good luck with the search!
Keyboard players who use subwoofers for on-stage monitoring include electric organ players who use bass pedal keyboards (which go down to a low "C" which is about 33 Hz) and synth bass players who play rumbling sub-bass parts that go as low as 18 Hz. Of all of the keyboard instruments that are amplified onstage, synthesizers produce some of the lowest pitches because, unlike a traditional electric piano or electric organ which have as their lowest notes a low "A" and a low "C", respectively, a synth does not have a fixed lowest octave. A synth player can add lower octaves to a patch by pressing an "octave down" button, which can produce pitches that are at the limits of human hearing.

You asked, and you shall receive, Sonicbids blog readers. Per multiple requests, here's my guide to, "When the hell do I start turning these knobs, and where do they go?" But before we begin, I offer you the fine print: These references are general ideas for where to begin to look for sonic issues with particular sounds, instruments, and voices. I'm not going to tell you "always notch this 9 dB here and add 3 dB here with a wide boost and, voila, perfect sound!" because it's unfortunately just not that simple. So before you message me, "Aaron, I notched out so much 250 Hz out of my snare, I snapped the knob off the console, and it still sounds muddy!" just know that not all sound sources are created equal.
This guitar has a maple neck which is coated with a thin satin finish and has a C-design which is easy for beginners to handle. It features an alder solid body. The vibrato design is enhanced with the addition of block saddles for adding firmness to the tone. They also give a precise breakpoint for the strings. Speaking of pickups, the PAC 112v is equipped with a 5-way blade pickup selector. There are master tone and volume controls for the neatest output. This guitar is available in seven finishes, natural satin, old violin sunburst, raspberry red, sonic blue, black, and silver metal.

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Description: Body: Maple - Body Construction: Semi-Hollow (Chambered) - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25" (64cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Adjustable - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Chrome, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch, Kluson Tuners - Pickups: Harmony - String Instrument Finish: Goldburst, Redburst
The Seagull S6 is another very popular choice for those looking for an affordable but great sounding acoustic. Owners claim it sounds as good as guitars in the $800-$1500 range. The S6 has a cedar top with cherry back and sides. It features a wider nut, which means this guitar will be a great choice for those playing finger style or that have larger hands. Owners of this guitar are singing it’s praises, saying that they have no regrets. The sound of this guitar is big, yet soft. Described as being “alive” with tone. Seagull has been making quality guitars at an affordable price for many years, so the S6 will not disappoint. See more on this guitar here.
So, how to use the tone knob? Open it to get a trebley sound, and roll it off to get a warmer, darker tone. Experiment. Some guitars sound best with the tiniest roll back on the tone knob, some songs require a certain combination of tone and pickup settings to sound best. Try to listen to the John Mayer DVD “Where the Light Is” and try to emulate the guitar tones there using only your pickup selector and knob. He uses different guitars and settings, but a lot of those can be emulated just with your guitar’s controls. Experiment.
We took another detailed look at all acoustic-electric guitars priced under $500 available from major American online retailers, and for this update, we shortlisted 78 of them for closer analysis. We then collated over 7700 ratings and reviews from forums, videos, retailers, blogs and major music gear publications and processed those data with the Gearank Algorithm to produce a Gearank score of out 100 for each guitar. Finally we selected the highest rated guitars in two of the most popular price brackets, sub $300 and sub $500. For more information about this process see How Gearank Works.
This said, the gig bag itself looks like it is top quality, with properly cushioned straps so you can wear it on your back if you need to, making it a great option for carrying it across town or campus. The only thing is, the listing says the guitar is lightweight, but at 16 lbs, some people would not say this is “light.” At least not compared with some of the more inexpensive models in this review list. After all, the back and sides of this instrument are made of mahogany, which is a hard wood. This makes the guitar more durable, but not easy for some to lift.
A difficult effect to explain, the compressor’s value is in it subtle and careful use. A compressor acts like bumpers on your signal's amplitude, preventing the volume from spiking too loud while also preventing the volume from decaying too quickly. Because of this, it increases sustain - which is great for solos - while evening out playing dynamics. Country and funk players use compression heavily to achieve spanky and crisp punctuation within their playing. Compressors will add noise to the signal, so many higher end boxes will have a noise gate feature. Other than making cleans sparkle, you can also front-load your distortion or overdrive to get great clear sustain.

Our private lessons in guitar, bass, keyboards, and drums are available in 30 and 60-minute sessions with flexible scheduling, so you can progress at your own pace. Maybe you'd rather be the instrument - in that case, come learn more about our singing lessons. And those are only scratching the surface of the unique services at Guitar Center Lessons in Fort Worth, which also include jam sessions, recording lessons, group lessons and more. Want to know what it's like to be in a band? Ask us about our Rock Show program, which connects you with other musicians at your skill level to get the full experience.
Since we only want to check how straight the neck is, we need to isolate this aspect of the guitar. In other words we don’t want the height of the nut or the placement of the saddles to confuse us, so we take them out of the equation. Don’t worry; we’re not going to remove any of these components, just circumvent them. I use a ruler to do this, but you can do it using only strings. I’ll describe both methods below.
“You can also think of it as what the signal path in a studio situation would be if you were to plug your guitar directly into the input of your amplifier, and process that sound through outboard effects. You’re not going to have your echo first before going into your distortion boxes—unless you’re looking for a specific sound—because you want the echoes to die out naturally, and not with your distorted sound.”

I have the Epi SG400. It is very playable, and I think the stock PUP's are fine. It is a very versatile guitar. The only thing about the SG is it has a heavy neck. I mean strap one on, and that long neck just tugs down on my left shoulder. I actually tried to sell mine a while back just because of the heavy neck. I added a strap bolt to the top of the horn thing, or whatever you call it, and that helped. Some like the SG310 which is cheaper, but it has a bolt neck, and I think that will translate into an even heavier neck. Rhonda makes some SG clones as well. My only advice would be try straping one around your neck before you buy if you can.


5 Star...So fun...I bought the playstation 4 for my wife for Christmas it came with the game uncharted 4 I'm surprised my wife played it and loved it so when she seen the uncharted the Nathan drake collection it has 1 and 2 and 3 on it she had to have it she started playing it and she loves this game also...great games to have for that special moment when you are in the mood for a journey.Few games have that replay ability when you get to know Drake you just can't put it down great deal great price only problem why I gave it 4 Stars there is no incentive or discount if you have already purchased it for Ps3 and now you would want it for your Ps4 but as I said great deal great story great price
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The final stages of on-board sound-shaping circuitry are the volume control (potentiometer) and tone control (a low-pass filter which "rolls off" the treble frequencies). Where there are individual volume controls for different pickups, and where pickup signals can be combined, they would affect the timbre of the final sound by adjusting the balance between pickups from a straight 50:50.
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