But in general, there's nothing wrong with Decca electric guitars, especially for indie musicians today who are looking for a vintage guitar with some character to it. Since most vintage guitar fans have seen every model that Gibson, Fender, et al, have ever made, many of the Japanese guitars of the '60s have a fresh look that stands out from the crowds. In 20 years, the M-i-J electric guitars of the '60s are going to be worth 4 or 5 times what they sell for now, and smart collectors who either can't afford Fenders, Gibsons and their ilk from that period, or who are interested in something more unusual, are already snapping them up.
Today’s beginner guitars are far superior to the hunk of wood with strings I started with, and now there is a huge array of instruments to choose from. In fact, I’d go so far as to say if you only intend to play guitar for fun you’ll never need to spend another dime on gear beyond your starter setup, if you don’t want to. (Except for things like strings and picks, of course.) That definitely wasn’t true thirty years ago.
I work out of my home shop in Idaho Falls, Idaho. I do repairs for clients and guitar shops all over the United States. I’d love to help you repair or restore your guitar. Repair prices are based on a rate of $60 per hour. These prices apply to guitars in otherwise good working order. Your repair may vary depending on the condition of your guitar and the specifics of the work needed. Please contact me using the contact page if you have a repair that you would like to discuss. Consultations are always free.
In the late 50s, McCarty knew that Gibson was seen as a traditional company and began an effort to create more modern guitars. In 1961 the body design of the Les Paul was changed due to the demand for a double-cutaway body design.[17] The new body design then became known as the SG (for "solid guitar"), due to disapproval from Les Paul himself. The Les Paul returned to the Gibson catalog in 1968.
Matthias Karl Hohner, son of Dipl.-Ing. Matthias Hohner and a direct descendant in fourth generation and name bearer of the founder Matthias Hohner, was one of the last members of the Hohner dynasty involved in managing the family business, between 1968 and 1986. His son Matthias Francisco Hohner belonged to the first generation of direct descendants who did not enter into the family business. Many direct descendants of the founder are still active as members of the "Deutsches Harmonika Museum" and the "Hohner'sche Familienverein".
While the general purpose is to emulate classic "warm-tube" sounds, distortion pedals such as the ones in this list can be distinguished from overdrive pedals in that the intent is to provide players with instant access to the sound of a high-gain Marshall amplifier such as the JCM800 pushed past the point of tonal breakup and into the range of tonal distortion known to electric guitarists as "saturated gain." Although most distortion devices use solid-state circuitry, some "tube distortion" pedals are designed with preamplifier vacuum tubes. In some cases, tube distortion pedals use power tubes or a preamp tube used as a power tube driving a built-in "dummy load." Distortion pedals designed specifically for bass guitar are also available. Some distortion pedals include:
You might recognise this in the tone knob above. The only difference is that R11 is a variable resitance from 0 to 250 Kohm, and C4 is a fixed value. Several guitars have several combinations of R11 and and C4 to achieve different cut-off points. When R11 is 100% position, the resistance is maximised, so there is little incentive for eelctrical current to flow to C4. The signal is not affected as much.
Alan Parsons: "I always use condenser mics on a guitar amp, never dynamics — they're too telephoney. That's an unfair expression for a very good dynamic mic, but by comparison to a condenser, you're not going to get the bottom end." While this stance is more hard-line than that of most engineers, condenser mics are, of course, regularly used for recording electric guitars. However, in practice they rarely seem to be used on their own and are very often lined up alongside the trusty SM57.
Squier model Telecasters are sold by Squier, a Fender-owned import brand. These can bear the Telecaster name, since Squier is owned by Fender. Squier guitars, especially the Telecasters, have gained popularity[citation needed] and a good reputation amongst guitar players,since it has expanded its production of guitar models.For example a 1989 Korean Squier Telecaster made in the Samick factory could be considered tonally superior[citation needed] to a modern American produced guitar besides necks being more comfortable in general.Template:Citation neede Squier has a wide range of different Telecaster type guitars available, from the entry-level Affinity Series to the better quality Standard and Classic Vibe Series. However, Standards are often used by beginners. Also available are the Artist Series and Vintage Modified Series. Among other famous musicians, Sheryl Crow has occasionally used a Squier Telecaster for recordings and live performances.[4][dead link]
There’s a common belief that certain strings are better for beginners than others. While nylon strings can be easier on beginner’s fingers, the main thing that matters when it comes to guitar strings is the style of music you are planning to play, because the difference in feel and sound between the two materials is significant – even for a beginner.
Finally, you’ll want to make sure you have the accessories you need to get up and playing fast. A strap, spare strings (they do break from time to time), and some plectrums are all essentials – and don’t forget an amplifier! You’ll also want a case (preferably hardshell, but soft and padded will do) to store and transport your guitar, and an electric tuner to keep it sounding good. These can all be picked up from your local guitar store, although if you are starting from scratch, you may want to consider a combo kit, which usually offer good value and convenience.
{"eVar4":"shop: pro audio","eVar5":"shop: pro audio: signal processors","pageName":"[gc] shop: pro audio: signal processors: multi effects processors","reportSuiteIds":"guitarcenterprod","eVar3":"shop","prop2":"[gc] shop: pro audio: signal processors","prop1":"[gc] shop: pro audio","evar51":"default: united states","prop10":"category","prop11":"multi effects processors","prop5":"[gc] shop: pro audio: signal processors: multi effects processors","prop6":"[gc] shop: pro audio: signal processors: multi effects processors","prop3":"[gc] shop: pro audio: signal processors: multi effects processors","prop4":"[gc] shop: pro audio: signal processors: multi effects processors","channel":"[gc] shop","linkInternalFilters":"javascript:,guitarcenter.com","prop7":"[gc] sub category2"}
Im sure are techs at these stores that aren't bad AT ALL, but when you don't know who they are, I wouldn't trust them with a truss rod while you're not there standing over trheir shoulder watching them. I may just be paranoid, but hey, better safe than sorry is the way I look at it. I've done my own setups. And I plan to keep doing it until the day comes when I order myself a custom bass that I worked my ass off for, then I'll be willing to spend $50 on a 'properly' done setup. I dunno

The Marshall Mini Jubilee 2525C Combo amp is closely based on the highly-coveted Marshall Jubilee series of amps. The powerful preamp has been designed to the specifications of the original 2525 Silver Jubilee diagrams, making this an authentic reproduction of these now out-of-production monsters of rock. Don’t let this little beast fool you though, the ECC83 & EL34 valve set produces some seriously loud sounds through the single 12” Celestion G12M–25 Greenback speaker. Perfect for lead and rhythm, this great combo amp is ideal for both stage and studio!
Here we have a well preserved vintage Hohner HW600n HW for Hohner Western Acoustic Dreadnought Martin D35 Style acoustic guitar. with a gorgeously grained THREE Piece Mahogany back and sides WoW its really a beauty. Workmanship Fit and finish quality is excellent this guitar is stunning, previously set up and is Great sounding in near mint like condition its from the late 80’s early 90’s D35 Look alike, Spruce top with Mahogany Neck and some of the absolutely highest grade Mahogany your going to see its flamed and figured and has fire and looks as if it could be Koa but listed as Mahogany at any rate this is one of the nicest models Hohner in this era truly a stunner,,, its in top structural shape as well its neck angle is excellent at 1-11/16ths at the nut its medium profile neck is very easily played and is a convertible c shape… We were impressed with her sound to with nice volume and a mature sounding tone. We think you’ll like this beautiful Vintage Hohner as well we believe this to be late 1980’s to early 90’s made in Korea and would fool any made in Japan fan for its fit and finish workmanship this is a good vintage guitar in its own right… no cracks no repairs no issues no excuses someone is going to have a smile on their face. any questions or to buy this guitar contact Joe at: JVGuitars@gmail.com .
{"eVar4":"vintage: guitars","eVar5":"vintage: guitars: electric guitars","pageName":"[gc] vintage: guitars: electric guitars: kent","reportSuiteIds":"guitarcenterprod","eVar3":"vintage","prop2":"[gc] vintage: guitars: electric guitars","prop1":"[gc] vintage: guitars","evar51":"default: united states","prop10":"brands","prop11":"kent","prop5":"[gc] vintage: guitars: electric guitars","prop6":"[gc] vintage: guitars: electric guitars","prop3":"[gc] vintage: guitars: electric guitars","prop4":"[gc] vintage: guitars: electric guitars","channel":"[gc] vintage","linkInternalFilters":"javascript:,guitarcenter.com","prop7":"[gc] vintage"}
Our first impression of this guitar was that something must be wrong. Surely this guitar is way more expensive than we thought? We doublechecked and the truth is that it’s just incredible value for money. Both the design and the sound are wonderfully good and we understand why Schecter describe their Schecter Hellraiser guitars as having “raised the bar on sight, sound, quality and affordability”- we totally agree!
Kent made a lot of "student model" instruments in the 1960's. I have always found most of the guitars to be quite playable but overall, the general guitar public in my area seemed to have a low opinion of them. I recently bought a solid body one pick-up, with case, that I practise on a lot. In fact, at a recording session I was using my Gibson Lespaul and the producer was complaining about the sound of it, so the next day I brought in my Kent and he loved it, it's on two songs on the CD we were working on!
Proceed to the next two chords. The next chord you would play would be a power chord on the fifth fret of A three times. So you would play with your index finger on the fifth fret of A, your middle finger on the seventh fret of D, and your ring finger on the seventh fret of G. Then, simply shift this finger shape down one string so that your index finger is on the fifth fret of the E string with your other fingers on the seventh frets of the A and D strings. Play the chords in the sequence that they're highlighted with parentheses below:
Further simplifications occur for the regular tunings that are repetitive, that is, which repeat their strings. For example, the E-G♯-c-e-g♯-c' M3 tuning repeats its octave after every two strings. Such repetition further simplifies the learning of chords and improvisation;[71] This repetition results in two copies of the three open-strings' notes, each in a different octave. Similarly, the B-F-B-F-B-F augmented-fourths tuning repeats itself after one string.[73]
PRS scale length falls between Fender and Gibson at 25 inches. These are typically set-neck guitars, often with carved tops. This style is a nice alternative for players who are looking for a middle ground between the warmth and resonance of a Les Paul and the tighter feel of a Strat. You’ll also see a lot of guitars that have that PRS look but are built to a different scale length.


Based on the MaxxFly body style, this guitar features a 22-fret rosewood fingerboard, a maple neck, and to top it all off, has a mahogany body. Possibly the best part of this guitar is that it comes equipped with Graphtech Ghost piezo pickups. These pickups turn your guitar into a full-blown midi instrument. You can learn more about the Graphtech Ghost pickups and other awesome guitar innovations at GraphTech’s site. Expect to pay slightly under $500 for this guitar. 

Guitar pedals, sometimes called effects pedals, provide an easy and effective way to modulate your electric guitar's tone. The order of your pedals well ensure the best tone, but what tone that is depends on your personal preference. While there are basic guidelines, there's really no right or wrong way to order your pedals. To set up guitar pedals, learn the basic guidelines and experiment to find the arrangement that best creates the style and tone you want in your music.[1]

{ "thumbImageID": "American-Professional-Precision-Bass-V-Maple-Fingerboard-Antique-Olive/J46466000002000", "defaultDisplayName": "Fender American Professional Precision Bass V Maple Fingerboard", "styleThumbWidth": "60", "styleThumbHeight": "60", "styleOptions": [ { "name": "Black", "sku": "sku:site51500000030634", "price": "1,549.99", "regularPrice": "1,549.99", "msrpPrice": "1,550.01", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Fender/American-Professional-Precision-Bass-V-Maple-Fingerboard-Black-1500000030634.gc", "skuImageId": "American-Professional-Precision-Bass-V-Maple-Fingerboard-Black/J46466000001000", "brandName": "Fender", "stickerDisplayText": "", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/American-Professional-Precision-Bass-V-Maple-Fingerboard-Black/J46466000001000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Antique Olive", "sku": "sku:site51500000030635", "price": "1,549.99", "regularPrice": "1,549.99", "msrpPrice": "1,550.01", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Fender/American-Professional-Precision-Bass-V-Maple-Fingerboard-Antique-Olive-1500000030635.gc", "skuImageId": "American-Professional-Precision-Bass-V-Maple-Fingerboard-Antique-Olive/J46466000002000", "brandName": "Fender", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/American-Professional-Precision-Bass-V-Maple-Fingerboard-Antique-Olive/J46466000002000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } ] }

The steel-string beauty is crafted from solid Sitka spruce on the top, which features solid Indian rosewood back and sides, and a slim mahogany neck and rosewood fretboard. You’ll notice some impressive decoration on the BR-160 (as we mention in our full review), including an exclusive Dalmatian-style tortoiseshell pickguard, accurate 14:1 butterbean-style tuners, and an elaborately decorated motherof-pearl headstock.
{ "thumbImageID": "Mustang-PJ-Bass-Pau-Ferro-Fingerboard-Olympic-White/K29653000001000", "defaultDisplayName": "Fender Mustang PJ Bass Pau Ferro Fingerboard", "styleThumbWidth": "60", "styleThumbHeight": "60", "styleOptions": [ { "name": "Olympic White", "sku": "sku:site51500000055415", "price": "574.99", "regularPrice": "574.99", "msrpPrice": "575.01", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Fender/Mustang-PJ-Bass-Pau-Ferro-Fingerboard-Olympic-White-1500000055415.gc", "skuImageId": "Mustang-PJ-Bass-Pau-Ferro-Fingerboard-Olympic-White/K29653000001000", "brandName": "Fender", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Mustang-PJ-Bass-Pau-Ferro-Fingerboard-Olympic-White/K29653000001000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Sonic Blue", "sku": "sku:site51500000055422", "price": "574.99", "regularPrice": "574.99", "msrpPrice": "575.01", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Fender/Mustang-PJ-Bass-Pau-Ferro-Fingerboard-Sonic-Blue-1500000055422.gc", "skuImageId": "Mustang-PJ-Bass-Pau-Ferro-Fingerboard-Sonic-Blue/K29653000003000", "brandName": "Fender", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Mustang-PJ-Bass-Pau-Ferro-Fingerboard-Sonic-Blue/K29653000003000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Torino Red", "sku": "sku:site51500000055423", "price": "574.99", "regularPrice": "574.99", "msrpPrice": "575.01", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Fender/Mustang-PJ-Bass-Pau-Ferro-Fingerboard-Torino-Red-1500000055423.gc", "skuImageId": "Mustang-PJ-Bass-Pau-Ferro-Fingerboard-Torino-Red/K29653000002000", "brandName": "Fender", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Mustang-PJ-Bass-Pau-Ferro-Fingerboard-Torino-Red/K29653000002000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } ] }
But I’d also like to share my interesting Goldilocks setup into the mix, I’ve had a Boss GT-8 for years and I love that thing for all the control it can give me at the front of stage. However, I’m only 18 and never had the kind of money to buy an amp I’d love to run 4 cables for (or in my case three, I run a Line6 wireless), so I use the virtual preamps and run it into the Effect return of my 6L6 loaded Kustom amp (never liked the preamp in it). This very fact made my gigs in high school extremely easy, as I could use virtually any tube amp with an FX loop as my backline, then adjust the global EQ accordingly to pull the best tone possible, or in one instance I had two amps at my disposal so I got the pleasure of switching up my Delay and Chorus type effects to their stereo modes. I also have a couple of pedals on my board to address a few tonal setbacks I found in the Boss, but that’s only suiting my personal taste. Enjoy my board…
Tuner: If you’re new to guitars and playing music, there is absolutely NO way that you know how to recognize all the notes by ear and tune your guitar without a tuner. Even if someone tunes the guitar for you at the shop, it will get out of tune by the time you’re home, so this one’s an absolute must have. Hang on for the price until we discuss the next device.
This guide is as marvelously written as it is exceedingly informative. It takes a long look at each of the major and minor American guitar companies — Gibson chief among them — and recounts the story of every guitar to come off their workbenches. Buoyed by scads of historical photos and thoroughly researched copy, this book earns its place at the top of this list.
You might have read our review about the C40 GigMaker kit from Yamaha earlier on. This is a similar guitar, but it’s the C40II, and the black color makes it a limited edition instrument. The inlay is less “traditional” looking. Instead of an ornate “rosette” style, the inlay is a stripe pattern all the way around the sound hole, making the guitar look somewhat “jazzy,” to use a more descriptive term. So if this is the look you prefer, read on for more details.
* The guitar has a mahogany neck, but a basswood body. Do not let anyone tell you this is a bad thing. Basswood is a completely acceptable wood for musical instruments. It is not worse or better than mahogany or maple. It is just different. Once again, the differences involved will probably be irrelevant when added into all the other things that players do with amps, strings and pedals to create tone and sound from an electric guitar.
Featuring a sound engine derived from the bigger, premium-priced GT-100, the GT-1 contains 99 preset and 99 user patches each built from a chain of blocks that can draw from 108 effects, including 27 amp/speaker sims and a 32-second looper. The first two footswitches scroll through patches, while the third (CTL1) footswitch is used to turn an effect, or a combination of effects, on and off in a patch, or for tap tempo. Sonically, there's some great stuff here. Many of the presets are playable straight off the bat, but the wide range of effects means that you can get really creative with your own patches. As you'd expect from Boss, the modulation effects are a highlight, as well as the delays and reverbs, particularly the Tera Echo. We've heard better pitch-shifting though... While the COSM amp sims will give you an approximation of the real thing for recording, at this price, you don't get the playability and detail of high-end modelers. Likewise, the overdrives and distortions work really well when building a patch but, used as solo effects, have less of the impact of real analogue pedals. The acoustic guitar simulator is class, though. For live use, the GT-1 doesn't have the flexibility of bigger units where you can switch individual effects, although you could get 
by in a live situation with careful sequential use of your own patches and the CTL1 button.

Roland has come a long way from its humble beginnings back in the early '70s as a rhythm machine manufacturer. The company grew to produce various other instruments and amplifiers, and is now one of the biggest music gear manufacturers in the world. With so many guitar brands under their name that could produce amps for them - like Boss and Line 6 - they still take the effort to build their own branded amps, and the success that they are enjoying is proof that they are doing the right thing. Their most popular amp is still the Roland Jazz Chorus, as used by artists like Albert King, Andy Summers, Metallica's James Hetfield and Kirk Hammett, Robert Smith of The Cure, Jeff Buckley and many more. These days they have a variety of amplifiers in the entry to mid-tier market, most of which continue to garner great reviews.
A Chorus effect can help you achieve lush, warm, and rich tones that work well during busier parts of a song. The effect attempts to simulate the sound of multiple performers playing the same part of a song at once. It works similarly to a flanger effect, where a sound is duplicated and slightly delayed. Choruses often use a longer delay than a flanger, and the delay time is also modulated with an oscillator to simulate the natural variations in time and pitch that will occur between several different performers.
The iconic Les Paul Standard is celebrated by the world’s greatest musicians as the standard for perfection in the world of electric guitars. The new Les Paul Standard features the popular asymmetrical SlimTaper neck profile with Ultra-Modern weight relief for increased comfort and playability. Impeccable looks are highlighted by the powerful tonewood combination of mahogany back and carved maple AAA figured top. BurstBucker Pro humbuckers provide modern and classic tones, while immense tonal variety from comes from 4 push-pull knobs. Includes hardshell case.

Now, instead of just containing part of the sound completely, the tone knob is hooked up to a capacitor. The capacitor doesn't let everything through. Basically, it starts with the highest frequencies, letting them through to be contained rather than go to the amplifier. The more of the signal you send to the capacitor, though, the more of the spectrum it is forced to let through, meaning that more and more of the high end of the continuum is let through - the rest of the current is sent back and is let out through the line to the amp.
Someone recently posted one of my pedal demos in a thread on a guitar forum and stated that he really liked the sound of the pedal in the demo. Another forum member chimed in and said that for some reason, everything I play through usually sounds good. Shortly after, forum member “Squank” replied, “It’s a talent. Most gear can be dialed in to sound at least decent.”

I have located a semi-hollow body electric Kent guitar that has a body some what like a 335 and the neck like a fender strat. The body is a beautiful natural birdseye maple. She is in awsome shape and plays well. I have the ser# (xxx) 3 digits and I believe that it was made in Japan in the Sixty's. I have no Idea what model it is or value because I can't find out any thing about Kent guitars. I've seen Kent amps guitars & drums but no info. I welcome anything.
Nothing says rock and roll quite like an electric guitar—and whether you're just learning to play or you've been practicing for years, the right instrument can make you feel like a rock star. Selecting the right match for you is a matter of personal taste and playing style, but the broad selection available at Amazon.com can help you find the guitar and the accessories you're looking for.
Originally the Stratocaster was offered in a 2-color sunburst finish on a solid, deeply contoured ash body, a 21-fret one-piece maple neck with black dot inlays and Kluson tuning heads. In 1956 Fender began issuing solid Stratocasters with alder bodies.[4] In 1960 the available custom colors were standardized, many of which were automobile lacquer colors from DuPont available at an additional 5% cost. The unique single-ply, 8-screw hole white pickguard held all electronic components except the recessed jack plate—facilitating easy assembly. Despite many subsequent Stratocaster models (including copies and the Superstrat), vintage Fender models are highly valued by collectors for their investment potential and players who prefer the timbre of older models.
Some versions of the TG-64 had the same floating-table vibrato system as on the SD-4L; my guess would be that these were earlier versions, although one can’t place too much faith in dating Japanese guitars by hardware appointments. Others had the more typical Japanese version of the Bigsby vibrato. This guitar was sold in the United States in ’65 as the Teisco Del Rey Model ET-320, but by ’66 had been dropped from the line.
Dive bomb is a guitar technique in which the tremolo bar is used to rapidly lower the pitch of a note, creating a sound considered to be similar to a bomb dropping. One of the most recognized pioneers of this technique is Jimi Hendrix. Other notable musicians who are widely known for using this technique are Eddie Van Halen and Joe Satriani. - winner333
In terms of how the effects and amp models sound, we give the Zoom G3X a 7 out of 10. Most effects sound great and very convincing. All but the most discerning tone snobs would be able to distinguish them from the “real thing.” As is typical for digital multi-effects units, the quality of the overdrive and distortion effects is sub-par. Conversely, delays, reverbs, and choruses sound pretty great. In fact, one recommendation many users make is to start out with the Zoom G3X, and eventually buy a separate dedicated overdrive or distortion pedal, like a Fulltone OCD or Pro Co RAT2. This comment from an owner sums it up well:
Primarily, reverb pedals tend to give you a lot more variety and control over the effect than you'll have with an amplifier. In fact, most amps that have reverb will have a single reverb knob that you turn up for more of the effect, or down for less. This can work if you use reverb sparingly, but if you're into the effect and like to use it a lot, that's not enough control to really get the most out of your reverberated tone.

• Library content : Choose from 154 patterns covering a wide range of realistic riffs, arpeggios, alternating intervals and chords. The patterns are conveniently grouped into 31 well-coordinated set of presets, suitable for everything from modern pop music to electronics. Autochord mode and convenient presets allow you to execute or program convincing batches of electric guitar, regardless of background music.
Seller: bennick2013 (4) 100%, Location: Marietta, Georgia, Ships to: US, Item: 302905274242 Beautiful red body and maple neck looks great despite minor dings and scratches. Neck is straight and intonates well, action just fine with no divots or dead spots. Get it now before they become scarce and PLAY Condition: Used, Condition: Very Good, Brand: Lotus, MPN: Does Not Apply, String Configuration: 6 String, Body Type: Solid, Body Color: Red, Model: Strat, Model Year: ? See More
the most with a headphone jack. Any suggestions? I am just a bedroom player who sucks and price is well I say depends what it (the amp) is worthy b/c I am on disability and my neurologist said just quit but at 48 years old it (music) is the only area of life besides my dog and mom that keeps me even and she is in worse shape than me (sorry for the soap box). Is the EVH 5150 III though its' combo is 50 watts but it has the headphone jack. Please anyone help???

From the low-string riff for “What Difference Does It Make?” to the deep tremolo textures and swooning string bends of “How Soon Is Now,” Marr always seemed to have the notes and the tone to suit the moment perfectly. Marr’s work has been profoundly influential to guitarists of the Nineties and beyond. Noel Gallagher of Oasis dubbed Marr “a fucking wizard,” and Radiohead guitarist Ed O’Brien has cited Marr as the reason he picked up a guitar. In essence, Marr is a classicist, drawing much of his approach from the guitar sounds of the Sixties British Invasion, yet deftly adapting those influences to rock and roll modernity.
{"product":{"id":"L20582","stock":"backorderable","price":"899.00","name":"Slash Firebird Limited-Edition Electric Guitar","download":false,"sku_id":"L20582000001000","checksum":"565047124900","rep_id":"site1prodL20582","sku_rep_id":"site1skuL20582000001000"},"category":"Electric Guitars","pageName":"product_detail","subcategory":"Solid Body Electric Guitars","dept":"Guitars"}
The most common overdrive will also alter the tone of the input signal by adding in a muli-processing chip within the circuitry. Such as the classic Ibanez TS-808, made in the 1980's, having the MP-D01201A multi-processing chip. Depending on the brand of the overdrive, the installed multi-processing chip and the preferences of the player, this type of overdrive is typically a go-to overdrive and is commonly the cheapest to purchase.
The first two Cordobas we’ve featured have been cedar-top guitars. Now we come to the C7, which is available in both spruce and cedar (see item 7). If you hadn’t noticed by now, the “SP” or “CD” abbreviations in the Cordoba listings indicate the wood that the front of the guitar is made from, so that should help you in the future when looking for a particular guitar with a particular sound, just with the factory-supplied strings alone.
Since it was originally introduced in 1975, the Destroyer has become an icon of that era's chapter in rock n' roll history. Over the years it has undergone many incarnations and the perennial classic returns once again. The body and neck of both guitars are made of a tight Mahogany for maximum resonance. The bound rosewood fingerboard is adorned with Jumbo frets. The Destroyer also features Sure Grip III control knobs for no-slip control. It's not called the Destroyer for nothing.
I always respond to these enquiries as I have played some in UK shops and like them a lot .Well designed and made though I am sure the odd duffer gets through like most imports .Trev Wilkinson did the designing ,though it should really read ,modifying ,as most are other makers basic designs,.The Les Paul lemon drop is superb judging by reviews and I loved their S types ..Worth the money it seems .I would prefer a Vintage Strat , 335 or Les Paul to the other cloned alternatives .I did buy an Epiphone Dot but after playing a Vintage 335 ,wish I had bought it instead .The ones I played were Chinese

Much like any other job or hobby, building guitar pedals requires specific tools in order to get the job done. Furthermore, before you start putting together your first build, it is vital that you have a significant understanding of how to solder circuit board electronics – otherwise you may find yourself at a loss due to faulty soldering (believe me, this is not a fun issue to troubleshoot).  If you need to practice soldering, here is a helpful video.
Coupling an SM57 with a small-diaphragm KM84 condenser finds favour with Bill Price and John Fry, while Mike Hedges chooses his favourite Sennheiser MKH40. Bill Price also mentions the importance of finding a very close phase match between the two microphones. "What one had to do was balance those mics equally, grab a pair of headphones out in the studio that were turned up nice and loud, and fractionally position one of the mics so that they were perfectly in phase at high frequencies, because if you had one mic five inches away and the other six inches away you'd obviously get really bad phase shift that would take the top off the guitar sound."
{"pageName":"[gc] pdp: washburn xmdlx solid body electric guitar","reportSuiteIds":"guitarcenterprod","prop2":"[gc] shop: guitars: electric guitars","prop1":"[gc] shop: guitars","events":"event3,prodView","evar51":"default: united states","prop5":"[gc] shop: amplifiers and effects: effects: effects pedals: delay and reverb effects pedals","prop6":"[gc] shop: amplifiers and effects: effects: effects pedals: delay and reverb effects pedals","prop3":"[gc] shop: guitars: electric guitars: solid body electric guitars","prop4":"[gc] shop: amplifiers and effects: effects: effects pedals: delay and reverb effects pedals","products":";114096449;;;;evar65=null-Guitars-Washburn","linkInternalFilters":"javascript:,guitarcenter.com","channel":"[gc] shop","prop7":"[gc] product detail page"}
Most lo-fi amplifiers in the 40s and 50s produced unexpected distortion or overdrive tones at higher volumes. Guitarists quickly discovered that the Fender Tweed Champ (originally marketed to beginners as the Champion 800 in 1948) produced a distorted sound at high-volume levels thanks to the Champ’s low power output and simple circuitry. Many of the classic guitar solos in the 1950s were recorded through a Champ, which resembled a wide-panel TV cabinet covered in tweed cloth. Leo Fender even went so far as to manufacture the first 100-watt amplifiers for surf guitar pioneer Dick Dale, who had blown hundreds of Fender amps and speakers from regularly turning up the volume.

Repetitive open-tunings are used for two non-Spanish classical-guitars. For the English guitar the open chord is C major (C-E-G-C-E-G);[67] for the Russian guitar which has seven strings, G major (G-B-D-G-B-D-G).[68] Mixing a perfect fourth and a minor third along with a major third, these tunings are on-average major-thirds regular-tunings. While on-average major-thirds tunings are conventional open tunings, properly major-thirds tunings are unconventional open-tunings, because they have augmented triads as their open chords.[69]

Thanks, guys....well, I don't think I'll be able to play any Agiles but I'll try and get my hands on some Epi's and give them a whirl. How are the stock pickups on both? Definitely in need of a swap? I had an Epi Les Paul an eon ago and don't recall liking the stock pickups, but I was also in highschool then and knew nothing about tone. Also, a quick look at Ebay indicates that any Epi SG in a color other than black or cherry will be hard to come by...
Slightly out-of-tune strings on a bass may not jump out as much as on guitar (especially in chords), but when that bass line is sitting under other parts in the mix, even slightly off-pitch notes will make their presence known, and sometimes be harder to track down (why does this song sound a little “off”?). I’d use a tuner (h/w or s/w), but I’d also always verify by ear, before hitting record, and I’d check tuning periodically as the session progresses—just as with drums, hard players can easily put the instrument out after a few energetic takes.
I'm going to assume that if you're reading this, you've probably been to two dozen guitar sites, all with varying, if not conflicting information on the correct way to do a setup. I've been there too, I've watched guys on youtube filing down frets with a dremel tool. Now it didn't look right to me, but maybe it works for him. The reality is there is more than one way to do something, and that's OK. If the end result is a great sounding instrument, it doesn't matter how you got there. So I'm going to show you my way of how to get to a great sounding electric guitar. And if you should choose to do something differently, and it works, great!!. Part of having some fun in life is experimenting, I encourage it.

Although this multi-effects pedal is powerful and full of features, it doesn't mean that you’ll have to face those awkward manual reading moments. The ME-70 is like a simple stomp box, each effect section has knob-based controls which makes it easy to dial tones. Similarly, whenever you need to add any effect; just kick press on one of the four foot-switches to fire up the game.
Whether you're recording or just plain playing for the fun of it, a headphone guitar amp is a great thing to have. You can even choose headphone amps that will work with pedals, mixing consoles and other connections, giving you a ton of versatility in how you use them. If there's one thing that's universally true about these amplifiers, it's that no guitarist should be without at least one.
Being a true pro-level instrument, the Yamaha LL16 comes with a jumbo body shape and built-in S.R.T Zero impact electronics. Playability remains beginner friendly, with a low action setup that new players will easily master. And since it comes with an all-solid wood body, this guitar will only sound better and better as it ages. If you are looking for a more long term instrument at the sub $1000 level, check out the Yamaha LS16.
As you saw in the video, I’ve gone through the Learn and Master Guitar Setup course, and all in all, I think there is a lot of great content in there. Greg Voros teaches you the basics of guitar setup and maintenance, and he does it in a slow and detailed fashion so that even if you’re following along at home you should have no problem learning his guitar setup techniques. Keep reading for more information on the course.

I had a Soundgear 5 string bass when they first came out and it was one of the worst basses I have ever owned. Crappy electronics, uncomfortable neck and the list goes on. I used it as a back up when I was touring 100+ shows per year and luckily my Tobias Killer B5 never had issues other than the occasional broken string. The best thing I can say about it is I lent it to a "colleague" and he ended up stealing it. Good riddance!


An amplifier stack consists of an amplifier head atop a speaker cabinet—a head on top of one cabinet is commonly called a half stack, a head atop two cabinets a full stack. The cabinet that the head sits on often has an angled top in front, while the lower cabinet of a full stack has a straight front. The first version of the Marshall stack was an amp head on an 8×12 cabinet, meaning a single speaker cabinet containing eight 12" guitar speakers. After six of these cabinets were made, the cabinet arrangement was changed to an amp head on two 4×12 (four 12" speakers) cabinets to make the cabinets more transportable. Some touring metal and rock bands have used a large array of guitar speaker cabinets for their impressive appearance. Some of these arrangements include only the fronts of speaker cabinets mounted on a large frame.[25]
The effect also took Nashville by storm in the 70’s as well and was a favorite of Waylon Jennings’ music and others. What the effect does is mix the guitars signal with a slightly delayed reproduction of the signal. This delay shifts the waveform a few milliseconds thus producing the out of phase sound. It then uses a LFO (low frequency oscillator) to control the sweeping effect of the phaser. This pedal is key to the classic VH guitar sound!

How it sounds: Ex. 1a demonstrates the treble-cut control—nothing surprising here. Ex. 1b features the bass-cut. With a clean tone like this, it’s a bit subtle, though you can hear the difference if you focus on the low notes. But Ex. 1c adds a vintage-style germanium Fuzz Face with the gain and volume maxed. With the guitar’s tone control wide-open, the signal easily overpowers my vintage Fender brownface—your typical Fuzz Face fart. As I gradually trim bass via the guitar, the tone acquires greater punch and clarity. I remain on the neck pickup throughout—the only thing changing is the guitar’s bass pot setting. The extreme-cut settings near the end of the clip may sound harsh in isolation, but they can be perfect in a band context. At the end of the clip I max the bass pot again to underscore how much the tone has changed. It ain’t subtle.
The D-18E was a mahogany dreadnought with the neck pickup and a second bridge pickup. The typical Martin pickguard had the front point cut off and a notch in back to make room for the pickups rings. A three-way toggle was mounted on the upper treble bout. Controls included one volume and two tones, with the big plastic knobs. D-18Es are the rarest of these early Martin electrics, lasting only from the ’58 prototypes through 1959. These began with prototype #163746. Around 858 of these were produced.

Harry Rosenbloom, founder of the (now-bankrupt) Medley Music of Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania, was manufacturing handmade guitars under the name "Elger." By 1965 Rosenbloom had decided to stop manufacturing guitars and chose to become the exclusive North American distributor for Ibanez guitars. In September of 1972 Hoshino began a partnership with Elger Guitars to import guitars from Japan. In September of 1981, Elger was renamed "Hoshino U.S.A.", retaining the company headquarters in Bensalem, Pennsylvania as a distribution and quality-control center.
The vibration of the wood isn't in question at all. It does indeed vibrate and if you put a microphone up to the wood of the guitar as it's being played (and if you can manage the feedback) you'll no doubt hear the tonal qualities of the wood. You can knock on it to hear that. It's like knocking on a door. ANY wooden door or any processed wood for that matter.
i just started using this book never having played before and am finding it totally easy to follow. the friendly narrative guides the reader through every step, explaining the most simple of terms and concepts clearly and concisely. and yes, the CD is funky and you can play along with it more or less straight away AND sound good, which keeps you motivated.
There are also companies like Eastwood Guitars that are releasing their own versions of the Hi-Flier. Available for a pretty low sum, you can get Eastwood’s recreation of a Phase 4 Hi-Flier in both right-handed and lefty configurations. If you don’t find the world of vintage guitars too appealing, but you dig the look and feel of the Hi-Flier, this might be a prime option for you.

In 2017, Slash was named Gibson Brands' first Global Brand Ambassador. And to celebrate, Slash has designed his first Signature Firebird for Epiphone! Slash’s Limited Edition Firebird features the classic Firebird profile that has gone virtually unchanged since its debut in 1963 and is made with a AAA Flame Maple top and a 3-piece Mahogany body in a Translucent Black finish chosen by Slash. The traditional Firebird style pickguard is layered white and black and has Slash’s “Skull & Top Hat” log in red. The Mahogany neck is glued to the body with a deep-set neck tenon and has a standard 24.75" scale and a rounded custom "Slash" profile. The Pau Ferro fingerboard has single-ply cream binding with Pearl trapezoid inlays, a nylon nut, and 22 medium jumbo frets along with a 2-way adjustable truss rod. The back of the Firebird's traditional reverse headstock has Slash’s Snakepit logo in gold.

Quality replacement pot from Bourns.   Knurled 1/4" shaft fits most knobs.  Low torque, carbon resistive element, great replacement in many applications using passive humbucker or single-coil pickups.   Note that length of threaded part of shaft is 3/8" - measure to make sure that this is long enough for your application, especially if the pot mounts through the wooden guitar body.   (This pot will not work on Les Pauls, for example).  250K, Special A2 taper preferred by guitar and bass players.  Nut and washer included.  Note: threaded bushing diameter is 3/8", like most 24mm "quarter-sized" pots.

achieved by the creators. A lot of YouTube channels can be very amateurish and suffer from poor video quality, muffled audio and presenters who don’t work well with a camera. And it doesn’t matter if the lesson is coming from someone in the same room or from a studio on the other side of the world, the guitar teacher needs to be good. Someone who communicates clearly and makes you feel welcome.

It wouldn't be called a tribute if it didn't follow convention, so having a mahogany body with an arched maple top is expected. Epiphone also designed the neck to mimic the playability of old LPs, giving this guitar a 1960s SlimTaper D profile. However, what makes the Epiphone Les Paul Tribute Plus stand out is the use of two Gibson USA '57 Classic humbucking pickups, which essentially gives this Les Paul a more premium Gibson voice, at a fraction of the price.
These guys are great! I took my Martin in for a refret, and it might have been the cleanest I have ever seen it done. Played better than it did when I got it. So after that show of quality work I took... my old Guild to them. It had developed a little belly bulge and warped top. Mark got that thing sounding and playing like brand new. They are priced honest and fair, and do work in a very timely manner. I am done looking for my guitar shop. I highly recommend these gentlemen. See More
Seller: bennick2013 (4) 100%, Location: Marietta, Georgia, Ships to: US, Item: 302905274242 Beautiful red body and maple neck looks great despite minor dings and scratches. Neck is straight and intonates well, action just fine with no divots or dead spots. Get it now before they become scarce and PLAY Condition: Used, Condition: Very Good, Brand: Lotus, MPN: Does Not Apply, String Configuration: 6 String, Body Type: Solid, Body Color: Red, Model: Strat, Model Year: ? See More

The neck, which extends from the guitar body, includes the fretboard and headstock on which the tuners are mounted. It contains a metal truss rod that prevents neck bowing and twisting, and can be adjusted to help the guitar maintain consistent pitch. The fretboard is usually made from a thin layer of rosewood or ebony, although some models, usually with maple necks, have a fretboard made of the same wood as the neck. Most fretboards have position dots or other markers inlaid in the fretboard. Some models have markers on the upper edge of the fretboard offering the player easy visibility.


The Telecaster was important in the evolution of country, electric blues, funk, rock and roll, and other forms of popular music. Its solid construction let guitarists play loudly as a lead instrument, with long sustain if desired. It produced less of the uncontrolled, whistling, ‘hard’ feedback (‘microphonic feedback’) that hollowbodied instruments tend to produce at volume (different from the controllable feedback later explored by Pete Townshend and countless other players). Even though the Telecaster is more than half a century old, and more sophisticated designs have appeared since the early 1950s (including Fender’s own Stratocaster), the Telecaster remains in production. There have been numerous variations and modifications, but a model with something close to the original features has always been available.

Because in most cases it is desirable to isolate coil-wound pickups from the unintended sound of internal vibration of loose coil windings, a guitar's magnetic pickups are normally embedded or "potted" in wax, lacquer, or epoxy to prevent the pickup from producing a microphonic effect. Because of their natural inductive qualities, all magnetic pickups tend to pick up ambient, usually unwanted electromagnetic interference or EMI.[23] The resulting hum is particularly strong with single-coil pickups, and it is aggravated by the fact that many vintage guitars are insufficiently shielded against electromagnetic interference. The most common source is 50- or 60-Hz hum from power transmission systems (house wiring, etc.). Since nearly all amplifiers and audio equipment associated with electric guitars must be plugged in, it is a continuing technical challenge to reduce or eliminate unwanted hum.[24]
×