Very disappointed! This was a gift from Santa this morning and the amp failed miserably. Would not work at all. Not with a battery or an adapter(which by the way is not included). Amp started to smell like it was burning/melting even though it showed no power at all. Son is very disappointed to say the least and so is mommy. Only thing he wanted was an electric guitar and he couldn't even enjoy it this morning. How do I explain returning it to Santa...
I have a friend with a cool little music store here in St. Louis. I pop in from time to time since he always has a great selection of vintage lap steels, as well as an ever-changing assortment of oddball pieces to check out. As I was on my way out the door after one of my most recent visits, I spotted an early 80s Harmony “Flying V,” and immediately stopped in my tracks.
The golden question is: What is the difference between acoustic and electric guitars. The primary difference between the two types of guitars is that acoustic guitars produces sound entirely through vibration. Its sound is emitted through the vibration of the string when it’s plucked back and forth. Electric guitars, on the other hand, are powered through electricity and electromagnetism generated through its components are what drives the sounds that come out of it.
The other switches you might find on a guitar can change the wiring of the pickups from being in series or parallel , or to switch the phase so the pickups are in phase, or out of phase. All the switches are there to allow you to change the tone of the guitar.  Those switches can be toggle switches, or push-pull switches built into the volume or tone control knobs.
Strumming Patterns: Rhythmic strumming patterns are rarely coupled with delay.Chords: In some cases, swelling chords that are strummed once can work well with a delay effect, but generally this is avoided in favor of a less-saturating effect, perhaps a kind of light modulation.Short Arpeggios: A five to 10 note arpeggio is the perfect spot to dial in a smooth delay to help fill in the sound.Quick Solos: Speedier solos can work with delay and make sense, but the faster you’re playing, the harder it is to get delay to sound clean and not muddy.
GREAT PICK YOU DEFINITELY WONT BE DISAPPOINTED!! If you are going to want brighter more crisp tone in the mids and treble go with extra light string, for warmth light strings. Always keep in mind the following WELL known facts: strings DO MAKE A BIG DIFFERENCE ON ANY ACOUSTIC GUITAR. USE LIGHTER GAUGE STRINGS. for more of a sleepy tone like gravedigger by Dave Matthews use medium gauge. typically you want a SOLID WOOD guitar! They just give you that full bright sound all players want in a good guitar. Indian rosewood back and sides with solid usually solid Sitka spruce top rosewood is the fret board preference the 214 series and up are the best for the price. I know you will absolutely LOVE the Taylor. I am a huge fan of the grand auditorium series on all acoustics they are much lighter and more comfortable to play. They also are the most versatile among many different genres. Unlike martins although with the right model woods and strings they still don't stack up to a Taylor
Every ZZ Top tour is a treat for guitar geeks, as Gibbons uses the occasions to unveil a six-string surprise. (Last year it was an elusive Gibson Moderne.) But what really makes Gibbons cool is a certain undefinable quality called “vibe.” Anyone who has ever met Billy and gotten to know him—however briefly—has an outrageous story to tell about the encounter.
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Air Norton
DP193
The Air Norton started out simply to be the Airbucker version of the Norton. DiMarzio thought it would make a distinctive-sounding bridge pickup with high-gain amps, but they soon discovered that it's a radically neat neck pickup, too. The tone is deep and warm, but not muddy. It's hot, but not distorted. It's even got cool harmonics, which are really unusual for a neck humbucker. The patented Air Norton magnetic structure reduces string-pull, so sustain is improved; and pick attack and dynamics are tremendously controllable and expressive. Combine the Air Norton with The Tone Zone in the bridge position for a perfect blend of power and tone.

The Tone Zone
DP155
Have you ever heard a bridge pickup that made a guitar sound like a giant mosquito attack? If you've run into this problem, The Tone Zone is the solution. The Tone Zone is hot enough to qualify as a high-output pickup, but it has a wider dynamic range - hard picking will produce a lot of power, and softer picking will be much cleaner and quieter. It's got tremendous bass and low-mid response to reinforce the bottom end and make the overall sound bigger. The highest single notes have depth, and chords sound huge. Patented dual-resonance coils reproduce more overtones than you'd expect from such a fat-sounding pickup. It makes a great match with an Air Norton.

Case sold separately.
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Firstly, they are cheaper than their tube counterparts, which is why most beginners will end up starting on a solid-state amp. They are also much more efficient, easier to maintain (no need to change tubes), lighter to carry, and less fragile. While the tone of modern-day solid-state amps can be incredible, they don’t tend to be as fluid or responsive as tube amps. For more on solid-state amps, check out our dedicated solid-state amp page.
There’s also the line of self-tuning “robot” guitars that Gibson spent more than a decade and millions of dollars developing. In 2015, Juszkiewicz made the feature standard on most new guitars. Sales dropped so dramatically, as players and collectors questioned the added cost and value, that Gibson told dealers to slash prices. The company then abandoned making self-tuners a standard feature. You can still buy them — they call them “G Force” — but they’re now simply an add-on option.
BTW, Superstition is not played on synth but clavinet, a stringed keyboard instrument with magnetic pickups that are, in this song, actually used like two guitar single coils. — I quite agree with all your arguments, however I prefer HSS on a strat-like guitar as it doesn't have the too-muddy-neck-humbucker problem. On a Les Paul or Tele, a neck humbucker is much more useful of course. – leftaroundabout Jun 24 '14 at 23:28
So what is the point of getting a small guitar amp? I mean you can get a whole lot of sound out of a medium sized amp without all of the sound issues that the small amps have. And yeah they are more ungainly and harder to lug around, but at least they have the sound and power required to handle a live performance and even band practice. Plus you can turn down the sound and practice at home just as well, right?’
I string up the guitar and tune it to standard pitch. Put the guitar in playing position and capo the first fret. I hold the 6th string down at the last fret as that is where the neck joins the body. Then I turn truss rod right (clockwise) until there is no relief hardly if any bounce at the 7th and 9th frets using the 6th string as straight edge, don't go too far just maybe a slight tiny bounce because you don't want to backbow the neck. Then I simply turn the truss rod left counterclockwise 1/4 of a turn for relief and that's it. Take capo off and set action at 12th fret with 6th string 5/64 and 1st string 3/64.
How is PRS 12? Most pro's have switched from Gibson to PRS, or from any brand to PRS for that matter. Go to any guitar store and put ANY PRS against any high end guitar and see for yourself. "Ibanhad" should be taken off this list, and all these 3rd rate walmart brands should be removed as well. How are there brands on the bottom of this list that don't even produce guitars?
So, we’re just over £100 here with the Fender Mustang I V2 Guitar Amplifier Combo, but we had to include the new version of the world's best-selling amplifier series. At just over £100 you get 18 amp models, 37 effects, and 24 onboard factory and user presets – which is a lot of features for such a small price tag, definitely making it one of the best cheap amps money can buy. With 20 watts of power at your disposal pumping out through an 8" Fender Special Design speaker, it won’t blow the windows out, but it will certainly stand up on its own on stage and when used in a rehearsal or practice situation.
I love squire guitars because they are cheap and affordable. I love the fact that I now have a stratocaster so if you think that they suck think again. I can play under the bridge and scar tissue etc on my squire stratocaster honestly for those that can't afford a fender this is the best thing that has ever happened to me because I can now play an electric guitar which is not only good but it is brilliant
Bass players who do not have a combo amp who are playing live shows can connect their bass to a DI unit and from there to the PA system. In a well-equipped nightclub or music bar, the audio engineer can then route the bass signal to a stage monitor suitable for bass, so the bass player and band can hear the bass tone. Some standalone bass preamplifier pedals have a DI output, so this output can similarly be connected to a PA system. Bass players who are playing in small venues (coffeehouses, small pubs, etc.) will typically need to bring their own bass combo amp (or an alternative amp, such as a keyboard amp combo), because very small venues often have a very small, low-powered PA system which is used mainly for vocals. Some small venues do not have monitor speakers, or they have only one, in front of the lead vocalist. Bass players who do not have a combo amp who are laying down tracks in the recording studio can plug into a DI unit (any professional recording studio will have one), which is connected to the audio console; the audio engineer can provide the bassist with the sound of their instrument through headphones.
Our congratulations and deepest thanks on making Ibanez your choice of instrument. Ibanez standards are second to none. All Ibanez instruments are set up to our strict quality control standards before shipping. The purpose of this manual is to explain how to maintain your instrument’s finish and to keep your guitar playing as well as it did when it...
The Hal Leonard Bagpipe Method is designed for anyone just learning to play the Great Highland bagpipes. This comprehensive and easy-to-use beginner's guide serves as an introduction to the bagpipe chanter. The accompanying DVD includes video lessons with demonstrations of all the examples in the book! Lessons include: the practice chanter, the Great Highland Bagpipe scale, bagpipe notation, proper technique, grace-noting, embellishments, playing and practice tips, traditional tunes, buying a bagpipe, and much more!.

A 100-watt stack is overkill if you live in an apartment and need an amp only for home recording. Conversely, a 10-watt combo is woefully inadequate if you play in a band with a drummer named Thunder Fist. Choose an amp that’s right for your primary application. You’ll need at least 30 watts for playing live with a rock band, but smaller amps often provide surprisingly huge sounds in the studio—just ask Jimmy Page. Also, as a rule of thumb, if you're playing out often, you might want to shoot for at least 15 watts of tube tone.
Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 22 - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: ABR-1 - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Nickel, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - Guitar Features: Pickguard - String Instrument Finish: Various
Type – the dielectric used in the capacitor. Polyester and polypropylene are most common, with ceramic capacitors also being popular, especially in lower-end instruments. Reissues of vintage instruments often use reproductions of vintage paper capacitors, which are also popular aftermarket replacements. Finally, audiophile-grade polypropylene film and foil capacitors are sometimes used in custom instruments, although their size can prove problematic as they're designed for use in audio amplifiers and consequently have working voltages in excess of 500 V, far higher than anything encountered inside an electric guitar.[16]
Some bonehead really put the WRONG pickups in a guitar you just bought. So you bought a sweet vintage Strat from a guy who put P-Rails in it because now it can get "any tone".  He failed to mention that all of those tones kinda suck.  Hey, you just want a great sounding STRAT!  Drop in the right vintage Strat pickups and you'll be there baby'.  Then off-load those jack-of-all-trades tone-suckers to some idiot who actually believes one weird pickup can nail EVERYTHING.

Kasuga produced their own house brand in Kasuga guitars. For a brief period of time the company produced Yamaha acoustic guitars. Kasuga guitars were first sold in America in 1972. Unlike many Japanese manufacturers who outsourced their guitar production in other factories outside the main maker, Kasuga produced all their products in-house. Badged guitars known to have been made by Kasuga include Conrad, Emperador, ES-S, Ganson, Heerby, Hondo, Mei Mei and Roland. Kasuga went out of business in 1996.
I'm unsure if this company existed or not, but since many major electronics manufacturers jumped into the electric guitar market in the 1970s, it seems reasonable that Hitachi could have ventured briefly into guitar production. A seller of the badged guitar "Splender" claims it was made by this company. Yet another seller claims the badge Slendon was made by this company.

The Canadian firm Godwin is another popular name for producing best quality electric and acoustic guitars. (Have you heard of Seagull acoustic guitars? It’s the same brand.) Godwin outshines among the world of guitars due to producing high-end instruments with surprising variations. They even manage to touch bass too. Not only the Godwin guitars depict quality, but also reflect classiness.
“William Kraus, who uses the logo (in highly stylized abalone) “WK” in which both the W and the K seem to be mating or something, is a maker of extremely fine sounding, beautifully hand-crafted guitars, in the traditional design of the great dreadnoughts of the past. This one, however, exceeds all expectations of excellence and beauty in that it has a Honduran rosewood back, sides and headstock overlay. About Honduran Rosewood, according to the website “globaltrees” (edited): Honduran Rosewood is a valuable timber species. Honduran rosewood – a/k/a Dalbergia stevensonii is known only from Belize, Guatemala and southern Mexico. Its valuable rosewood timber is highly sought after for quality products including musical instruments, turnery and carving. Honduran rosewood is reportedly the best wood for marimba and xylophone keys and it has been suggested as an acceptable substitute in guitars for Brazilian rosewood – Dalbergia Nigra — (international trade in which is now banned under CITES). Because it is a Dalbergia, like Brazilian, it sounds absolutely unbelievable!”

This has always been one of the most revered brands of guitars amongst professional musicians. They sell one of the most affordable and durable electric guitars. The acoustic and classic guitars sold by this brand are ideal for students and beginners. The dreadnought sized body with cutaway has a Sitka spruce top with nato back & sides. The neck has 20 frets & dot inlays on the fretboard and made of nato. The bridge and fingerboard are made of rosewood. Yamaha’s own System55T. The starting price of a Yamaha acoustic 6-string guitar is 6990 INR.approximately.
The inlays are the little shapes that are installed in the instruments neck/fretboard. Inlays do not make a significant difference in the sound of the instrument. They come in various shapes and materials. Inlays allow a player to quickly see where certain positions are located on the fretboard. They are also a great way to decorate, or personalize an instrument. Choose among our existing inlays designs, or send us a drawing of your own designs. Some popular inlay designs are band logos, initials, corporate brand logos, or tribal designs.
Effects can be connected via insert points, or the effect send and return loop that is included in most consoles and DAWs (Digital Audio Workstations). When effects are used in the send/return loop, their Mix control should be set to 100 percent wet, so you add back only effected sound to the dry sound, which comes directly through the mixer channel.
The Hi Flyer was a thin-bodied reverse Strat-type with a German carve around the top, almost always seen in sunburst. This was identical to the Aria 1702T. The bolt-on neck had a three-and-three castle head, plastic logo, string retainer bar, zero fret, 22-fret rosewood with large dot inlays. A white-black-white pickguard carried volume, tone and three-way. Two black-covered single-coil pickups were top-mounted, the neck slanted back like on a Mosrite, with six flat non-adjustable exposed poles in the center. An adjustable finetune bridge with round saddles sat in front of a Jazzmaster-style vibrato. The plastic logo was still in use in 1971, though gone was the string retainer, replaced by a pair of little string trees. Dots had gotten smaller by ’71, and the Hi Flyer was available in three finishes – orange sunburst (U1800), black (U1801) and white (U1802). The Hi Flyer listed for $82.50 (plus $12 for case) in ’71.
OK some people will know this already but let’s just be clear about switch terminology. A switch as you see it on the bench in front of you will often be a set of switches, mechanically connected within a single assembly. Wikipedia explains. The important thing to remember is the number of ‘poles’ is the number of switches that you have ganged together off a single lever in the component and the ‘throw’ or ‘way’ part describes how those switches operate.

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Yamaha is famous Japanese Company known for producing an extensive range of musical instruments. It has caught the attention of the beginners and intermediate guitar players due to its budget-friendly product prices. Thus, it is the excellent choice for those who are going to have a first experience of buying any guitar. They can indeed get a good deal without costing a fortune. It is also suitable for Acoustic players. Yamaha continuously produces high-quality instruments that are unconquerable when it comes to the material or even sound quality.
Electri6ity is frequently compared to Musiclab’s real electric guitar line as they came out around the same time, and while Musiclab delivers better quality in most aspects, you only have one guitar per VST - where Electri6ity has eight. However,  while Electri6ity will give you twice as many guitars for the price, Musiclab continues to update their Real line, now blowing Electri6ity out of the water.
it is four solders on a guitar on say a les paul needs electricty so two wires pass the electricity through the other two wires are for your pickups the pickups electricity goes through the wires of them , into a potentiometer which is the technical name for the thing under the knob (or two depending on the guitars wiring) .... than into the 3 way and than finally passes out of the guitar and into an amp , pedal or tuner
I think this is one of the better done tests. Any musical instrument is subjective, so there is no “this one sounds ‘better’”, but having an understanding of how individual components interact in the overall sound is important in a luthier. Too often players are too quick to label one guitar as sounding “good” or “bad” instead of quantifying what characteristics they do or don’t like. Building this sonic vocabulary helps a musician work their way towards their ideal instrument instead of haphazard trial and error.
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We don’t have many cutaway styles or Jose Ramirez guitars in our review list, but this is one of them, and it just happens to be a “hybrid,” or a classical guitar with an electronic pickup. Handcrafted in Spain, the 4NCWE model is a cedar-top with Indian rosewood on the back and sides. Like the other Ramirez guitars we have listed, this comes with a hard-shell case, so you won’t have to worry about the guitar being broken in transit.
Tube Is Probably Not The Way To Go – Don’t get me wrong, I am a fan of tube amps. There are a lot of great things about them, but in most cases, tube amps are a lot more expensive than solid-state amps. They are also harder to maintain and keep working. While you might want the tone of a tube amplifier, a chance is you can’t afford it as a beginner and neither do you have to afford it. As a beginner, at least I, did not have enough skills to make full use of tube amps so why spend money on a model that you cannot fully make use of? Apart from that, solid-state, especially practice ones are renowned for their durability. Whether you play it for hours on end or have a small accident you probably won’t damage it (unless you really try).

and i dont know how the new ones are, but the only ones, though called AD3000, they weren't like the other 3000 series guitars Agile offered. back then, they came with maple necks. they also came with 3 or 4 piece bodies, while AL3000/3100 etc came with 2. this came with a matching headstock, which only the 4000 series offered....so its almost as if the AD3000 was a missing link between the different series of guitars....

I'm sorry to disagree Merlin, but the woods used really do make a big difference to the sound of a solid body guitar. Both the neck and body are resonators, the string energy drives the woods which damp some frequencies and use that energy to emphasise the resonant frequencies. That drives the string's vibration through the bridge/nut/fretboard. It's a feedback loop.
Amplifiers for electric guitars are more likely than bass amps to have multiple "channels", but some bass amps also have channels. By providing two or more "channels", each with its own gain, equalization and volume knobs, a bassist can preset various settings (e.g., an accompaniment setting for playing a backing part and a solo bass setting for playing a bass solo). In a heavy metal band, a bassist may use a multi-channel amp to have one setting with an aggressive overdrive, while another channel has a "clean" sound for ballads.

Not something you have to think about with an acoustic guitar, the electrics in an electro acoustic are quite important, though not as critical as with an electric guitar. You’ll want to make sure that you’re getting a good quality pickup and preamp, and then the next thing to consider will be features. Preamps often come with EQ adjustment to alter the tone slightly, and some will even come with certain effects that you can add on. Builtin tuners are a common addition too which mean you don’t need a separate tuning box.

Practice amps often have an auxiliary line-in jack, so that the bassist can plug in a recorded music signal (often via an 1/8" jack), to practice along with a recording. The line-in jack can also be used to plug a drum machine into the amp, also for practice purposes. Some practice amps have a level control knob for the line-in input. Practice amps often have a headphone jack, with a feature that turns off the power amplifier when headphones are connected. This feature enables bassists to practice silently at night, to avoid disturbing others in adjoining rooms or apartments. Higher-priced practice amps aimed at pro bassists may have a DI out jack, so that the amp's preamplifier signal can be connected directly to a mixing board for a live show's sound reinforcement system or for a sound recording session. DI out-equipped units effectively turn the practice amp into a preamplifier unit.
Now, let’s get to the amplifier. If you’re a traditionalist, this means you aren’t using some kind of high fidelity audio reproduction system to expose that weak signal for the anemic, naked thing that your tone really is at this point. You’re like the rest of us, depending on that signal working with a classic tube guitar amp to shape your sound and help you get awesome and loud. Well, that amp has got a host of things going on. The signal hits the high-impedance input and visits the preamplifier. See, the “natural” sound coming straight from our guitars, as big and tough and old school special as we might think think it is, really isn’t strong enough to directly power the power amplifier. It’s depending on a series of fairly intricate pre-amplifer gain stages to give the Popeye signal the spinach it needs before any filtering or equalization (oh, they don’t use them? Really? What do those knobs marked ‘bass’ and ‘treble’ say? Just because someone leaves them at “5” doesn’t mean they aren’t in use). It then may visit a phase inverter before hitting the tube power amp section, which finally gives you the high current signal to cause those speakers to go back and forth.
Sennheiser's cardioid MD421 crops up almost as frequently in interviews, and has a wider frequency response, none of the low mid-range suckout, and an even heftier sensitivity boost upwards of 1kHz. This microphone also has a larger diaphragm than the SM57, and the off-axis response anomalies of the larger diaphragm, in particular, give a different character to the sound. Although obviously very popular, this mic seems more often to be used in combination with other mics than on its own.
This is a right handed 2018 Gibson Custom Shop Explorer, Extra/Elbow Cut, with a heavy aged relicing, Natural Finish, Gold plated Nickel hardware. This model is patterned after the 1958 Explorer owned by Eric Clapton. It is brand new with OHSC, COA, and all paperwork/tags. The weight is light at only 7 lbs, 12 oz. This is only one of a limited run of 5 in the Natural Finish. I also have the same guitar in Cherry finish, one of only 5 in the Cherry finish.
But not everyone hated the album. Pete Cosey was later told by Hendrix's valet that before he would perform live, he'd listen to "Herbert Harper" for inspiration. In the '70's, when Marshall Chess went to visit the Rolling Stones rehearsal space, he saw a poster on the wall for the Electric Mud album. Led Zeppelin's bassist John Paul Jones cites Electric Mud as the inspiration for the basic riff behind "Black Dog." Marshall Chess also notes "the English accepted it; they are more eccentric." Strangely enough, rapper Chuck D of Public Enemy has emerged over the years as the biggest supporter of the record, stating "To me, it's a brilliant record. I've played it a thousand times." Chuck D also explained part of the intent of the record saying "It took me a while to warm up to traditional blues, but what struck me right away was the Electric Mud thing." Based on the success of Electric Mud, another blues musician on Chess, Howlin Wolf, was forced into recording a psych record. This Is Howlin Wolf's New Album (subtitled And He Doesn't Like It) (1969) isn't as good as Electric Mud although it did yield a minor hit with a psyched out version of "Evil." Chubby Checker even released a psych record (Chequered (1971)) that sounds better than you'd expect, though it only came out in England.

Looking for Used Gear? You may have just discovered your future. Music Go Round franchisees started out as customers of our stores. They have a love of music, they love gear and they understand the industry. Most importantly they’ve taken their passion and turned it into a business they’re proud of which is an asset to the music scene in their community. Who wouldn’t want to own a business where every day they were doing what they truly love? Sound interesting?
During World War II, instrument manufacturing at Gibson slowed due to shortages of wood and metal, and Gibson began manufacturing wood and metal parts for the military. Between 1942-1945, Gibson employed women to manufacture guitars. "Women produced nearly 25,000 guitars during World War II yet Gibson denied ever building instruments over this period," according to a 2013 history of the company. Gibson folklore has also claimed its guitars were made by "seasoned craftsmen" who were "too old for war."[13][14]

Overall length is 28 1/2 in. (72.4 cm.), 10 in. (25.4 cm.) width, and 1 5/8 in. (4.1 cm.) in depth, measured at side of rim. Scale length is 15 1/4 in. (387 mm.). Width of nut is 1 3/4 in. (44 mm.). All original and complete, and quite clean overall; there are a few small dings to the finish and some light checking-almost inevitable on the Eko-made Vox instruments. The only notable finish marring is one spot where a superglue repair to a cracked pickguard corner left a bit of residue behind. A very nice little player, with an awful lot of chime! Excellent - Condition.
The Red Hot Chili Peppers always knew how to rock a party; it took John Frusciante to turn them into an arena-packing band with a sound they could call their own. Frusciante is a remarkably elastic stylist and a gifted sculptural arranger who pushed the Chilis to explore new worlds without getting in the way of their funk-pumped energy; he beefed up their sound with both well-placed fire (the volcanic, Hendrix-style solo on “Dani California”) and remarkable elegance (the indelible opening chords of “Under the Bridge”).
I have $100 guitars that play and sound great. I have $15,000 guitars that play and sound great. That said, a great middle of the road guitar that won't break the bank is an Epiphone Masterbilt. I find them to sound remarkable AND play great, ESPECIALLY for the money. I like buying guitars used and save about half from the retailers. A good used Masterbilt will cost about $300 on Ebay or Craigslist.

But how do you find a guitar master? It's not like he's listed in the phone book under "Guitar Master," although you can buy a Guitar Master Certificate for $10,080 from the Berklee College of Music. (Let me know how that goes.) And when you do find one, how do you know he can handle the job, making the right repair in the shortest amount of time? A guitar master must know how to diagnosis the problem when the only explanation he's offered involves slurring through a mouthful of tears, or an, "Oh, my bad, man, do you think you can fix her by tomorrow?"
Guitarists don’t have to just look on in envy as pianists lead the holiday sing-a-longs this Christmas. Our selection of holiday Guitar Tabs include traditional classics we all love like “O Holy Night” and “Carol of the Bells” and the pop favorites that just wouldn’t be the same without a guitar, like “Jingle Bell Rock” and “Happy Xmas (War is Over)” by John Lennon. But if you just can’t get enough of those traditional Christmas classics, you can pick up our collection of ’Christmas Favorites for Guitar.’
The tricky little lead lines with which she peppers St. Vincent’s already impressively broad catalog hint at Annie Clark’s almost casual mastery, but her true genius lies in the way she treats the guitar as a dynamic sound source rather than a static instrument. In her hands, and within a tautly complex compositional framework, the guitar sounds limitless, capable of screaming, squalling, soaring, and crying — as if Hendrix were sitting in with a downtown art-rock band.

Some solid-bodied guitars, such as the Gibson Les Paul Supreme, the PRS Singlecut or the Fender Telecaster Thinline, among others, are built with hollows in the body. These hollows are designed specifically not to interfere with the critical bridge and string anchor point on the solid body. The motivation for this can be to reduce weight, to achieve a semi-hollow tone, or both.

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