If you already have an electric guitar and you're looking for replacement strings, carry cases, guitar stands, or other accessories, you've come to the right place. Amazon.com offers a selection of tools and accessories designed for players of every age and skill level, from beginners to pros. Look for amplifiers, cables, and microphones too—you can enjoy great selection right here online, with no need to make a special trip to the guitar shop.
If you wanted to quantify what is meant by "best," which you really should, then we actually would need to consider the specifications of guitars in the given price range. Although there may be differences of personal preference when it comes to areas such as individual tone woods used, fretboard scale, and nut width, we could still make very good general assumptions about whether laminates are better than a solid wood model, whether synthetic fretboard material was favorable to natural wood, whether one pickup is better than two, and/or whether including a built-in tuner is preferable. In other words, Forget about the names of the manufacturers and do a real comparison of specifications of guitars in the given price range.
The color black is powerful, mysterious and evokes a sense of potential and possibility. It’s widely regarded as the single most popular color for Rock ‘n’ Roll thanks to rock pioneers such as KISS and AC/DC. Get back in black with these fine offerings from Dean with our vivid take on the classic black electric guitar with a few other shades thrown in for good measure. Plug in and play. Get your wings!
Bass effects that condition the sound, rather than changing its character are called "sound conditioners." Gain booster effects pedals and bass preamplifier pedals increase the gain (or volume) of the bass guitar signal. Bass preamplifiers for double basses are designed to match the impedance of piezoelectric pickups with the input impedance of bass amplifiers. Some double bass preamplifiers may also provide phantom power for powering condenser microphones and anti-feedback features such as a notch filter (see "Filter-based effects" section below).
This model offers the pretty standard budget Stratocaster experience, with the bright, open tone of alder as the body wood. It comes in two configurations, S-S-H and H-H, and given that the humbucker is the star, you might opt for the H-H version, especially because it comes with a coil tap. It’s a solid guitar and should give you everything you need for short money, minus the frustrations of a lot of cheap guitars out there. If you’re just starting out, you could also go cheaper with the PAC112J, but you have to give up the coil tap.
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@Christos – As mentioned in the article above, wherever they sound good to you is the best place to put them! However, traditionally people tend to put filter pedals near the beginning of the chain (like wah pedals), and volume pedals as well. An EQ can go first if you just want to EQ your guitar signal before running into your effects, or last if you want the EQ applied to your entire signal chain, or somewhere in between. It really depends on what you personally are going for.
Music Go Round® is your ultimate used gear resource—we buy used musical instruments all day, every day. We understand the value of your instruments and make it easy for you to sell or trade. Bring your used music gear, such as guitars, drums, amps, bass guitars and pro-sound equipment —we’ll pay you $$$ on the spot—and you take home that must-have piece to your collection.

The Duo-Sonic is a short-scale student model that has become highly prized for its excellent playability and tone, making it one of the best electric guitars for beginner guitarists with cash to spare. This updated model - with its slab alder body, flawless in sparkly Surf Green - features the classic offset Fender waist that gives the series its name. The three-ply white/black/white scratchplate also plays host to a chrome-tipped three-position pickup selector switch and knurled (aka easy-grip) volume and tone knobs servicing two pickups, a neck single coil plus a bridge humbucker. The latter is also coil-splittable via the push/pull tone knob. We've encountered guitars at more than twice the price that don't play anywhere near as well as this thing does. Oh, and it doesn't matter what size your hands are. If we had to use a song to describe the tonal range of the bridge pickup, we'll have Smells Like Teen Spirit, please. A clean setting here echoes the clattering rhythm voice of the song's intro while a fuzz box unleashes a racket not unlike the heavy sound Kurt craved. If it sounds like we're typecasting this guitar then rest assured the Duo-Sonic is versatile enough to handle country picking, surf, indie, classic rock, whatever. Plus, the neck pickup warms things up perfectly for clean or dirty blues lead or jazz chords.
PRS SE Standard 24 Electric Guitar The PRS SE Standard 24 is a great first or backup electric guitar. This is a reliable workhorse that more than delivers in design, build, playing comfort and overall sonic performance. It can also be your only electric guitar, but chances are you’ll want another one along the way and give in to another model - or another SE Standard 24.
I play in cover bands. Own large collection of pedals, some I love, some stink. Then I found out that the only people that care about the effects are other musicians. The people( girls dancing mostly) could care less. So now I got a tuner, and drive pedal for solo tone....that's it, and my tone is awesome and hassle free. For studio cats it may be a different story.
While all of the brands featured in this guide produce wonderful instruments, the clear all around winner is Fender. Fender somehow manages to feature the best of both worlds in nearly every category. Guitar players have been turning to Fender for over seventy years, and for good reason. The company is renowned for its high quality craftsmanship and their beautifully constructed instruments have been inspiring guitarists for decades.
About the only thing that all these producers have tended to agree on across the board is that you should try to get your guitar sound as good as you can before you even think about recording. "The stupidest thing that any musician can do," remarks Tony Platt, "is to just plug in and play and say 'make that sound good'. It doesn't work like that. I will always say to the guitar player, for instance, 'Is that sound coming out of your amplifier the sound you want to hear? If it isn't, show me what it is and we'll try to get somewhere close to that before we even put a microphone on.' It's a waste of everybody's time to sit there tweaking stuff until somebody says 'Oh that's good.'"
In the 1920s, it was very hard for a musician playing a pickup-equipped guitar to find an amplifier and speaker to make their instrument louder as the only speakers that could be bought were "radio horns of limited frequency range and low acoustic output". The cone speaker, widely used in 2000s-era amp cabinets, was not offered for sale until 1925. The first amplifiers and speakers could only be powered with large batteries, which made them heavy and hard to carry around. When engineers developed the first AC mains-powered amplifiers, they were soon used to make musical instruments louder.
The significance of Les Paul’s contributions to his Gibson guitar design remains controversial. The book “50 Years of the Gibson Les Paul” limits Paul’s contributions to two: advice on the trapeze tailpiece, and a preference for color (stating that Paul preferred gold as “it looks expensive”, and a second choice of black because “it makes your fingers appear to move faster on the box”, and “looks classy―like a tuxedo”).[11]
To preserve the clarity of the tone, it is most common to put compression, wah and overdrive pedals at the start of the chain; modulation (chorus, flanger, phase shifter) in the middle; and time-based units (delay/echo, reverb) at the end. When using many effects, unwanted noise and hum can be introduced into the sound. Some performers use a noise gate pedal at the end of a chain to reduce unwanted noise and hum introduced by overdrive units or vintage gear.[12]
Its ok to put diffrent brand pickups in, i have a guitar with an iron gear hammer head at the bridge for heavy riffing and a slash signiture at the neck for sweet blues solos. I had it wired diffrent though, 1 master tone 2 volumes and a blend knob, with the 3 way switch in the middle i was getting too much hammer head due to its out put being higher, so the blend knob allows me to fine tune the mix of the pickups.
Up next comes another compact model and our second Yamaha recommendation. This time around, we are looking at their Yamaha FSX830C model. Unlike all of the guitars we have mentioned so far, this one isn't a dreadnought. Instead, we are looking at a standard concert shape with a cutaway. Now, you do have the choice of eleven finishes and body types, and since the options are nearly endless we've narrowed down to our favorite configuration, but definitely look at the others, there's some neat options in there.
Flanging is the strongest of the standard modulation effects. The feedback control increases the depth of the 'comb filtering' produced when a delayed signal is added back to itself. Because it is such a distinctive effect, it is best used sparingly, though it can also be used to process a reverb send to add a more subtle complexity to the reverbed sound.

Vibrato design is slightly changed and enhanced with the addition of block saddles for adding a fair amount of firmness to the tone. Likewise, they also give a precise breakpoint for the strings. Talking about pickups, pac 112v is equipped with 5-way blade pickup selector. Similarly, master tone and volume controls are also provided for the neatest output.

These guitars are to hard for most people to understand, but there is so much quality to these guitars, more than most brands. Its like a science project making them most of the stuff on Manson Guitars hasn't even been heard of being used, or even invented by any other brands. Ill tell you what I wouldn't save my money up for a expensive strat that no ones really going to be impressed with or appreciate save your change for one of these bad boys, people will pass out of enjoyment though.
Guitar chords are dramatically simplified by the class of alternative tunings called regular tunings. In each regular tuning, the musical intervals are the same for each pair of consecutive strings. Regular tunings include major-thirds (M3), all-fourths, augmented-fourths, and all-fifths tunings. For each regular tuning, chord patterns may be diagonally shifted down the fretboard, a property that simplifies beginners' learning of chords and that simplifies advanced players' improvisation.[70][71][72] The diagonal shifting of a C major chord in M3 tuning appears in a diagram.
Small guitars were often looked at as mere travel or couch alternatives, but times have changed and they are making a comeback on big stages. The LX1E Little Martin is at the forefront of this rekindled interest, with artists like Ed Sheeran impressing big crowds with just his humble and small LX1E. Thankfully, its price has remained stable despite the its current worldwide recognition.
WahWah ('Filter' category): What's a guitar rack without a Wah? Cubase's is really quite good: not only can you vary the band‑pass filter frequency, you can set high‑ and low‑frequency limits, and the Q at those limits. The frequency responds to host automation, but if you want to do real‑time pedalling, the WahWah shows up as a destination in any inserted MIDI track, so you just need a MIDI foot controller. Because insert four comes before the amp simulator, adding a wah there more faithfully duplicates the traditional rock wah sound, where guitarists patched it between the guitar and (usually overdriven) amp. The filter changes thus occur before distortion, which gives a very different sound compared to placing it after distortion. For more emphasis on the wah sound, you could remove the StereoDelay or StereoEnhancer effect, and place the WahWah in one of those slots instead.
Completely agree. A couple years ago I was also wanting a software guitar to play some simple chords over a track. Instead I spent about $140 on a guitar from Craigslist. A couple weeks and a couple dozen YouTube tutorials later and I was able to play the chords myself. Learning to play the instruments is a valuable skill that will separate you from others who just use software.
The use of two or more mics is likely to result in other phase issues when these mics are combined in the mix, since they will almost certainly be capturing sound waves that reach the mic capsules at slightly different times. Whether such issues are bad enough to cause a problem (or even be heard) depends on the situation. First, if your two mics sound odd and hollow and/or lacking in low-end from the outset, flip the phase of one (usually via a switch on the preamp or afterward in your DAW) to ensure you aren’t trying to blend two mics that are reverse-phase in the first place. If your two-mic sound goes from hollow and thin sounding to fat and full, you had a reverse-phase issue. If it doesn’t improve – or gets worse – you need to consider other remedies. Once you know that both mics are at least in phase with each other, you can improve their phase relationship even further by moving the position of one around until any other sonic oddities are less obtrusive, which is simply determined by finding a pair of positions that are really smoking tone-wise.
We are your Vintage Pickup specialists.   We have cornered the market of manufacturing the most accurate vintage pickup reproductions to which can not be equaled.  Our process is to chemically analyze an original pickup magnets and wire, then we reproduce them with the exact same magnets and wire.  We don't use stock magnets or wire.   We don't degauss magnets and say they are vintage.  Our magnets are only as strong as the elemental composition will hold.  Our wire is specially manufactured for us, we have many batches of wire with all different types of resistances and O.D.'s.  Our wire also is processed differently than modern conventional wire, these little details are what makes the Klein Pickups Reproductions the most accurate in the world.   We have a full array of models that we reproduce.  Check out our site for the full list of all of our offerings.   As a small business we always appreciate your business & support.  -Thanks
Whether you have your sights set on a dreadnought acoustic or a classic Squire Strat, the guitar value packages found here consist of everything a player needs to make their guitar learning experience an exciting and enjoyable one. From Fender, Dean and Alfred to Jasmine, Ibanez and Martin, all the big names are here. You'll have no problem finding the perfect guitar value package that pertains to your specific music tastes.
It was a great guitar to learn on, but you are ready for a serious gigging guitar.  Okay, if she was your FIRST love then don't dell her, keep her around for inspiration (plus she ain't worth any money anyway).  Do NOT upgrade her.  Once you start, there will be no end.  Sure great pickups will make her sound great, but you'll also want to replace ALL the electronics, and the tuners, and the bridge, and... well, you get the idea.
At the end of 1931, Beauchamp, Barth, Rickenbacker and with several other individuals banded together and formed the Ro-Pat-In Corporation(elektRO–PATent-INstruments) in order to manufacture and distribute electrically amplified musical instruments, with an emphasis upon their newly developed A-25 Hawaiian Guitar, often referred to as the “Frying Pan” lap-steel electric guitar as well as an Electric Spanish (standard) model and companion amplifiers. In the summer of 1932, Ro-Pat-In began to manufacture cast aluminum production versions of the Frying Pan as well as a lesser number of standard Spanish Electrics built from wooden bodies similar to those made in Chicago for the National Company. These instruments constitute the origin of the electric guitar we know and use today by virtue of their string-driven electro-magnetic pick-ups. Not only that, but Ro-Pat-In was the first company in the world specifically created to manufacture electric instruments. In 1933 the Ro-Pat-In company’s name was changed to Electro String Instrument Corporation and its instruments labeled simply as “Electro”. In 1934 the name of Rickenbacher” was added in honor of the company’s principal partner, Adolph Rickenbacker. In 1935 the company introduced several new models including the Model “B” Electric Spanish guitar which is considered the first solid body electric guitar. Because the original aluminum Frying Pans were susceptible to tuning problems from the expansion of the metal under hot performing lights, many of the new models were manufactured from cast Bakelite, an early synthetic plastic from which bowling balls are made.[2]
While there are some obvious quality gaps, they do appear to be closing as time passes on. The hardware used on Epiphone is getting better, and the presence of the new ProBucker Pickups helps to elevate the brand to new heights. The fact of the matter is, while Epiphone is viewed as just being a cost friendly alternative to Gibson, guitar players gravitate to the brand anyways for its own special sound. While it may use the same Specs as a Gibson, they are far from equal guitars, including in the sound department (4).
The K-4L (Teisco Del Rey ET-460 Super Deluxe) had four of the large, chunky, single-coil pickups with chrome sides and black center insert revealing six square poles. These were controlled by four sliding on/off switches, plus a 3-position switch for solo, rhythm and super bass sounds, as well as volume and tone. The roller bridge had a spring-loaded muffler/mute.
The body of the guitar is usually made of wood; different types of woods are used by different manufacturers, and there is ongoing debate concerning which is best. Typical woods include maple, mahogany, swamp ash and alder for quality guitars, and plywood or pine for cheaper, less durable guitars. While the type of wood used in the solid body of an electric guitar will noticeably affect the sound it produces, the quality of the sound is most affected by the pickups which convert the vibration of the strings into an electrical signal, as well as the amplifier that's used to shape and model such signal. We could go on and on dissecting the technical aspects of electric guitars, and yet never get close to that which makes that music unique: it's soul. That's something that can be clearly felt and experienced by players and listeners alike, but which all the while can hardly be put into words. Enjoy the electric guitar music loops!
Electronics installs are one of my favorite jobs here at the shop and this project was one of the funnest.  Installing a Clapton pre-amp is more then just a quick wiring job because of the surface mount board.  The board needs to be routed into the body underneath the pickguard.  Setting up the router is the most time consuming part of this job and once the routing in complete the actual wiring takes only a few minutes.  The guitar was then topped off with a fret level and setup. -Evan
Engineers invented the first loud, powerful amplifier and speaker systems for public address systems and movie theaters. These large PA systems and movie theatre sound systems were very large and very expensive, and so they could not be used by most touring and gigging musicians. After 1927, smaller, portable AC mains-powered PA systems that could be plugged into a regular wall socket "quickly became popular with musicians"; indeed, "...Leon McAuliffe (with Bob Wills) still used a carbon mic and a portable PA as late as 1935." During the late 1920s to mid-1930s, small portable PA systems and guitar combo amplifiers were fairly similar. These early amps had a "single volume control and one or two input jacks, field coil speakers" and thin wooden cabinets; remarkably, these early amps did not have tone controls or even an on-off switch.[1] While we do know that these late 1920s portable PA systems were used by guitarists and singers, it is not known whether upright bass players used these PA systems.
This is also an amazing choice for kids and guitar novices. It comes in many different colors and it is quite easy to set up and tune. Once you manage to tune it, it will run for a long time. It has four tone modes and you can select one of them using a switch. It has one tone knob adjustment and one volume adjustment. It is quite easy to play and also highly comfortable.
The “fatter wire = fatter tone” equation is nothing new. Ever since jumbo frets have been available, many great players—Rory Gallagher, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Kenny Wayne Shepherd— have been known to re-fret their Fender Stratocasters in particular with jumbo wire (vintage-spec Strats arguably provide a more dramatic before and- after picture than some other guitars, since they were born with narrow frets). More metal in any fixed component usually means a greater vibrational coupling between string and wood, so there is presumably something to this theory. But what else changes with fret size?

I bought a Palmer acoustic-electric about 10 years ago, for 185.00, used, it's white, with black trim, and still plays very well. I also can't find out where it's made, the neck is still straight, and the tone is good. It says hand crafted inside, and model p-38-12 and a letter I don't recognise, or is a misprint. the pick-ups are near the last frets, small screws, almost hidden. The neck is kinda wide, but you get used to it. Thats all for now, I'll bet all their guitars are pretty good.


Rock’s ultimate minimalists, Earth reduced heavy-metal thunder to a blissful rumble in the clouds. Their pioneering 1993 drone suite Earth 2 — pulseless, fearless, relentless — was little more than Dylan Carlson’s guitar chugging away on a note or two for 73 monolithic minutes. Relieving metal and grunge from any pretense that wasn’t distortion, menace, or catharsis, Carlson found a headbanger/shoegazer home between the primal and the O)))therworldly.

1. Examples. There are a handful of examples in this book and that's about it. I expected much more in the way of alternate wiring examples but they were only mentioned in passing it seems. Additionally if you're looking for good step by step instructions you wont find it here. The instructions are average at best and never really go deeper than "put this wire here and that wire there" . It's step by step,but just barely. Don't expect any deep explanations on the theory behind why certain wirings do what they do or why they sound the way they do. It's cursory at best.


Praises and recommendations continue to flood the reviews of the Fender Super-Champ X2 HD, pointing to its great value for money as its main selling point. Even users who are not happy with some of the extra features agree that the amp gives you more than what you pay for. As expected from a Fender tube amp, clean tone is well received, while others are equally happy with the other voicings. Another plus for the Super-Champ X2 HD is that it gets good feedback from guitarists of different playing styles and instruments, be it single-coil equipped or even those with active humbucker pickups.

Slicer – A dynamic effect that sounds like your guitar tone is chopping in and out. This percussive effect is akin to sequencer-type effects used by synthesizers. The effect turns the volume of the signal on and off, and sounds like the signal is being “chopped up” or “sliced” in a specified pattern. The BOSS SL-20 Slicer features 50 patterns to turn your guitar into a groove machine!
Pitch shift effects, which includes harmony and octave pedals, are a lot of fun, and add depth and flavor to a guitar player’s sound. The effect works by taking the fundamental note being played on the guitar, and adding another note either above or below the original. Simply adding more notes will often produce odd, off-key notes if you’re not careful. Most modern pitch-shifting effects use advanced technology to make sure the added notes work harmoniously with the original.
More theory: tone knobs are basically adjustable resistors with certain values. The higher the value of your potentionmeter (hence “pots”), the more treble you allow to pass. This is why Fender guitars with their bright single coil pickups have 250K pots, while Gibsons with humbuckers have 300K to 500K pots. Some guitarists emply 1000K pots for maximum treble, and some make pots that when maxed out, make it seem to the circuit that it is not present, allowing all frequencies to pass through.
Before World War II, Epiphone was one of Gibson's fiercest competitors in the guitar market—especially when it came to archtops. With legendary models like the Broadway, Deluxe, Emperor and Triumph, they were a force to be reckoned with on the hollow-body electric guitar scene. In the 1940s, Epiphone went from one of Gibson's competitors to one of its subsidiaries, paving the way for Epiphone Electric Guitars to become synonymous with many Gibson models.  Despite this drastic shift, Epiphone continues to be renowned for their archtop electric guitars even today. Models like the Wildkat Royale and the limited edition ES-335 Pro are worthy throwbacks to that golden era of electric guitars, giving you authentic vintage sound that's perfect if you're into classic rock. Another Epiphone original that's still available today is the solid-body Wilshire. The impact that the Wilshire had on guitar design is so strong that it's still one of the first mental images that comes to mind when we think ""electric guitar.""

What guitar you get will heavily depend on what style you want to play. If you like death metal you probably don't want to buy a pink Telecaster... think about what you like and what you are going to play! But maybe you want to make a statement and be the guy playing a pointy metal guitar at a jazz jam? The guitar should reflect your personality to some degree at least!
The volume pedal is about as simple as a pedal can get. It is basically an external volume knob that you work with your foot. They are an excellent way to control the volume of your rig and can be placed at different places in your guitar chain. When placed first for example it can be great for volume swells (as we will see), reducing your amp gain by acting like your guitar’s volume knob. If placed after your gain section it will bring down your overall volume without reducing changing your tone or gain. You can really experiment with the placement of a volume pedal to see what matches your needs.
In 1954 Pat Hare produced heavily distorted power chords for several recordings (including James Cotton's Cotton Crop Blues"), creating "a grittier, nastier, more ferocious electric guitar sound,"[36] accomplished by turning the volume knob on his amplifier "all the way to the right until the speaker was screaming."[37] Link Wray's 1958 recording "Rumble" inspired young musicians such as Pete Townshend of The Who, Jimmy Page of Led Zeppelin, Jeff Beck, Dave Davies of The Kinks, and Neil Young to explore distortion by various means.[38] In 1966, the British company Marshall Amplification began producing the Marshall 1963, a guitar amplifier capable of producing the distorted "crunch" that rock musicians were starting to seek.[39][40]
This multi effects pedals brings all that shine of the studio in a single compact device. Now you have state of the art processors like flanger (click here for flange pedals), chorus, a phaser pedal, delay, a vocal effects processing device, and tremolo and pitch shifter in your bare hands. Apart from such features, you also get a mind-blowing back up of 24-bit/40 kHz resolution that turns your jamming into a soulful experience.
For an experienced guitarist, the choice of amplifier is personal and a major part of the guitarist’s sound. But most of our panelists thought that, for a beginner, it’s most important for an amp to offer a variety of good sounds so that they can find what works for them and make adjustments as their style and taste evolve. As Ken Rosser put it, “If a kid’s starting out and they’re really into Pantera, they’ll love an amp that gives them that sound, but next year they might discover Eric Clapton and want a different sound.”
Wah pedals make exactly the noise they’re named after – yep a “Wah” noise! If you say to yourself “Wah, Wah, Wah” slowly, that’s the same sound the pedal makes. Imagine a baby crying in slow motion and you kind of get the idea. The Wah sound was probably best captured on “Foxy Lady” by Jimi Hendrix and is widely used in funk and rock solos thanks to its really cool sounding effect.
If you are recording the output of a bass amp, try to use a mic that will capture more of the low-end than a typical stage mic. An SM57/58 will work, but a mic with a more extended low-frequency response would be a better choice. The Sennheiser 421 is often used, as is the classic kick drum mic, the AKG D112, which has a bumped-up response tuned specifically for low-pitched instruments. I prefer the Electro-Voice RE-20 (you know, the “announcer’s mic”)—it’s more neutral, and it has an extended low-end response, so you’ll get not just boom, but real depth.
Once The Beatles became tied to Vox amplifiers (a deal was struck early in their recording career whereby they would be provided Vox equipment for exclusive stage use), the quest for more power began. John Lennon's first Vox was a fawn-coloured twin-speaker AC15, while George Harrison's was a fawn AC30 with a top boost unit installed in the rear panel. They were later provided with twin black-covered AC30s with the rear panel top boost units. Paul McCartney was provided with one of the first transistorised amplifiers, the infamous T60, which featured an unusual separate cabinet outfitted with a 12" and a 15" speaker. The T60 head had a tendency to overheat, and McCartney's was no exception, so he was then provided with an AC30 head which powered the T60's separate speaker cabinet.
Lyle guitars are among the rarest brands of electric and acoustic guitars in the world. Produced during an indefinite timeline in the 1960s and 1970s in Japan, the history of the Lyle instrument brand remains somewhat of a mystery. Total distribution of Lyle instruments in the U.S. was very limited. The same company that produced many of them, Matsumoku, also produced the more popular Aria brand.
The effect also took Nashville by storm in the 70’s as well and was a favorite of Waylon Jennings’ music and others. What the effect does is mix the guitars signal with a slightly delayed reproduction of the signal. This delay shifts the waveform a few milliseconds thus producing the out of phase sound. It then uses a LFO (low frequency oscillator) to control the sweeping effect of the phaser. This pedal is key to the classic VH guitar sound!
Yes, but not by a guitar center tech who realistically knows fuck all about anything he is adjusting. Find a luthier out independent repair person in your area. Even if it's an hour drive, the difference in the setup will be well worth it. You will also have established a relationship with someone who will know the right way to fix it if and when something breaks.
A compressor acts as an automatic volume control, progressively decreasing the output level as the incoming signal gets louder, and vice versa. It preserves the note's attack rather than silencing it as with an Envelope Volume pedal. This adjustment of the volume for the attack and tail of a note evens out the overall volume of an instrument. Compressors can also change the behaviour of other effects, especially distortion. when applied toward the guitar, it can provide a uniformed sustained note; when applied to instruments with a normally short attack, such as drums or harpsichord, compression can drastically change the resulting sound. Another kind of compressor is the optical compressor which uses a light source (LED or lamp) to compress the signal.
Placing a texture-based effect such as chorus before distortion basically means that the chorus effect will be distorted rather than the distorted tone getting some chorus. That may sound kind or original and appealing to some but trust me – you do not want to waste your distortion pedal effect by distorting an already subtle effect. This very concept is extremely important in determining the correct placement of your effects.

Keep focused on one goal at a time. For example, you could spend a week or two really getting to know 5 chords (why 5? Just pick a realistic number for that window of time and go with it!). Then, in the next week or two, practice changing between those chords using different combinations. In the next week, work on your strumming or picking, using the chords and chord change combinations you've learned.
You will come across many people who'll give you different opinions regarding different brands, and also, there are several other reviews on the Internet too. Keep your research simple, experiment, and keep frequenting guitar shops and secondhand musical instrument stores to check out the different kinds of brands. Play as many guitars of different brands as you can, and one day, you will find your 'guitar-soulmate' (sic.), the sight and sound of which will make you go 'wow!' So, if you're new to the guitar world or have recently developed an interest in it, this Melodyful article will surely sort out your doubts. Here is a brief comparison of different guitar brands along with detailed descriptions of the tone and sound. Take a look!
Designed in collaboration with the legendary Guns N' Roses guitarist, this limited-edition Slash Firebird won't last long. After all, as Slash himself says, "Who doesn't want a Firebird?" Limited to a production run of just 900, worldwide, this version of the iconic guitar combines tradition, like the reissue Kluson banjo-style tuners, with some of Slash's signature touches like the Seymour Duncan Slash signature Alnico II pickups and flame maple top. Great for rock and blues, don't miss your chance to snap one of these up. Case sold separately.

This guitar was first introduced in 2014, and has since been one of their more popular acoustics - thanks to its USA hand-crafted quality which you can own for a relatively accessible cost. The guitar is built using North American tonewoods that include solid walnut back and sides, along with a solid Sitka spruce for the top. This configuration, along with Gibson's premium build quality results in a balanced and full sounding acoustic voice, that elegantly matches the vibe of the instrument.
His kustom masterpieces like “Slow Burn” (a 1936 Auburn boat-tail speedster), “Skyscraper” (a 1953 Buick Skylark) and his daily driver known as “The Grinch” (a 1952 Oldsmobile) are drivable works of art that defy the bland Toyota Priuses, Lexuses and Land Rover SUVs of his Northern California environs like a stiff middle-finger salute wearing a skull ring.

Stompboxes are small plastic or metal chassis which usually lie on the floor or in a pedalboard to be operated by the user's feet. Pedals are often rectangle-shaped, but there are a range of other shapes (e.g., the circle-shaped Fuzz Face). Typical simple stompboxes have a single footswitch, one to three potentiometers ("pots" or "knobs") for controlling the effect, and a single LED that indicates if the effect is on. A typical distortion or overdrive pedal's three potentiometers, for example, control the level or intensity of the distortion effect, the tone of the effected signal and the volume (level) of the effected signal. Depending on the type of pedal, the potentiometers may control different parameters of the effect. For a chorus effect, for example, the knobs may control the depth and speed of the effect. Complex stompboxes may have multiple footswitches, many knobs, additional switches or buttons that are operated with the fingers, and an alphanumeric LED display that indicates the status of the effect with short acronyms (e.g., DIST for "distortion").[5][9] Some pedals have two knobs stacked on top of each other, enabling the unit to provide two knobs per single knob space.
I’m also going to go out on a limb and suggest the earliest Univoxes also included the ‘Lectra, a version of the one-pickup Aria 1930 violin bass (made by Aria). These were basically violin-bodied basses originally inspired by the Gibson EB-0, and popularized among imports by Paul McCartney’s use of the Höfner violin bass, copied by EKO. This was a hollowbody with no f-holes, Cremona brown finish, single neck pickup, bolt-on neck with position dots along the top of the 22-fret bound rosewood fingerboard. Strings anchored to a covered bridge/tailpiece assembly.

The Orange Crush PiX CR12L is still a relatively inexpensive option for a beginner amp. In terms of the basic features, it isn’t quite the best value on the market. However, it delivers a better made, better designed beginner amp at a very reasonable price. Beginners that can afford to spend a bit more, but want a standard beginner amp might find the extra cost worth it for the extra quality of the Orange Crush PiX CR12L.


Lastly, there's Session mode. When you need to take a break from structured lessons or just want to shred for a while, enter this mode and play to your heart's content. Rocksmith 2014 will even provide you with a backup band: tell the game what instruments you want in your power trio or quartet and the AI will follow your lead on the drums, bass, keys or anything else in its arsenal. We highly recommend the kazoo.
Cool guitar! You really don’t see many of these anymore. You are correct that it’s similar to the Washburn Wing series, specifically the Washburn Eagle from the late ’70s and early ’80s. In fact, aside from different fretboard inlays and brand names on the headstocks, when you compare the two they’re nearly identical. If this connection seems odd, the occurrence of very similar guitars with different brand names is more common that many of us would think.

Two brands are synonymous with this type of instrument: Gibson and Fender.  Not only were they the earliest to bring the electric guitar to the masses, but the designs they created are still employed today, preferred by budding beginners and working professional musicians alike.  Other companies have made their mark in the market by creating variants on Gibson’s and Fender’s original designs, but they are still identified through the names that the originals were given.
Loved this guitar a lot😘, been going back and forth to our nearest guitar center and to he honest with you, I tried the Taylor gs mini, MartIn Black electric acoustic, Breedlove electric acoustc, but man, when I tried and started playing this awesome Ibanez AW54CEOPN, I was blown away!!! The sound was loud and cleat the tone was awesome, the color was fantastic! For the price of $299.00 was very cheap for the quality and sound that this guitar can offer👍🏽👍🏽👍🏽

Control knobs and buttons are typically on the front of the cabinet or chassis, though in some cases, the knobs are on a recessed panel at the back of the top of the amplifier. The most basic amps only have a few knobs, which typically control volume, bass and treble. More expensive amps may have a number of knobs that control pre-amp volume (or "gain"), distortion or overdrive, volume, bass, mid and treble, and reverb. Some older amps (and their re-issued versions) have a knob that controls a vibrato or tremolo effect. The 1/4" input jack is typically mounted on the front of the amplifier. In the simplest, least expensive amplifiers, this 1/4" jack is the only jack on the amplifier.


German tonemeister and Vintage endorsee, the one and only Thomas Blug arrives in the UK for a promotional tour this weekend. Following an appearance at Northern Guitar Shows London International Guitar Show at Kempton Park Racecourse on Sunday, Thomas will perform the following in-store clinics to launch the brand new BluGuitar AMP1 Mercury Edition.
Another great option if your budget for an acoustic is $500 or less is the BG 40 from Blueridge. It has a sitka spruce top with mahogany back and side. It features scalloped bracing for a clean and crisp tone. Owners describe it’s tone as loud and bassy, and compared the neck width to that of an electric. This could be a plus for those with smaller hands. This guitar also features a bone and nut saddle and East Indian rosewood fingerboard for smooth playability. Based on customer feedback, this is a great budget choice that won’t let you down.
If a love of flamenco and salsa music sung by the Gipsy Kings brought you to the best classical guitar, then you are going to want to read this review. The Cordoba company, as you can now see, has quite the reputation for quality guitars, and their GK Studio Negra left-handed model—a Gipsy Kings signature instrument—could easily be the right one for you (no pun intended).
Still available in Japan in ’66, but not promoted in the U.S. by Teisco Del Rey, were the Teisco TG-64 “monkey grip” guitar, its companion TB-64 bass, plus the similar non-grip NB-1 and NB-4 basses. The three-pickup TG-64 had a striped metal guard and the four-and-two hooked headstock with a metal plate on the front. The TB-64 probably still sported a plastic guard and three pickups. However, in the Japanese catalog from ’66, the TB-64 appears to be a 6-string bass, with an elongated variant of the hooked headstock with a rounded tip and a four-and-two tuner arrangement.
“Volume pedals work well just before any delay or echo effects, as you can fade in and out of delays smoothly. A volume pedal at the very end of the chain just before the amp input will control master volume, and can also be used as a mute. Reducing the signal at this point will also reduce any noise. I put clean boosts right at the end—also just before the amp input—to ensure that any effects earlier in the chain would not be overloaded.”
The American David Schecter founded his company in 1976 in order to produce spare parts for guitars already available (especially Fender and Gibson). But since 1979 the brand has been manufacturing its own guitars. In the beginning they had only Fender-based models but nowadays, Schecter guitars are clearly conceived for hairy players (but not exclusively), with models like the Hellraiser or the Damien. Among their most famous users are Billy Corgan, Eddie Vedder, Pete Townshend, Mark Knopfler, Matthew Bellamy... And the brand also presented its first amps at the latest NAMM show.
Steel-string Acoustic Guitar The steel-string acoustic guitar is a modern form of guitar that descends from the classical guitar, but is strung with steel strings for a brighter, louder sound. The most common shape is the dreadnought (originally developed by C.F. Martin & Company), which incorporates a deep soundbox and a smaller and less pronounced upper bout, giving it a wedge-shaped appearance. Other popular body styles include the larger jumbo body shape, as well as the smaller auditorium (000) body style and even smaller grand concert (00) body style. Check out the Martin Ed Sheeran X Signature Acoustic Electric for a smaller body type with a punchy sound.

Located on the corner of Menaul Boulevard and San Pedro Drive NE, Guitar Center Albuquerque is just a short drive from the Lousiana Blvd. exit off the I-40. Since opening our doors in March of 2004, we've been making the dreams of musicians become realities. We take pride in our dedication to customer service and our in-depth knowledge of the latest and greatest musical trends. We invite you to come check out all we have to offer at Guitar Center Albuquerque. First and foremost in Guitar Center Albuquerque, we strive to give you the experience that Guitar Center is known for nationwide: big-store selection and prices with small-shop expertise and personality. From sales to repairs, our staff in each department is well-trained to cater to music-lovers from all over Albuquerque. Our store is open every day of the week, so there's always a right time to visit even if you're on a busy schedule.
Where you let the overdrive or distortion fill out the tone generated by only three notes. Mess around with different pairs of notes and you'll soon find what sounds good with distortion and what sounds harsh and dissonant. A simple root fifth octave triad is the bread and butter of overdrive and distortion playing. Sometimes if you have a lot of gain on a hot distortion setup you may need to roll off the highs a bit as the high end harmonics can get a bit too brassy on top and harsh on your ears. Have a blast.
ESP Is simply the best brand you could ever use, from it’s awesome quality ESP too their good quality/price realtion with LTD. You can use an LTD distressed series for playing classic rock, for blues also, and the Xtone series make their work too, and from their LTD standard and deluxe series to their ESP standard and signature series for the best and widest range of metal you could ever imagine, with them you can from Black Sabbath or Ozzy Osbourne, to Metallica and Children of Bodom. (Kirk Hammett, James Hetfield, Alexi Laiho, Henkka, Michael Paget, Gus G, Tom Araya, Jeff Hanneman and almost any japanese guitar and bass player that is considered good [Seriously, without exagerations or lying] endorses ESP guitars and basses).
“The California Series captures the true meaning of a Fender acoustic guitar,” said Billy Martinez, VP Category Manager – Acoustics and Squier Divisions. “From the iconic 6-inline Stratocaster headstock to the original Fender body shapes and organic styling, everything about these guitars is uniquely Fender making them the ultimate tools for artistic creative expression. Whether you’re at the beach or rocking out with a band on stage, we’re offering players of all levels a chance to express their own creative style, standing out in the crowd with the bright colors and energy these guitars give off.
The stringed, chord-playing rhythm can be heard in groups which included military band-style instruments such as brass, saxes, clarinets, and drums, such as early jazz groups. As the acoustic guitar became a more popular instrument in the early 20th century, guitar-makers began building louder guitars which would be useful in a wider range of settings.
What’s more, musicians will (or at least modern musicians have the opportunity to) learn about their niche area through metadata analysis and find out what makes the fans tick, so that they can pick up on this connection between music maker and listener. As such, how can you really be sure that the person playing the drums, strumming on the guitar or singing the song on your favourite album is actually feeling the music in the magical way we’d like to think they are?

This guitar was first introduced in 2014, and has since been one of their more popular acoustics - thanks to its USA hand-crafted quality which you can own for a relatively accessible cost. The guitar is built using North American tonewoods that include solid walnut back and sides, along with a solid Sitka spruce for the top. This configuration, along with Gibson's premium build quality results in a balanced and full sounding acoustic voice, that elegantly matches the vibe of the instrument.
Of all the positions GC interviews for, tech has the highest standards and is arguably more demanding in terms of hours worked and product knowledge required than store manager. The tech for the store I worked at frequently worked 60+ hours a week to keep turn-around time to a week or less and his set-ups were so good and in such high demand that the store got an exception to the chain-wide $35 set-up price to charge $50 in hopes of lightening his load/keeping his overtime down, but he still got just as much work as he did before. If you're unsure about the reputation of your local GC's tech, don't be afraid to call the other stores and ask them who the best tech in their district is, because they'll usually be pretty straight forward with you. Most GC sales people have had their instruments set up by their in-store tech at least once and if their tech isn't very good, they'll tell you who you should go to if you want good work done because it's an absolute pain in the ass dealing with a customer whose instrument wasn't set up right when the tech is gone for the day and having to deal with the tech's fuck-up.
A Twitter follower once asked me what electric guitar I’d recommend for a beginner with a max budget of around $200 total (for guitar, amp, tuner, etc.). So, I wrote a blog post for her where I recommended two all-in-one “starter packs” that are a great value for someone with such a low budget. The guitars in those starter packs are worth around $150, give or take.
Like Television not too long before them, Fugazi founders Ian MacKaye and Guy Picciotto engaged in a locomotive, dub-influenced dual-guitar shouting match. Though most of the talk around Fugazi inevitably leads back to their founding ethos, that way of thinking and operating permeated the music as well: Together, MacKaye and Picciotto were anti-frontmen, playing like a living, fire-breathing, two-pronged embodiment of democracy.
Most Heroic Moment: The simple, searing lines of 1990’s “Turnover.” D.B.
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I was paging through my daughter's Rolling Stone Magazine today and saw a small article with three different artists that use Harmony Guitars and they were singing their praises. I'm an old dude (or shall we say vintage)who's not familiar with all of the new bands popping up today, so I can't even tell you who these artists are. However, I did find it interesting that Rolling Stone did a spot on these guitars. I was too young to get my hands on many Harmonies when I was a kid, so I can't comment on their quality, but I know they were budget guitars and weren't considered anything special back then.

The iconic Les Paul Standard is celebrated by the world’s greatest musicians as the standard for perfection in the world of electric guitars. The new Les Paul Standard features the popular asymmetrical SlimTaper neck profile with Ultra-Modern weight relief for increased comfort and playability. Impeccable looks are highlighted by the powerful tonewood combination of mahogany back and carved maple AAA figured top. BurstBucker Pro humbuckers provide modern and classic tones, while immense tonal variety from comes from 4 push-pull knobs. Includes hardshell case.


The Gibson-owned Epiphone Company makes around 20 models of the Les Paul, most are similar copies of Gibson-made models, although when inspected closely, the Gibson originals are most often superior in craftsmanship and materials. Made in places outside the U.S., the Epiphone Les Pauls are made from more commonly available woods using less expensive foreign labor and have less hand detailing than the Gibson models, and, as a result, sell for a lower price. Epiphone Guitar Co. has been owned by Gibson Guitars since the 1950s. Once Gibson purchased Epiphone they quickly began making lower-quality guitars based on Gibson designs.[24]
*We build all of our Custom Shop and Semi-Custom instruments from scratch and on demand - therefore, Custom Shop and Semi-Custom orders are fulfilled in the order in which they were received. These times can vary due to demand and the custom options you choose. Our production/assemble time frame: 20 - 25 working days since our professional Control Team and Supervisor Engineer will ensure that your ordered guitar is top notch considering the fact that this guitar is intricate to assemble and they check very carefully every detail such as the finish, fret work, pickups, strings. And also, they will test the sound quality. We do not rush up the process of manufacturing your guitar since we would like to deliver to you best quality performance.
The Continental and other Vox organs such as the Jaguar, the Continental II, Super Continental, and the Continental 300 share characteristic visual features including orange and black vinyl coverings, stands made of chromed steel tubing, and reversed black and white keys. The English wood key single manual Continental (V301J) is increasingly collectable, although the wood key American-built (V301H) and plastic key Italian-built models (V301E, V301E/2 and V302E) also command premium prices. Jennings sold production rights for the Vox Continental organ to an Italian subsidiary of Thomas Organ in 1967. Under the new production agreement, the Continental was gradually and subtly altered in quality and sound, and reliability became questionable. For example, Ray Manzarek of The Doors had been using a Vox since 1966, but could no longer trust it during performances because of the problems in quality after 1967, and thus was forced to look elsewhere for an organ. He settled on the Gibson Kalamazoo, because it had a flat top like the Vox Continental, so it could accommodate the physical requirements of the Fender Rhodes Piano Bass, which was the bass instrument for The Doors in concert.

This is a gradual and repetitive change in volume, going up and down. Done slowly and subtly it can be very gentle, but turn up the controls and you get a surf-guitar like shimmer. On extreme settings the signal turns from fully on to fully off sharply and repetitively, giving a robotic sound. Controls are usually rate and depth, with a third control to affect how sharply the volume changes occur – whether they are smooth and gradual or sharp and sudden. Tremolo pedals are often equipped with tap tempo too, allowing you to match the volume changes with the tempo of the song.

Among the popular performers of Hawaiian (and most other types of) music on the Vaudeville music hall circuit was Roy Smeck (1900-1994). Smeck was a talented instrumentalist who played guitar, banjo, ukulele, and lap steel guitar, earning the sobriquet “Wizard of the Strings.” Smeck made quite a few recordings and starred in part of the first “sound on disk” movie that was released in 1926. Like many other performers, Smeck endorsed a number of instruments by various manufacturers over the years, but is probably best known for the line of Harmonies introduced in 1927 with the pear-shaped Vita-Uke. Smeck’s name would be associated with Harmony instruments until near the end of the company’s run in 1973.
There are tons of different online retailers and ebay stores that you can find a great deal on parts and supplies, but those were just some of the ones that I have purchased on and been satisfied with their service and parts. NOTE: Do your research when it comes to parts and the quality of the parts you buy. I like to get feedback and reviews from Harmony-Central. You might not be able to get reviews on everything, but it helps you out allot.
PUENTE HARDTAIL Para cambiar las cuerdas, pase las nuevas cuerdas por los ojales correspondientes situados en la parte posterior de la guitarra y llévelas por encima de la silleta. Puede ajustar la octavación girando el tornillo de octavación situado en la parte posterior del puente con un destornillador Phillips para desplazar la silleta adelante o atrás.

This open-C tuning gives the initial harmonic series when a C-string is struck.[4] The C-C-G-C-E-G tuning uses the harmonic sequence (overtones) of the note C. When an open-note C-string is struck, its harmonic sequence begins with the notes (C,C,G,C,E,G,B♭,C).[3][4] This overtone-series tuning was modified by Mick Ralphs, who used a high C rather than the high G for "Can't Get Enough" on Bad Company. Ralphs said, "It needs the open C to have that ring," and "it never really sounds right in standard tuning".[5]
Valco manufactured Spanish acoustic guitars, metal-bodied resonator guitars, electric lap steel guitars, and vacuum tube amplifiers under a variety of brand names including Supro, Airline, Oahu, and National. They also made amplifiers under contract for several other companies such as Gretsch, Harmony, and Kay. In the 1950s they began producing solid body electric guitars.
ESP Guitars makes seven types, the Eclipse series, James Hetfield Truckster, and Kirk Hammett KH-3 from ESP, the LTD EC series and Truckster, the Edwards E-LP series, and the Navigator N-LP series, which are based on the Les Paul design. Certain EC models have 24-fret necks and active electronics using EMG pickups instead of the standard passive pickups and 22 frets found in the traditional Les Paul. The Edwards and Navigator lines are made in Japan, and available only on the Japanese market; they come standard with Gotoh hardware and Seymour Duncan pickups (EMG pickups in a few models), and unlike the EC and Eclipse series guitars, which are updated variants on the Les Paul, these are made to be as close to the Gibson 1959 Les Paul design as possible, in the vein of the late 1970s and 1980s “lawsuit” model guitars from Tokai, Burny, and Greco, complete with Gibson style headstocks.
The volume pedal is about as simple as a pedal can get. It is basically an external volume knob that you work with your foot. They are an excellent way to control the volume of your rig and can be placed at different places in your guitar chain. When placed first for example it can be great for volume swells (as we will see), reducing your amp gain by acting like your guitar’s volume knob. If placed after your gain section it will bring down your overall volume without reducing changing your tone or gain. You can really experiment with the placement of a volume pedal to see what matches your needs.
In Vietnam, electric guitars are often used as an instrument in cải lương music (traditional southern Vietnamese folk opera), sometimes as a substitute for certain traditional stringed instruments like the Đàn nguyệt (two-stringed lute) when they are not available. Electric guitars used in cải lương are played in finger vibrato (string bending), with no amplifiers or sound effects.
Back in the 1930s jazz and big-band guitarists began to make the switch to electric guitars in order to compete with the volume of other instruments onstage. Early electric instruments were hollow-body guitars. They were big, and featured an arched top that helped with power and projection. They had f-holes to facilitate amplification acoustically, and the first rudimentary pickups that allowed the guitar to be plugged into an external amplification system.
History: Before solid-state technology, Valve amps were manually assembled by large teams of women in conditions that would not be accepted today. For domestic application the majority were not well made. Before manufacture, designs were scrutinised and modified to reduce production cost. Valve count kept to minimum, cheapest components used at voltage rating limits, safety standards almost non-existent.
Although Gibson guitars are expensive, they are the highest quality guitars out there. The guitar is made of high quality wood that makes your guitar create rich and smooth tunes. One of the most famous guitars created by Gibson is the Les Paul. The Les Paul is used by multiple celebrated musicians all over the world and it has been used many different times in musical history, meaning this guitar has survived for ages. Gibson is one of the most popular and praiseworthy guitar names on the market. Investing in a Gibson will be like carrying an award in your hands.

Possibly the most famous of all guitar effects, the talk box has its indelible place in history.  The guitar signal is pushed thru a speaker into a tube that the player holds in their mouth.  This tube is usually run up a mic stand, so that the player can use the embouchure of the mouth cavity to control vowel sounds that are then picked up by the microphone and pushed back through the PA system.
Great condition. With the exception of the gold foil missing from the back pad, allowing the pink to show thru, the guitar is entirely original. Has a couple of small spots of edge wear, and a chip on the front, the size of this 'o'. Plays and sound fine. Has correct amount of neck relief (.010") at the 7th fret, when fretted at the first fret and the body fret. Includes original chipboard case.
In rock music (and even in some pop music), guitarists often substitute power chords for full chords to enable the vocal part to stand out more from the music. You can hear this kind of power chord sound in old songs such as “Johnny B. Goode” and “Peggy Sue.” The following figure shows the power chords that you use to produce this kind of sound. Play this progression by using either two- or three-string power chords.

The body of the instrument is a major determinant of the overall sound variety for acoustic guitars. The guitar top, or soundboard, is a finely crafted and engineered element often made of spruce, red cedar, redwood or mahogany. This thin (often 2 or 3 mm thick) piece of wood, strengthened by different types of internal bracing, is considered the most prominent factor in determining the sound quality of a guitar. The majority of the sound is caused by vibration of the guitar top as the energy of the vibrating strings is transferred to it. Different patterns of wood bracing have been used through the years by luthiers (Torres, Hauser, Ramírez, Fleta, and C.F. Martin being among the most influential designers of their times); to not only strengthen the top against collapsing under the tremendous stress exerted by the tensioned strings, but also to affect the resonation of the top. Some contemporary guitar makers have introduced new construction concepts such as "double-top" consisting of two extra-thin wooden plates separated by Nomex, or carbon-fiber reinforced lattice - pattern bracing. The back and sides are made out of a variety of woods such as mahogany, Indian rosewood and highly regarded Brazilian rosewood (Dalbergia nigra). Each one is chosen for its aesthetic effect and structural strength, and such choice can also play a significant role in determining the instrument's timbre. These are also strengthened with internal bracing, and decorated with inlays and purfling.

All the connections are conveniently grouped together on the back of the unit. You have a mono 1/4” input for your guitar and a stereo output which allows you to listen to your playing on headphones, speakers, or a guitar amp (there’s also a balanced XLR output if you need it). Zoom also includes a USB connection, which not only can power this pedal via USB, but also turns the Zoom G3X into an audio interface! This way you can easily record in your favorite DAW. The USB connection also means you can use Zoom's free Edit & Share software so you can easily manage your patches on your computer. Just like everything else on the Zoom G3X, the input and output options are just right and provide plenty of flexibility. There’s really no major omission we can think of.

A looper pedal or "phrase looper" allows a performer to record and later replay a phrase or passage from a song. Loops can be created on the spot during a performance or they can be pre-recorded. Some units allow a performer to layer multiple loops. The first loop effects were created with reel-to-reel tape using a tape loop. High-end boutique tape loop effects are still used by some studios who want a vintage sound. Digital loop effects recreate this effect using an electronic memory.


This is another really nice 12" 16 ohm guitar speaker from 1973, and is a matched pair with the one listed earlier, it has its original Pulsonic H1777 cone, and is in excellent condition, there it also has a tiny repair on the edge of the cone but this doesn't affect the sound in any way.Cash on collection preferred but carriage can be arrange if required.
Johnny Marr is an iconic and influential guitarist best known for his work in the Smiths, which broke up in 1987. His guitar phrases and his genius for crafting textured and tonally rich rhythmic leads has influenced countless rock guitarists of the last quarter-century. Since leaving the Smiths, Marr hasn't exactly been idle or resting on his laurels.
Epiphone returns with yet another Solid and high-quality Les Paul Standard electric guitar, this time, an ebony styled-version of the Les Paul series. The body of this ebony version is made of solid and durable mahogany wood construction, including a maple top design. The fretboard of this Epiphone Ebony version electric guitar is made of rosewood, containing 24.75 scales.
Guitar Center added a replica of the “Black Beauty” Les Paul Custom, with three pickups, that Peter Frampton used as his main guitar from his days in Humble Pie through his early solo career, photographed playing the instrument on the front jackets of his albums Frampton and Frampton Comes Alive. It has all the same qualities such as the three uncovered humbucking pickups and missing pickguard. The Black Beauty was not issued until 1957; however, the one given to Frampton by a fan named Mark Mariana was a 1954 model that had been routed out for a middle pickup.
"NEW-DEMO" means that we are an authorized dealer of the item and acquired it directly from the manufacturer. We consider the item to be new because it has not been sold to or owned by another customer. NEW-DEMO items, however, have been on display in an active retail music store for some length of time. As a result, these items may have been tried out by other customers. They may be dusty, have fingerprints, stick marks, pick swirl, etc. Please refer to the item's description for more detailed information. All NEW-DEMO items come with a manufacturer's warranty (where applicable), but some may not have original manufacturer's packaging. Please refer to our Appearance and Technical Condition scales below for more information about the item’s appearance and condition. 
"The library has a huge amount of great samples covering every nook & cranny of the electric guitar, and it really is of the highest quality... I could tell that they must have put in a gigantic effort into the scripting, sampling, and design... It’s easy to use, has extensive options for articulations, sounds even better with its effects, and yet it can have a pristine, clean sound as well. I highly recommend it... When they say 'Absolute Electric Guitar' on their website, those words are a lot to live up to [and] they achieved this with a brilliant product and awesome sound." Rob Mitchell (SoundBytes Magazine)

In the early 1960s the Brothers Grim became the first American group use Vox Amplifiers. Joe Benaron, CEO of Warwick Electronics Inc. / Thomas Organ Company, the United States distributor of Vox, along with Bernard Stockly (London), importer of Challenge pianos to the United States, arranged for the boys to have full use of the tall Super AC 100 Vox amps (4×12" speakers). The solid-state version of this amp (known in the USA as the "Super Beatle") was produced to cash in on the Beatles-Vox affiliation, but was not nearly as successful as the valve AC30 and AC15 models.
Soundwise, it still packs the same AudioDNA2 processor but somehow sounds 'better', I think John Johnson (founder of Digitech before it was sold to Harman re-hired to work on this RP) had a lot to do with the improvements. I think they have made this with it being used/abused in mind, from the rigid metal chasis, to the USB connectivity, line-in jack to play along backing tracks, headphone input, stereo out, built-in looper (40 seconds) and the awesome Stompbox and SoundCheck features.
You can always rely on Epiphone to provide an acoustic guitar with eye-catching looks and a quality sound at an excellent price, and the EJ-200CE is certainly a testament to this. Based on one of the world’s most famous guitars, the J-200 (introduced in 1937), this revamped model offers an excellent mix of vintage style and modern components, perfect for any level of skill.
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Regardless of the invention debate, it is clear that former radio repairman Leo Fender was the first to mass-produce and sell a successful solid-body Spanish-style electric guitar. His company’s simply constructed 1950 Fender Broadcaster (renamed Telecaster as the result of a trademark dispute), with its flat body and a neck bolted onto it, was initially derided by competitors as too simple and lacking in craftsmanship. Gibson’s president Ted McCarty dismissed it as a “plank guitar.” Yet everything about its patented, practical design was optimal for mass-producing an inexpensive solid-body guitar, earning Fender the moniker “the Henry Ford of the electric guitar.”
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The neck is also crafted from mahogany, topped by a 20-fret rosewood fingerboard with a standard scale length of 25.5" and a nut width of 1.75". In contrast to its vintage looks, the neck follows a slim "C" profile that is as easy on the hands as it is on the ears. Finally, this guitar is wrapped in a nice gloss cherry red finish that stands out easily on any stage. Check this one out if you're looking for a quality mahogany body acoustic guitar with an old school vibe.

For this particular setup, I used a Fender Stratocaster. George used those quite frequently. They used a Tweed Champ. Now, these were being used quite a bit around that time. Eric Clapton was using them on Layla, and word is that when Clapton was playing on All Things Must Pass, he had his Champ there, and I know for a fact that George had a collection of tweed amps.
PICK GUARD - KRAMER 450 - LO GIBSON - GOLDTOP - GIBSON SG CUSTOM SHOP - THUNDER JET - TAKAMINE - GIBSON 1959 - 450 12 - 66 ES-330 - 1972 - HAGSTROM F-300 RED LEFTHANDED - GIANNINI - BALLADEER - WHITE LES PAUL - HAGSTROM BRIDGE - CONRAD - LES PAUL 1953 - PROJECT - WASHBURN EA27 - KALAMAZOO KG - FRAMUS BASS - BASS VI - 1967 - ES-330 - HOLLOW - 1981 LES - BALDWIN BABY BISON - STELLA ACUOSTIC - MARTIN N-20 - VAN EPS - LES PAUL RECORDING - PIG - MARLBORO - HAGSTROM F12-S - FENDER STRATOCASTER 63 - LS 6 - HARMONY - J-45 - UNIVOX BASS

Before we wade in, please note that National Dobro and subsequently Valco, more than most other manufacturers, were notorious for putting together guitars with parts left around. This, combined with the fact that they routinely used components (especially bodies) provided by other manufacturers, means that you are likely to find instruments with details inconsistent with catalog descriptions, and they may just be Kosher.


@Joe Mullikin – Yes, you can place each of the Strymon pedals within their own loop while engaged in your switcher using the LEFT INPUT and LEFT OUTPUT jacks of these pedals and just use the loop switcher controls to bring the effects in and out of the signal path. Make sure to use standard mono TS instrument cables as the jacks are unbalanced and do not benefit from TRS connections.
By the way, if you like older Japanese guitars, you must obtain a copy of Mr. Noguchi’s book, ’60s Bizarre Guitars (Guitar Magazine Mooks, Rittor Music). It is lusciously printed in color and, while the text is in Japanese, model names and dates are in English, so it is an invaluable reference tool, as well as a fun coffee table book. Some of the following information on specific guitars comes from this source, as well as catalogs and other research materials kindly provided by dedicated guitar fans in both the U.S. and Japan. It’s virtually impossible to reconstruct a comprehensive chronology, but we will attempt to document some broad-brush details and periods of what guitars we can, and with luck you’ll be able to search out and identify your favorite Teiscos with much greater authority. Your corrections and additions are most welcome!
There is a historical parallel between musical styles (baroque, classical, romantic, flamenco, jazz) and the style of "sound aesthetic" of the musical instruments used, for example: Robert de Visée played a baroque guitar with a very different sound aesthetic from the guitars used by Mauro Giuliani and Luigi Legnani – they used 19th century guitars. These guitars in turn sound different from the Torres models used by Segovia that are suited for interpretations of romantic-modern works such as Moreno Torroba.
After being branched into ESP-LTD designs, the company made its signature guitars accessible to the masses. This was done by launching these guitars with the affordable price range. The design of ESP-LTD guitars is quite similar to the typical ESP designs like the Eclipse. Its ESP-LTD EC-1000 is a fantastic guitar model for rock, with high-quality features. In fact, if you are looking for something that could substitute the Les Paul guitar, EC-1000 will be the right choice.
The modern classical guitar is usually played in a seated position, with the instrument resting on the left lap - and the left foot placed on a footstool. Alternatively - if a footstool is not used - a guitar support can be placed between the guitar and the left lap (the support usually attaches to the instrument's side with suction cups). (There are of course exceptions, with some performers choosing to hold the instrument another way.)
Most bass speaker cabinets employ a vented bass-reflex design, which uses a port or vent cut into the cabinet and a length of carefully measured tubing or pipe to increase the low-frequency response and improve the speaker system's efficiency. To give an example, if one compares two bass cabinets, each with the same type and power of power amplifier, one cabinet being a sealed box and the other being a vented or ported cabinet, most listeners will perceive that the ported cabinet produces more bass tone and deeper bass tone. Less commonly, some bass speaker cabinets use one or more passive radiator speakers, a voice coil-less "drone cone" which is used in addition to a regular woofer to improve the low frequency response of a cabinet. Passive radiator speakers help to reduce the risk of overextension. Acoustic suspension designs with sealed cabinets are relatively uncommon because they are less efficient. Some cabinets use a transmission-line design similar to bass-reflex, and in rare cases, some large cabinets use horn-loading of the woofers (e.g., the Acoustic 361 18" speaker cabinet from the late 1960s).
In the past, buying an electric guitar wasn’t always as satisfying as it should be. In the days before the internet, you had to rely on the wisdom of your local guitar store, a couple of magazines, and your gut instinct. You may have ended up with something half decent – if you were lucky – but rarely would you have found your ‘dream guitar’. In fact, without the internet, you probably weren’t aware it even existed!
In 1958, Gibson made a radical design change to their Junior and TV models: with the design change came cosmetic changes to these guitars that would later take on enormous importance. To accommodate player requests for more access to the top frets than the previous designs allowed, Gibson revamped both these electric guitar models with a new double-cutaway body shape. In addition, the Junior’s fresh look was enhanced with a new cherry red finish, while the re-shaped TV adopted a new, rather yellow-tinged finish for its new design.
Who created the first distorted electric guitar sound in history? I’ll tell you: the first adventurous player to plug a hollowbody guitar into a tube amplifier way back in the 1930s, that’s who. We might have forgotten his name, or maybe there was no one there to witness the event, but you can bet he lifted up that guitar, checked out his new amp, saw that the loudness control went to 10, and cranked it up to hear just what it could do.
Best brand in price/quality relation. I have 4 guitars, an epiphone explorer goth made on korea, and Jackson KV2 made on usa and 2 ibanez. RG320PG P2 and a RGT6EX, both made on indonesia. The first one is the cheaper, but the sustaine, action a comfort is very nice for a bugget guitar. I've played bugget guitars of other brands, and ibanez is far superior. In fact, my RG320 P2 is nice as some others guitars that cost twice of it price. Mi RGT6EX is excellent, to me must worth $1000 USD but the real price is close $800 USD or less.
He may have spent much of his Guns n' Roses prime shirtless, drunk and surrounded by snakes, but Slash brought good taste and restraint back to hard-rock guitar. "It was a stripped-down rock & roll sound compared to what everybody else was doing," says Slash. He could riff like Joe Perry, and intertwine, Stonesstyle, with Izzy Stradlin. And lyrical solos like the from-the-mountaintop grandeur of "November Rain" were permanently laced into the songs' fabric. "It's hard to play those solos any other way," says Slash. "It will sound wrong."
Now we’ve moved away from the three ‘main’ shapes of steel-strung acoustics, we start looking at the off-shoots and variants which exist to give players even more options and opportunity to find the guitar which is exactly right for them. First among them is probably still well-known and identifiable in itself; the round-shoulder dreadnought. Again, these are largely Gibson-led creations, and include among their ranks the famous J-45 style famously employed by the Beatles and Noel Gallagher.
The Line 6 Spider Classic 15 is similar in many ways to the Fender Champion 20. It offers digital simulations of various amplifiers and built-in special effects. The two amps are usually priced identically. The reasons we didn’t make the Spider Classic 15 our top pick is that it’s much larger and heavier than the Fender (about 40 percent overall, at 14.7 by 15.7 by 8.3 inches and 18.4 pounds), and its controls work in an unusual fashion that sometimes frustrated our panelists.

Based on Mesa's flagship Mark V, the Mark Five: 25 head is small, perfectly formed and typical of Mesa's superlative design and attention to detail. Two independent channels, each with three very different voice presets, combine with Mesa's iconic five-band graphic EQ for a choice of 12 sounds. You can footswitch between the channels, with the graphic on or off for quasi four-channel operation and preset 25 or 10 watts per channel. One of the best features lives on the back panel: a CabClone speaker-emulated direct output, with a speaker defeat for silent recording or practice, using the built-in headphone socket. Despite the Mark Five: 25's long feature list, it's very easy to use and its tones are sensational. The rhythm channel covers the shimmering clean tones of the modern Boogie and the fatter 'blackface'-inspired midrange of the fabled Mark I, while the Mark V crunch voice is so deep and three-dimensional you could record an entire album with it. The lead channel is equally inspiring, with a perfect rendition of the Mark IIC's overdrive tone (arguably the most coveted Boogie sound), along with more modern distortion effects that sound unbelievably good when tweaked with the graphic. The Mark Five: 25 is one of the best small Boogies we've ever heard, which means it's one of the best small amps there is.


 This Tempo guitar combo amplifier with tremolo and reverb effects is well-used, but still delivers great retro sound. If you're looking for genuine vintage guitar sounds, the Tempo delivers in a delightfully trashy way. The sound is twangy and clear, but you can overdrive the volume a bit to get a raw lo-fi sound perfect for garage punks, mod revivalists, surf rockers, etc. and This solid state amp was made by Japanese guitar manufacturer Tempo. It has three inputs, just like you'd expect from a late '60s - early '70s model. The temolo speed is adjustable from slow to fast, and though the intensity is not adjustable, it has a nice "just right" sound that's not too mellow or too choppy. The reverb sounds like a classic spring reverberation unit, and it gets the job done well. The cabinet measures 18 inches x 13 inches x 7 inches and houses one 8-inch loudspeaker. Check out the short video below to hear the Tempo in action and examples of the tremelo and reverb, both at maximum settings. Finding all of this great stuff for you guys has left me with virtually no free time, so please do not laugh at my years-out-of-practice playing style when you hear the sloppy Link Wray and Duane Eddy riffs...

I skimmed ahead and quickly realized that, at last, someone has written THAT GUITAR BOOK that we are all looking for when we start out but that no one seems to have written yet but that you hope to write someday when you finally figure out what you are doing so that you can help others and prevent them from wasting so much time and money and hopes....(takes a breath)
As nobody wants to lug around a 50-watt combo when casually travelling, many guitarists rely on portable amplifiers to quench their amp needs while on the road, street corner or beach. Power isn’t particularly important in this category – size and weight are the most crucial aspects. Other factors such as being battery-powered and having a headphone jack are also key features of these amps. One of the most impressive is the Roland Cube Street, which is a street performer’s dream as it offers great portability, a decent 5-watt output, two channels and several on-board effects.

The woods used on the body and neck are worth considering too, although are unlikely to be a defining factor when you consider your purchase. Basswood features heavily as the body wood of many guitars in this price range because it’s affordable and has decent tonal properties. You will also find cheaper to produce woods like poplar and alder, although the traditionally more premium mahogany is also found on affordable guitars these days.


If all other Telecaster models fail, the Standard Tele is a safe pick. The two Tele pickups provide a warmer tone and add more “twang” to your sound than the other pickup configurations we’ve seen. I’ve had some Telecasters get strangely noisy, with even the more expensive American models needing help from a good noise suppressor. It’s not a universal Telecaster problem, but the Tele pickups (especially the neck variation) can be susceptible to excess noise.
Totally disappointed in the workmanship.. No quality control.. the fret bars raised off the neck are so sharp that they almost cause lacarations in your fingers, they Pickups are the Cheapest you can get and I am very disappointed in the quality control and what product exactly they are trying to put out the door... maybe revamp your product and put out least worth getting a good review over...
In the early Sixties, Blackmore did sessions with legendary British producer Joe Meek and apprenticed with U.K. session ace (and Jimmy Page mentor) Big Jim Sullivan. Blackmore founded Deep Purple in the late Sixties and led the group through various incarnations. He also spearheaded metal icons Rainbow with the late Ronnie James Dio and has more recently played a role in Blackmore’s Night with his wife Candice Night.
It should also be mentioned, that LX does not just stand for U.S. made. Originally LX was an indicator for an Ovation guitar that included several new features that were not available on previous guitar models. Back in 2007 Ovation explained on its website, that the new features included the new OP-Preamp, an advanced neck system (lightweight dual-action truss rod, carbon fibre stabilizers), a patented pick-up (made of 6 elements), inlaid epaulets, scalloped bracing as well as a new hard composite Lyrachord GS body.[25] Back then, no such thing as an AX model line existed (the first AX models appeared on the Ovation-website in 2010). Based on the website’s history the LX features must have been introduced in 2004.
Just in early Red Lable Nippon Gakki FG150 in excellent Vintage Condition CLEAN!.............. rare to find one pretty, then to be straight, then sound deep and loud like this one sounds but to have great action too its intonation is dead on upgraded nut & saddle & strings to Martin Marquis 80/20 - 12s This is a pleasure to play with wonderful tone its like 45 years old and the tone woods always sounded great but even better now its the one!!!... serious collectors guitar and is Recording worthy... shes somthing special. to buy it contact Joe: JVGuitars@gmail.com .
Picking out a guitar can be a bit daunting. And since there’s a lot of subjectivity involved, new players trying to pick out an instrument often find a lot of ambiguity and guesswork awaiting them. For someone buying their first guitar, the goals become fairly simple. Get a decent, budget guitar that you can afford and see if you stick with it. In so doing, avoid the worst guitars.
Smaller combo amps may be easier to transport and set up than using separate amplifier and speaker units, and as such, they are a popular choice for many bass players. Bass players in quieter, more acoustic genres (e.g., jazz quartets which play in a wine bar or a folk music group which plays in a coffeehouse) may be able to use smaller, more modestly powered combo amps. Bassists who play in genres more associated with a high stage volume (e.g., hard rock or electric blues) may tend to use, larger, more powerful (in wattage) combo amps. While a gigging musician will typically only bring one combo amp to a show or recording session, some bassists in major touring bands have two or more combo amps on stage, with an "A/B" switching pedal used to select different amplifiers. In this way, a bassist could have a vintage tube combo amp and a modern solid state amp, and then switch between them to select a different tone for different songs.

Compressors are often applied to electric guitar tracks to bring out the guitar’s natural sustain, as well as even out the overall dynamic range. Lead guitar parts usually benefit from a degree of compression treatment, while heavily overdriven rhythm parts often require very little or none at all, as the distortion naturally provides its own type of dynamic control. In the case of unnatural sounds, such as electric guitar, compression becomes a highly subjective topic, so experimentation is key to achieving the desired effect. As a starting point, therefore, try medium-fast attack and release times – an extremely fast attack time will blunt the transient response of the note. Remember that electric guitars can be inherently noisy and compression will generally exaggerate any hums and buzzes.


This guitar is awesome. If you are on the fence, get off and buy it. It's beautiful and sounds awesome. I'd give it 10 stars if I could. The tone is so much better than my old acoustic. All mahogany I love it. Looking forward to years of getting better with this beauty. I have zero negative to say. Had it a few months have played everyday. I hate to leave it to go to work. Wish I had all day to play it.
Randall deserves to be up here in this list. Don't get me wrong, they've got a lot to contend with, in Orange and Mesa Boogie in particular, but Randall have always crafted excellent amps. Rugged build and vast tonal opportunities make this brand a mighty force, I mean they were good enough for Dimebag Darrell and countless others, enough said really...
Ok I know Hondo? .... But this is a good one folks its got a lot going for it really have a closer look, its actually built well it is a beautiful vintage guitar in its own right its condition and patina good looks good sound and easy playability make it an excellent entry or back up choice into vintage guitars, The Top appears to be solid 2 piece center seam spruce top you see grain going from top to bottom with really beautiful straight grain with flame type figuring that is surprising on a Hondo it's unique in that feature and it has that patina I love it caught my eye big time as I got close I couldn't believe it was a Hondo, it's logo has that same font as old Martin & Takamine used this one has the look and feel, but it's action was a little off spec , so I fixed all that it has great action now it's neck set and angle was excellent and I ended up changing its nut & saddle out for Martin born nut & saddle set and a new set of 80/20 strings, this guitar has good volume and sweet tone it rings clear and true with good intonation. It's in very good to excellent vintage condition, it's body & neck has no cracks , no finish checking and still shines like glass it's beautiful just have a look, it's not new or mint it has a couple drinks on its top and a couple on its back too but besides those it's exceptional vintage and plays easy with good low action with plenty of saddle left to lower more down the line of ever needed it's set up to meet or exceed Martin specs for playability. This is a lot of vintage guitar for this kind of price WOW! .
I’ve written in previous issues of Premier Guitar about how the size and shape of a guitar’s headstock affect its sustain and tone. Clearly, the mass of the tuning machines is a factor in this, as well. Having overseen the building of tens of thousands of custom guitars over the course of my career has given me cause to consider machine-head weight as a fine-tuning tool in and of itself. This kind of mod is more complex than the others I’ve presented here because it is harder to predict, and obviously more costly to dabble in because it involves replacing the existing tuners. Nevertheless, I put it out there for those of you who are willing to go to the limit of sanity in the search for a responsive instrument.

I've had an Ovation Celebrity for over 5 years. Great action, wonderful sound with or without an amp. Stays in tune. Play anything from classical to rock. The Ovation can do it. The sound is unique, so making it your only guitar may not work if your in a band. If you're a beginner, the string tension is really low so it's easy on your fingers. It is a hollow body accoustic, but it plays like an electric. I've owned and still own several guitars. This is the one I reach for the most.
Steel-string Acoustic Guitar The steel-string acoustic guitar is a modern form of guitar that descends from the classical guitar, but is strung with steel strings for a brighter, louder sound. The most common shape is the dreadnought (originally developed by C.F. Martin & Company), which incorporates a deep soundbox and a smaller and less pronounced upper bout, giving it a wedge-shaped appearance. Other popular body styles include the larger jumbo body shape, as well as the smaller auditorium (000) body style and even smaller grand concert (00) body style. Check out the Martin Ed Sheeran X Signature Acoustic Electric for a smaller body type with a punchy sound.
I played a gig (to an empty house) at The Haunt in Ithaca NY. A lot of up and coming regional bands play there. We, on the other hand are just a cover band from Binghamton, about an hour away. While setting up, the sound man left a mic on the floor where I’d be setting up. I let him know that I send a direct signal. I could tell he wasn’t happy. After the gig though, he came and complimented me on my sound, saying that he didn’t expect a direct sound to be that good.
Jazz rhythm guitar often consists of very textural, odd-meter playing that includes generous use of exotic, difficult-to-fret chords. In 4/4 timing, it is common to play 2.5 beat intervals such as on the 2 and then the half beat or "and" after 4. Jazz guitarists may play chords "ahead" of the beat, by playing the chord a swung eighth note before the actual chord change. Chords are not generally played in a repetitive rhythmic fashion, like a rock rhythm guitarist would play.

This is one of the most popular and oldest brands of acoustic guitars available in India. There are various brands and models of guitar available under the umbrella of Gibson Guitar Corporation. ES-335, SG, Flying V, and Firebird are one of the most iconic models of guitars produced by this brand and their classic acoustics include the hummingbird. These are ideal guitars that can be used by beginners made in – the USA. The price of Gibson 6-string guitars starts from 4,000 INR approximately.
To tell you the truth, in the first few years i started playing, after i learned the use of the switch, I was approach by a man that also a guitarist and asked, "YOur guitar sounds good, I believe it so expensive". Well, I bought the guitar only for $150 dollars, But, I toggled the switch to the right pickup on the right time, makes my guitar sounds like an expensive guitar.
For visual clarity, I’ve indicated ground connections with a down-facing triangle. As you probably know, all ground wires must be electronically connected to each other. (One convenient method is to solder all pickup ground wires, the output jack ground, the pickup selector ground, and the bridge’s ground wire to the back of the volume pot, and then run a jumper wire to ground the treble control. In conventional wiring, all pots must be grounded, but here, it’s not necessary to ground the bass pot.)
The Fender Stratocaster features cutaway horns that give musicians access to higher frets. The back of the body is designed for comfort for longer performances. These guitars have three single coil pickups which transfer the string vibrations to the amplifier. They can all be turned on at once to produce a wide range of sounds. It also features a tremolo bar which allows you to lower or raise the pitch, much like tremolo pedals themselves, by pulling up or down on the bar to produce different effects. Stratocasters are the best option if you like to dabble in different playing styles and music genres.
* The guitar comes with very light bendy strings. This is probably due to market data that tells Epiphone that the bulk of buyers for this guitar are teen Guitar Heros who think that string bending every note is an essential aspect of shredding and wailing. If you plan to put heavier strings on the guitar (like 12-51s for example) for jazz or other styles of music then you will probably need a truss rod adjustment to compensate for the added tension. If you don't know how to do this, ask someone who does. You can ruin a guitar, permanently, by being too aggressive with a truss rod adjustment.
The Teisco brand name stands for 'Tokyo Electric Instrument and Sound Company'. Teisco was founded in 1946 by renowned Hawaiian and Spanish guitarist Atswo Kaneko, and electrical engineer Doryu Matsuda. Teisco guitars sold in the United States were badged "Teisco Del Rey" beginning in 1964. Teisco guitars were also imported in the U.S. under several brand names including Silvertone, Jedson, Kent, Kingston, Kimberly, Tulio, Heit Deluxe and World Teisco. While guitars manufactured by Teisco were ubiquitous in their day, they are now very collectable.
So what are acousticelectric guitars? Quite simply, it’s an acoustic guitar with slight modifications that means it can be plugged into a power amp. This means that the sound from the guitar can be made much louder for use live or with a band. It also means that, as the signal becomes electric, it can be altered with effects pedals and other equipment. Sometimes, because of this, electric acoustics are used when recording in a studio, though a microphone is often used too.
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Description: Guitar Type: Acoustic/Electric - Body: Mahogany - Body Size: Dreadnought - Top Wood: Engelmann Spruce - Back: Bubinga (African Rosewood) - Figured - Sides: Bubinga (African Rosewood) - Figured - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Construction: 1 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Binding: Ivory - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Mother Of Pearl - Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Soundhole: Round (Traditional) - Rosette: Mother Of Pearl - Hardware: Diecast, Gold, Grover Tuners - String Instrument Finish: Natural
One of modern metal's key figures, Dimebag Darrell founded Pantera with his brother, drummer Vinnie Paul Abbott – forging a style that combined brutally precise, punk-honed grooves with splatter-paint melodic runs. After he was tragically shot by a deranged fan during a show with his band Damageplan in 2004 – on the anniversary of John Lennon's death, freakishly enough – the tributes rolled in from fans, peers and forerunners. "One of the greatest musicians to grace our world," Black Sabbath's Geezer Butler said simply. "Rest in peace."
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Being by nature rather sceptical, I have to admit to initially dismissing many of the recording methods in this article as 'studio snake oil', and because there was usually too little time during my own sessions to experiment with new ideas, I'd usually end up with an SM57 glued to the speaker grille by default. Taking the time out to trial the above techniques in the studio showed me quite how much I had been missing — not only much better raw recordings, but also tremendous extra flexibility at mixdown. But don't take it from me — listen to the audio examples for yourself and make up your own mind. If they don't expand your recording horizons, I'll eat my SM57...
The fourth type of system employs string-through body anchoring. The strings pass over the bridge saddles, then through holes through the top of the guitar body to the back. The strings are typically anchored in place at the back of the guitar by metal ferrules. Many believe this design improves a guitar's sustain and timbre. A few examples of string-through body guitars are the Fender Telecaster Thinline, the Fender Telecaster Deluxe, the B.C. Rich IT Warlock and Mockingbird, and the Schecter Omen 6 and 7 series.
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