The DigiTech Whammy is a great example of a powerful pitch shifter. Controlled by an expression pedal in a manner similar to a wah, it gives you the ability to immediately alter the pitch of the notes you are playing. Pantera and Damageplan guitarist Darrell Abbott used and abused such a pedal to get some amazing sounds in his hardcore style of play.
Player-friendly features like a slim "C"-shaped maple neck give this guitar a slick, smooth feel, while the 12" fingerboard radius and jumbo frets are ideal for speed and effortless bends. The dual ceramic humbucking pickups boast hot output for powerful tones perfect for crunchy rhythms and soaring solos. Premium styling cues include chrome pickup covers and an eye-catching matching painted headstock to make this guitar stand out from any crowd.
I have a Hohner DC. It is either a MIC or MIK. It does not have body, or neck bindings, but in every other respect is very nice. It was one of the first guitars I got when I started paly about 5 years ago. As a matter of fact, I had not played it for over a year - I recently got it out of the case, re-strung it and played it regularly for a couple weeks. I have been going over my colection looking for things I could sell off, but I decided to keep this one.
The best guitars?  Look at what the best players use.  Certainly Gibson and Fender are in the mix, but these are typically priceless, early production or highly customized one-off units.  If you want something more or less off the shelf that is in the same range of build, tone and feel quality look at the following (BTW, you can't get these at Guitar Center, which is probably why they haven't been mentioned yet):
A. Electric guitars either have bolt-on, set neck, or neck-through neck construction. Bolt on necks are simply bolted onto the body, set necks are set into the body and glued, and neck-through construction is where the neck extends all the way through the body. The latter is generally considered the best and most durable, but won't be found on cheaper guitars.
However, if you want a small guitar that will give the quality of sound you might expect from a larger guitar, or if you are considering this style as the first beginner guitar for a child or student, you may want to consider other models that are more typical of a guitar suitable for learning, recording or for growing and developing better skills.
Looks like a good guitar. I honestly think that for 90% of the hobbyist players out there, after buying better pickups, the difference between the sound of a Squier and a real Fender is negligible. I could be wrong I guess, but my ear doesn't really pick up enough of a difference to justify the money for a more expensive guitar. The quality of the guitar plays a big part for me. For instance, when I first got my guitar, the frets weren't smooth. Bends sucked because the note had lost it's sound by the time it was bent all the way up. Finally through playing and polishing, they flattened. Now they play really nice. I'm sure that on a new Gibson, that wouldnt happen. Oh well. About the Tele headstock that you didn't like, what don't you like about it? Do you like the gibson style 3 tuners to a side configuration?(like an acoustic?)

Description: Black Finish Model. Body: Alder - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Alder - Neck Attachment: Bolt - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: C-Shape - Nut Width: 42mm - Fingerboard: Maple - Frets: 21, Jumbo, Medium - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Headstock: 6 In-Line - Bridge: Tremolo - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Chrome, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - Guitar Features: Pickguard - String Instrument Finish: Black - Made In: Mexico
Jazz rhythm guitar often consists of very textural, odd-meter playing that includes generous use of exotic, difficult-to-fret chords. In 4/4 timing, it is common to play 2.5 beat intervals such as on the 2 and then the half beat or "and" after 4. Jazz guitarists may play chords "ahead" of the beat, by playing the chord a swung eighth note before the actual chord change. Chords are not generally played in a repetitive rhythmic fashion, like a rock rhythm guitarist would play.
Additionally, the instrument gets a good once-over for all other miscellaneous needs. Every Calibration & Reset is tailored to the individual player and there are never any charges for adjustment once the service is initially completed. Every Calibration & Reset is guaranteed for 60 days from completion (though typically adjustments are made well past the 60 day mark for free). No Calibration & Reset is done until you're completely happy with the way your guitar plays. The only limitations are the laws of physics, which despite our many attempts, we have yet to find ways to break.
Theory - These sessions will be devoted to investigating how the fretboard works, how strings and notes relate to each other, what chords are made up of etc. A lot of theory time will be spent reading and analysing diagrams and your guitar's fretboard. This aspect is for understanding how music works on the guitar, to map out the fretboard in your mind so you can later apply the physical techniques with confidence. If you're serious about getting good on guitar, you need time devoted to theory.
Body tops are optional. If you're just starting out, you should either skip this option, or choose the veneer top that appeals to you most. We offer veneer tops (paper-thin layer of wood) and cap tops (thick layer of wood). Most people will add a top to their instrument because of the top’s naturally beautiful appearance. Some people will add a top to their guitar because it can affect the overall sound of the instrument, too (only applies to cap tops, not veneers).
Every year we bring a new opening act on tour with us, and every year I have the harsh task of going on stage after some of the finest players in the business. This summer’s tour was no exception. With Montgomery Gentry in the support slot of the Toby Keith Biggest and Baddest tour, I had my work cut out for me. Two of the best axe slingers the music scene has to offer—Frank Bowers and Bo “two-timechampion” Garrett—have some of the greatest chops and sounds on the circuit today.
2.      Weight – a LOT less. This is important if you’re leaving the garage for the first time and don’t have roadies, if (like me) you’re trying to not injure your back anymore lugging equipment), if you’re a touring band trying to spend less on cartage and more on crew, or if you’re a worldwide act who needs to truck and fly your stage rig between continents.
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FeaturesThe Gibson LogoAngled HeadstockAdjustable Truss RodNew Asymmetrical Neck Profile22-Fret Rosewood FingerboardAlloy Fret WireTrapezoid Inlays Set-Neck ConstructionPlus Maple TopChambered Mahogany BodyPickups: Gibson Burstbucker ProsTonePros Locking Tune-o-matic Bridge and Locking Stopbar TailpieceNitrocellulose FinishBody BindingCustom-Made PotentiometersLocking Neutrik JackLocking Grover TunersRevolutionary Plek Set UpNew Enlarged Neck Tenon
What does all this have to do with guitars? Crudely speaking, the metal strings of an electric guitar are a bit like dynamos: they make electricity when you move them. Under the strings, there are electricity-generating devices called pickups. Each one consists of one or more magnets with hundreds or thousands of coils of very thin wire wrapped around them. The magnets generate a magnetic field all around them that passes up through the strings. As a result, the metal strings become partially magnetized and, when they vibrate, make a very small electric current flow through the wire pickup coils. The pickups are hooked up to an electrical circuit and amplifier, which boosts the small electric current and sends it on to a loudspeaker, making the familiar electric guitar sound. Usually, the amplifier and loudspeaker are built into a single unit called an "amp."
First of all, the pickup configuration is getting into the heavy metal side of things and, like the two previous recommendations, it offers a great introduction into changing your sounds on the fly. You know that expert players are constantly stomping on effects pedals to change the tone of the guitar, but they’re also tweaking the pickup positions, tones and volumes to create unique sounds, too.

Gibson announced a new interactive computerized Les Paul that produces more sounds, named the Dark Fire. It was released on December 15, 2007. The guitar has a computer integrated into the body and controlled by the “Master Control Knob” (MCK). The MCK allows players to change the pickups and coils, adjust each tone and tunings automatically and simultaneously, even during a song being played. Like the Robot, the Dark Fire features the ability to tune the guitar; however, in an improvement over the Robot, the player can tune it up to 500 times per battery charge, allowing the tuning pegs to adjust themselves to different tuning styles. Using the “Chameleon Tone Technology” Gibson claims this guitar will produce every imaginable guitar sound. In addition to the improved and advanced tuning features, the guitar has three types of pickups which include Burstbucker (humbucker), a P-90 single-coil and a bridge-mounted piezo acoustic, all of which contribute to organic blends of original sounds.

Most Martin guitars made are "flat top" models. That is, they have a round sound hole in approximately the center of the flat top of the guitar, with a "pin" style bridge. Martin also made some archtop models during the 1930s. These can have a round sound hole, or two "f" style sound holes (one on each side of the top of the body), and have an arched top, with a "trapeze" style bridge. Martin also made ukuleles. If a guitar only has four strings (and is not a ukulele), this is known as a Tenor guitar. Uke size instruments with ten string are Tiples. Uke size instruments with eight strings are Taropatches. Martin also made mandolins, which have eight strings. To summarize:
In 1971 Larrivee began adding inlay designs to their guitars and in 1977 inlays became a standard for their guitars. Beginning in 1978 their inlay designs took on a more romantic style. Since 1979 all engravings were designed by Wendy Larrivee except for a 1998 inlay called the “Joker.” In 2007 Larrivée began using laser engraving for their inlays.
Nickel ES-335 diamond trapeze tailpiece. This is a short version of the standard ES-335 style tailpiece which was also used on many arched top instruments. Overall length of Tailpiece not including hinge = 3 1/8 inches. Side to Side width at bar = 3 9/32 inches. Width of string bar = 47/64 inches. String Spacing at Bar = 1 61/64 inches. Important Hinge/Mounting Specs: Mounting Area of Hinge length = 1 1/2 inches. Mounting Area of Hinge Width - 2 inches. Mounting hole location bottom center = 11/32 inch from bottom edge Two Mounting hole locations from side edges = 5/16 inches. Two mounting hole locations Apart from eachother = 1 25/64 inches. Upper side of hinge length = 1 1/8 inches. Upper side of Hinge width = 1 25/64 inches.
The theory of evolution says that the longer something has been evolving the more complex it tends to get, and this is certainly true of the electric guitar, which has been evolving for over half a century. Electric guitar sounds rely on the instrument itself, the amplifier through which it is played and also on the loudspeaker system used. Further variables are introduced when miking techniques are taken into consideration, though these days miking is only one of the ways of recording an electric guitar — we also have a number of effective DI techniques from which to choose.
In 1931, Martin reintroduced the dreadnought with X-bracing and two years later gave it a modified body shape to accommodate a 14-fret neck, and it quickly became their best-selling guitar. The rest of the industry soon followed[citation needed], and today the “dreadnought” size and shape is considered one of the “standard” acoustic guitar shapes, iconic for its use in a wide variety of musical genres.

My 15 year old daughter recently renewed interest in the guitar she had bought a few years ago but had never really played much. She was disappointed when she noticed the strings were loose. We brought it here and Ted was so helpful and engaging. He recommended new guitar strings; normally you can buy the strings and do it yourself, or pay them to do it. He readily understood that while my daughter didn't know how to do it herself, she would like to know. He showed both my girls how to string a guitar, talking them through each step while he expertly strung the guitar and got it in perfect tune. Ted teaches guitar and his tutorial was an excellent recommendation of his teaching skills. He also threw in a cleaning cloth and gave us chocolates - how much better does it get than that?! We will definitely be coming back!


There were actually two bolt-neck DT-250s, both with basswood bodies and the very nice locking Powerocker vibratos. The regular model came in black or white and had a rosewood fingerboard. Well, a little boring. But the Transparent Red TRs came with a maple fingerboard stained red. Yes, that’s what we’re talking about! If you’re going to have a red guitar, you ought to have a matching red fingerboard. Hard maple, made slick with the red polyurethane.
Pete Townshend turned his guitar into a machine gun. That was the actual sound he went after, slamming his guitars into speaker cabinets and toggling the pickup-selector switch violently. “To me the guitar was a symbol,” explained the Who’s lead guitarist. “It was a metaphor for a machine gun. And the only thing you could do with a machine gun in the 60s was break it across your legs. That’s what I did.” You can hear these specific sonic strategies on songs like My Generation and Anyway, Anyhow, Anywhere.

I have a sunset hellraiser fr. I have been playing for 8yrs and it is by far the best guitar I have ever owned or even played. Next to the ltd models that I was considering the schecter had better quality, feel, and sound at almost HALF the price of the high end lts. The quality of the abalone inlays, the finish (black cherry), the original floyd, grover tuners, 24 fret rosewood board, incredible set neck (you would think its a neckthrough without checking the specs), and the coil tapping emgs is unbelievable. I could go on forever about this guitar's action, sound, feel, quality, looks... I have spent over a 1000$ on a few dif. Guitars and I will never do it again. Ex- zack wylde epi, 2 usa fenders couple mex. 1's, a gibson Linkin Park standard, ltd kh-602, and a really nice jackson dinky style(not sure model) with 3 carvin humbuckers coiltaped just to name a few. Hellraiser is better than all of them. I recommend any of the hellraiser guitars especially with coil tapping emgs.

If you are an insurance agent, pawn store, a manufacturer or appraiser searching for used guitar prices and other musical equipment values, Used Price is for you. Our extensive database contains the value of thousands of pieces of used musical equipment. Whether you are looking for a Fender guitar value, a Gibson guitar value or a certain bass value or drum value, we have them for you all in one convenient location.
Many players today have more than one overdrive/distortion stomp box on their pedal boards and sometimes use both at once. My personal preference is to place the lower gain pedals in front of the higher gain ones, but the opposite is absolutely fine if you prefer the sound of that configuration. Placing overdrive/distortion pedals later in the signal chain can increase noise as the noise of several effects chained together can add up, and any noise produced by other effects going into an overdrive/distortion effect will be boosted along with the guitar signal.
Love love love this guitar! I ordered it because it reminds me of my Dad's old Kay archtop that I initially learned to play on. The retro jazz style of this guitar is awesome. My musician friends love it and and like the sound of it although they haven't heard it plugged in yet. It took me a very short while to get used to the strings (made by the company for this guitar) and while they have a tinnier sound than what I'm used to for an acoustic guitar, they do deliver when it is plugged in. Overall it really seems to be more of an electric-style guitar. The neck is narrow and the body is small - something that I am so happy with! It is extremely playable. I may switch to bronze strings to get a warmer tone, but for now I want to give these strings a chance to sing. I also ordered a case from the company that fits this guitar, and for the price, it is awesome as well! Very light and the guitar fits perfectly and securely. At a recent gig, a complete stranger came up to me to look at and admire this guitar - it truly is a beautiful instrument. The woodgrain is rich and not as red as the pictures make it look. I feel like Stu Sutcliff - don't really need to know how to play - I can simply stand in the background and look cool ;-)

What does all this have to do with guitars? Crudely speaking, the metal strings of an electric guitar are a bit like dynamos: they make electricity when you move them. Under the strings, there are electricity-generating devices called pickups. Each one consists of one or more magnets with hundreds or thousands of coils of very thin wire wrapped around them. The magnets generate a magnetic field all around them that passes up through the strings. As a result, the metal strings become partially magnetized and, when they vibrate, make a very small electric current flow through the wire pickup coils. The pickups are hooked up to an electrical circuit and amplifier, which boosts the small electric current and sends it on to a loudspeaker, making the familiar electric guitar sound. Usually, the amplifier and loudspeaker are built into a single unit called an "amp."
Add bite or presence by boosting between 2kHz and 6kHz, depending on the tone you're after. Little over 4-5kHz is produced by a guitar speaker, though going for a brighter DI'd clean sound is quite legitimate for artistic reasons. Similar-sounding electric guitars that may be conflicting within a mix can be separated to a limited extent by adding bite at different frequencies, though choosing two different-sounding guitars and/or amp sounds and examining the arrangement carefully usually works better. As a rule, single-coil guitars are best for cutting through a busy mix without taking up too much space, while humbucking pickups create a thicker sound which may be beneficial in recordings where there is only one guitar part.

In this article you will learn the basics of guitar effects pedals so you will be better prepared to choose the right analog stomp boxes and digital effects to complement your sound. I’m not going to spend too much time on the science of how effects boxes do what they do. But I will do my best to explain, in plain English, the basics of each effect.


This D-15M dreadnought features a solid 'genuine' (South American) mahogany top over A-Frame X bracing; the same material is used for the back, sides and neck. The neck profile is a 'modified low oval', and it's hard to imagine anyone having a problem with it. Bone nut and saddle: check. Vintage-style, open-gear tuners check. Super-thin matt nitrocellulose finish all over: check. Tonally, there is a rich and projecting core sound that's complemented by the unmistakable, Martin D-resonance. It's vibrant and ebullient, yet not brash; warm and full without being thick or indistinct. It puts every single cent of its build budget into making the best sounding and playing instrument, with very little concession to cosmetics, electronics or anything else. Solid woods, improved neck joint, bone nut and saddle, no frills whatsoever, save for the 'burst – it's unreservedly recommended.
This depends on personal preference; changing the order of drive pedals changes how they sound when used together. For instance, a clean boost placed before a heavy distortion or fuzz will result in a louder boosted signal hitting the heavier distortion circuit which in turn works that circuit harder and you get heavier distortion. If you place that clean boost after the heavy distortion, it will just make the original distorted sound louder. Experiment with different placement order and you will find your own preference.
If you’ve ever stepped foot into a music store, you’ve seen a Hal Leonard book. They’re iconic in the annals of guitar-learning lore. They’re not the hippest or the most accessible, but they nevertheless remain key fixtures. This compendium combines the three books of the method into one. Just about everything you need to know is in here somewhere, though it’s commonly said that an instructor is needed to parse the flow of information. Still, it’s a great reference and if it makes sense to you out of the gate, there’s the potential to learn a lot from this classic tome.
It's a basic rule of physics (called Faraday's law) that a changing magnetic field produces electricity. So a guitar string will produce electricity only for as long as the magnetic field is changing—in other words, for only as long as the metal string is moving. Once the string stops vibrating, the sound stops. In that respect, an electric guitar is just like an acoustic one.
    Kahler Tremolo bridges feature 6-way adjustable string saddles, which really allow you to dial in your string action and intonation. They have a fairly wide range-of-motion, but less than the Floyd Rose. The Kahler’s have a smoother feel compared to the Floyd Rose, and also have a convenient locking mechanism to convert the bridge into a fixed bridge.
Reading the comments, looks like people dont like Ibanez, in my 15 years of guitar playing I have own three, all mid-lowend models in the RG series, those things are of amazing value they can take a lot of abuse and still sound great. I dare to compare them whit my SL3 jackson a guitar that costed me three times more than any Ibanez I had own, the only big difference are the pickups because other than that the built quallity is much the same and I dare to say Ibanez uses better compenets (frets, pots, switch) than Jackson...
You've come to the right place.  We offer a wide range of vintage and used guitars and basses including a great selection of Fender instruments.   We're guitar players who recognize and appreciate how important Fender has been to the evolution of Rock and Roll.  Please browse our web site, give us a call or visit our Chicago show room.  We're constantly searching for Fender guitars, new gear is arriving daily and they often sells before we have a chance to list them on our web site.  
FX or no FX? Again, it's almost a question of valve or solid state, here. Most valve amps don't come with any effects other than tremolo and reverb, at most. Solid State amps often come with a wide range of features such as digital FX and amp modelling. If you're an have lots of fx pedals, you don't really need a modelling unit, but if you're new to guitar playing, buying an amp with modeling FX might be a good way to get familiar with all those sounds.
While tremolo is a change in volume, vibrato is a constant and repetitive change in pitch up and down. It can be used to make chord progressions shimmer and to add a wobbliness to single note lines. It is like adding vibrato with your finger, but it is constant and consistent. Controls are usually the same as tremolo pedals, with tap tempo also being common.
Gibson's factories were raided in 2009 and 2011 by agents of the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS). In November 2009 authorities found illegally imported ebony wood from Madagascar.[37][38] A second raid was conducted in August 2011,[37] during which the FWS seized wood imports from India that had been mislabeled on the US Customs declaration.[39][40] Gibson Guitar Corp. filed a motion in January 2011 to recover seized materials and overturn the charges, which was denied by the court.[41][42]
Once the electric guitar had been firmly established by the 1960s and 1970s, guitar designs became increasingly distinctive and reflective of popular music trends. And by the 1980s guitarists were more and more concerned with the look as well as sound of their instruments, regarding their guitars as identifying signatures. Eddie Van Halen decorated his guitar with colored sticky tape, and Prince has had guitars of all shapes and colors custom-created for his stage performances.
Consideration of this takes us back again to Kink Dave Davies: “The blues players were the first to crank it up, and the music had that spirit, that anguish. We used to listen to all those guys. Like John Lee Hooker—he had that buzz, that drive. I used to listen to him and think, ‘What’s he doing there? That’s amazing—how do you get that sound?’ I think all those elements led to me messing around with amplifiers, because all the amplifiers were clean, soulless.”
View a complete range of budget friendly electric guitars over at PMT Online today or call in to your local PMT store to see a full range. We have many electric guitars spanning all budgets, styles and genres including a complete range of guitar starter packs. Alternatively, call 0151 448 2089 to speak to one of our guitar experts to discuss your needs.
Starting in the early '90s, music gear manufacturers began developing digital effects models that aimed to re-create the sounds generated by classic effects, instruments, and vintage amplifiers. This technology quickly expanded to include models of revered amplifier heads, speaker cabinets, microphones, and even specific microphone placements. Many amps and multi-effects units today incorporate a wide range of models, often grouped into categories such as stompboxes, amps, and mics. Over the last decade, Line 6, one of the leaders in this field, has even created guitars and basses that contain modeled sounds of famous vintage instruments. As the technology has grown more sophisticated, models have become more realistic, often very closely resembling the gear on which they’re based.

Guitar pickups are quite heavily affected by the impedance of whatever they're plugged into. If it's a low impedance input, you'll end up with a muddier, flatter sound going into your amp sims. Ideally you want a high impedance input, and if the 6i6 isn't doing it a cheap-ish D.I. box will be the thing to go for. Behringer's got some that get the job done.

Amazing guitar for the price. Honestly plays almost as good as the Paul Reed Smith I used to have. Light weight, great sustain, built in tuner and the pick ups produce a great sound. I was shocked at how good the guitar was... HOWEVER - the amp is total crap. It cracks and pops... my suggestion is to buy the guitar by itself and spend the $100 you save on a real amp (many starters that are superior to this one are the around that price.


Major-chord progressions are constructed in the harmonization of major scales in triads.[21] For example, stacking the C-major scale with thirds creates a chord progression, which is traditionally enumerated with the Roman numerals I, ii, iii, IV, V, vi, viio; its sub-progression C-F-G (I-IV-V) is used in popular music,[22] as already discussed. Further chords are constructed by stacking additional thirds. Stacking the dominant major-triad with a minor third creates the dominant seventh chord, which shall be discussed after minor chords.
I've been a guitar player for decades but only recently became serious about working on my instruments. In my research, I’ve found hundreds of articles about instrument repair, and while many are fantastic and chock full of information that’s invaluable to musicians, a lot is impractical or requires more space or specialized tools than most of us have. Plus, some repairs, such as fretwork, nut replacement, under-saddle pickup installation and finish repairs are best left to professionals.
Williamson went on to produce and play on Iggy’s classic solo 1979 album New Values, which features gems like “I’m Bored” and “Five Foot One.” The guitarist also played a key role on the follow-up disc, Soldier, anchoring a punk rock all-star lineup that included ex-Pistol Glen Matlock, Ivan Kral from the Patti Smith Band and Barry Adamson from Magazine. Shortly after Soldier, Williamson took a hiatus from rock to study electronic engineering, becoming Vice President of Technology and Standards for Sony.
I just purchased a Lyle acoustic guitar in excellent condition. It's Serial # 204 and Model # 712. The top of the guitar says Lyle with a gold cross-like design up by the tuning keys. It looks like it was painted on the wood by the manufacture. The top tuning key head and neck are the color of milk chocolate with pearl-type fret inlays. The body of the guitar is a light tangerine color showing the natural wood grain under the clear lacquer finish. It has a dark chocolate bridge, and a black pick guard with a white pearl engraved inlay of a floral sprig or vine-type design. There is a set of three circles around the center opening (1 thin black line, a wide band of black and white lines and another thin black line. It has light tangerine and milk to dark chocolate stripped sides and back which is the natural wood grain showing through the clear lacquer finish. JAPAN is engraved on the back of the tuning key head in back.

Description: Body: Mahogany - Top Wood: Mahogany - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Neck Construction: D-Shape - Fingerboard: Ebony - Frets: 24 - Inlay: Pearl - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Headstock: 6 In-Line - Bridge: Tune-O-Matic - Bridge Construction: Ebony - Hardware: Black, Grover Tuners - Pickups: Seymour Duncan Live Wire - Pickup Configuration: Dual - String Instrument Finish: Charcoal Burst, Vintage Burst


Hendrix was known for a lot of things.The beautiful chord embellishments on Little Wing, the grit of the solo in Voodoo Child screaming off of his strat pickups, his cover of the Dylan song All Along The Watchtower, and the backwards solo in Castles Made of Sand, but known as a great innovative guitar player over and over again. His short but explosive career influenced numerous artists for many years past his death and continues to influence musicians today. To make such a difference in such a short amount of time truly earns Jimi a spot as number two. But…then you may ask, “Who is deserving of number one?!”

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New to the music scene, and never one to stand on formality, I had a chance (multiple chances) to visit Grumpy's Guitars and Stuff, and was never anything but treated with respect, courtesy, and professionalism. My purpose for the visits were neither to buy, nor to have repaired, an instrument. It was to have the proprietor take a look at the bass that I had build. To give me his opinion and estimation on how I did. He walked through the process I'd used, for defretting, paint stripping, and then staining and poly sealing. Demonstrated how to adjust the truss rod, and complimented me on the work I'd done. All while setting aside his own work (A gorgeous early era hollow body electric Gibson.) I was charged a grand total of a great conversation for the tutoring and advice... Above and beyond! The selection of instruments was impressive -- and Grumpy's is the ONLY music/stringed instrument store I've entered in Albuquerque with not one, but 3 double basses, including an electric, and 2 classic uprights. Thanks for the great service, and awesome selection! I'll be by to have my '62 Fender Re-Issue pickups ordered through you, and to see about switching to a new brand of flatwound, when I break my next GHS.
According to the official information Guitar Tricks has more than double the number of song lessons than any other guitar learning site. It goes on to say that there are more than 600 but I feel that the number could be even higher by now because new songs are added regularly. The songs available on Guitar Tricks are the ones that I want to learn, oldies and modern songs from major artists like The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, Eagles, Blink-182, Extreme, Good Charlotte and many more. Check out this list of Guitar Tricks Artists. Did I mention that lots of songs have a beginner and an advanced level lesson? I just love that the advanced level songs are taught based on the original arrangement and not some vague resemblance used to avoid copyright issues. This is because Guitar Tricks has licenses for teaching the original songs.
Some versions of the TG-64 had the same floating-table vibrato system as on the SD-4L; my guess would be that these were earlier versions, although one can’t place too much faith in dating Japanese guitars by hardware appointments. Others had the more typical Japanese version of the Bigsby vibrato. This guitar was sold in the United States in ’65 as the Teisco Del Rey Model ET-320, but by ’66 had been dropped from the line.
Here we have another excellent FG160 for your serious consideration the Yamaha FG 160 Acoustic Guitar Made in Japan in the early - mid 70's from Nippon Gakki factory. This example is an early 70's a more RARE version Yamaha FG 160 again this example is the Made In Japan Nippon Gakki and not to be mistaken for the similar Korean version of the FG-160 which is also nice but not the same as these apples/oranges. This example is MADE IN JAPAN and was built well over 35 years ago and was built to very high detailed standards as well as some of the best Exotic grained Honduran Mahogany woods available ( see pics please for that detail ) in that time period to compete with the great Martin and now this Yamaha is quite well aged with beautiful patina of a true vintage instrument and is a true vintage guitar in its own right. This one has the Amber/Tan label and not the Red Label but the golden lable. The frets are very good - original. The guitar has it's natural age and patina with a few expected minor nicks,dings from a well loved and adult respected instrument. This fine example is here and in stock... We upon receiving have remove the strings cleaned and detailed the guitar oil rosewood and polish finish, and this guitar to plays very well and optionally available upgrade if wanted please ask us...may include new bone nut/saddle/ we have several of these old Yamaha's and they are truly amazing instruments very well compared to Martin, Taylor, Gibson for there fine construction and playability with amazing tone for this kind of money... Here s a link to Harmony Central if you care to rehttp://reviews.harmony-central.com/reviews/Guitar/product/Yamaha/FG-160+/10/1 All New pics ... Interested ? ask Thanks . .
Still in the line in ’41 was the Supro Amplifier No. 50, now also called the Supreme. This had been given an updated look, with rounded corners on the cabinet and a slight narrowing taper toward the top. It still had the round grill with two horizontal bars. It was now covered in tweed, with a tweedy grillcloth, and a flat leather handle. The oval logo plate still graced the upper left corner. The back exposed the chassis, with twin inputs and volume control on the bottom. It still had five tubes, 12 watts and a 10″ speaker. In April of 1942 the Supreme amp cost $76.50. This amp would make it all the way to the proverbial end of the line.
A basic overview of how they function might, the volume pot will receive a signal from the pickup selector it will then transfer this signal to both the tone pot and output jack. Pots can also come as ‘blended’ in which case it will control two pickups and may even have a toggle switch dedicated to just the one pot. This is much less common and won’t play a role in assembling an electric guitar kit in most cases.

Ibanez' strategy to have virtuoso guitarists as endorsers have paid off big time, allowing them to not only produce signature instruments, but to also improve on their production line guitars using the ideas they compiled from various artists. Among their many signature instruments, the Ibanez JEM series is easily one of the most easily identifiable, thanks to its affiliation with guitar wizard Steve Vai and its unique monkey grip handle, which is carved into the body.
Fuzz – A dynamic distortion effect that sounds just like the name. Fuzz was originally created by putting a pinhole or cut in the speaker of an amplifier. Original fuzz pedals use a transistor-based circuit to create the sound. Compared to distortion, fuzz is more raw, abrasive and doesn’t compress the tone. These pedals typically perform best at the front of your effects chain into a clean amplifier.
When buying your first guitar, the cost is always a matter of consideration. Be careful not to let this become the focus of the search otherwise you run the risk of compromising on quality. Think about it, you don't want to learn on the shoddy piece of equipment. You can usually get a good value with proper research. If you have a friend who plays the guitar; find out if they are willing to give you the benefit of their experience.

^ Jump up to: a b Peterson (2002, pp. 36–37):Peterson, Jonathon (2002). "Tuning in thirds: A new approach to playing leads to a new kind of guitar". American Lutherie: The Quarterly Journal of the Guild of American Luthiers. 8222 South Park Avenue, Tacoma WA 98408: USA: The Guild of American Luthiers. Number 72 (Winter): 36–43. ISSN 1041-7176. Archived from the original on 21 October 2011.
I have a Schecter S-1+ (which I believe is close enough) so I'll try my best to answer. There should be 3 knobs and 1 switch. The toggle switch is the pick-up selector. When it is in the middle the sound is coming from both pick-ups. When you flip it left the sound is coming from the neck pick-up. When you flip it right the sound is coming from the bridge pick-up. Next the 3 knobs. The left knob is the volume for the neck pick-up I believe. The middle knob is the tone. And the right knob is the volume of the bridge pick-up. If you are playing a left handed guitar the switch the directions (Ex. Left would now be right; right would now be left; middle stays the same.) So there ya go. Hope that helped!
Some of the more distinctive specifications include, the headstock shape, tuners, neck and fretboard, bridge, and pickups and electronics. The headstock shape is based on PRS’s trademark design, but inverted to both accommodate Mayer’s playing style and also to keep a consistent length of string behind the nut, which makes staying in tune easier. The tuners are a traditional vintage-style, closed-back tuner, but with PRS’s locking design. The neck shape was modeled after 1963/1964 vintage instruments, and the fretboard has a 7.25” radius. The moment your hand grabs this neck, it just feels right. Like the tuners, the steel tremolo takes a classic design and incorporates PRS’s trem arm and Gen III knife-edge screws. The bridge on the Silver Sky is setup flush to the body in the neutral position so that the tremolo bridge only goes down in pitch. By keeping the bridge in contact with the body, the guitar itself is acoustically louder, which improves the signal to noise ratio of the single-coil pickups. The 635JM single-coil pickups are very round and full, with a musical high end that is never “ice-picky” or brash.
YouTube has become well known for its tutorial videos and how-to clips on every subject on the planet and guitar lessons are no exception. Videos don’t provide the same kind of interactivity as our Uberchord app, which can listen through your device’s microphone and give you instant feedback on your playing. But we agree that YouTube clips can let you actually see and hear what’s going on—it can make a difference when things get confusing.

The first trick is the most obvious one: to double a crunch or heavily distorted guitar with a clean one. By sub-mixing a clean sound, you will be able to retain some precision, which is no minor detail considering that distortion has the annoying tendency of blurring sound. For this trick to be as transparent as possible, the crunch and clean performances must be as similar as can be. That being said, if you have a hard time getting that perfection, you can always "cheat": be it by editing the clean sound to make it match the original performance or simply doing some reamping with the first take, as discussed previously. In both cases the trick ought to work wonders because the clean take is only meant to be "felt" but not distinctively heard by the listener.


The 2008 Les Paul Standard is one of the first models from Gibson USA to utilize the revolutionary Plek machine in setting up the guitar. The Plek is a German-made, computer controlled machine that carefully measures each fret, along with the fingerboard height under each string, and then automatically dresses each fret, virtually eliminating string buzz and greatly improving the overall playability of the guitar. This pioneering process does in minutes what it takes a luthier several hours—sometimes even days—to accomplish. Every fret is accurately aligned, and the guitar is properly intonated, leaving the instrument “Plek’d” and amazingly playable.
These guitars use very cheap materials. I bought a washburn WM24v PROE for $300 and it come with Mahogany body & neck, phenolic fretboard, emg81/85 and original floyd rose... Ibanez RG costs $400 and comes with basswood body, bolt on maple neck, rosewood fingerboard, shoddy pickups and a licensed floyd that WILL NOT stay in tune. Poor quality for money, if you get a Ibanez go for a fixed bridge/string-thru because their trems are HORRIBLE! Original floyd is the only way to go!
My brother owns a Norma acoustic guitar modeled on the Gibson Hummingbird. He bought it used in the mid 70s. Solidly built but only average sound. I would guess that like many Japanese made guitars from the 70s, Norma was not a "company," but simply an American sounding brand name chosen by a larger Japanese instrument manufacturer to market their guitars in the USA. I own a mid 70s Penco acoustic, same deal, name was used on Japanese made guitars marketed through the Pennsylvania Music Company, thus Penco.
SJ Series: The SJ is Collings’ version of what is commonly called a small Jumbo. Although the 16 inch lower bout is slightly wider than a dreadnought, and the sides almost as deep, the tight curve at the waist creates in a very different sound chamber. SJs, especially examples in maple, typically have a more pronounced midrange response when compared to a dreadnought.
We supply different variants of Electric Bass Guitar, which is just an extension of the Electric Guitar. The only difference between the two is that the former comes with a longer neck and scale length. It also comes with an option of 4, 5 and 6 strings. The four string bass guitar is tuned in a way similar to tuning a double bass guitar. It is capable of

Among the most common rookie amp buyer mistakes is buying a big amp that's too heavy to gig with, or going the opposite and buying one that's too small. If you're gigging at different places and you don't have a roadie, then consider going with a smaller amp that has DI output so you can go straight to PA with your tone intact. In big venues where big amps are a must, some opt for amp heads because the separated head and speaker cabinet are lighter on their own, although you'll have to move more pieces.


Getting the right amp for your acoustic electric guitar is definitely something you want to think about. You can have a guitar that sounds stunning when plugged in, but not so much when playing acoustically. Reversely, you can also have a guitar that sounds absolutely beautiful acoustically, but sounds like a tin can when plugged in. Sometimes, this is just due to plugging into the wrong amp.
• Brute force game : Offers the same realistic engine that can be found in STRUMMED ACOUSTIC 1 and 2 – ideal for chord accompaniment. It also contains riffs and a new game mode by picking Picking: just play a chord for creating very convincing arpeggio patterns. Reproduction of these new types of patterns should be completely familiar to users of STRUMMED ACOUSTIC.

In some small to mid-size venues, such as bars and nightclubs, the PA system may not have the capacity to provide the bass sound for the venue, and the PA system may be used mainly for vocals. Bass players in bands that play at a variety of venues, including these types of small to mid-size venues, may need to be able to provide the bass sound for the venue, and so they will require a large combo amp or bass stack with this capability.
Thanks for your note, Ed. I try and be terribly clear that there’s no notion of 1 being higher than another. They’re simply completely different, and it’s a matter of preference what you wish. Nothing I’ve ever denote has gotten additional attention than this, thus despite it in all probability being futile, i’m getting to build redo of this with video likewise.
The EC-1000ET is an all-mahogany single-cut loaded with an set of EMG 81 and 60 active humbuckers, a comfortably modern neck and a high level of construction quality. Its key selling point, however, is a fitted EverTune bridge -  unlike other tuning systems, it doesn't tune your guitar for you or offer altered tunings. Instead, once set and tuned, it simply aims to stay there, thanks to a series of tension-calibrated springs and levers. We tried everything we could to knock it out of whack: huge, three-step bends, wildly exaggerated string stretching... we even put the guitar into a freezer. It came back perfectly in tune every single time.  What's more, a guitar that's perfectly tuned and intonated up and down the neck seems to play much more musically. We're not aware of any tone compromises, either. The EC sounds as full and aggressive as ever, with the more mellow tones of the neck EMG being pleasantly rounded, and all bereft of any metallic spring clank. If never going out of tune is important to you, this is one of the best electric guitars going.
And that’s exactly what reverb effects are trying to emulate: the way a single instrument sounds different in different spaces and reflecting off of different materials. Many common environments that reverb units try to emulate are halls, churches, and chambers. There are some pretty unique reverbs like a particle reverb that adds special effects to make things sound more spacey, and there’s even one that attempts to emulate what we imagine a black hole to sound like.
Myself, were my budget less than a thousand then I'm dropping a big name like Martin of my list entirely, and probably I'm dropping Taylor too. Seagull makes some solid wood instruments for around $700...no idea how much the electronics tack onto the price, but I'm betting a Seagull SWS guitar with electronics could be had at $900 or so with ...just the slightest of scratches or blemishes.
I finally had the chance to bring my les paul for Steve to look at an annoying fret buzz. First he said the guitar is too straight and adjusted it. Then he quickly discovered the 4th string buzz was at the first fret but it had nothing to do with the buzz because the issue was at the nut, it was cut too low! Steve redo the string while we were chatting about how the neighborhood has changed. Within 5 mins, Steve redo the with some filling and filing and voila!! The buzz was gone. I was so happy and asked him how much, he said it was easy so he didn't want take any money. But i have him some coffee money and he said it was too much, I said it was for a week and he laughed. My last issue I brought to Steve as well and we had the same conversation. I highly recommend Steve as experienced luthier and for someone who loves guitars and someone who can solve guitar problems. Steve is a hidden gem in the Boston guitar world.
Johnny Thunders’ snot-nosed New York take on Keith Richards’ cool is one of the pillars on which punk rock was built. An Italian-American guy (birth name John Anthony Genzale Jr.) from Queens, he was born a little too late to be part of the Sixties rock explosion. But the bands of that era were his influences, and he put his own spin on them in the early Seventies as the New York Dolls came together with Thunders on lead guitar.

"We are extremely excited about this next phase of growth that we believe will benefit both our employees, and the Memphis community. I remember when our property had abandoned buildings, and Beale Street was in decline. It is with great pride that I can see the development of this area with a basketball arena, hotels, and a resurgent pride in the musical heritage of the great city of Memphis. We continue to love the Memphis community and hope to be a key contributor to its future when we move nearby to a more appropriate location for our manufacturing based business, allowing the world the benefit of our great American craftsmen."[36]
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This is a type of electronic amplifier that uses vacuum tubes to increase the amplitude or power of a signal as opposed to using transistors. A vast majority of vintage guitar amplifiers use tubes, which help to give them a warmer, sweeter tone. They are available in combo amps and in amp heads, which then require an external speaker cabinet to produce sound.
SOLD OUT ...Here is yet another GREAT Sounding and PLAYING Nippon Gakki 000 Red Label made in the famous Nippon Gakki plant in Japan. Absolutely surprising Booming tone from a small package who would have guessed these sound so great... This one is in excellent vintage condition that is to say all the important structural components of this guitar are in good shape that is to say that this guitar has GOOD BONES…. NO CRACKs its neck angle alignment is still good to this day its top is for the most part flat and its Bridge is nice and tight to its top … it appears to be a solid two piece center seam Sitka Spruce top and its cross braced like an old Martin , This guitar is over 40+++ years old and has been played and is not mint of course it has its share of superficial dings and drinks but nothing that can deter its ability to play great and sound great and look Fantastic with its Vintage Amber top and lush PATINA its a classic 000 that has THE SOUND!…. When we received it I loved the sound immediately it was pretty deep and rich sounding for such a small guitar with old cruddy strings I was thinking but like many of these Old Yamaha’s the action was too high so I did have to do our full JVGuitars UPGRADE set-up to it so I stripped its old strings off..its cheap plastic nut & saddle and bridge pins tossed to garbage, its fingerboard was remarkably clean and rut free and the pearloid inlays look great vivid with that patina of 40+ years and the frets were not bad with just minimal groves so I adjusted true rod -leveled -dressed & polished the frets, cleaned fingerboard and Lemon oiled the rosewood fingerboard and the bridge which is crack free as well.. all is looking and feeling great now.. Then using hyde glue installed a Martin Bon nut and a compensated bone saddle was fit following up with a quality set of fancy Rosewood bridge pins with Abalone and brass ring they fit sung for optimum tone resonance transfer. This has made a markable improvement in its resonance and its a bit louder now too SWEET sounding now! When we got this one it has a small chip at sound hole just under the fat bass E string looks like an aggressive finger style did the damage and was at the sound hole edge and I have successfully repaired this same sort of spot before so I wasn’t worried this one was nick named “Chip" for this reason I since repaired the spot using the professional woodworking Mohawk system of melting in a resin bar with jot knife that was spruce color then graining the repair and top coating brush tip matching lacquer to the repair spot area to blend…. its not really noticeable anymore now and is a non issue. I did notice that someone changed the tuners for other old Yamaha FG tuners tiny holes didn't line up but this makes no difference in performance what so ever and is not even noticeable they are Yamaha tuners. Overall structurally this guitar is still in top condition players and it really has that beautiful vintage 40+++ year old Martin like Patina aura about it.... i its VINTAGE PATINA and character is absolutely beautiful this is in the eye of the beholder of course but if your vintage lover you’ll appreciate this instrument for what she is. This Old guitar plays like a $ MUCH more expensive guitar any day... People of all walks of life worldwide on the net are comparing the sound of theirs to a Martin it take years for a guitar’s tone to naturally open up like this guitar has set up and plays and sounds amazing and the price is right Questions or to buy it contact Joe at: jvguitars@gmail.com .
Earth Quaker Devices – Have you ever heard a song and wondered “how did they get that sound?”. If it was a recent recording there is a good chance these guys were behind it. They make an incredibly wide range of pedals that all go from great quality, usable pedals for almost any style to the weirdest, most wonderful tones that you have never heard before.
Your circuit shows a conventional RC tone control with a further small capacitor wired directly across the pickup. If you regard that extra cap, not as an additional component, but instead as the self capacitance of the pickup, which is normally a few hundred pF, then your circuit is already present in almost all electric guitars. OK I realise I’m being a bit smartarse here, it did strike me as another way of looking at this.
I had a single-minded desire for single-ended tone, but I didn’t want to drop insane moolah on a tweed Champ (or any of the tweed Champ clones out there, or even a tweed Champ kit), cool as they may be. Heck, even a Silverface Champ is going to set you back in the $300+ range these days. And it’s a Fender. Dependable? Yup. Great sounding? Sure. But no one is going to see it and say, “What the hell is that?” Which is part of the fun for those of us involved in the weirdoes and freakazoids of the gear world.
Vox quickly grew. In 1964 Tom Jennings, to raise capital for JMI's expansion, sold controlling interest in JMI to the Royston Group, a British holding company, and sold American rights to the California-based Thomas Organ Company. Displeased with the direction his old company was taking, he left the company in 1967, which was around the same time that Marshall overtook Vox as the dominant force in the British guitar amplifier market. While Royston's Vox Sound Equipment division set up new operations in the Kent town of Erith, Tom Jennings set up a new company in his old Dartford location, joined later by Dick Denney. Jennings Electronic Industries operated for several years, making an updated and rebadged version of the AC30 along with other amplifiers, as well as a new range of organs.
Just SOLD OUT: here is a great sounding wonderful 43 year old Vintage Japanese OOO guitar in excellent vintage condition. We have already set her up with our Martin Bone Nut & Compensated Saddle and action is dialed in to Martin specs. We also upgraded the original plastic bridge Pins to SOLID Ebony with Abalone dot with brass ring and of course a new set of Martin Strings 80/20 Bronze 12's.. and this guitar Sounds like a true vintage classic if not familiar with the Morris brand thats ok many are not, I have know of these for 2 decades now many of these were made in the Terada factory in Japan... another name you may not have heard of none the less they are know to make the highest end guitars in Japan in those days and also today, for makers like Ibanez virtually all of their top end guitars like Musicians - Artists - George benson GB line and the old Aria L-5's and Ibanez L-5's and many others continuing on today in that great Custom Shop tradition. This is one of them and is very well constructed with top workmanship and fit and finish build quality is comparable to a Martin- Taylor_Gibson and so on... that is to say no worries this guitar Morris has an excellent pedigree. Guitars of great playability and great sounding what more do you need?.... This guitar was built from wods aged at least 20 years at time of build that was over 40 years ago and just look at its condition to this day... it has truly stood the test of time. See for yourself... it this price range a wonderful classic 000 style Japanese true Vintage guitar in its own right. Great Value and great fun Japanese vintage collectible. For a song. .

Perhaps our favorite feature is a far more subtle aspect of this pedal's interior, which is a circuit design that runs your dry signal through an analog path, before reuniting it with the wet reverb signal, which is produced by a digital processor. This means your guitar's signal coming into the pedal is unimpaired by the digital components, giving you a far more pure and organic-sounding output. 
The other US-based manufacturers were from Chicago Harmony (formerly owned by Sears), National-Dobro (Supro/Valco) and Kay. Chicago was the largest guitar manufacturing area of the US at the time. The only other manufacturer of Silvertones during this period was the Japanese-based company, Teisco (or Teisco Del Ray as it was formerly called). Teisco created some of the wildest designs for Silvertones, in our opinion. The earliest model was the TG1. This was the first guitar to incorporate an amplifier and speaker into the body of the guitar. Although some people look down on the Japanese guitars we think they've got some really interesting sounds and innovations not found on American made guitars.
Yamaha is famous around the world for its incredible, quality, instruments. Its electric guitars are no exception. The Yamaha Pacifica Series PAC112V Electric Guitar, Old Violin Sunburst is another example of Yamaha's on point production. This guitar has a solid alder body, a maple bolt neck, rosewood fingerboard, and a five-position switch with coil tap. Plus there's the tremolo - a vintage tremolo with block saddles.
The guitar is very light in weight and pretty resonant. At this point they were hard-wiring the cord right into the guitar with a nifty spring strain relief on the plug. This guitar has a brighter sound than my Gretsch and I probably prefer it for ultra-clean work because it has that vintage "thang" going on that some call "mojo." I am, however, trying to get the driven sound sorted at this point because of all the overtones. Now I know what sort of sound the Telecaster bridge pickup was based upon!
Obviously listing something as subjective as musical greatness is tough and inevitably going to cause disagreement, but this is another level. Including John Frusciante and Jack White was a little absurd. Excluding players like Yngvie Malmstein, Dave Mustaine, and Slash was questionable. Excluding Eric Clapton was shocking, offensive, but almost admirable. Very little genre diversity, too. By my count, half of these players are blues or heavily blues-based. The complete absence of heavy metal is glaring. This list is ambitious, but golly, this is pretty darn bad.

Here is s very nice 1976 Takamine F375s from the laswsuit era with the Headstock shape and logo style font replica of a Martin D-35 Exotic Brazilian rosewood guitar from 1962, An amazing likeness in looks obviously and she sounds sooooo sweet the 40+ years since she was built back in 1976 at the time of this build it has been said that Takamine had used aged woods of at least 20 years aging prior to its construction... this guitar has been extremely well cared for and it has barely a few scratches that will be sort of hard to find, the structural integrity of this guitar is excellent its neck set is excellent as is its action is low and as a result this guitar plays amazingly with no buzz smooth action and a pleasure to play. Frets have been lightly dressed and are nice too. Neck width is 1-11/16ths at the nut with a medium profile it feels like an old Martin to just perfect. It has been set up with a Martin bone nut & saddles set as well as new Martin 80/20 strings set she sings loud and sweet a pleasure to play with rich encouraging tone. This guitar is straight as can be with no cracks or separation on its body or neck with the only exception being its Solid Sitka Spruce top has 2 fine hairline cracks in the top and they do not go threw to the back side and are insignificant and have been properly sealed and buffed and you can not see them until the closest inspection, they are not progressing and have been stabilized professionally years ago. Other that the hairlines you cant see its near mint otherwise overall condition give this a very good to -excellent vintage used condition rating and a great choice fot the lover of these great exotic Brazilian Rosewood guitars, Japan does offer these Exotic Jacaranda Brazilian rosewood bodied guitars today but note they do not come with the OLD school Martin Headstocks or the old style Script logo they have the modern headstock Takamine design and logo oh ya a $4500-6000 price tag as well. You will find that this beautiful Rare guitar is a Bargain priced gem and should be played tonight as it is Ready to tour or Record tonight! .
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I bought my amp at my local music store. When I walked in, I told the sales person that I got my El Dorado and I wanted to buy an amp. I asked him if he would mind playing my guitar through the amps in my price range. He readily agreed because he is the person who found Big Lou Guitars on the internet after I tried every brand of electric guitar in the store and believed I needed a big nut guitar because my hands needed an action with more space between the frets and strings. He told me to bring it in when I got it because he wanted to try it. He plugged it in and went up, down, and across the fretboard playing riffs and chords. When he finished, he said “great action, I’m surprised – and the price!”
Another way of categorizing bass equipment manufacturers is by which part of the market they are targeting. While Peavey and Yorkville products are aimed at the generalist mass market, some bass equipment manufacturers, such as Acoustic Image or Walter Woods make expensive "boutique" equipment that is aimed at a niche market within the professional musician market. Acoustic Image amplifiers and speaker cabinets tend to be used by professional acoustic folk and jazz musicians, and Walter Woods amplifiers are associated with professional acoustic jazz bass players.
The neck is also made of mahogany and is hand set into the body. Looking at the fretboard, we see a standard rosewood design with white binding and classic trapezoid inlays. Epiphone went with a set of Alnico Classic humbucker pickups. These are very close to what the original Gibson solution had to offer. Classic rock and blues just flow out of these, although you are more than free to crank up the gain and blast some heavy riffs.

As you know, like most guitars sporting more than a single pickup, your Strat lets you select any pickup by itself or choose certain dual-pickup combinations. The standard way to connect multiple pickups is to wire them in parallel. This generates the classic tone our ears know from countless records, when a guitarist uses the bridge and middle or middle and neck pickups in tandem (positions 2 and 4 on a normal 5-way Strat switch).


Hendrix, Van Halen and, uh, Mozart are the musicians to thank for most heavily influencing death-metal shredder Azagthoth, not that they really come through in the jagged riffs and cheetah-fast solos of Morbid Angel classics like “World of S—t” and “Where the Slime Live.” But that’s because he has blazed a tension-filled style all his own (when he solos, he enters a mystical mind state he calls the “Temple of Ostx”) that is finally getting more praise than early antics like cutting himself with a razor before hitting the stage and extolling Satanism.
I have had an old beat-up non-functioning norma electric archtop (hollow body) since i was 13(in 1984). A friend gave it to me and said i could have it if i could fix it... well like 20 years later i fixed it! and had the electrical redone for like $60.00. it needed some new parts (basiclly EVERYTHING) but i really wanted an archtop and knew i could fix this one up to sound pretty cool.... what i have found out about these guitars is that they really arent worth anything... i thought this one may have been from the late 50's early 60's so i may be worth something.. but as it turns out most people i have talked to about restoring it says its not worth anything that they were just little copies made in the 50's-60's and bought in the US at probably sears or something.... oh well I DONT CARE i really like it and its made well, so for the sheer vintage look and great feel I LOVE IT!-jj

Compared to other plastic exterior multi-effects, the RP360 XP feels solid and durable. And this is reflected in many reviews, which mention the pedal's reliability as one of its good traits. Versatility and value for money also came up a number of times, both from pedalboard owners that have downsized, and beginners who are just trying out multi-effects.
Maybe the most well known amplifier released under the Peavey name, the 5150 is the result of a collaboration between Peavey and Eddie Van Halen. Debuting in 1992, the 120-watt, all-tube, two-channel head featured a searing lead channel that helped usher in a new wave of high-gain guitar ferocity in the early Nineties. Since Van Halen and Peavey parted ways in 2004, the model name was changed to the Peavey 6505 and has become an industry standard for modern metal bands such as Chimaira, August Burns Red, All That Remains and others.
Washburn started in Chicago in 1883. They manufactured guitars and various other string instruments. Now they’re a division of the US Music Corp and owned by JAM Industries USA, but they continue to produce quality guitars. In the beginning, they mostly focused on banjos and mandolins. Starting in the 80s, they branched off into producing signature guitars. Now days they make a wide variety of instruments and are very beginner friendly. Washburns are made from fine-quality wood. This means they can get pricey. But the quality the solid wood offers is well worth the price increases. They’re a decent american company that make very consistent instruments. 
“But I was recently talking to a guy at Yamaha who told me the total global revenue from musical equipment sales sold round the world doesn’t add up to one-thousandth of Apple’s AAPL, -1.42%   daily turnover. It’s a small specialist market,” Hook said. “Gibson guitars are expensive and they have been taken over by so many cheap copies. That’s what has caused a lot of harm to such a luxury product.”
For guitarists who must have original-era Strat® sound, look and feel, the Classic Series '60s Stratocaster Lacquer epitomizes the instrument during its second decade, when musicians used it to conjure and create electrifying sounds never before imagined or experienced. With authentic features including a nitrocellulose lacquer finish in classic Fiesta Red, everything about it takes you back to a wildly creative time when rock music came into its own—from surf to psychedelia and more—and players started to discover in earnest just what a phenomenal instrument the Stratocaster really was.
The most common route for absolute beginners will likely be a good, old fashioned guitar instruction book. We’ve all seen at least one of these kicking around. They tend to have a guitar and some interesting 80s-inspired graphics emblazoned on the front. The typical format is either an encyclopedia of scales and chords (indeed, some on this list follow that formula), or a series of songs broken down into digestible theory tidbits often accompanied by an ancient information vessel known as a Compact Disc.
The Fender Mustang I V2 Guitar Amplifier Combo also features USB connectivity allowing you to hook it up to your computer or DAW software for easy recording. If you don’t already have a DAW, you can utilise the free downloads of Fender FUSE and Ableton Live software suites to create your own music and take advantage of all the great features within the amplifier when recording. An intuitive, easy to use control panel allows you to see and change your sounds and footswitch connectivity (sold separately) ensures you can have complete control without the need for a pedalboard. A fantastic amplifier for beginners and players of all levels.
Regardless of their investment potential or merit compared to Martins, Fenders and Gibsons, the fact remains that clean original Harmony and Kay guitars as well as some of the other interesting student-grade instruments of the 1960s and earlier are quite rare today. Since they were prone to structural problems, many were simply thrown away rather than being repaired. Due to the lack of good repairmen prior to the mid 1970s, attempts to repair such instruments were often as bad or worse than the original problems, further adding to the destruction. Since most of these instruments cost much less than a Martin, Gibson or Fender when new, owners often felt much less of an incentive to take good care of them. Back in the mid 1960s when I was starting out, I saw far more people playing Harmonys, Kays and Danelectos than Martins, Fenders and Gibsons, but for a variety of reasons most of these student instruments have not survived, so that today it is actually a rare occurrence for me to find an original Harmony Sovereign or a good Kay archtop in playable or good cosmetic and structural condition.

In the present scenario many brands are providing the better quality Guitars and serving their customers the best services. Nowadays music industry is demanding better performances. For performing the best people are switching one to other brands. The brands are competing with each others to maintain their selves in to the top 10 chart. So please strike down to your strings for the right notes.


In my opinion, I don't think this guitar is quite worthy of all of the rave reviews here, based on the thin sound. I bought this because my Zager needs to go in for new frets and I have to wait until May to get it worked on, and wanted to get something inexpensive to use in the meantime. This is a beautiful instrument, no doubt. The finish is stunning, it's very nicely made and ready to play out of the box, so on that level I would give it 5 stars. But soundwise, for me I'd say 2 and half stars. The bottom end is nowhere to be found. I tried to switch to the same strings I am using on my other guitar and it's no different. This guitar has about the same dimensions as my Zager, but nowhere near the same bass response. It'll do fine as


The microphone set up I described earlier will give you a similar effect. The close mic gives you great detail (in audio terms, top-end, treble) and warmth. The mid-distance mic will give you the perspective that the amp is in a room, but without too much loss of detail. The far mic will tell you in no uncertain terms that you are definitely in a room, and with any luck, the listener's brain will process that information and tell the listener what size the room is (I'm not talking exact measurements here--just rough approximations). There will be a fairly significant loss of detail though. The combination of any of the mics will give you varying degrees of perspective and detail.

Some single cabinets use mixed speaker sizes, although this is less common. Examples include MESA Engineering's 1x15"/4x10" cabinet,[8] Peavey's PVH 1516, which has 1x15" and 2x8" speakers.[9] and Traynor's TC1510 combo, which has 1x15" and 2x10". Other large single cabinets with speaker sizes other than 10", 12" or 15" are less commonly used, but they do exist. Examples include the 6x8" and 8x8" cab configurations. Users of two cabinets may use two 4x10" cabinets (more easy to transport than a single 8x10" cab), a 15" cab and a 2x10" cab, or other variations (e.g., a 2x15" cab and a 4x10" cab).
Developed by Martin in 1916, the dreadnought shape changed the landscape of acoustic guitars. Thanks to its punchy sound, loud volume and improved bottom end, dreadnoughts quickly rose to popularity and has since been copied by virtually every acoustic guitar manufacturer. Today, if you're thinking acoustic guitar, the most probable image in your mind would be of a Martin Dreadnought or one of its many clones.
Austin-based John Grammatico is building some of the best amps available, and with his current range of products he’s managed to capture the spirit of legendary vintage amps while utilizing modern reliable components. The LaGrange is a small 15 watt amp that will sound great with either single coils or humbuckers. Expect a warm, woody sound with throaty mids and bell-like highs. The sound is transparent, harmonically rich and well worth the investment.

Two and one half steps down from Drop D. This tuning is most often used by death metal or deathcore musicians, such as Suicide Silence or Whitechapel (both use seven-string guitars and tune down the seventh string a full step). Utilized by bands like Nile, Motograter, Thrice, Filter (on the songs "Columind" and "The Missing" from The Amalgamut and "Drug Boy" and "The Trouble with Angels" from the album of the same name), Dead by April, RED, Ill Niño (on Dead New World) and occasionally Slipknot, Crowbar, Amon Amarth, Five Finger Death Punch, and Parkway Drive. Trapt uses this tuning on their songs "Hollow Man" and "Waiting".


Splitting the humbucker #1: by grounding the coil-tap and connecting the hot lead to output we’re rendering the coil closer to ground useless because both of it’s leads are grounded. What we’re left with is the coil closer to the hot lead. Since we only have one coil, it will not be hum-cancelling on it’s own. It’s common to split a humbucker, so it can be wired with another coil in parallel, making the noiseless combination, especially on H-S-H guitars.

Phrase sampler: Like a loop pedal, a phrase sampler will store loops or phrases of even greater length. The more expensive and sophisticated phrase samplers will save multiple phrases or loops, drum and bass, rhythm guitar, or practice solos. Some have USB connectivity and can hook up to your computer for uploading, so you never lose a loop or phrase.
The one major drawback of Guitar Tricks is the almost overwhelming amount of material that is available. There is a chance that you get distracted into trying out many different styles and techniques. You may find yourself jumping around from song to song and lesson to lesson wanting to see whether you are up to it. As a result you may not be able to follow your curriculum as initially planned. On the other hand, I strongly believe that this will broaden your horizon and make you a better and more versatile guitar player.

Standard tuning but with the 6th string dropped one full step. Utilized by bands and/or artists: Radiohead, Avenged Sevenfold, Arrowmont, Kvelertak, Led Zeppelin on "Moby Dick", Jack White on the song "High Ball Stepper", Rage Against the Machine, Prayer for Cleansing, Lamb of God, Underoath, Evanescence, Silverchair, Muse, Skillet, Helmet, Soundgarden, Metallica on songs "All Nightmare Long" and "Just a Bullet Away", Rammstein, Fugazi in some songs, Tool in all their albums (except Prison Sex which is Drop B in standard variation Tuning and Parabol/Parabola which has E dropped to B and A dropped to E), C3 Church on their song Breathe, as well as numerous songs on older albums Stone Temple Pilots in some songs, Audioslave, Filter, Foo Fighters, Porcupine Tree, Incubus in some songs, Guns N' Roses on the title track and "Better" from Chinese Democracy (most of the rest of the album was in E♭ tuning), Black Veil Brides (on the song "Knives and Pens"), The Devil Wears Prada, Nirvana in some songs, Zakk Wylde in some of his projects, Quicksand, Alesana, Eyes Set to Kill, and The Beatles on "Dear Prudence", Iron Maiden on "If Eternity Should Fail", Jorma Kaukonen of Jefferson Airplane on Embryonic Journey from the Surrealistic Pillow album, All Time Low on the biggest part of their discography.

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Wah – a frequency-based effect that creates a sound similar to a voice saying “Wah”. A Wah pedal uses a filter that sweeps across the frequency band. In a pedal wah, pressing the toe down will make the guitar signal brighter; heel down makes the signal darker. The filter can be controlled either automatically by electronics within the pedal or manually by the use of an expression pedal giving the guitarist’s hands-free control over their tone.

This guitar also features Epiphone’s patented Locktone Tune-O-Matic Bridge and stop bar tailpiece for serving the easiest string changes and increased sustain. It comes with master volume and master tone controls along with the long-lasting 3-way pickup selector for a bold and controllable performance. The most exclusive feature added by Epiphone is that by pushing a button you can mute all the outputs to add more rock and roll to your performance.
As for necks, the majority of guitars will have either a maple or mahogany neck, with a rosewood, maple or ebony fretboard. Again, there’s no right or wrong, and a neck wood is never going to sway your decision. But you should choose something that feels smooth and comfortable to play. There are a variety of shapes and profiles, and what you go for will depend on personal preference and playing style. For example, a modern C-shaped neck is always a safe choice as the majority of guitarists will feel comfortable using it, while a thin U-shape is great for faster players (think punk rock and metal).

Thanks for this explanation. I have built a few electric guitars, but they have been in the Gibson style with two humbuckers. I am now working on a guitar with an HSH configuration, so for starters, I needed to understand the basic 5 way switch, which if you just looked at it, it makes no sense. Now I see that the wipers of each pole are on the opposite end of each side.
Quality replacement pot from Bourns.   Knurled 1/4" shaft fits most knobs.  Low torque, carbon resistive element, great replacement in many applications using passive humbucker or single-coil pickups.   Note that length of threaded part of shaft is 3/8" - measure to make sure that this is long enough for your application, especially if the pot mounts through the wooden guitar body.   (This pot will not work on Les Pauls, for example).  250K, Special A2 taper preferred by guitar and bass players.  Nut and washer included.  Note: threaded bushing diameter is 3/8", like most 24mm "quarter-sized" pots.
The Epiphone DR-100 acoustic guitar definitely falls under the category of “entry-level” or “student” instrument, but sound quality has not been sacrificed for the sake of a lower price point. Many guitar instructors urge their students to invest in this model because of its resonant mahogany components. There can be some buzzing because of its lower action, but beginners will have a better learning experience because of the improved tonality. Epiphone is a strong name in guitars, and considering the low price, the DR-100 is a good buy. We recommend it for the mahogany alone, but the tone quality is also appropriate – and perhaps even better than it should be – for the price.
Guitar wiring refers to the electrical components, and interconnections thereof, inside an electric guitar (and, by extension, other electric instruments like the bass guitar or mandolin). It most commonly consists of pickups, potentiometers to adjust volume and tone, a switch to select between different pickups (if the instrument has more than one), and the output socket. There may be additional controls for specific functions; the most common of these are described below.
I have an old 1964 60watt Australian Goldentone which I love and will keep. Had a Marshall 800 Lead at one time (head and quad box) when I was in a band but let that go when I stopped gigging. I tried a 50W ENGL combo as I was looking for an amp that was easier to cart around than my old Goldentone and I was blown away with the sound and the build quality. The ENGL should be in the top ten.
Another Martin creation, the 000 shape guitar is almost the perfect halfway house between a dreadnought and a parlour. Its classic hourglass figure meant it sat comfortably on the knee, endearing it to players of folk and other fingerpicking-heavy styles of music. The shape ensured it had the perfect balance between playing and comfort, and was often seen on the lap of no less a player than Eric Clapton. However it wasn’t averse to a bit of heavy strumming when the occasion called, and it’s large bottom end ensured it could keep pace when playing with others.
Unlike acoustic guitars, solid-body electric guitars have no vibrating soundboard to amplify string vibration. Instead, solid-body instruments depend on electric pickups and an amplifier (or amp) and speaker. The solid body ensures that the amplified sound reproduces the string vibration alone, thus avoiding the wolf tones and unwanted feedback associated with amplified acoustic guitars. These guitars are generally made of hardwood covered with a hard polymer finish, often polyester or lacquer. In large production facilities, the wood is stored for three to six months in a wood-drying kiln before being cut to shape. Premium custom-built guitars are frequently made with much older, hand-selected wood.
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