Generally speaking, the amp market tends to be less fueled than other categories by the year-to-year cycle of new product hype that kicks off at the annual NAMM show in January. While there are always hot new models and brands (Quilter amps being a good recent example), amp sales on Reverb are largely dominated by tried-and-true favorites and good deals on used gear.

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hi-can you put two caps on your two tone pots or will just the one do as is mormal-aslo on a push pull pot do you need two tone caps one for the bottom half as regular-if putting on the square part  of the push pull pot -can you put on any of the six lugs ie the ones not used -i have instaleed a push pull swich but when down the tone on the neck pickup does not seem to have any effect -when i pull it when usingn the pull pull it does have a effect is this normal-i have now neck-bridge-and all three in a row-when not pulled which would be normal five wat switch sound i seem to get a telecasster sound ,i thought this was the case when i pull it up=i have now a nice selection of sounds—thankls sean

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You didn’t think we would forget bass amps, did you? Due to their inherent differences in design, bass guitars require a dedicated amplifier – using your old Fender Champion isn’t going to cut it. Bass amps offer more power, with some outputs reaching 1000 watts or more. Like guitar amps, bass amplifiers come in many shapes and sizes – including heads and combos – although the mid-range Hartke HD500 offers a stage-worthy 500 watts of power in a portable combo unit, with great controls and an excellent balanced tone.

Guitar lessons work best if you're putting your skills together to learn how to play songs. That's why Guitar Tricks has a ton of great song tutorials for when you've mastered the Core Learning System, or if you want to try something new. These easy guitar songs are great, especially if you're a beginner that recently picked up an electric guitar. 
Just as it’s important that the guitar, amp and effects are performing to spec, make sure that all cables are functioning properly (it’s uncanny how many times a lead that was working fine yesterday suddenly develops a fault just before a take). It’s a good idea to ensure that spares are available. That goes for strings, too – valuable recording time can be lost just because a string has broken and no one has a spare. Some engineers will try to insist you use brand new strings when recording, but don’t be bullied into it if you prefer the warmer sound of a played-in set; that applies especially to bass, as new bass strings can introduce undesirable harmonic content into the sound.
Simulators: Simulators enable electric guitars to mimic the sound of other instruments such as acoustic guitar, electric bass and sitar. Pick up simulators used on guitars with single-coil pick ups replicate the sound of guitars with humbucker pick ups, or vice versa. A de-fretter is a bass guitar effect that simulates the sound of a fretless bass. The effect uses an envelope-controlled filter and voltage-controlled amplifier to "soften" a note's attack both in volume and timbre.[97]
What was listed above was just the tip of the iceberg, and many many other pedals are waiting for you: why not check out our huge guitar pedal selection, by clicking here? You will find Multi-effects (a clever way to have all your effects in a single and practical format), looper pedals (in case you want to record a short phrase and start playing over it and layer some guitar parts), fuzz pedals (made famous by the good ol’ Jimi Hendrix and many others), Phaser, Flanger etc.
The AF75 also has an ART-1 bridge and a VT60 tailpiece for increased resonance, improved tuning stability, greater sustain and an enhanced tone. It is also equipped with Classic Elite humbucking pickups at the neck and bridge, producing a rich and nuanced tone with just the right low-end heft. Tone shaping is an easy affair with the Sure Grip III control knobs, which are designed for non-slip, precise control.
To capture the best “dry” performance, an active DI such as the Radial J48™ is recommended as it produces more level which is useful for standard guitar pickups. As a rule of thumb, when using a passive instrument, select an active DI and when using an active instrument (such as a bass with powered pickups), a passive DI should be used. The DI makes the guitar signal suitable for recording by changing the impedance and converting it to a balanced signal. For a more affordable option there is the Radial Pro48™ which uses Eclipse transformers, while the JDV MK5™ is Radial’s flagship DI and can be optimized for any instrument.
well it all depends on your budget. If you're looking for a beginner guitar go for pluto 39 inch model it will cost you around 5.5k. Don't go below this as all those cheap guitars are useless after 6 to 7 months of use. If you can increase your budget then I'll suggest a cort AD810, pluto 41 inch semi acoustic model, or a fender SA150. These will cost you around 7k to 10k but these are the best you can buy as a beginner! Just remember that your first guitar should not sound crapy and it should be good on your fingers. I hope this helps. Happy guitaring!
In nature, reverb is an extremely fast series of echoes that reduce in volume over time.  Depending on the size of the environment, the number of repeats and the timing at which they occur will change.  Digital reverb pedals are very good at replicating the differing types.  Basically, you can take small tiled bathroom and the Grand Canyon (and everything in between) with you to your gigs.
Rotating speakers are specially constructed amplifier/loudspeakers used to create special audio effects using the Doppler effect by rotating the speakers or a sound-directing duct. The rotating speaker creates a chorus-type effect. Named after its inventor, Donald Leslie, it is particularly associated with the Hammond organ but is used with a variety of instruments as well as vocals. The Hammond/Leslie combination has become an element in many genres of music. The Leslie Speaker and the Hammond Organ brands are currently owned by Suzuki Musical Instrument Corporation. The stompbox that simulates this effect is the Uni-Vibe pedal.
The Marshall JMP Super Bass is a 100 watt amp. Lemmy, bassist/lead singer of Motörhead, used numerous of these amps to drive cabinets with four 12" speakers and others with four 15" speakers. His amps were labelled named “Killer,” “No Remorse,” and “Murder One".[5] The Peavey Mark IV is a large, solid-state amp providing 300 watts at 2 ohms; the Mark IV was known for its affordable price and its reliability.[6]
Two brands are synonymous with this type of instrument: Gibson and Fender.  Not only were they the earliest to bring the electric guitar to the masses, but the designs they created are still employed today, preferred by budding beginners and working professional musicians alike.  Other companies have made their mark in the market by creating variants on Gibson’s and Fender’s original designs, but they are still identified through the names that the originals were given.
If you wanted to quantify what is meant by "best," which you really should, then we actually would need to consider the specifications of guitars in the given price range. Although there may be differences of personal preference when it comes to areas such as individual tone woods used, fretboard scale, and nut width, we could still make very good general assumptions about whether laminates are better than a solid wood model, whether synthetic fretboard material was favorable to natural wood, whether one pickup is better than two, and/or whether including a built-in tuner is preferable. In other words, Forget about the names of the manufacturers and do a real comparison of specifications of guitars in the given price range.
The lotus had a plywood body and was pretty cheap, I wouldn't pay a 100 bucks for one today, if anything. But, back then, it was as good as any, we worked with what we could get. I know we played some excrutiating unison leads (ala Blackfoot, Molly Hatchet,etc) he with his souped up Lotus, me with my Memphis Strat copy, both plugged into my bitchin solid state Crate (looked like a real wooden crate!) amp.
I suspect this has been done by someone but I can't find any such tests in my quick internet search. Seems to me this is the only way to really settle the debate; the differences may be too small to hear, but regardless if there is differences then the tone is being affected by the instrument. In that case the wood and body design is making the string vibrate differently, which is what the pickup...picks up.

To produce Music and create the melody man has invented some musical instruments. In this process he has created the Guitar. Guitar is the instrument in which by the vibrations of the strings we can amplify the music. It’s an instrument having “a long, fretted neck, flat wooden soundboard, ribs, and a flat back, most often with incurved sides”. The melody produced by Guitar is also depends on the better finishing of its parts and strong pickups. That’s why it’s a vital task to select the best quality of guitar.

Try different gauge strings. As you know, guitarists can be creatures of habit. But heavier strings can help both your tone and fingering strength, while lighter strings may suit bigger bends. Experiment! Billy F Gibbons has the thickest tone but his top E is only a .007. Stevie Ray Vaughan’s top E was a .013. Changing string gauge may just bring out your best inner-self.


There exist libraries that can do astoundingly realistic guitars, but they're expensive. There are a few guitarists hanging around the AF, I suggest you hook up with one of them. Even if you do buy a library, if you don't play the guitar there's a decent chance you won't be able to write for them well. No one wants clunky, awkward guitars! Team up with a fellow musician and have some fun.
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There's no wrong answer to which neck will work best for you. When people speak of rounder vs. flatter being better for chording/bending, they are referring to the radius of the fretboard, not necessarily overall neck shape. The fretboard on all guitars has a curvature across is, from the the treble to the bass side. Generally speaking, most people would agree that rounder fretboards facilitate better chording, while flatter ones facilitate better bending, but even that's not hard and fast.
Don’t be fooled by the lack of reviews for this guitar on Amazon. Dean makes some really solid guitars, they just happen to be a less popular brand than the other big names. I love this one because you’ve got 2 humbuckers for powerful rock and metal tones, but you get additional tonal versatility thanks to a push/pull coil tap. So, the C350 definitely isn’t a one trick pony. The flame maple veneer adds a nice finishing touch.
However, you don͛t need to fork out over $10k for this version, as it comes with a respectable sub-$1,000 price tag. Sporting a familiar Strat style basswood body, this model is available in three iconic EVH-approved colors. Playability – as you͛d expect – is top-notch, with a reinforced quatersawn maple neck and a compound radius rosewood fretboard.
Whether he was playing as a Muscle Shoals studio musician or as one of the lead guitarists in The Allman Brothers Band, Duane Allman was brilliant. Both his standard playing and slide playing were some of the smoothest and most adventurous the world has ever seen. To hear Allman at the height of his guitar playing prowess, give a listen to “The Allman Brothers Live at The Fillmore East.”
Distortion was not an effect originally intended by amplifier manufacturers, but could often easily be achieved by "overdriving" the power supply in early tube amplifiers. In the 1950s, guitarists began deliberately increasing gain beyond its intended levels to achieve "warm" distorted sounds.[29] Among the first musicians to experiment with distortion were Willie Johnson of Howlin' Wolf,[29] Goree Carter,[30] Joe Hill Louis,[31][32] Ike Turner,[33] Guitar Slim,[34] and Chuck Berry.[35]
Featuring a comfortable neck and solid spruce top, the Epiphone Dove Pro Acoustic-Electric Guitar rings out with full, rich sound. Based on a design going back to 1962, the Dove Pro is equipped with a Fishman Sonicore pickup system that accurately reproduces its acoustic tone when you plug the guitar into an amplifier or PA system to play with amplified instruments. A terrific value.

Much like booster pedals – where its placement depends on what exactly you’re looking to boost – the location of compressors and wah-wah pedals in a signal chain will vary depending on what type of sound you are trying to create. In this case, you are encouraged to experiment with their order and see what you like best. Although as mentioned above, try to keep the wah-wah after tier one effects as they generally do not sound that usable in that order. Compressors, on the other hand, can be placed before any pedal, even distortion, as it shapes the signal rather than modifies it.
With the advent of belly bridges in 1931, Martin started to compensate their saddle placement. What this does is make for better string intonation. However early pyramid bridge have straight saddles, mounted 1/8" back from the front edge of the bridge. (with the center of the pin holes 3/8" from the back of the saddle.) The 1931 to 1933 belly bridges have a compensated saddle placed 1/8" from the front of the bridge on the treble side, and 3/16" from the bass side. Then on belly bridges in the mid 1930s Martin moved the bass end of the saddle back to 1/4" from the front of the bridge.

We carry many new and ‘lightly’ used instruments. So called “low mileage” instruments, in near mint condition, are our specialty. Currently in house: Santa Cruz, Bourgeois, Eastman, Fender, Larrivee, Martin, Epiphone, Gibson, Gretsch, Guild, Giebitz, Huss & Dalton, Sobell, New World Classical Guitars, Cordoba Classical Guitars, Loar, Recording King, G&L, LsL, Breedlove. Amps from Magnatone, […]
More recently, many boutique pedal manufacturers, such as the Z.Vex and Death by Audio series, have attempted to revive the analog strangeness of germanium transistors and diodes. Not bound by imitation, they continue to innovate with analog materials as if the technical innovations of the 70s and 80s had never happened. The mid-90s Z.Vex Fuzz Factory is notable for establishing internal feedback loops that are inadvertently tied to the logic of circuit bending. This means that the pedal self-oscillates, producing an absurd yet controllable noise, akin to an air-raid siren.
The Les Paul Custom single cutaway was discontinued in 1961 and replaced with the SG (as we know it) designation for “solid guitar”. This model featured a thin 1-5/16″ body and a double cutaway. Confusion abounds to this day over the name Les Paul Custom. Since the single cutaway was discontinued, Gibson transferred the name Les Paul Custom to the new models.
Chuck Berry is the true founding forefather of rock and roll. His guitar playing in the mid Fifties defined the true personality and vocabulary of rock and roll guitar so comprehensively and conclusively that it’s impossible to find any rock player who doesn’t still steal his licks, riffs and tricks today. In fact, Berry doesn’t even tour with his own band; instead, he hires local musicians to back him up, because almost everyone all over the world knows how to play his songs.
I disagree about Martin being THE BEST ACOUSTIC GUITAR. While Martin is an excellent guitar that is definitely ONE of the best! Taylor is THE BEST FOR THE HIGHER END TO MID PRICE RANGE! A decent TAYLOR will bea Taylor will beat the brakes off a brakes off the same Martin, because they SOUND BETTER and they can be used for more than one or two styles. If you are playing county music the Martin is better, but Taylor will play a lot better sound way better on every other kind of music styl! Buy a TAYLOR
However, unlike a boost pedal, the overdrive effect is not dependent on the amplifier to have a distorted sound. The overdrive pedal will internally boost the input signal so much that the top of the signal wave will be forced to naturally shrink itself. This is called soft clipping and it simulates amplifier like clipping as though an amplifier was being overly driven, hence the name overdrive. The distortion pedal will also boost the input signal but will then add resistors within the circuitry to not just shrink or soft clip the wave form but completely flatten the wave peaks. This is called hard clipping. For more understanding on the differences between soft clipping and hard clipping see the illustration below.
By the late twenties, the idea for electrified string instruments had been around for some time, and experimental banjo, violin and guitar pickups had been developed. George Beauchamp had himself been experimenting with electric amplification as early as 1925, but his early efforts involving microphones did not produce the effects he desired. Along the way Beauchamp also built a one-string test guitar made out of a 2X4 piece of lumber and an electric phonograph pickup. As the problems at National became more apparent, Beauchamp’s home experiments took on a more rigorous shape, and he began to attend night classes in electronics as well as collaborating with fellow National employee Paul Barth.[1] When the prototype electric pickup they were developing finally worked to his satisfaction, Beauchamp asked former National shop craftsman Harry Watson to make a wooden neck and body to which the electronics could be attached. It was nicknamed the frying pan because of its shape, though Adolph Rickenbacker liked to call it the pancake.[6] The final design Beauchamp and Barth developed was an electric pickup consisting of a pair of horseshoe-shaped magnets that enclosed the pickup coil and completely surrounded the strings.[1]
Featuring the Wilkinson WTB Bridge this classic 3-saddle design has been around for over 50 years and is still regarded as the ultimate tone machine. Staggered brass saddles offer individual string intonation never before available in a design of this type. The baseplate itself is a faithful reproduction of the original, made from steel, very important in a bridge of this style due to the tonal effect it has on the magnetic field of the pickup mounted in it.

• Them Changes: Since the strings on acoustic guitars play a much more important role in projecting volume and clarity than strings on an amplified electric guitar, considering changing acoustic guitar strings often to keep an instrument sounding its best. Remember to wipe down the strings after playing and check for string damaging fret wear. Both can prematurely end a guitar string’s life.
Effects and effects units—stompboxes in particular—have been celebrated by pop and rock musicians in album titles, songs and band names. The Big Muff, a fuzzbox manufactured by Electro-Harmonix,[49] is commemorated by the Depeche Mode song "Big Muff" and the Mudhoney EP Superfuzz Bigmuff. Nine Inch Nails, Pink Floyd, George Harrison, They Might Be Giants and Joy Division are among the many musicians who have referenced effects units in their music.[50]
I love them both, have a Strat and Les Paul. they are such different animals. Each has it’s place in my music, each has a special sound. Used to own a Tele which I just didn’t enjoy playing so much, so traded in for the Les Paul. I later bought a modified Tele with humbuckers (I know it’s a sin) but damn it sounds so good, for heavy power chords, more like a PRS sound. I’ve been playing 27 years now and am a composer / songwriter. Played in lots of bands, and during my live work I have to say I prefer my Strat. It’s lighter than the Gibson, and contours nicely to my body. With a good valve amp and the right strings I can get some lovely fat sounds out of it. I use the Gibson mostly in the studio. When I moved countries, I needed a cheap electric to tide me over until my stuff got sent over. I picked up a $100 Mitchel (Made in China). The setup was awful, totally unplayable, so set it up properly, and to be honest it plays like a dream. The neck is amazing for a $100 guitar, and with some new pickups the sound is great too. The upshot here is that it doesn’t really matter what guitar you use to make music on, as long as you enjoy the instrument, a cheap guitar can go a long way. I find the discussions about which is better kind of like guys comparing their crown jewels, it’s purely academic and what matters is how you use the thing 😉
If you can afford to go to a store and drop $3000 on the latest, greatest Les Paul Gibson or vintage Fender Stratocaster, this is a very different question. But let’s assume your budget isn’t quite that big. Many affordable guitars are very similar, but come in a variety of packages that include lots of extras and even an amplifier. In case you are looking to buy the amp separately, here is an amazing list of 10 Best and Affordable Guitar Amps for Beginners: 2016 and while you are it, check out: Top 5 Guitar Plug-Ins You Need to Know: AmpliTube, Guitar Rig & Others.
A good custom shop will have insight based on their experience that will help make the project better. That’s part of being custom — making concepts a reality. But there is more to running a custom shop than simply having the ability and experience to create someone’s dream. Figuring out what that is requires a little digging. The concept is buried in first understanding the other meanings of the word custom. Although “made-to-order” is a correct characterization where you can personalized the headtsock with your name or initials and you can CUSTOMIZE YOUR GUITAR: Mahogany, Alder, Maple, Bass Wood, Right/Left handed guitar, Body colour, Neck profile, No dots on fretboard and Fret size.Our Custom Shop Guitars referred to in this site as drawing "inspiration" from the major guitar brands and any reference to custom shop brand names or "Inspired by" are made strictly for comparison purposes only.

A musician is only as good as the songs he or she plays - except when you're improvising, of course! And even for those of us who write mostly our own music, there's always room for a repertoire of the classics. Building up your musical library starts with the tablature available in this section, and where it ends is up to you. If you're like most musicians, you'll probably spend your whole life collecting and trying your hand at new music. And with material here for guitar, bass, ukulele, banjo, mandolin and even violin, there's something for virtually everyone. Cover the songs in your own personal style or try your hand at recreating them as they were first recorded; it's up to you.

The key to capturing any kind of ambient tracks is a good reverberant space, although a narrow or dead room can also work, as long as there is sufficient distance between the guitarist and the amp. I usually put the air mic at least ten feet from the amp, positioned off-axis, or in an omnidirectional pattern to pick up as much reflected sound as possible. Placing a baffle between the guitarist and the amp will increase the apparent room size, as will making the amp sound pass through a doorway or turn a corner into another room.
In mid-’29, John Dopyera left the National company to start the Dobro Manufacturing Company along with his brothers Rudy and Ed, and Vic Smith. National String Instrument Corp. continued operating under Beauchamp, Barth et al. In 1930, the Dobro company name was changed to the Dobro Corporation, Ltd., with additional capital provided by Louis and Robert Dopyera. Dobro was, during this period, a competitor of National’s, although in this somewhat incestuous world, both got their resonator cones, plate covers and other parts, like tailpieces, from Adolph Rickenbacker.

Seller: musiciansfriend (269,349) 99.5%, Location: Kansas City, Missouri, Ships to: US, Item: 163232174143 Home Guitars Percussion Accessories Alvarez RP266SESB Parlor Acoustic-Electric Guitar Sunburst Sunburst item# 1500000019429 New The Alvarez Regent Series is a high-quality, entry-level guitar line designed to provide superior instruments with many features and specifications you'll find in pro-level Alvarez models. Components such as the bi-level engineered rosewood bridge, scalloped bracing and PPS synthetic bone nut and saddle, work together to get the best tone and response possible. Regent Series has also been designed with the student in mind and has a slightly slimmer neck profile and nut, making it very easy to hold and fret. This guitar has a roadworthy, vintage vibe with a satin finish. This is a great looking guitar and for its size has a very open and warm voice. It is fitted with the Alvarez SYS250 from B-Band, a 3-band EQ with onboard digital backlit tuner. Shipping Orders are generally shipped the following business day after payment is received. For example, if your order is placed AND paid for at 1 p.m. Eastern Time on Friday, Musicians Friend will ship it on Monday. We are only shipping eBay orders via standard ground shipping at this time (3-7 business days for delivery once the item leaves our warehouse) Payment Musician's Friend only accepts payments for eBay orders through Paypal. Immediate payment is required upon selecting "Buy It Now". Sales Tax We are required to collect sales tax on all orders shipped to Alabama, California, Connecticut, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, New Jersey, North Dakota, Utah, Vermont, Washington and Wisconsin. You will be charged the state and local sales tax rate for any orders shipped to these states. 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Details on how to file this return may be found at your applicable Department of Revenue website. Store Policies If you’re not satisfied, neither are we. If for any reason you’re not completely satisfied with your purchase of a new item, simply return it in its original condition within 45 days of purchase (see exceptions below) and we’ll give you a full refund. It’s that simple. Returned items must be in original, brand-new condition, showing no signs of wear or use such as belt-buckle or pick scratches, scuffs, dings or scrapes on the instrument or collateral materials. Items must also include all original packaging, manuals, warrantees and accessories or your return may be subject to a return handling charge. Your refund will be promptly processed upon successful evaluation of your returned item from our trained category professionals in 2-3 business days. Refunds are made for product value only, excluding shipping and handling charges. If you received Free Shipping on your order, the value of the uncharged shipping cost will be deducted from your refund. Exceptions Additionally, the following items are returnable only if defective OR unopened - strings, reeds, computers, tubes, earbuds, earplugs, recorders, tin whistles, flutophones, "world" wind instruments, harmonicas, raw-frame speakers, drumheads, drumsticks, turntable cartridges, fog fluid, clothing/footwear, body jewelry, sheet music, cleaners, polishes and polishing cloths. Software/soundware, books, CDs, DVDs, and videos may be returned for credit only if they are in their original, sealed packaging. All returned woodwind and brass instruments incur a $10.00 sanitization fee. Returned bows are assessed a $4.00 restocking fee. Returned mouthpieces priced over $300 incur an $8.00 sanitization fee; the fee for mouthpieces under $300 is $4.00. Stringed instruments priced at $1999.00 or more, must be returned within 10 days of shipment. Should you decide to return your shipment, please follow the return steps printed on the back of your invoice and pack your return carefully to prevent damage in shipment. All returns must: 1. Include a Return Authorization Number; (Please contact us via eBay messages for an RA number) 2. Be in the original packaging complete with all collateral materials such as cases, straps, cables, care kits, certificates of authenticity, warranty cards, manuals, and any other materials that originally shipped with the instrument; 3. Be in brand-new condition, showing no signs of wear or use such as belt-buckle or pick scratches, scuffs, dings, or scrapes on the instrument or collateral materials. Condition: New, Brand: Alvarez, MPN: RP266SESB, Features: Features: Mahogany Top / Vintage Sunburst See More
Kent made a lot of "student model" instruments in the 1960's. I have always found most of the guitars to be quite playable but overall, the general guitar public in my area seemed to have a low opinion of them. I recently bought a solid body one pick-up, with case, that I practise on a lot. In fact, at a recording session I was using my Gibson Lespaul and the producer was complaining about the sound of it, so the next day I brought in my Kent and he loved it, it's on two songs on the CD we were working on!
But how do you find a guitar master? It's not like he's listed in the phone book under "Guitar Master," although you can buy a Guitar Master Certificate for $10,080 from the Berklee College of Music. (Let me know how that goes.) And when you do find one, how do you know he can handle the job, making the right repair in the shortest amount of time? A guitar master must know how to diagnosis the problem when the only explanation he's offered involves slurring through a mouthful of tears, or an, "Oh, my bad, man, do you think you can fix her by tomorrow?"
The following songs have been selected to highlight some of the best electric guitar songs from the 1980s. Each song includes links to tab, and wherever possible links to free audio versions of the song. A guideline for the difficulty of each song has been included. The assumption with these guidelines is beginner guitarists can play the ​basic essential open chords, F major, plus basic power chords. Difficulty assessments do not include the guitar solos.

Super info. thks. Just found your site as I too, had some questions about action. I have a Martin D-28, manufacture date late 2013 and I purchased new in Feb. of 2015. It has always been humidified and kept in the case. I only really noticed the ‘high’ action when I changed to drop D tuning and I noticed amplified ‘string whip’. I estimate the height to be 4mm. I re-tuned and looked again and the action is noticeably higher than my Epiphone EJ 200 and Simon & Patrick Woodland Folk. I think, as you have said, the guitar is just getting acclimatized to it’s ‘new’ home. Play ability is still good, (although the player needs work!) but I think I will take it back to Folkways Music to have the Tech take a look. Thks. Great site, I will bookmark it!
BOO TO AMAZON FOR CARRYING A MISREPRESENTED PRODUCT. Due to the description I thought we could use this for lessons. It is NOT an instrument it is a toy. It doesn't stay tuned for even a 1/2 hour lesson and the teacher won't allow him to use it for fear that it will hurt his ability to hear when a real guitar is out of tune in the future. I tried to return but they didn't respond for weeks and told me it was too late after they finally responded. The guitar has barely been used at all and won't be used since it is clearly doing more harm than good for a young musician! AMAZON you should drop this product, it is NOT what is presents itself to be!!!
Martin guitars have been around for over 180 years, and are widely considered to be some of the best guitars currently in production. The Little Martin is a ¾ scale guitar perfect for kids and beginners with a smaller stature. Featuring professional-grade construction and hardware, the Little Martin has a big sound in a small package. Also great for travel, the compact body stows easily.

Before Nathan Daniel started the Danelectro company in 1947, he made amplifiers for Epiphone from 1934 to 1946. Epiphone wanted Daniel to make amps for them exclusively, but he preferred to stay independent. Instead he founded the Danelectro company in 1947 and started making amplifiers for Montgomery Ward. By 1948 Daniel expanded and became the exclusive guitar amplifier producer for Sears & Roebuck. At the same time he was also supplying other jobbers such as Targ & Dinner of Chicago.
From the jazz-tempered Artcore series to the metal-shredding Iron Labels and all of their rocking classic models, Ibanez electric guitars are definitely not confined to any one genre. You can play whatever music you like with the right Ibanez axe, whether you go for one of their off-the-shelf designs or the signature style designated by your favorite guitar hero.
Before Nathan Daniel started the Danelectro company in 1947, he made amplifiers for Epiphone from 1934 to 1946. Epiphone wanted Daniel to make amps for them exclusively, but he preferred to stay independent. Instead he founded the Danelectro company in 1947 and started making amplifiers for Montgomery Ward. By 1948 Daniel expanded and became the exclusive guitar amplifier producer for Sears & Roebuck. At the same time he was also supplying other jobbers such as Targ & Dinner of Chicago.
Jazz guitar playing styles include rhythm guitar-style "comping" (accompanying) with jazz chord voicings (and in some cases, walking basslines) and "blowing" (improvising solos) over jazz chord progressions with jazz-style phrasing and ornaments. The accompanying style for electric guitar in most jazz styles differs from the way chordal instruments accompany in many popular styles of music. In rock and pop, the rhythm guitarist typically performs chords in dense and regular fashion to define a tune's rhythm. Simpler music tends to use chord voicings focused on the first, third, and fifth notes of the chord. In contrast, more complex music styles of pop might intermingle periodic chords and delicate voicings into pauses in the melody or solo. Complex guitar chord voicings are often have no root, especially in chords that have more than six notes. Such chords typically emphasize the third and seventh notes of the chord. These chords also often include the 9th, 11th and 13th notes of the chord, which are called extensions, or color notes.
Epiphone's passion has always been about more than just making guitars. It has been about making music. It has been about understanding what is inside every musican that makes them want to, have to, express themselves. And understanding the myriad musical styles, where they are going and how they might develop. For over one hundred and twenty-five years they have continually looked for new and better ways to help players take their music farther.
Joe is a musician, engineer, and producer in NYC. Over the years, as a small studio operator and freelance engineer, he's made recordings of all types from music & album production to v/o & post. He's also taught all aspects of recording and music technology at several NY audio schools, and has been writing articles for Recording magaz... Read More
There are two main types of controls on bass amps: switches and rotary knobs. The simplest, least expensive practice amps and combo amps may only have a few switches and knobs, such as an "on/off" switch, a volume knob, and a bass and treble control knob. Mid-priced models may add additional tone controls (e.g., one, two or three "midrange" controls and a "presence" knob for very high frequencies) and/or add a second type of volume knob called a "gain", "preamplifier" (or "preamp"/"pre"), or "drive" (short for "overdrive") control. A good selection of equalizer knobs and gain stages is standard on expensive amplifiers. If an amp has one or more preamp or gain knobs, the second volume knob may be called "master", "volume" or "post".
As cool as these little amps are, they only have a fraction of the features you’ll find in their larger, more powerful big brothers. But, they are more than enough for a newbie to get started on, and they meet and exceed the criteria I outlined in the beginning as what to look for in a good starter amp: They sound good, they are flexible with good overdrive, multiple channels, solid EQ sections and some even have built-in effects.
This is breathtaking and very inspiring pop-rock music with great energy and bright motivational atmosphere. Main instruments are electric guitar, digital synth, bass, strings, piano and drums. This exciting and uplifting track could be a perfect choice as background music for any video production, multimedia projects, Youtube channels, narrations or life stories, films and other projects.

This guitar sounds tighter and is less loud than a dreadnought. But its construction warms its tone considerably. Its owners say that its tone is well balanced – clear and punchy but still warm. It offers clarity in the higher registers, but some boom in the lower registers. For that reason, the LL16 is suited to almost any style of playing. It will not, however, be as punchy as the Taylor 210 or as round sounding as the Blueridge.
I have been a rock drummer for 40+ years. Due to extreme back surgery I am laid up for a few months so I decided to try a little guitar. I wanted something that both looked and sounded good, but did not want to spend a fortune. My son in law just bought a very similar Martin guitar. He was amazed when he saw and played my Jameson, and completely shocked when he was told that he paid 10 times what I did. The finish looks like glass. Not a single flaw that I could find. The color is deep rich and absolutely beautiful. The sound both acoustic and electric is exceptional. My jam buddies are constantly asking to borrow it. These are guys that on a daily basis play vintage models of Gibson, Fender, Martin. My only observation rather than complaint is that I would have liked a better,
If you plug your electric guitar into the auxiliary input of your home stereo, you can get away with not buying an amp at all. All you need is a special, inexpensive adapter that you can purchase at any electronic or music store for less than $3. The adapter is just a metal or plastic-coated plug that has a female quarter-inch jack on one end and a male RCA (sometimes called phono) plug on the other. (Just tell the salesperson what you want to do, and he can supply the correct unit.) The following figure shows how the adapter and the guitar cord work together.
My brother owns a Norma acoustic guitar modeled on the Gibson Hummingbird. He bought it used in the mid 70s. Solidly built but only average sound. I would guess that like many Japanese made guitars from the 70s, Norma was not a "company," but simply an American sounding brand name chosen by a larger Japanese instrument manufacturer to market their guitars in the USA. I own a mid 70s Penco acoustic, same deal, name was used on Japanese made guitars marketed through the Pennsylvania Music Company, thus Penco.
Bowers loves combining incredible chops with strong melodies, and his influences read like a “Who’s Who” of guitar heroes. Included are such high-tech players as Steve Morse, John Petrucci, and Steve Howe. While talking with Frank, I learned that he has had two of his Les Pauls customized to accommodate a push-pull tap switch on their tone knobs. In the normal position he has full control of his Seymour Duncan humbuckers; in the pulled-up position he goes to a single coil “spin-a-split” configuration that allows him to get more of a “Tele” tone at zero—or he can dial in a bit more of the other half of the pickup to emulate more of a P-90 sound. The thinner “Tele-ish” tone cuts better, allowing more clarity on his leads and rhythm patches.

Rickenbacker manufactures three distinct pickups for their current standard models: Hi-gain, Vintage Single Coil Toaster Top, and Humbucking. All three pickup designs share the same footprint, allowing them to retrofit into most current or vintage models. The tone varies from one style to the next, partially because of the types of magnets used[13] but also due to the amount of wire wound around the pickup’s bobbin.
The stompswitches take a couple stomps to cut on. There also some tape residue around the led lights where someone covered them. But its not a huge issue for reverb considering that the way I play, I always have a little reverb on to add texture and presence to my tone. Also, if you have a pedal switch looper that you can run all your pedals through it can stay always on that way too. But I'm going set the bidding price lower just because they don't work 100% properly and the tape residue. Other than the issue with the stompswitches the effect works great. Just clarify, you have to stomp on the switch 2 or 3 times and it cuts on.
We’ve already shown you how you will sometimes want more than one mic on your amp to achieve ideal sound in your tracks. Many semi-distant and ambient techniques will be most useful, along with a close mic, but on a separate track, to retain the option of blending a more-direct tone to create your overall sonic picture. Any single-mic positions discussed thus far can be combined into multi-mic sounds in the mix when recorded to different tracks. There are also several other approaches to multi-miking that might come in handy now and then, and which are worth some exploration.
No matter whether you used method A or B, you can now go about measuring the neck bow. This is done by measuring the string height (the gap between the ruler/string and the top of the fret) at about the 8th fret. There is a lot of debate over how straight a neck should be, and in fact it really is personal choice, but a height roughly the same as the thickness of a B string is a good starting point. Personally, I use a 0.012” feeler gauge to do this, but you could use a B string. Simply slide the feeler gauge/B string into the gap to see if it is too big/small.
Washburn - With a long history that dates back to 1883, Washburn makes various types of guitar related products including electric, acoustic, bass, amps, banjos, mandolins and amplifiers. Their old acoustic guitars were involved with Delta blues back in the 1920s, while now, they are recognized mostly for their metal/rock friendly electric guitars.
At first it sounds kind of like a buzzsaw, but after listening to the song, people usually have a hard time getting the catchy riff out of their heads. The best part? It's one of the most fun beginner guitar songs and anyone can play it! The riff is played entirely on one string, the A string and consists of only three notes. Fun fact, the riff was supposed to be a placeholder for a horns section, but they loved the fuzzy guitar tone so much they never got around to the horns.
Description: Body: Mahogany - Top Wood: Maple - Curly - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Fingerboard: Ebony - Binding: Natural - Frets: 24, Medium - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge Construction: Ebony - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Gold, Nickel, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch, Waverly Tuners - Pickups: Fralin P-90 - String Instrument Finish: Golden Natural, Winter Solstice, Hickory Burst, Aged Scotch, Faded Onyx - Made In: America
Being one of the reputed organizations, operating in this domain, we are engaged in manufacturing and supplying a quality range of Gigmaker Electric Guitar. We only use high grade components and latest technology while designing these guitars. The offered range is widely appreciated all over the nation for its salient attributes. With our quality range, we

Here we JUST SOLD OUT: another excellent FG160 for your serious consideration the Yamaha FG 160 Acoustic Guitar Made in the early - mid 70's from Taiwan factory. This example was built well over 35 years ago and was built to very high detailed standards as well as some of the best grained Mahogany woods seen in this time period ( see pics for those detail ) in that time period these were meant to compete with the great M@r#!n and now this Yamaha is quite well aged too and is a REAL vintage guitar in its own right sounding SWEET with its well aged woods with really beautiful patina of a true vintage instrument. This one has the Amber/Tan label and not the Red Label but the golden label. The frets are very good - original I did a quick dressing of the lower 5 or so frets and polished all. The guitar has it's natural age and character with beautiful patina and it has been played of course its not new its over 35 years old with a few insignificant minor nicks,dings from a well loved and adult respected instrument. This fine example is here and in stock... We upon receiving have remove the strings cleaned and detailed the guitar oil rosewood and polish finish, We have * upgraged* its TONE by installing a Martin BONE nut and compensated BONE saddle set for improved tone resonance over the old plastic stuff so she has a nice deep ring to its tone now and this guitar to plays very well Yamaha's and they are truly amazing instruments very well compared to a much more expensive brand guitar as you may have heard…. These FG’s are known for there fine construction and playability with amazing tone for this kind of money… to get a vintage aged tone woods instrument built this well and in this kind of condition make this FG160 the one to own for a song! Re: condition its over 35 years old and is BETTER than average This guitar has no cracks, no finish checking no warped top, no loose or pulling bridge Its neck has a real nice feel to it and is a medium - slim profile = feels like M@r#!n D-28ish substantial but not too fat - Just right! 1-11/16ths at the BONE NUT Play action is very good see pics Its a standard Dreadnought Acoustic and is Identical to the Yamaha FG180 This is an excellent vintage Yamaha FG160 You will be pleased with its sound she has good bones its over 35 years old and has proudly stood the test of time there is no reason this guitar will not continue to serve another 35+ years with average care. Beautiful Patina only seen on real vintage guitars Let me know if you have any questions ore are ready to purchase email Joe at JVGuitars@gmail.com.
Mikko, spot on. Even light wood has density, and there comes a point in solid body electric guitars where how dense any piece of wood is only makes a difference acoustically. The point you made about how a guitar feels when you're playing it is sound, though. Its weight and acoustic resonance will affect how you respond to it and how you attack it (same for neck thickness and profile), and that will account for the preference we have for one guitar over another of the same model.
A steel-string guitar tuned to concert pitch endures a tension of about 180 pounds (800 N) on the top of the guitar from the strings[citation needed]. The X-bracing system has been shown to be an efficient technique for preventing the top of the guitar from warping under this force. The braces are generally carved, scalloped and tuned to improve resonance and integrity of the guitar top, such capability being performed by skilled artisans and not readily reproducible by machine[citation needed]. This work is an important factor in determining the timbre of the guitar and a major determinant in the observation that rarely do two guitars ever sound alike, even though they are ostensibly identical in construction.
Generally speaking, no. When it comes to guitar quality there are always exceptions, but for mass produced brands, the top models almost always come from America (generally more skilled craftsmanship: more attention to detail, less assembly line). The top Fender guitars, for example, are American made, and consequently significantly more expensive. That doesn't mean that they are inherently better than their Mexican made brothers, but that they tend to be crafted in a more quality controlled environment. That being said, the guitar is a very personal instrument, they change guitar to guitar for the same model. It's all about the connection between the guitar and the player: what feels right and what sounds best to them.
I own a Decca guitar, it is what I learned to play on many years ago. From what little I have gathered about them they were an order by mail brand, and you could only get them from a catolog such as Sears & Roebuck. I havent been able to find a price for them or any ifo on what catalogs they were from. Mine has a Ernie Ball Musicman-like peghead (4 one side 2 on the other) and has a metal pick guard with 2 giant switches which seem to have no effect on tone. It has a brown & yellow sunburst paint job (ewwww).I thought I possibly had the only one in existence, lol, guess not.

By 1939, Supros had grown again. The ’38 line was essentially intact with the addition of a number of new resonator acoustics. New was the No. 23 Supro Arcadia Guitar, a sunburst birch-bodied resonator made by Harmony. This had a simple nickel coverplate with two concentric circles of round holes, a slightly-rounded head with an oval Supro metal logo plate. The fingerboard had four dot inlays, the body two f-holes. Cost was $22.50.
Here you will find a list of beginner guitar chords. These chords are very commonly used through many popular songs and so learning them is a great foundation for your guitar future. With the chords below you will be able to play thousands of songs, including most of your favourites. And once you have learnt these chords and the changes between them you will find it very easy to learn new chords and add them to your repertoire.
“Photocell Tremolo is found in mid-1960s American amplifiers. Those classic circuits used a light-dependent resistor to attenuate the input signal, coupled with a miniature neon bulb that is connected to the LFO. As the LFO oscillates, the bulb gets brighter and dimmer which in turn varies the resistance of the LDR. The varying resistance works with other circuit impedances to change the signal level, which produces a characteristically ‘hard’ sounding tremolo that moves between two levels, reminiscent of a square wave.” Got that? Well it is tricky and they do sound somewhat different but essentially they produce the same effect. The pedal I am using here, the Fulltone Supa-Trem uses a photocell to produce the sounds found in the classic Fender amps and most common tremolo circuit.
Of course, if you already have the basics down, there are plenty of books here that offer an assortment of sheet music for your favorite songs. If you're a fan of the Beatles, for example, check out the Beatles Complete Scores Book. If you're more of a Pink Floyd fan, be sure to pick up the Music Sales Pink Floyd The Wall Guitar Tab Songbook. Maybe you're a fan of the Piano Man? Then get a hold of the Hal Leonard Billy Joel Greatest Hits Volume 1 & 2 Piano, Vocal, Guitar Songbook. To be honest, it really doesn't matter where your musical interests lay; we've got you completely covered. Books, sheet music & media are a must for any performer. They can help you keep your skills sharp, as well as help you develop new ones. Whether you're learning how to play an old favorite or writing a new song all your own, books, sheet music & media can make the process much easier.
That wraps it up folks! We hope you found some inspiration from our chart and managed to get a little closer to finding your best guitar for jazz. Now it’s simply a matter of reading some reviews, watching some videos and making a decision! Don’t forget, if this is your first guitar, you’ll need to buy a good amplifier to go with it. If you liked our stuff, you can subscribe to our newsletter for more sensational guitar deals.
Despite racial laws still in place at the time, the youngsters knew that they were buying African American music and it didn’t stop them. The shallow radio pop music no longer appealed to them and they found blues music expressed many of the emotions and views. The kids felt a connection to the music, they felt frustrated and wanted a voice and culture of their own.
I once had RARE rogue made in the early 90s, set up exactly like some of the best ibanez.s. Shark fin inllays, cool headstock, grover tuners, real floyd rose, etc, even the pickups used were authentic dimebuckers. Rogue made these to compete with bigger names and sold them for around $200, best guitar ever. I wish I had never sold it. I still have pics if anyone wants to see it.
Therefore, if you are a beginner that is still struggling to find a product that comes shipped with other accessories, you should really pay attention to this model. Besides, although this is a full-sized guitar, previous buyers of the model have stated that the unit is not particularly heavy. Consequently, it can be used by teens without worrying about its size and weight.
Numerous classic guitars made by the likes of Gibson, Epiphone, Fender, and Guild are worth thousands, sometimes tens of thousands; a little expensive for the average player, and often these are the preserve of investors and collectors. Early versions of the Gibson Les Paul, SG and Flying V guitars, or the Fender Stratocaster or Telecaster. But there are still very many affordable, great sounding, and exciting to play vintage guitars that offer something simply not available in a new guitar. A well-built vintage instrument, although expensive can actually be superb value for money in comparison to some of the new guitars available at that price.

I found myself un-obligated, bored and holding a fist full of cash one Friday afternoon, so I wandered into my local guitar shop. With a new found love of single coil pickups I had been eyeballing the Gretsch and Guild hollow bodies unfortunately too poor to actually buy one. On this afternoon, however, I played the Godin 5th Avenue Kingpin. It was love at first strum. Mine is called Cognac Burst. The satin finish on these instruments is beautiful, and give it a vintage, played look. This guitar has a really nice feel in terms of the neck and the thickness of the body. I have fairly long fingers and the neck is comfortable to play. It feels to me, a bit like the thicker necks on the Les Pauls of the late 50s. When I got the guitar, the shop said they'd dial it in for me for free, but frankly, I have no complaints as it is. With the classic style floating bridge you can drop the action impossibly low before you start to get fret buzz. After I brought mine home, I did just that and it plays like a dream. The frets are finished well and there is a bevel on the edge of the fret board and frets that keep them out of the way if you're in the habit of sliding your hand up and down the neck quickly. The Kingpin has a warm mellow tone when unplugged that is perfect for playing jazz and blues. I also enjoy the lower volume of the guitar since it has f holes when I play later in the evening. Plugged in, the P90 kills and sounds good clean and driven. It also retains that warm, mellow tone when played without distortion. I haven't had any trouble with feedback as I tend to keep the volume a bit lower for small spaces. My one complaint is the hideously ugly case, that costs 80 bucks. It's like its made of extra tough styrofoam. I understand they were going for lightness, but it's just ugly. All in all though, this guitar is a great choice and plays as well as my Gibson Les Paul and my buddies Gretsch 51... whatever.
The Orange Crush PiX CR12L is still a relatively inexpensive option for a beginner amp. In terms of the basic features, it isn’t quite the best value on the market. However, it delivers a better made, better designed beginner amp at a very reasonable price. Beginners that can afford to spend a bit more, but want a standard beginner amp might find the extra cost worth it for the extra quality of the Orange Crush PiX CR12L.
There's no wrong answer to which neck will work best for you. When people speak of rounder vs. flatter being better for chording/bending, they are referring to the radius of the fretboard, not necessarily overall neck shape. The fretboard on all guitars has a curvature across is, from the the treble to the bass side. Generally speaking, most people would agree that rounder fretboards facilitate better chording, while flatter ones facilitate better bending, but even that's not hard and fast.
Another early solid body electric guitar was designed and built by musician and inventor Les Paul in the early 1940s, working after hours in the Epiphone Guitar factory. His log guitar (so called because it consisted of a simple 4x4 wood post with a neck attached to it and homemade pickups and hardware, with two detachable Swedish hollow body halves attached to the sides for appearance only) was patented and is often considered to be the first of its kind, although it shares nothing in design or hardware with the solid body "Les Paul" model sold by Gibson.

Palmer is a Miami, FL based guitar maker. They have high end models made in the states and cheap models contracted out to the highest bidder like most guitar maker today. I would say that if you tried to sell one of these, you would most likely not get what you paid for it new because they are simply made cheaply in huge numbers. They eventually turn up at used music shops and garage sales around the country. I wouldn't pay more than $50 for one myself and did just that. They make good campfire guitars.

As Jay Verkuilen, has already noted here (no pun intended!), be careful not to hammer too hard on the unplugged guitar as you can be fooled into thinking you have to play much harder that you really do. Fretboard exercises & scales, practicing chord forms, and the like while unplugged is beneficial to your playing, "muscle memory," and aids your relationship with your housemates and neighbors.
There’s also the line of self-tuning “robot” guitars that Gibson spent more than a decade and millions of dollars developing. In 2015, Juszkiewicz made the feature standard on most new guitars. Sales dropped so dramatically, as players and collectors questioned the added cost and value, that Gibson told dealers to slash prices. The company then abandoned making self-tuners a standard feature. You can still buy them — they call them “G Force” — but they’re now simply an add-on option.
THIS IS THE ONLY WIRING GUIDE YOU WILL EVER NEED TO BUY. Learn step by step how to completely wire Telecaster, Stratocaster, Esquire, and Les Paul guitars and all of the potentiometers, capacitors, switches, ground wires, hot wires, pickups, output jack, and bridge ground. Even if you dont have a Fender or Gibson, this guide will teach you how to wire a guitar with 1, 2, or 3 pickups. Also learn where you can get the complete wiring kits for dirt cheap, and learn essential soldering tips. Why not learn how to change your pickups, tone or volume controls, switches, and capacitors yourself? There are a ton of modifications you can do to your guitar for dirt cheap. This book will also show you some secret "hot rod" techniques that the pros use. This book will teach you how to do coil tapping, coil cutting, phase switching, series wiring, parallel wiring, bridge-on switching, mini toggle switching, varitone switching, mega switching, yamaha switching, blend pots, and much more !!!
Either today or tomorrow my SSS Mexican Stratocaster will be arriving at my local Guitar Center and I'm not sure if I should pay to get it setup. The guy that worked there, Jon, suggested I get my guitar setup as soon as I go and pick it up since its 50% off for a first time setup. He said the technician would adjust the guitar strings, double check the action or height of the strings or something. It sounds like something I wouldn't really need but then again I'm just a beginner - maybe some of you more experienced guitarists can let me know if Jon was trying to do me a solid or if he was just trying to make a sale. He also said they'd help me get my guitar in tune which was pretty cool.
Though it’s a pretty sad end to what became a beloved brand and guitar, the Hi-Flier guitars and basses gained new life in the mid-‘90s, thanks to the aforementioned famous players. Today, they're again seeming to blossom in the vintage market. Only a few years ago, a Hi-Flier could be purchased on the cheap, but sales prices for these funky guitars have steadily been on the rise.
In the Guitar amplifier world, ANY of the “boutique” brands (some are truly boutique, offering one-of-a-kind amps, but many are just small-scale shops that have a couple lines to choose from and a couple of customizable features) fit this classification of “top shelf,” because they offer the highest quality components, are assembled with the greatest of care (usually by hand with almost no automation), and generally offer tweaks and improvements on older designs. In effect, these amps are “custom built or even bespoke.
The contents of this article are subject to worldwide copyright protection and reproduction in whole or part, whether mechanical or electronic, is expressly forbidden without the prior written consent of the Publishers. Great care has been taken to ensure accuracy in the preparation of this article but neither Sound On Sound Limited nor the publishers can be held responsible for its contents. The views expressed are those of the contributors and not necessarily those of the publishers.
To start off, the GIO GRX70 features a basswood body with quilted art grain top that makes it look more expensive than it actually is. But it's not just about the looks because for the price, you are getting Ibanez level playability, which is consistently comfortable and easy to play. Following conventional Super Strat specs, it has a 25.5" scale maple neck, topped by a 22 fret rosewood fingerboard wit a nut width of 1.65". Three Powersound pickups in HSH configuration are tasked to give this guitar its versatile rock and shred friendly tone, without breaking the bank.
As these same makers ramped up for digital production, digital choruses naturally joined the team. The effect as produced digitally might sound broadly similar, but it is done differently than in the analog circuits. Digital chorus pedals double a signal and add delay and pitch modulation to one path, the latter wobbling below and above the pitch of the unadulterated signal, which produces an audible out-of-tuneness when the paths are blended back together. It’s hard to fault the power and range of control that digital technology affords, and this version of the effect has been hugely successful, but many guitarists still prefer the subtle, watery shimmer of the analog version. Conversely, the same ears often find the digital variety makes them a little queasy.
4. Vox VT40X 40-watt 1x10 Combo Amp ($249.99): The Vox is another modeling combo that utilizes a Valvetronix tube preamp to give you the sound qualities of a tube amp. With 13 onboard effects, you can channel quality effects without having a pedalboard at your disposal. Vox’s Virtual Elements Technology has allowed them to carefully recreate up to 20 realistic models of very sought-after amp tones, all within an attractive looking package.

Packing almost the entire tonal essence of 80's arena rock n' roll into one bar-shaped unit, with a glassy and transparent, BBD-style chorus, a crushing hot rod Marshall-stack crunch distortion, a natural-sounding delay, and a spacious reverb. Turn on every module on the bar, with a little tweaking, you've got yourself THE EPIC lead tone, which is dynamic, responsive to your hands, with long sustain, and cuts through the mix like a knife through butter. A built-in cab simulator for getting a real guitar cabinet sound straight from the PA system; Max delay time: 500ms It is the ultimate tool for road touring gigs. Aluminum-alloy, metal casing, stable and strong; compact size. Grab it! Plug it! Tweak it! Rock it! LED indicator shows the working state; Power: DC 9V 5.5x2.1mm center negative,.
Next, squirt your cable and rub it using a clean cloth. To cleanse the amplifier and guitar inputs, compress an area of the clean magazine around a Q-tip. Next, apply a bit of contact cleaner to the cloth, and push it in and out of the inputs to all your guitar gear such as effects pedals, amps, guitar. A point to take note here is that you should use a fresh new section of the cloth for each jack input.
Using that pickup and gain level, you should be able to hear some guitar distortion. Of course, if that's not entirely satisfactory, there are a few other things you can do. If your amp has tone controls, you can turn up the mid knob to hear the guitar distortion more clearly. If there's only bass and treble controls available to you, you can turn both of these down a little to hear more distortion.

Wes Borland (b. 1975) guitarist for Limp Bizkit has owned many Ibanez guitars, including a custom 4-string baritone guitar, although he no longer endorses them. He was mainly noted for playing an Ibanez RG7 CST which had selectable piezo and magnetic pickups, only 18 of these were made in 1999. Borland has a signature Yamaha guitar, but has been seen playing a Jackson with the reformed Limp Bizkit.
While I’m on the subject of guitar myths... Many sellers of vintage Japanese guitars have been throwing around the term “lawsuit guitar”, although not usually in reference to Kents. In 1977 the Norlin Company, which owned Gibson at the time, sued Elger Guitars, which was the U.S. distributing arm of Hoshino Gakki of Japan. The suit claimed that Hoshino-made Ibanez guitars too-closely copied the headstock design of Gibson. Just the headstock. By the time the suit was brought out, Hoshino had already changed to a headstock more closely resembling what was on Guild guitars of the time. So it was pretty easy for Elger Guitars/Hoshino to promise not to copy the Gibson headstock anymore.
That's what I'm hoping to address in this post along with clearing some common misconceptions too. The guitar world and community is very big on the vintage thing, and that has filtered down to replacement parts of course too. It is very easy to get lost in the world of 'vintage' style parts making an improvement in tone, so let's cast those notions aside here and look at the facts of why in some cases that's both correct and incorrect. Tim McNelly of McNelly Pickups put it really well in a recent social media post '..New electronics won’t necessarily make your guitar sound any different than it does now. New pots won't NECESSARILY change the tone if you don't know the exact value of the pots coming out..'. I think this is a really great way to put it and a great starting point for this post and discussion (feel free to comment too!).


While there’s still 9 more guitars to talk about on this list, you really can’t go wrong with stopping here, at the Les Paul Standard. This guitar is one of the most sought-after electrics in its price range. If you’ve ever played a Les Paul Epiphone before, you know what we’re talking about. Besides being a legendary guitar invented by the artist, inventor, and guitarist, Les Paul, this guitar also has what it takes to be legit, such as ProBucker-2™ and ProBucker-3™ pickups with coil-tapping. You can find this guitar for literally one dollar under $500 at most stores. 

The trusty traveler guitar:  There are many makes and models, and of those that we reviewed, some that are cheaply priced (i.e. under $150) are just that- cheap.  Traveler guitars come in all kinds of shapes and sizes, and some more complex models offer foldaway design that buckle at the neck joint.  Additionally, there are acoustic electric models if you desire the flexibility of plugging in.  First, it is best to determine "why" you are seriously considering a travel guitar before getting into the research.  Answer that question for yourself first, and it could steer you away from a specific traveler guitar and toward a different size acoustic guitar body.  Also, it might re-affirm your choice.  Consider the following questions:
Now think about all the advances in guitar technology that we’ve witnessed over the decades—how much smarter we are now when it comes to acoustics, electronics and precision manufacturing? Sticking with this metaphor, isn’t it a bit crazy that we place such high value on the early designs that represent the Model T-era of the electric guitar’s evolution? We’re not just talking nostalgia and historic significance here—ask most guitarists to name the most amazing, best-sounding electric guitars ever made, and they’ll go all the way back to early-fifties Broadcasters, late-fifties Les Pauls, and early-sixties Stratocasters. Guitarists cling to the tones produced by what is, essentially, first generation technology.
If you wanted to quantify what is meant by "best," which you really should, then we actually would need to consider the specifications of guitars in the given price range. Although there may be differences of personal preference when it comes to areas such as individual tone woods used, fretboard scale, and nut width, we could still make very good general assumptions about whether laminates are better than a solid wood model, whether synthetic fretboard material was favorable to natural wood, whether one pickup is better than two, and/or whether including a built-in tuner is preferable. In other words, Forget about the names of the manufacturers and do a real comparison of specifications of guitars in the given price range.
This is obviously the most important value when it comes to any musical instrument. If the guitar doesn’t sound right, none of the other values will be able to make up for that. Guitarists are notorious for their attention to tone, and many players will form a tight allegiance to the brand they feel provides the perfect sound. The Gibson is sought after for its full bodied overdriven sound in rock circles, while others swear by Fender’s classic offerings. It all comes down to a matter of preference, so you will want to be well acquainted with the sounds of each brand. Look up your favorite guitarists and see what they play. That will likely put you on the right track.

Reverb is one of the most fundamental effects for electric guitar, which is why it is already built into most amps. Reverb adds natural sounding depth to your sound. Used extensively in the recording world, electric guitars do not sound “right” without it. Just a little makes the guitar have more of a natural sound and decay, but you can go to the extremes and get cavernous depth to your sound. Plate and spring are the most common types, but with so many makers coming up with new sonic “spaces” to play in, finding your reverb sound is a priority.
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