Bass cabinets are more likely to have thicker wood panels than regular electric guitar amps, and to have stronger internal bracing. These design features help to lessen the likelihood of unwanted cabinet buzzes or rattles, which are more likely with bass cabinets than electric guitar cabs because of the low-frequency sounds that bass cabs have to reproduce.

Practice makes perfect. While this might be a trite statement that your teacher used to say as you rolled your eyes in annoyance it could not be closer to the truth. Practice is especially vital with music. No matter what you plan on playing or already play unless you practice you’re not going to get anywhere even with the best guitar. So we have figured out so fat that practice is vital to reaching the level you want but that is not the end of it. A good guitar is just as important. And I don’t mean a great guitar that you will have to shell out your entire savings on. No, I mean a quality guitar that will help you out in your practice rather than hinder you. (If you still have not got a guitar but plan on doing so we have an entire catalog of the best guitars under $100, best guitars under $300 and so forth). You thought that’s where we would end the list of what you need to learn how to play? Nope. You need a good amplifier. As much as this equipment is often overlooked because it seems too had to choose, it is vital for practice.  Without further ado, let’s get into some of the best guitar practice amps.


Not a bad article, but I’d go even cheaper. As a long time guitar and bass player (no longer gigging) and father, with guitars high and low cost in the house, I would advise parents to get a new Yamaha, Epi, or Squier (or a good used one of those) for a couple hundred $ or less and a decent Fender or Vox,, Spider, etc modeler amp for the same and see what happens. It has been hard to keep my kids interested, hurts the fingers, and my guitars have low action and play like butter. It isn’t like Rock Star! Reportedly 90% drop out in the first year, and by the time you are my age maybe 99% have quit! Lot of used stuff in the closets out there! So go to a decent store or a friend who plays and seek their help and advice. And get it set up by someone who knows what they are doing. My current favorite setting out and being played a lot is a 1996 Korean Squier Strat Deluxe, used for $99. So if they say spend over $400 total amp and guitar, ask someone else! They lose value real fast!
When you are also tracking a close mic at the same time, you might try variations of the approaches discussed in the sections above on distant-miking or ambient-miking to get a little or a lot more room sound into the brew. This often will capture the best overall sound for a range of musical styles – the close mic delivers punch and plenty of midrange grind (depending on mic choice), while the distant mic – placed from about 12″ away to several feet – adds depth, dimension, and the natural reverberation of the space. After careful consideration for both mic placements (using the “position, listen, re-position” techniques discussed above to find ideal on-the-track sound from each mic), some skill in the mixing process is also often required to make the most of any multi-mic setup. The discussion about phase alignment in the sidebar (“Correcting Phase Issues”) is often a big part of this post-tracking approach to maximizing multi-mic techniques, but also be aware that you can use whatever proportional blend of the two tracks works best, a variety of effects and dynamic treatments on each track, and whatever panning of the pair best suits your overall mix, from dead-on together to any different pan of each within the stereo field.
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I wanted the action lowered on two acoustics and a strap button put on. I called 6 different places around town, each one quoting me prices ranging from $50-$60 for the setup (action adjustment) and another $10 for the strap button. I called Franklin Guitar and Repair and was quoted at $25-$30 for the setup and $5 for the strap button. What a steal! So I took both guitars. He looked at one and said all it needed was minor adjustments, which he did right then and there for free. The other, he kept overnight to adjust and add the button. I picked it up today. $15 TOTAL.
My first guitar, bought out of an advert in Kerrang over 20 years ago. I think it was branded "Axe" and it had absolutely nothing good about it. Some sort of MDF body, horribly bowed neck (couldn't be adjusted as the truss rod was broken), high frets everywhere (you could pull them out with your fingernails, fortunately), slipping tuners, hopeless bridge, hopeless nut, everything. Nearly put me off playing before I'd got started.
• Now let's add some slap-back room delay. In the seventh insert (which, incidentally, comes post‑fader in Cubase, as does insert eight), go to Delay/StereoDelay. In the left channel, try setting Delay to 1/16T, Feedback to 6.5, Lo to 50, Hi to 15000, Pan to ‑100, and Mix to 20, and enable Sync, Lo Filter, and Hi Filter. Use the same values for the right channel, but with Delay at 1/16, Feedback at 7.3, and Pan at 100.
It’s 1951, a dark, rainy night on the backstreets of Memphis, Tennessee. Ike Turner and His Kings Of Rhythm are packing the gear into the station wagon, getting ready to head off to the studio to record a track for producer Sam Phillips, a track that the Rock and Roll Hall Of Fame will one day honor as the first rock and roll song of all time, ‘Rocket 88.’ (Although, distinctly unfairly, the song will be credited to singer Jackie Brenston and the imaginary band ‘His Delta Cats.’) “The amp—a Fender Bassman—was in the trunk of the car and it fell out, right on the road,” Ike Turner told Guitar Magazine’s Rick Batey in 1998, “and it was raining, so the amp got wet. When we got to the studio and plugged it in one of the tubes went ‘pop.’ We didn’t have no more tubes—so that’s where the fuzz came from.’
Visually, what sets this guitar apart is its distinct headstock shape, but there's more to this guitar than meets the eye. Firstly, the guitar's top is crafted from solid cedar, an interesting wood choice because this type of wood is more commonly used on nylon string guitars. The warm tone of cedar matches nicely with the bright sound of wild cherry, a staple tonewood used on the back and sides of most Godin guitars. This combination gives the instrument a more distinct appearance and sound. Other features that don't follow the usual convention include the use of maple for the neck, and its B-Band M-450 T preamp system.
The original electric guitars were hollow. Well, scratch that — the original Electric Spanish guitars were hollow (stick with us for the third installment of “Fundamentals of Guitar Anatomy” on pickups. The first pickup was made for a lap steel guitar!) Gibson took the words Electric Spanish and turned them into an acronym — ES. We commonly refer to these as hollow body guitars.
The Yamaha LL16 gives you high-end features for a lot less money, starting off with its solid Engelmann spruce top and solid rosewood back and sides. This all solid body results in richer and more detailed acoustic tone, something that you will have to pay top dollars for from other acoustic brands. It also sports a slightly smaller body that gives it an elegant appeal, adding to its already favorable affordable price and top-tier specs.
In choosing an amp you have to first consider how much you have to spend, the style of music you like to play, and what kind of tone you like best. It is perhaps best to start with something small. You might feel that a Marshall stack is the way to go, especially if you have the money, but for home use, big amps are hard to work with because to drive them into distortion, you have to get really loud. They also take up a lot of space.

Of course, this top-down lecturing is all very abstract without examples. Let me give you the worst case scenario. My school talent show, 2008. Two friends of mine performED an ambitious but utterly inappropriate Metallica cover in front of the other students, their parents and the faculty. It was excruciating. Although the solos (presumably the only thing they had bothered to practice) were technically flawless, the whole song was undone by their terrible rhythm. The timing of the song became displaced, the chords were so badly fingered that it was difficult to hear the riff and consequently the whole performance fell apart. They looked like morons. They had sacrificed learning basic rhythm and paid the price. Make sure you don’t do the same.


By definition, distortion pedals are designed to adulterate the guitar’s signal in and of themselves. To use a rough analogy to tube amp tone, where overdrives are looking to take you into anywhere from pushed to cranked JTM45 or tweed Bassman, distortions aim to do the Mesa/Boogie Triple Rectifier, Bogner Ecstasy, or six-Laney-full-stacks trick in a 3"x5" box. These pedals unashamedly screw with your sound. They generally filth it up and slap their own notion of the ideal heavy rock or metal EQ all over your tone’s backside. But of course they will also boost the guitar signal as well (depending on the volume/output/level settings), and the sound we associate with them is still some confluence of pedal and amp, not to mention guitar.

With the correct strings on the guitar, and the strings tensioned to the tuning you intend to use, place a capo at the first fret, or depress the low "E" string at the first fret. While doing this, depress the same string at the 12th fret. Site along the bottom of the string and note its relationship to the top of the frets up and down the fretboard between the fretted positions. The string in this situation, since it is under tension, is essentially a straight edge, and the curve, or profile, of the fretboard can now be seen. Generally, a gap of 1/64 - 1/32 " between the bottom of any string and the tops of the 6-7th frets (when fretting the string at the 1st and 12th frets or higher) is considered acceptable. You could go a hair flatter, or even a bit more curved depending on the needs of a given player, but start here.

"Mangoré, por Amor al Arte" is the title of the 2015 movie, the real life story of Agustín Barrios, an influential and important composer and classical guitarist from Paraguay. Born in Paraguay in 1885 talented Agustín was persuaded in his young adult age to move to Buenos Aires, the cultural hub of South America. In Argentina he began an affair with the beautiful Isabel but,...

The company was founded in 1931 as the Ro-Pat-In Corporation (ElectRo-Patent-Instruments) by Adolph Rickenbacher and George Beauchamp in order to sell electric Hawaiian guitars. These instruments had been designed by Beauchamp, assisted at the National String Instruments Corporation by Paul Barth and Harry Watson.[1] They chose the brand name Rickenbacher (later changed to Rickenbacker), though early examples bear the brand nameElectro.[2]


Our electric guitars deliver the same rewarding mix of playability, tone and craftsmanship that players love about our acoustics. Proprietary Taylor pickups fueled the design of our current electric family, featuring three series, each loaded with player-friendly features: the groundbreaking hollowbody hybrid T5, the electric-leaning T5z, and the semi-hollowbody T3.

by pedalhaven Black & white board from  @alexjacob_ ! Here’s the signal chain: Boss TU-3 Chromatic Tuner EarthQuaker Devices Palisades Boss NS-2 Noise Suppressor Hotone Nano Legacy BritWind (Effects Loop) Boss NS-2 Noise Suppressor Joyo D-SEED Digital Delay TC Electronic Arena Reverb Don't forget to DM/Tag us to submit your photos! ▪️ ▪️ ▪️ ▪️ ▪️  #pedalhaven   #pedalboard   #guitarpedals   #knowyourtone   #ambienttones   #pedalboards   #pedalnerds   #pedalporn   #guitar   #gearporn   #gearnerds   #pedalboardpeople   #shoegaze   #geartalk   #guitarsdaily   #gottone   #tonefordays   #guitargear   #reverb   #gearpost   #boardshot 

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The construction of an instrument is naturally a fundamental characteristic that pertains not only to playability, but the ultimate sound of the instrument as well. Durability will be affected by this as well. Guitar construction varies from brand to brand and model to model; instrument makers utilize a wide variety of materials to build the guitar body. Wood is the most common material associated with guitars, but plastic and metal are used as well. Construction should also be given extra consideration with electric guitars, as the electrical components serve as a secondary construction within the instrument.

What equally contributes to the Entourage’s place on our list of the best acoustic-electric guitars is its nuanced and bright acoustic sound. This signature tone comes courtesy of a select pressure-test solid cedar top and wild cherry back and sides. The electronics on this model are easy to use and compact, highlighted by a pewter plate giving the entire package a stylish appearance.​
Description: Body: Mahogany - Neck Attachment: Neck-through - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 1 Piece - Nut Width: 47.6mm - Fingerboard: Maple - Frets: 24, Jumbo - Inlay: Piranha Tooth - # of Strings: 7 - Scale Length: 26.5" (67cm) - Headstock: 7 In-Line - Bridge: Floyd Rose Special Tremolo - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Jackson Tuners, Black, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Seymour Duncan Nazgul/Sentient - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Bright Blue - Made In: America
Strumming Patterns: Rhythmic strumming patterns are rarely coupled with delay.Chords: In some cases, swelling chords that are strummed once can work well with a delay effect, but generally this is avoided in favor of a less-saturating effect, perhaps a kind of light modulation.Short Arpeggios: A five to 10 note arpeggio is the perfect spot to dial in a smooth delay to help fill in the sound.Quick Solos: Speedier solos can work with delay and make sense, but the faster you’re playing, the harder it is to get delay to sound clean and not muddy.
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This guitar has a maple neck which is coated with a thin satin finish and has a C-design which is easy for beginners to handle. It features an alder solid body. The vibrato design is enhanced with the addition of block saddles for adding firmness to the tone. They also give a precise breakpoint for the strings. Speaking of pickups, the PAC 112v is equipped with a 5-way blade pickup selector. There are master tone and volume controls for the neatest output. This guitar is available in seven finishes, natural satin, old violin sunburst, raspberry red, sonic blue, black, and silver metal.
An equalizer (more often called EQ) is the device that allows you to adjust certain frequencies within your tone. The 3-band part implies that the EQ offers three points of control: bass, middle and treble. While 3-band is the standard, you can also have 2-Band EQ (which tend to offer just bass and treble), as well as 4-band EQ, 5-band EQ (low-bass, mid-bass, midrange, upper-midrange, treble) and upwards! Of course, the higher the band, the more versatility the amp offers. But 3-band tends to be the easiest to get to grips with.
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While most single-coil pickups are wired in parallel with each other, it is possible to wire two or more of them in series, producing a fuller and stronger sound not unlike that of a humbucker.[26] This is a popular modification for instruments with two single-coil pickups like the Fender Telecaster and the Fender Jazz Bass. For the former, special 4-way switches are available to replace the stock 3-way switch and provide a series wiring position.[27]
A diagram showing the wiring of a Gibson Les Paul electric guitar. Shown are the humbucker pickups with individual tone and volume controls (T and V, respectively), 3-way pickup selector switch, tone capacitors that form a passive low-pass filter, the output jack and connections between those components. The top right shows a modification that allows both pickups to have their volumes adjusted independently when the selector switch is in the middle position: the two bottom connections are simply swapped on each volume potentiometer.
Most of the better machine heads on the market these days use a standard .375" headstock hole, so swapping tuners isn’t that hard to do. The problem comes with the mounting at the rear of the peghead. Luckily, if you use the type that screw down from the front side with a nut and washer, you can swap and test before you drill additional mounting-screw holes.
Description: Natural Model. Guitar Type: Acoustic - Body: Mahogany - Top Wood: Spruce - Back: Mahogany - Sides: Mahogany - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Construction: 1 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 26" (66cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Bracing: X-Type - Soundhole: Round (Traditional) - Rosette: Pearloid - Hardware: Chrome, Diecast, Classical Tuners - String Instrument Finish: High Gloss Natural
MAKE YOUR OWN BODY BLANK Another neat trick to create your own body blank for $10 is to get a 3/4" thick peice of Birch Plywood that comes cut into a 4' by 2' board. Simply cut out two rectangular sections of the board that will accomodate your desing and wood glue them together. Be generous with the glue to make sure there aren't any spaces between the boards when you press the two together, clamp and stack weights on top of it so the two peices are joined firmly and let dry overnight. This gives you a a 1 1/2" thick body blank that is rigid and works great for electric guitars. You will have to go with a solid color paint when you finish it but you won't be able to tell the difference between it and the solid wood blank. Plus you'll save a good chunk of change that you can use towards good pickups and hardware. If you want to make the body a little thicker, you can get a 1/4" peice of birch and glue it between the two thicker peices. It's also a good idea to prerout any wire cavities in that 1/4" peice before you glue them together. That way you don't have to worry about drilling them later and ruining the top of your guitar body with the drill.
There have been two documented 1970 Brazilian rosewood D-28's, which are anomalies. The first one was #265783, which was retopped with red spruce in 1993. The second one is serial number 265941. There are several D-35's with mixed woods in the 3-piece back. Like D-35 #258962, which has a Brazilian rosewood center wedge in the back. Note some post-1969 Martins have some Brazilian rosewood, in the bridge, bridgeplate, fingerboard, or peghead veneer.
This is the name given to the amplifier, separate from the speakers. It’s the pre-amp and amp in one box, which is usually placed on top of a cabinet or a stack of speakers. This is a common configuration for large venues, and it might be useful to have a separate amp head if you play a lot of festivals or “battle of the bands” events, where the speakers are generally provided by the organizer.
Yeah. He may have to sit down when he plays, but he’ll have you on your feet when he does. BB’s creamy yet piercing tone, his unique vibrato and his absolute flawless ability to express his emotions through the guitar earn him a spot in the top ten. King’s years of fame haven’t gone to his head. He is still as humble as ever giving front row seat tickets to fans waiting in a cold parking lot just to have a glimpse of him. BB King can’t play chords. Nor does he sing and play at the same time. But he has worldwide recognition of his accomplishments as an artist. That’s a mark of a truly great guitarist.
The GE-7 Graphic Equalizer is good to have after the overdrive in case you want to use it to scoop mids or bump certain frequencies for solos. (To show that these are not hard rules, it also works pretty well if the EQ is after the compressor but before the overdrive. But this changes how the EQ sounds, since you would be distorting it with the overdrive, so try it in the suggested position first.) Also, it’s good to have the EQ before the noise suppressor, since EQs can add noise as they boost tone at various points in the frequency spectrum, including any noise that is already there.
One of the most versatile electric guitars we encountered when putting together our list is ESP’s LTD EC-1000 KOA. Koa is a Hawaiian wood that this guitars top is made from, and it has very special sound qualities. It makes the tone very bright, crisp and clear, but at the same time it’s full of life and depth. We immediately though that the sound reminded us of an ukulele or some other happy little stringed instrument, and the sound can easily bring us back to summer evenings around a camp fire.

What’s the point in having these lists anyway? There’s always going to be anger over people who were left out/included on the list when they didn’t deserve to be… And to say that any of the musicians mentioned so far aren’t talented is ridiculous, there’s no limit in the world on how much talent there is, so why does this list have to be limited to 10? Just saying…

Taylor went with their own Expression electronics for the BT2. This system features volume and tone controls as well as a built-in tuner. You generally don't get too much maneuvering space in terms of tone shaping, however, the default setting of the Expression preamp is perfectly capable of reproducing this Taylor's native tone, and there's generally never any desire to leave that realm either.


Rock’s ultimate minimalists, Earth reduced heavy-metal thunder to a blissful rumble in the clouds. Their pioneering 1993 drone suite Earth 2 — pulseless, fearless, relentless — was little more than Dylan Carlson’s guitar chugging away on a note or two for 73 monolithic minutes. Relieving metal and grunge from any pretense that wasn’t distortion, menace, or catharsis, Carlson found a headbanger/shoegazer home between the primal and the O)))therworldly.
What equally contributes to the Entourage’s place on our list of the best acoustic-electric guitars is its nuanced and bright acoustic sound. This signature tone comes courtesy of a select pressure-test solid cedar top and wild cherry back and sides. The electronics on this model are easy to use and compact, highlighted by a pewter plate giving the entire package a stylish appearance.​
Unfortunately, no reference materials were available for this early period, so we’ll make some educated guesses. Based on the evidence of the logo on the 1968 amplifier, we suspect Univox guitars with the plastic logo debuted at about the same time. By 1970, Univox was employing decal logos on some models, further corroborating this conclusion. If this assumption is correct, it would suggest that among the first Univox guitar was the Mosrite copy known later as the Hi Flyer, debuting in around 1968. This would be consistent with the evolution of “copies” in Japan. As the ’60s progressed, the Japanese were getting closer and closer to the idea of copying, producing guitars similar to their competitors, such as Italian EKOs and Burns Bisons, etc., finally imitating American Mosrite guitars in around ’68. The Japanese affection for Mosrites was no surprise, since the band most associated with Semi Moseley’s guitars was the Ventures, who were enormously popular in Japan.
I have a problem with the way the neck bows going down from the low to high e strings. I have a Gibson les paul with the recent change in seasons I notice it on all my guitars I can adjust it out but it will some times just do the same thing, I see this on my fender and my Acoustic guitars as well when I adjust this I have a lot of problems with tuning I know this is not exactly what we were talking about but jut a question I wanted to ask I hope I made what I am saying plain enough I am pretty new to all of this. Thank you for all the great info.
Jamplay is a large YouTube Channel featuring all levels of guitar lessons from the very basic, beginners’ guides to expert levels and, of course, some videos that dissect popular songs or styles down to the last finger and fret. It has big range of different players and “teachers”, so if you maybe find one guy a bit hard to understand or perhaps you don’t quite connect with his style, look around and you’ll soon find someone else.
AmpliTube Free is a cool entry level program for those that want to experience software based guitar effects and amp modeling without spending money. It only comes with 9 stompbox and 2 rack type effects, but it covers essential effect types which are good enough for various musical genre applications. Should you need more, AmpliTube offers an upgrade system in which you can shop for additional amps, cabinets, mics and effects. Each model can even be tried out for free for two days prior to purchase, quite impressive for a free software!
If you're a Zakk Wylde fan, take a look at his signature Les Paul or the exclusive Graveyard Disciple with its authentic Floyd Rose tremolo bridge. For the metalheads among us, there's the Brendon Small Thunderhorse Explorer, a mahogany axe based on the one Brendon plays in concert with Dethklok. To satisfy Beatlemaniacs, Epiphone also has a Casino guitar inspired by John Lennon’s famous six string.
If you have a little bit more to spend than what you pay for the Epiphone LP Special II you might want to consider the Epiphone Les Paul 100. It has a mahogany body with a maple top, mahogany neck and rosewood fingerboard. It’s got solid tuners and hardware, a 3-way switch and two tone and volume knobs. It’s slimmer and therefore much lighter than the Gibson Les Paul. The Epiphone LP 100 feels and plays good. It’s a reliable and durable guitar. A great choice for rock and blues!

On my guitar, the bridge plate is held on by five screws. Three on the back of the plate, two towards the neck on the front. You may need to remove the intonation block things.One or all. If you decide to take any off, use your calipers and measure from the front of them to the back of the bridge plate, so that you don't lose your intonation. Mark each saddle like in the picture.

Play It Loud: An Epic History of the Style, Sound, & Revolution of the Electric Guitar is just that: a swooping, all-encompassing timeline of the instrument’s early days to its beyond-essential role in pop culture and music. Written by Brad Tolinski and Alan Di Perna, with a foreword by Carlos Santana, the book dives into the electric guitar’s place in our society, tracing its evolution in sound, style, look and purpose. Here are 10 things we learned from reading:

Now that we’re comfortable with the basic wiring of a guitar, we can look at some of the more popular mods. This article introduces mini toggle switches and push/pull pots, and shows how we can use these to modify a Strat in such a way as to allow use to add the neck pickup to any selection. This expands the number of available pickup combinations to 7.


The following year, the company hired designer Lloyd Loar to create newer instruments.[11] Loar designed the flagship L-5 archtop guitar and the Gibson F-5 mandolin that was introduced in 1922, before leaving the company in 1924.[12] In 1936, Gibson introduced their first "Electric Spanish" model, the ES-150, followed by other electric instruments like steel guitars, banjos and mandolins.
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CALIFORNIA SPECIAL models mix no-compromise attitude with top-notch build quality and sound. Optimized bracing reduces mass for superior resonance, while the upgraded bone nut and saddle grant them exceptional sustain. Featuring all-solid construction, the fully-painted solid Sitka spruce top and matching 6-in-line headstock give the models a shot of electrifying attitude and unconventional Fender style that loves to be both seen and heard.
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Picking out a guitar can be a bit daunting. And since there’s a lot of subjectivity involved, new players trying to pick out an instrument often find a lot of ambiguity and guesswork awaiting them. For someone buying their first guitar, the goals become fairly simple. Get a decent, budget guitar that you can afford and see if you stick with it. In so doing, avoid the worst guitars.

These guitars also appeal to adults who played in their youth and would like to pick up the instrument again. Fortunately, they’ll find that high-efficiency, low-cost overseas manufacturing has created a new generation of inexpensive guitars that play and sound very much like more expensive models—something that wasn’t true 20 years ago, when few cheap guitars were worth playing. We also discovered in our Best Electric Guitar Amp for Beginners article that there are several very nice amps available for less than $100, so an adult can get back into the game for well under $300.

: But in general, there's nothing wrong with Decca electric guitars, especially for indie musicians today who are looking for a vintage guitar with some character to it. Since most vintage guitar fans have seen every model that Gibson, Fender, et al, have ever made, many of the Japanese guitars of the '60s have a fresh look that stands out from the crowds. In 20 years, the M-i-J electric guitars of the '60s are going to be worth 4 or 5 times what they sell for now, and smart collectors who either can't afford Fenders, Gibsons and their ilk from that period, or who are interested in something more unusual, are already snapping them up.
Polishing the frets is a whole instructable by itself, but I definitely recommend that you do it at least once a year. It makes the guitar look nice, and it gets some of the oxides off the frets(not sure if it really helps anything, but it sounds helpful, right?). Also, the tape pulls out some of the junk in the open pores of the wood(if your fretboard is rosewood).
A combination of standard 6 string tuning and a 7th string dropped one full step for power chords, used by deathcore bands such as Suicide Silence, Oceano, and Whitechapel, as well as other bands such as Lacuna Coil, Blotted Science, In This Moment, Chimaira (on Pass Out of Existence and Crown of Phantoms), and occasionally Scar Symmetry, Escape the Fate, King 810, The Devil Wears Prada, Dry Kill Logic, Eldest 11, December In Red, A Fall To Break, and CFO$ on some songs. Triumphant Return guitarist Matti varies this tuning by dropping both the low B to A and low E to D and raising the high B and E a half-step to C and F (A-D-A-D-G-C-F).

 The type of guitar strings you choose, and how often you change them will not only dramatically affect your tone, but also impact the playability of your guitar. By learning about the different string options available for your guitar, you can find the strings which strike the best balance between great tone and playability. The key components affecting tone and playability come from string gauge, string winding method and the string construction material.
Just in...We are proud to offer this fine rare example of a Washburn vintage instrument .... This is super guitar! .. Wow talk about some beautiful exotic woods have a look at the Koa sides & back ,its a Solid Sitka Spruce top, Super high AAA grade 3 piece flamed Ribbon Mahogany & walnut neck with the Martin style Diamond Volute on back.... bone nut & saddle this is first class sound & playability & craftsmanship for a song.... Just look at that workmanship.... Great Tone woods with some ager to her now she a real Singer all right... rare to see one of these with such exotic woods makes it specially beautiful. I would compare the feel & tone and volume to that of the Old FG180 Yamaha's very similar ...Just in and its SUPER CLEAN collectors example so get her before she is gone... any questions .... ask please Thanks for your interest and looking....
My band has two guitar players. One often plays acoustic while the other one plays an electric guitar. There has always been a problem balancing the volume and the frequences. While both guitars play on a clean sound it sounds fine but when electric guitar changes to distorted, overdriven or crunched sound then even at a low volume the acoustic guitar is almost unheard. Is it a common problem or particulary our local one. Any solution?
DRILLING THE NECK HOLES ON THE BODY Before you do this you can carve down the back of the neck area if that is something you were going to do. If you are just going to leave it flat then that's ok too. The first step if you are using furreles is to map out where you want to place them and then mark the center of the hole where the screw will go. Then take your forstner bit drill enough to fit the furrele inside. Usually you can tell how deep to go if you drill a little at a time, and place the furrele in it to see if it is just low enough in the hole not to see the top of it if you look at the body horizontally or it is flush with the wood. After doing this you can drill the holes for the screws. Use a bit that has the same circumference as the screw including the threading so when you put the scre into the hole it just passes through with out you having to screw it in. Drill in the indention that was left by the tip of the Forstner bit, keeping the drill as straight as possible.
This is a similar model to the one we just talked about. However it’s a more basic version. Aside from a different finish and several other factors, it’s the same guitar. Tone-wise, everything is on point and you can dial in a variety of great tone colors. S series is definitely one of my favorite. I have a lot of hands-on time with them, and they are on my list of favorites.
11. Yamaha THR10 ($299): Another compact yet mighty combo amp, the THR10 boasts a mid-century-modern design with a variety of onboard effects and amp emulation options. This amp uses Virtual Circuitry Modeling (TCM) technology, which creates realistic and pristine tone. When plugging in your bass or acoustic guitars, you can even bypass the modeling section. One of the most convenient functions is the ability for the amp to run on a supplied AC adaptor or battery power for ultimate portability in your individual practice scenario. And it even includes Steinberg’s Cubase AI recording software so it’s plug-and-play right out the box!
Gotoh’s Telecaster bridge has the vintage look and mounting layout with a few modern additions: The In-Tune saddles give you the vintage look with unique grooves cast into the saddle to move the contact point of each string for more accurate intonation. Each saddle is reversible and can be used in any position. This gives you a huge advantage over traditional barrel style saddles that were never designed with precision intonation in mind. The brass saddles will give you that bright Tele twang! The stamped steel base plate’s cut down sides give you the unrestricted string access that many modern players prefer.
So half of it is finding a happy place in terms of neck size. The other half is the setup. String height is usually adjustable, with electric guitars, which is a good thing in your case. Lower string height means you don't need to push down on the string as hard to play the notes. When you find a guitar that feels good to you but the strings are kinda hard to push down, talk to the store about having it setup and intonated with a very low string height... some people use the term "fast" action.
As I’ve mentioned before, the topic of guitar pedals can really be a rabbit-hole and some people get really, really into them. They are very often the key to the tone you keep chasing after. However, at the end of the day, a lot of your sound depends on your ability to play your instrument, so please don’t neglect practicing your instrument over trying out different effects.

This is a no brainer, but a value that must be considered before any purchase no less. As mentioned above, your abilities on the instrument will likely affect the price range you’re looking at, which may have an effect on the brands you shop within as a consequence. For instance, if you’re not looking to buy a high end guitar, you probably won’t even bother testing out a Gibson, as their guitars will likely be out of your range. The reverse is true as well, an experienced player on the market for high end tone probably won’t be satisfied by many of Yamaha’s offerings.
Here we have a well preserved vintage Hohner HW600n HW for Hohner Western Acoustic Dreadnought Martin D35 Style acoustic guitar. with a gorgeously grained THREE Piece Mahogany back and sides WoW its really a beauty. Workmanship Fit and finish quality is excellent this guitar is stunning, previously set up and is Great sounding in near mint like condition its from the late 80’s early 90’s D35 Look alike, Spruce top with Mahogany Neck and some of the absolutely highest grade Mahogany your going to see its flamed and figured and has fire and looks as if it could be Koa but listed as Mahogany at any rate this is one of the nicest models Hohner in this era truly a stunner,,, its in top structural shape as well its neck angle is excellent at 1-11/16ths at the nut its medium profile neck is very easily played and is a convertible c shape… We were impressed with her sound to with nice volume and a mature sounding tone. We think you’ll like this beautiful Vintage Hohner as well we believe this to be late 1980’s to early 90’s made in Korea and would fool any made in Japan fan for its fit and finish workmanship this is a good vintage guitar in its own right… no cracks no repairs no issues no excuses someone is going to have a smile on their face. any questions or to buy this guitar contact Joe at: JVGuitars@gmail.com .
It all added up to a cartoonish minimalism that struck a vital cultural nerve when the Ramones burst out of Manhattan’s Lower East Side CBGB scene in the mid Seventies. They were the perfect antidote to the bloated self-indulgence of Seventies arena rock and the tendency—a hangover from the hippie era—for rock and rock musicians to take themselves way too seriously. The Ramones were passionate about rock, without ever being pompous.

Yamaha is well known for the quality of their mass produced and affordable guitars, and they continue to be the brand of choice for students and even for teachers. The Yamaha FGX800C is tasked to represent brand in the sub $300 price range, and judging from reviews, it is doing very well in the market. Everything about this guitar is conventional, from its familiar dreadnought cut-away shape to its comfortable neck and string action. It also comes with built-in electronics that give you 3-band EQ control and a tuner. But what makes this guitar a bit more special is the use of solid spruce with scalloped bracing for the top, which ups the value of the instrument.
In 1945, Richard D. Bourgerie made an electric guitar pickup and amplifier for professional guitar player George Barnes. Bourgerie worked through World War II at Howard Radio Company making electronic equipment for the American military. Barnes showed the result to Les Paul, who then arranged for Bourgerie to have one made for him. (info from Wikipedia, photo of Jimi Hnedrix from bassmiddletreble.files.wordpress.com)
There are many answers to your question like Jakedog mentioned. As far as finding a neck that is easy to play on, you'd be wise to go to a guitar shop and grab several different models of various brands and find what fits in your hand, yet allows full control over the fretting with your fingers. Smaller hands seem to like soft v shaped necks, yet I know several people with stubby little claws who play only boat necks...meaning huge round chuncky necks. I'm referring to the back of the neck in this case.
Many inexpensive starter guitars are built with laminate tops, made from several layers of wood pressed together. While laminate is durable and can be quite attractive, it will not produce as pleasing tones as solid wood. To a lesser extent, this is also true of the guitar’s back and sides—solid woods will produce better tone. When reading guitar specs, if you see terms such as “select spruce top,” that indicates the top is made of laminated woods with a spruce-like grain pattern imprinted on it.
We've had a thread here in the last couple months about Squires, with some pretty discerning forum members praising their quality and tone. You don't need to spend a lot of money these days for a good guitar. The one the OP bought was years ago. The fierce competition in the guitar market since the economy went bad, has forced manufacturers to up their game, and recent production is of a much higher standard.
Once you’ve gotten past the touch-or input level–intensive effects, your next primary goal is to refine your tone while at the same time minimizing noise. If you use a compressor, its ideal location is directly after the pitch shifter/harmonizer, envelope follower/auto wah and wah pedals. Because a compressor compresses the entire signal, it’s not recommended to place one after a boost, overdrive or distortion/fuzz pedal as those pedals often generate noise that will be boosted by a compressor along with the guitar’s signal.
The case was settled on August 6, 2012, with Gibson admitting to violating the Lacey Act and agreeing to pay a fine of $300,000 in addition to a $50,000 community payment. Gibson also forfeited the wood seized in the raids, which was valued at roughly the same amount as the settlement.[47][48] However, in a subsequent statement Gibson maintained its innocence with Juszkiewicz claiming that "Gibson was inappropriately targeted" and that the government raids were "so outrageous and overreaching as to deserve further Congressional investigation." Juszkiewicz continued to state, "We felt compelled to settle as the costs of proving our case at trial would have cost millions of dollars and taken a very long time to resolve."[49]

The GT-70 was a re-styled two-pickup, single-cutaway recalling the F-55s. The cutaway retained the wide horizontal angle of before, however the upper bass bout received a more graceful treatment, with a slight inward curve as it met the neck at the 16th fret. The controls were the same as before; the elevated pickguard had become a large white affair, the tailpiece was the V-notched Bigsby. Pickups remained our familiar DeArmond humbuckers. Gone were the plastic bridges in favor of metal adjustable finetune variety. Finishes were either burgundy or black. The first prototype serial number was 203803. Around 1,450 of these were made between January of 1966 and October of 1968.

There was a band in Manchester called Sister Ray, who were just this scary bunch of men/reprobates. I guess word had got around that I had a knack and was a useful little guy to have around, and you only have to buy me some Coca-Cola and I was good to go. So I played with them. I started playing my first sort of shows in front of real [crowds] when I was fourteen.


Some modeling processors fit the palm of your hand and you can place them on a tabletop and punch their buttons to select sounds and effects; some are almost two feet long, weigh as much as 10.5 pounds, sit comfortably on the floor and are operated by foot switches or rows of foot switches called pedalboards. Depending upon how sophisticated, complex and pricey your modeling processor is, you can have a huge sonic palette at your fingertips (or underfoot). Many of these units are MIDI compatible as well, allowing you to stream MIDI data to your computer or other recording device, or trigger other MIDI instruments. Just remember that for performance, you will probably be better off with a processor that is operated by foot switches; this allows your hands to remain free for playing your guitar or guitar synth.


Thinking out loud... what defines electronics then? I've always assumed that the pickups, caps, pots, etc. inside an electric guitar constituted an electronic system. The "guitar's electronics" facilitate a deliberate flow of electrons through a circuit with semi-conductors, etc. Heck, with coils and magnets (and sometimes battery packs), they also provide the electricity that's conducted through the system.


I have a Decca that my uncle gave to my dad and he gave to me (I think, he's never really asked for it back since he doesn't play). It's in rough condition, has stripped and rusted screws with a lot of connection issues. But I love the shape, I love the pickguard, I love the all out retro look of it. Any idea on if I should spruce it up with some new screws and seeing what I can do to fix the wiring? And if so, how do I get the cash for such project?

In the late 70’s digital technology boomed and made its way into the guitar community. It first entered in the form as rack units which were expensive and relatively large. As costs came down and the technology shrank, digital delay pedals were introduced into the market by Boss in 1984 with the Boss DD-2. Since then as technology advanced, delay pedals now offer many features in a very small box such as tape echo, analog, reverse delay, modulated delay, and loopers.


Engineers invented the first loud, powerful amplifier and speaker systems for public address systems and movie theaters. These large PA systems and movie theatre sound systems were very large and very expensive, and so they could not be used by most touring musicians. After 1927, smaller, portable AC mains-powered PA systems that could be plugged into a regular wall socket "quickly became popular with musicians"; indeed, "...Leon McAuliffe (with Bob Wills) still used a carbon mic and a portable PA as late as 1935." During the late 1920s to mid-1930s, small portable PA systems and guitar combo amplifiers were fairly similar. These early amps had a "single volume control and one or two input jacks, field coil speakers" and thin wooden cabinets; remarkably, these early amps did not have tone controls or even an on-off switch.[1]


Welcome to The Guitar Store, an owner operated store with big box selection and pro services. Offering expert amp and guitar repair. Do you like effect pedals? We have 9 cases full of over 400 different pedals to choose from. The largest stock of PRS, Fender, Mesa Boogie, Gretsch, Breedlove, Earthquaker, EVH, Strymon, Reverend and other guitar and amplifier brands in the northwest! We not only offer a diverse selection of high quality new and used guitars, but you can learn to play a ukulele, banjo, or mandolin here too. We have 5 teaching rooms with lessons daily. Check us out on social media outlets to find out about upcoming workshops and live in-store visits by local or national touring acts. We love what we do and it shows. Come on in today and get the help from professionals. You deserve it.
From 1959 to 1967, the Stratocaster was made with a rosewood fretboard as standard, as well as color choices other than sunburst, including a variety of colorful car-like paint jobs that appealed to the nascent surfer and hot-rod culture, pioneered by such bands as the Surfaris,the Ventures and the Beach Boys. Fender would paint any guitar from the DuPont car color range for 5% over purchase price.
Because bass amps have to reproduce lower frequencies than an electric guitar amp, and it takes more amplifier power to reproduce bass frequencies, a bass player will typically need three or four times the wattage of the electric guitarist.[16] For example, if an electric guitarist has a 100 watt amp, the bassist in the band should have a 300 to 400 watt bass amp. For electric guitar amps with 50 watts or less of power, a bass player may need an even higher multiple. While an electric guitarist will often find that a 50 watt amp will be adequate for rehearsals and mid-size performance venues, a bass player performing alongside this electric guitarist will typically need at least a 300 watt bass amp, six times the power of the electric guitar amp, to get a good bass volume. "More advanced players who regularly gig in small to medium sized venues...typically [use amps that] produce 300-700 watts of output."[17] Bass players using bass stacks in very large venues (e.g., stadiums, outdoor festivals) may use amp heads that put out 750 to 2000 watts of power. British rock bassist Mo Foster tours with a 1,500 watt bass rig.[18] Somewhat controversially, as there is no clear engineering support, many think that a tube bass amp will sound louder than a solid state bass amp of the same wattage.[19]

Seller: atcycle (2,136) 100%, Location: Sugar Land, Texas, Ships to: US, Item: 122791185383 This Used Guitar, cosmetically in general is in good used condition, it's played and everything works fine. Includes tremolo bar. The string trees have been removed for tuning stability but will be included should you wish to use them. Please use the enlarge feature and look over all pictures as this is the best way for me to show / describe the condition to you. I will have other Guitars listed. PLEASE NOTE ALL FAULTS SHOWN IN PICTURES ARE CONSIDERED PART OF THE DESCRIPTION.This Lotus "Strat" triple single coil is one of the finest examples of high quality imports which strongly competed with the big boys back in the day. Those of us who were around back then, learned that frequently these guitars had better sound and build quality than the Name Brand at that time. They were so good that the Big Name Company had them build many guitars for them! Condition: Used, Condition: There are a few signs of wear typical of an older used instrument. Missing switch button., Brand: Lotus, Body Type: Solid, MPN: Does Not Apply, Dexterity: Right-Handed, String Configuration: 6 String, Body Color: Black, Body Material: Solid Wood See More
As the author of the article, I don’t use an Axe-Fx, but a $250 Fly Rig. But if I want to talk to an expert on modeling, I wanted to ask the company that knows it best. Sure, you have to take in to consideration a PA, but you have to do that if you own an amp too, since proper sound sends keeps the volume lower on stage to send everything through the PA.
NOTE: Due to the nature of electric guitar construction, it is extremely common for these instruments to need fret work to play well. 80% or more of electrics, especially those with bolt-on necks, have high frets in the tongue area that must be addressed in order to play without excess buzzing. This includes most new electric guitars right off the shelf. Please see the section below for fret work pricing.
top 5...Top 5!...I had recently bought a gaming console after not owning one since the ps2 so not the biggest gamer but getting into it again has been fun when there free time to waste ha overall it's a pretty good game haven't stopped playing it just need to finish it up to continue the side story...What I'm disappointed is with the actual story of the game, which for me was very predictable and disappointing...I don't get how this game gets so many appraisal which for me is a good game for sure...but far, far, far away from one of the best games ever made as many say.
Some early Valco instruments continued to make it into the marketing pipeline – early on, at least. Probably as a sign of the increasing difficulty in getting product, the Spring/Summer 1942 Sears catalog sported a full complement of Supro guitars, essentially the ’41 line, all labeled with the newly-chosen Sears brand name, Silvertone. Shown in the ’42 Sears catalog were the Supro Capitan and Supro Rio, now renamed the Silvertone Crest (carved torch logo) and Silvertone Spanish (no logo), respectively. The Capitan had a standard trapeze tailpiece rather than the Dobro variety, with permanent cord coming out of the top of the lower bout!

The Ibanez Artcore AF75, PRS SE Standard 24 and Schecter PT, for example, are priced below $600 and have been highly rated. They’re not exactly cheap money-wise, but they’re definitely worth a lot more. Getting one of those from the get-go will make playing guitar a lifetime passion. “Cheap” guitars may seem more affordable at first, but many of these are poorly made and can be more costly in the long run because of constant repairs and replacements.
I recognize that these lists are really the preference of the writer and that in itself makes the list valid. However……Robert Johnson at #1? I realize that many people studied him and he was a great guitarist for his era, but he wasn’t even the best guitarist of his era. That title goes to Son House, who taught Robert Johnson. The fact is that you could have had a Clapton without a Robert Johnson. Johnson wasn’t the only player whom Clapton was inspired by.

A variation on Drop E, A with the G flattened one half step to F♯; this tuning is identical to 6-string Drop A, with two E strings added: one above, and one below. Like Drop E, A; this tuning allows easy fingering on the E since it is a standard fourth interval below the A. It also provides three high strings a fourth apart instead of the usual two. The tuning is used by Infant Annihilator on their album The Elysian Grandeval Galèriarch. A 7-string variation of the tuning without the high E (E-A-E-A-D-F♯-B) was used on their previous album The Palpable Leprosy of Pollution and is used by Enterprise Earth/Delusions of Grandeur guitarist Gabe Mangold.

Since treble frequencies pass through a capacitor, what would happen if you routed the positive lead THROUGH the capacitor rather than having it ground out frequencies?  The answer: just the opposite - the signal from you pickups would pass through the capacitor and only treble frequencies would get through.  Aha!  A new type of tone control.  The illustration below shows this type of wiring in a bit of an advanced concept.
There’s always been something special about playing a great guitar riff. Riffs that are memorable, get stuck in your head, and that everyone knows are actually in many cases are relatively easy to play. That’s because most people remember simple melodies that they can hum along to. I don’t think many people would be able to hum along to “Through the fire and flames”.

If you see "PM," play using palm muting. For standard right-handed guitar playing, gently lay the edge of your right palm across the strings near the guitar's bridge. When you strike the notes (with the same hand as is providing the mute), you should hear the tone of the note, but with a subdued, dead quality. Move your hand slightly up the strings toward the neck to deaden the notes more.
The first subject I concentrated on is (you guessed it) recording electric guitars. What became immediately apparent was that there was a huge range of different techniques being used, and also that there were strong differences of opinion between different professionals, which left the question 'who do I believe?' The only way I could answer that question was to put the different techniques into practice in the studio, and then A/B them to sort the sheep from the goats.
Half a step down from standard, used by bands such as Emmure, TesseracT and Meshuggah in their earlier days, Jeff Loomis (now formerly of Nevermore), Cannibal Corpse mid-career, ERRA, Hypocrisy on End of Disclosure, Adema, American Head Charge, Sonata Arctica in their album Unia, Mushroomhead, Korn in Neidermeyer's Mind demo album, Revocation, Dir En Grey since "Dum Spiro Spero," After The Burial on Forging a Future Self album, Chad Kroeger of Nickelback on the song "This Means War" (Ryan Peake used a six-string), Slayer (on War Zone and Here Comes the Pain from God Hates Us All), and Trivium on Silence in the Snow, The Sin and the Sentence, and all live performances of songs previously written on standard tuned seven string guitars.

I thank Roger Evans “How to play guitar” for his easy & intuitive written method, a good reason why he is a bestseller & outselling your hard-pushed videos. I can assure you, you will be a better teacher if you buy his book, and you will a top teacher if you read his other books such as “How to Read Music”, “How to play piano”, & ” How to play keyboards”. You will thank me for this advise and you will be a better asset to your potential students.
Plugged into a Fender blue deluxe, this instrument immediately proved to be a love at first riff. The humbuckers sounds so amazingly, and coupled with great and rich percussive and natural full tone, that overall sound that emanates from this instrument is far beyond what is normally expected for a beginner’s piece. The fact that it is made in China has nothing to do with its quality. This might just be your favourite new ax.

My Carvin SH575 is a semi-hollow body electric. The size is similar to the Gibson 336, but sounds totally different. When you play this guitar you can't put it down, Carvins are made with computer aid wood carving CNC machines the proto-type of the guitar is measured with lasers and programed into the computer so every guitar they make is to the 1000th to the original. The finish and the detail is awesome. It also is wired with hum bucking pick-ups, piezo acoustic pick-up and Roland GK synth guitar. You can get some beautiful hybrid tones from this thing and I never can stop finding new ones. Try one of these out if you ever go to California I think there is like 5 stores around the L. A. / San Diego area, you will see what I mean.
It usually has 8 terminals – two poles with 4 terminals each. Each pole has one common terminal and 3 switched. The first thing you want to figure out is which terminal is common. Note that terminal on the left is connected to the lever all the time – that’s our common terminal. The other three terminals are connected to the lever only in certain switch positions. Represented as a schematic, each pole would look like this.
To create a thicker rhythm guitar sound, overdub the same part one or more times. Depending on the desired effect, the overdub can be treated as one mono signal and mixed to the same stereo position, or panned left and right for a stereo double-tracked sound. Alternatively, treat the original track with an ADT (Artificial Double Tracking) effect. This can be done with a digital delay set to around 40 milliseconds. Again, the delayed signal can be panned or mixed as one with the original guitar track.
There is something special about musical instruments of a certain age. Guitars built from the mid 1950s until the late 1970s are generally held in high esteem; techniques and materials, particularly pre-1970 were vastly superior to today's 'mass-produced' standards. But is a vintage guitar really much different to a modern day equivalent? People often say wood is wood, but this is simply not the case. Centuries old trees that were regularly harvested for guitar manufacture in the 1950s are now protected, and it is these old trees with close grains and unbeatable tonal qualities that make the very best guitars. With rainforests rapidly diminishing their protection can only be a good thing. But it does mean that good quality older guitars, perhaps with a few modern upgrades can make some of the very best instruments available. What's more, much of the painstaking attention to detail lavished upon fine old jazz guitars by special order/custom departments and aimed at serious guitarists has been replaced by the continual churning out of 'limited editions', aimed at serious collectors. Whether these rare, but ultimately not-so-special guitars will be quite so desirable in 30 years time remains to be seen.
The Ace Frehley (KISS) signature model, released in 1997 and re-released in 2012, has three humbucking DiMarzio pick-ups, a cherry sunburst finish (AAAA), a color image of Frehley’s face in his Kiss make-up on the headstock, and mother-of-pearl lightning bolt inlays, and Ace’s simulated signature on the 12th fret. There was a limited edition, Gibson Custom Shop run of only 300 guitars that were built with DiMarzio PAF, Super Distortion, and Dual Sound pickups. The production run model was only built with DiMarzio Super Distortion pickups. This was one of Gibson’s best selling artist runs. These guitars are now valued at between $US4,000–12,000.[citation needed]The more recent 2012 “Budokan” model features mother-of-pearl block inlays (no signature at the 12th fret), a Richlite fingerboard, Grover machine heads with pearloid banjo buttons, and a grade A maple top.[44]

Bass amps come with a range of different input and output jacks, depending on the cost of the amplifier and its intended purpose. The least expensive practice amps may only have a single 1/4" input jack and no output jacks. Some practice amps and small combo amps have RCA or 1/8" inputs for plugging an MP3 player or CD player into the bass amp, to facilitate practicing with a recording. Some amps have a high-gain input, for basses which have internal preamplifiers one the instrument. The high-gain input is routed through a pad (attenuator). An amp may also have a low-gain input, which is unattenuated, for regular basses. Some combo amps have a 1/4" auxiliary input, which could be used to plug in a keyboard, drum machine or second bass.

There are nine types of guitar here: four folk, two classical, one flamenco, one jumbo and one gypsy, as well as a choice of nylon or steel strings. It works like Kontakt in that you have MIDI keys for playing notes and then control keys for the playing articulations, such as legato, palm mute, harmonics, sustain or chord detection. There are different chord types and a strumming engine to recreate the action of playing.


This is something that a lot of people get wrong. Electric Guitars are much smaller than Steel-String Acoustic Guitars and Nylon String Classical Guitars, they can basically be used by most people, but you do need to consider the extra weight. An Electric Guitar can weigh 5-6 Kg which can be difficult for children to handle. We would normally recommend children be at least 13 years before they try an Electric Guitar, but this is a generalisation and some children (sometimes as young as 10) have been ok. Every child is different, and some children may be capable at a younger age, so if you consider your child to be quite strong for their age, then by all means go for an electric. We carry a broad range of sizes in our entry level range. The correct size is most accurately determined by the player’s height, age and in some cases gender. If you can tell us these three details we can give you a personal recommendation.
When recording an electric guitar, the amp is the instrument as far as the mic is concerned, and mic position is important. While a lot of sound comes direct from the speakers as you'd expect, a significant level is also emitted from the back and sides of the box via panel vibrations. Also, an open-backed cabinet throws about as much sound out of the back of the box as it does out of the front. Choosing a mic for recording electric guitar isn't difficult, as virtually any decent mic of any type can be made to produce usable results. If I were to generalise, I'd say that British recording engineers tend to use cardioid, dynamic models while American engineers seem to prefer capacitor microphones. The dynamic mic produces a solid sound with a smooth high end, while the capacitor mic's increased definition produces a brighter, more open sound when used in the same way. However, the mic position has just as much bearing on the tone as the mic itself.
One unique application of a fuzz pedal involves starving the pedal of voltage--which will produce a scratchy, velcro-like tone. This is desirable by some musicians because it is a highly unique sound and is often employed by more avant garde musicians. This sound can be achieved by purchasing a power supply with a sag output, or using a nearly dead battery, although the pedal won't last long when using that method.
Description: Body: Maple - Flamed - Body Construction: Semi-Hollow (Chambered) - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Block - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Tune-O-Matic - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Diecast, Gold, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Sunburst, Orange
By and large, time-based effects split the guitar output into two identical signals and momentarily hold one back while allowing the other to play in real time. The two signals are mixed back into one at the output. Usually you can control the length of the delay and the amount of the signal that is affected versus the part that stays "dry" (unaffected). This latter control—found on most effects—is usually called the level control.
The two most prominent electric guitar brands overall are Fender and Gibson. Although you won't find guitars with those labels on the headstock in this price range, both of them have sub-brands under which they sell their entry level models: - Fender owns the Squier brand and Gibson owns the Epiphone brand. Other well-known brands that have guitars in this price range include Dean, ESP, Ibanez, Jackson, Kramer and Yamaha and Washburn.
I have located a semi-hollow body electric Kent guitar that has a body some what like a 335 and the neck like a fender strat. The body is a beautiful natural birdseye maple. She is in awsome shape and plays well. I have the ser# (xxx) 3 digits and I believe that it was made in Japan in the Sixty's. I have no Idea what model it is or value because I can't find out any thing about Kent guitars. I've seen Kent amps guitars & drums but no info. I welcome anything.

Searching for Guitars market values? You have come to the right place! IGuide?is proud to host the online Guitars Price Guide.The price guide is maintained by Jon R. Warren, whose price guide books have been the authority on collectibles values since 1985. The searchable database consists of detailed reports on a ever-growing list of items. Each report includes current market values in ten different grades, as well as a section for "Real Market Data", actual prices fetched at auction. The database is updated daily.
Synonymous in the electric guitar industry, the Gibson brand continues to produce some of the best electric guitars on the market, including the Les Paul Studio. Designed with a classic look that maintains the appearance of a vintage quality, this electric guitar comes with a neck that is slimmer than most traditional models, allowing for ease and smooth transitions when switching between notes. The guitar utilizes an upgraded version of humbucker PAF to cancel out any outside interference that detracts from the quality of the sound, while maple and mahogany wood are combined to deliver both definition and sustainability. Other features include traditional tuners that can be manually altered, a Graph Tech Nut for precise spacing between strings, and a neck heel with the class Les Paul design. Well reviewed and great for the price, the Les Paul Studio is one of the best electric guitars available if your cash flow allows.
The top of the archtop line featured two very nifty new models called the Vegas 40 and Vegas 66. The Vegas 40 (Teisco Del Rey EP-11T) double-cutaway thinline was promoted both in Japan and the U.S. It was a full size ES-335-style with two pickups (the large rectangular type with chrome sides and black insert, square poles), bound f-holes, volume and tone controls on the lower bout (no plastic plate) and a fancy new angular archtop Bigsby and roller bridge. The pickup selector was a rotary switch on the lower horn with a new round knob with a lever (versus the old chicken beak). The bolt-on neck had a new three-and-three head with a flared “check mark” indentation in the top, with wide wings on either side, a shape that would characterize a number of other models later in the decade. The fingerboard was bound, with dots. On the Japanese version, the headstock carried a zippy new typeface proclaiming “Vegas 40,” while the pickguard used a similar angular script for the Teisco logo. The Teisco Del Rey carried its regular sticker.
So far I’ve only tried this on breadboard, though I plan to deploy it in a new “parts” guitar I’m assembling. So far it sounds … really good. A lot like a ToneStyler, actually, but with fewer parts and handpicked values. The only tricky thing was finding a good pot value where all the action wasn’t bunched up at one end of the knob’s range. A reverse-log pot worked best for me—I got nice results with both a C500K and C1M.

Hybrid bass amplifier heads typically pair a tube preamplifier with a solid-state power amplifier. This provides the player with the best elements of both amplifier technology. The tube preamp gives the player the ability to obtain tube amplifier tone, which tube enthusiasts state is "warmer" than a solid state (transistor) preamp. As well, tube users state that tube preamps have a more pleasing-sounding, natural tone when the preamp's volume is pushed up so high that the bass signal becomes overdriven; in contrast, a solid state preamp that is pushed to the point of signal "clipping" can be harsh-sounding. Some hybrid amp heads have a bypass switch, so that the tube preamp can be bypassed, if the tube breaks or develops a technical problem. The tube preamplified signal in a hybrid amplifier head is then sent to a solid state power amplifier. Compared with tube power amps, solid state power amplifiers are more reliable, require less maintenance, less fragile and lighter in weight. A hybrid tube preamp/solid state power amp thus provides a bass player with the benefits of both technologies' strengths: tube preamp tone and solid state reliability for the power amp.
Busker? If you're a busker, you're better off with an amp that does not require a power supply. The Roland Micro Cube is a great little amp, very popular with buskers who require amplification due to its portability, cheap price and the fact it can be powered by batteries! It's pretty loud, too! Here's a great blog on some of the best amps for busking.

Launch price: £849/€850/$999 | Type: Amp modeller/multi-effects pedal | Effects: 116 | Connections: Input jack, main output (L/MONO, R) jacks, SEND1 jack, RETURN1 jack, SEND2 jack, RETURN2 jack: 1/4-inch phone type - Sub output (L, R) connectors: XLR type - Phones jack: Stereo 1/4-inch phone type - CTL4, 5/EXP2 jack, CTL6, 7/EXP3 jack, AMP CTL1, 2 jack: 1/4-inch TRS phone type - USB port: USB B type - DC IN jack - MIDI (IN, OUT) connectors | Power: AC adaptor
I've been an on/off guitar player for at least 15 years now. Never really good, but steadily improving. My hardest thing is consistent motivation. I go through spurts where I study theory and practice like crazy and then, suddenly I just stop. I got this both because I was exceited about it's teaching potential (lessions were $20/30 min when I was a kid, got this for $25) and it has got me playing again and is a lot of fun.
The first of these guitars was the Slash “Snakepit” Les Paul Standard, which was introduced by the Gibson Custom Shop in 1996. It has a transparent cranberry red finish over a flame maple top, a relief carving of the smoking snake graphic off the cover of Slash’s Snakepit‘s debut album, It’s Five O’Clock Somewhere, hand carved by Bruce J. Kunkel (owner of Kunkel Guitars – kunkelguitars.com), and a mother of pearl inlay of a cobra wrapped up the length of the ebony fretboard. Production was limited to 50, with Slash receiving the first four including the prototype, the only one with the carving on the body turned 90 degrees to be viewed right side up when displayed on a guitar stand. In 1998 Slash’s studio was broken into and his guitars were stolen, including the “Snakepit” prototype, so the Gibson Custom Shop built him a replica. These guitars are by far the rarest and most collectible of any of the Gibson Slash signature guitars, they sold for around $5,000 when new, the Hollywood Guitar Center was asking $20,000 for one in 2002.[citation needed] In 1997, Epiphone released a more affordable version of the “Snakepit” Les Paul, featuring a decal of the smoking snake logo and standard fretboard inlay.[32]

OK, so you're ready to try your hand at the electric guitar, but where do you start? A good place to start is with an electric guitar that's specifically geared toward beginners. And although many guitars cost over $1,000, there's no need to shell out that much dough for a student model/novice instrument. To help you sort through all the options, we put together a list of the best beginner electric guitars worth buying right now. So whether you’re looking to become a shredding metalhead, a cool jazz player or an all-American country star, one of these electric guitars will have you well on your way.


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What started out as Gibson’s daughter company that was tasked with producing affordable guitars, has grown into a giant. Not so long ago, Epiphone was the brand you turned to if you wanted a legit Les Paul but didn’t have the money for Gibson one.Today, things are vastly different. Gibson stepped up their game across the board, producing some of the absolute best guitar on the market.

There are only two Amazon reviews for this instrument, as it is at a higher price point than other guitars, but the reviews are very positive. The rich tone of the cedar as well as the ability to take this classical guitar into the world of electrical pickups makes this a fabulous option for the musician looking to upgrade to a more professional-sounding instrument.

Eddie is #1, or at least tied with Hendrix, who relies on reputation alone. Bon jovi's guitarist is a joke. For some reason, people (who have no idea what they are talking about) think Bon jovi is better than all of the other 80s bands that have solid guitar players that aren't on the list that are better in many ways, specifically the guitar. (definitely leppard, Guns N' Roses, Ratt, motley crue, etc.) Anyway Eddie Van Halens self taught style is the best that there is. This list is more of a popularity contest, a popularity contest where people who have no idea what they are talking about vote for the band they have heard 1 or 2 songs from. The electric guitar was played by many, for all those who can't get on the radio and name the band that is playing most of the time, better yet the album, shouldn't be voting. But if you can, vote whoever.
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Byrd recommended Kaman show his guitar to folk singer Josh White, who was performing in town at the time. Kaman promptly did so, and for White, it was love at first strum. He enthusiastically agreed to have an Ovation guitar made to his specs, and became the first Ovation endorser, in ’66 and brought his entire family to Connecticut to pick up his first guitar, playing the first Ovation concert with his new guitar. Byrd did eventually get a classical guitar from Ovation, and performed with it for many years.
On some amps with a number of input and output jacks, the jacks may be consolidated in a patch bay. Some amps have an input jack for a foot-operated switch which can be used to turn on an effect or switch to a solo channel. Some higher-end amps have a Speakon speaker jack for an extension speaker. In the 2010s, the Speakon jack is often used in high wattage amplifiers, because the design of the connector, which is shielded from human touch, prevents electrical shock from a high-powered amplifier. Some amplifiers have a "tuner out" jack, for sending the instrument signal to an external electronic tuner. Bass speaker cabinets often have two 1/4" jacks. These are provided so that one speaker cable can be plugged into the first jack and connected to the power amp; if the bassist wants to use a second cabinet, a second speaker cable is plugged into the second jack and then into second speaker.
I like most of the the 814's I've played though they seem just a bit brighter than some other guitars along that range. I prefer Collins guitars they're kind of in between the Martin sound, and the Taylor's brighter sound. After recording with several different ones. My favorites productions are Collin's OM1A , and more affordable Blueridge, and Recording king. I prefer Rosewood back and sides, Adirondack top, mahogany neck, with ebony fingerboard. Although mahogany back and sides with Sitka/ Engelmann tops sound nice too. When recording I think (might just be me) that I get better note separation from the Collins
I play a Breedlove and it compares very favorably with Martin, Taylor, and Gibson while I prefer it to Fender acoustic guitars (I think Fender electrics are much better). Beautiful tone, and in one place where I play I'm not allowed to plug in. At that place, my Breedlove is the only one of my guitars I can get sufficient volume from. My other guitars are a Martin, an Ibanez, and a Schechter. Breedlove should be in the top ten.
If you play an acoustic guitar but don’t own an amp and prefer not to (perhaps because you almost always play into a PA system) then this preamp is ideal for your situation. Not only does it give you the added control over your tone but, it also eliminates the need for an acoustic amplifier entirely, similar to the Venue DI. It’s also much cheaper than an amp.
Official Vintage Guitar Price Guide: This print guide, published by Vintage Guitar and Bass, is an annual guide that is re-published with updated information each year. The webpage above is handy because it shows links for all guides that have been published in one place and will continue adding links for future years. The link shown for each guide will take you to a store online where you can purchase the guide. It is known for being extremely thorough, and its latest edition, the 2017 guide, has appraisals for 2,000 brands of guitars, basses, amps, effects, mandolins, steels, lap steels, ukuleles and banjos.
I’m not a very good guitarist. In fact, some people would probably say I’m really awful. And that’s ok. But I’ve owned guitars. I can play a G chord. I can fumble my way through some 3-chord punk, alternative rock songs and a Beatles tune here and there. At the very least, I know a tiny bit about guitars and things. For example, I wouldn’t confuse a drum kit with a guitar, so score points for me there.
Taylor is other remarkable guitar brand which manufactures good looking guitar with easy instruction to play. And people can easily but it medium price budget. Just try out this brand and test once and you will get to know its specifications well. This has been placed on the eight positions due to its some unique characteristics including clear sound.

Have you ever heard a bridge pickup that made a guitar sound like a giant mosquito attack? If you've run into this problem, The Tone Zone is the solution. The Tone Zone is hot enough to qualify as a high-output pickup, but it has a wider dynamic range - hard picking will produce a lot of power, and softer picking will be much cleaner and quieter. It's got tremendous bass and low-mid response to reinforce the bottom end and make the overall sound bigger. The highest single notes have depth, and chords sound huge. Patented dual-resonance coils reproduce more overtones than you'd expect from such a fat-sounding pickup. It makes a great match with an Air Norton.

1959 is widely considered to be the pinnacle year for Gibson’s mid-century solid body electric guitars, and no 1959 Gibson model is more famous than the sunburst Les Paul Standard. At first a commercial failure, the model was eventually adopted by some the world’s greatest guitarists – Jimmy Page, Duane Allman, Mike Bloomfield, Keith Richards, Eric Clapton, and Billy Gibbons, to name a few. The rarity and celebrity association of the model has pushed the values of original examples into the stratosphere. Gibson Custom’s 1959 Les Paul Standard is a painstakingly-accurate replica of these highly-valuable guitars rendered in detail so intricate that even the chemical composition of the parts has been scientifically examined and re-engineered – and that’s just one small example. Sonically, visually, and tactilely, owning a 2018 Gibson Custom Historic ’59 Les Paul Standard is as close as one can get to owning a priceless original!


Since digital effects use DSP, manufacturers have made the most of the processing power by adding amp modeling features. To the point that amp modeling has become a standard feature, and has even overtaken effects in popularity. If you already have a good amplifier, then amp modeling is not important, but it's still a good addition for the extra versatility amp modeling provides.
In order to trigger these notes, a MIDI guitar controller is needed. Alot of work just to recreate what you can do on a real guitar. The only advantage to this technique, is the ability to take a MIDI track, creating this way, and substitute different guitar models to audition what might sound best. Also, the MIDI guitar track can also serve as an educational tool and how a part is performed.

Gibson's first production electric guitar, marketed in 1936, was the ES-150 model ("ES" for "Electric Spanish", and "150" reflecting the $150 price of the instrument, along with matching amplifier). The ES-150 guitar featured a single-coil, hexagonally shaped "bar" pickup, which was designed by Walt Fuller. It became known as the "Charlie Christian" pickup (named for the great jazz guitarist who was among the first to perform with the ES-150 guitar). The ES-150 achieved some popularity but suffered from unequal loudness across the six strings.
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