This is a 'basic' guide that allows you to methodically set up a guitar that has no major problems to begin with. This will not tell you how to do a neck reset on an acoustic, or shim an electric bolt-on neck for instance.The guide is cheap, effective and very informative, considering the pittance of a price being paid for it. This author obviously loves guitars and has a commendable desire to not only be able to make all the BASIC adjustments for themselves, but also to briefly and effectively explain WHY the adjustments work.
My brother owns a Norma acoustic guitar modeled on the Gibson Hummingbird. He bought it used in the mid 70s. Solidly built but only average sound. I would guess that like many Japanese made guitars from the 70s, Norma was not a "company," but simply an American sounding brand name chosen by a larger Japanese instrument manufacturer to market their guitars in the USA. I own a mid 70s Penco acoustic, same deal, name was used on Japanese made guitars marketed through the Pennsylvania Music Company, thus Penco.

Pitch Bend/Shifting: From a simple octave above the note you’re playing or at intervals in between, a pitch shifter effects pedal will change the pitch of your note or chord. More sophisticated pitch shifters create two or more harmony notes so you can accompany your root note for a fuller sound. Some simulate a chorus effect by providing minute shifts in pitch.
Gibson is easily one of the most identifiable guitar brands in the world today, and even with the premium price tags of their instruments, many continue to look up to them as their dream instruments. Thankfully, the company has toned down the price a bit on some of their guitars, one of which is the J-15, which enters this list with its good balance of workhorse ready features, premium prestige and reasonable price tag.
Pictured is a tremolo arm or vibrato tailpiece style bridge and tailpiece system, often called a whammy bar or trem. It uses a lever ("vibrato arm") attached to the bridge that can temporarily slacken or tighten the strings to alter the pitch. A player can use this to create a vibrato or a portamento effect. Early vibrato systems were often unreliable and made the guitar go out of tune easily. They also had a limited pitch range. Later Fender designs were better, but Fender held the patent on these, so other companies used older designs for many years.

It comes with a single coil pickup in the neck position and a humbucker at the bridge - switching between the two pickups gives you both a strat like sound and an LP like tone. The pickup selector is 3-way so you can play with both pickups at the same time. It sports a shorter 24.75" scale length and smaller 12" radius on the rosewood topped mahogany bolt-on neck with a 1.6875" nut width making it very playable and accessible to guitarists of all levels of experience. Many customer reviews suggest the Empire HG feels and plays like a more expensive guitar.
What makes a good beginner electric guitar? Well, it should be cheap and easy to setup so you can start playing immediately. After comparing almost 13 guitars, we believe that Squier by Fender Bullet Strat is the best electric guitar for beginners. You don't have to take my word for it, but there has been some pretty solid positive reviews about this guitar.
The panel on top carries the controls for an old school look and feel overall, consisting of a master volume, gain, bass, treble and the model AC10 comes equip with a built-in reverb effect that makes it even more powerful and articulate to use. This amp is at top of its class when used at home, awesome for a recording studio and bringing it on stage to cover a small to medium size venues.
Manufacturing techniques can alter the impact of the variability of other factors. A .strandberg* guitar is made from lightweight but stiff materials. The neck is reinforced with carbon fiber. Each string rests on its own bridge that does not transfer vibrations to the other strings in the same way as a conventional guitar bridge. The bridges themselves are made from light and stiff aircraft aluminium instead of brass or steel as is commonplace. Each component is tightly coupled to the next with no room to vibrate. Regardless of tonewood, your .strandberg* will sound clear, airy, organic, dynamic, and respond quickly to the plucking of strings with a great dynamic range – as a result of the construction itself. The characteristics of different woods and pickups are transferred more effectively than might otherwise be the case. Is this better? Again, it depends on what the musician is after… I’ve come across for example ES-335 players that are intimidated by the responsiveness and dynamics and who become inhibited and self conscious when picking up a .strandberg*. But for most, it’s a pleasant experience that liberates their tone.

Martin & Co is without a doubt one of the most reputable acoustic guitar makers in the world, so if you or someone you know is planning to spend a lot of dough on an acoustic guitar - it best be a Martin. One of the more recent releases from Martin that deserve special mention here is the 00-42SC John Mayer, a signature guitar inspired by the classic Stage Coach(SC) design, which were prevalent in an era where small bodied parlor guitars were highly favored.


Beginning in 1960 with the T-60 solidbody, Teisco began to use the elongated “Strat” six-in-line headstock. This lasted through 1963. In 1963, the squarish Strat headstock appeared with the GB-1 solidbody bass. This seems to have lasted through 1965, but only on selected models, and with several subtle variations, including a slightly more rounded version. In 1964, probably later in the season, most of the Teisco solidbody line acquired a new hooked Strat-style headstock with four-and-two tuners on the guitars and three-and-one on the basses. This had the little hook at the throat like a Strat, and a larger hook on the tip, almost like a Woody Woodpecker plume.

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The earliest boost pedals used a germanium transistor and was often in the form of a treble booster. The most famous treble booster is the Dallas Rangemaster which is rumored to have been used by Eric Clapton on the Bluesbreakers record, often referred to as the Beano record or Beano tone. (This is because Clapton is reading a Beano comic on the record cover). At the time Eric was using a Marshall JTM45 2×12 combo (commonly referred to as the Bluesbreaker because of this recording) and a Les Paul and man does it sound good. Allegedly he was using the Rangemaster to push the front end of the amp into more distortion. This has never been confirmed to my knowledge but is the source of much Internet speculation. But I have played an old Bluesbreaker amp with a Les Paul and it sounded pretty darn close.
Dick Dale is a prominent Stratocaster player, who also collaborated with Leo Fender in developing the Fender Showman amplifier. In the early 1960s, the instrument was also championed by Hank Marvin–guitarist for the Shadows, a band that originally backed Cliff Richard and then produced instrumentals of its own. So distinctive was Hank Marvin’s sound that many musicians, including the Beatles, initially deliberately avoided the Stratocaster.[citation needed] However, in 1965, George Harrison and John Lennon acquired Stratocasters and used them for Help!, Rubber Soul and later recording sessions; the double unison guitar solo on “Nowhere Man” is played by Harrison and Lennon on their new Stratocasters.[10][11][12][13]

Rosewood back and sides, abalone (pearl) inlay around top edge and soundhole (but not on top around the fingerboard like a style 41,42,45 would have), inlaid bridge pins. Fancy backstripe of horizontal lines between two rows of diagonal lines (like style 45). Most style 40 models made were hawaiian style with flat fingerboard radius, flat flush frets, high string action, and no bridge saddle compensation. Most popular was the OO-40H (though they did made 2-40, 0-40, 000-40 and 000-40H models prior to WW2). Sometimes these are converted to regular "spanish" style guitar (fingerboard radiused, refretted, neck reset, bridge saddle angled). Made from the 1860s to 1917, then 1928 to 1941, then 1985 to present.


*The expensive Fender USA hardware (supposedly genuine, purchased at Guitar Center San Marcos CA), which includes the 2-point delux strat tremolo, big-apple scratch plate, Sperzal USA tuners, Graphtech nut, and pickup selector. These items should all combine to sound awesome, and coming from a reputable supplier and for the price I paid I would expect to be identical to what is found on a USA standard or delux Fender.
Many inexpensive starter guitars are built with laminate tops, made from several layers of wood pressed together. While laminate is durable and can be quite attractive, it will not produce as pleasing tones as solid wood. To a lesser extent, this is also true of the guitar’s back and sides—solid woods will produce better tone. When reading guitar specs, if you see terms such as “select spruce top,” that indicates the top is made of laminated woods with a spruce-like grain pattern imprinted on it.
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In some ways, the Champion 20 isn’t quite as versatile as the other digital amps. For example, the Line 6 Spider Classic 15 has two effects selector knobs, allowing a guitarist to mix modulated effects such as phaser, flanger, and chorus with different types of reverb and echo. However, our panelists generally felt the Champion 20’s ease of use outweighed this disadvantage, and the Champion 20 does offer 12 different amp models as opposed to 4 on the Spider Classic 15. The Champion 20 also doesn’t play as loud as the Stage Right 611800, but all of our panelists thought it played plenty loud enough for beginners.
This is a very general question, but I will attempt to answer. I'll not get into brands, buy what "feels" right and has a good tone. If, a beginner, a good acoustic can be bought new for $200.00 - $300.00. If, you are an experienced or professional player, "The Sky is the Limit" only limited by how much you want to spend. My first guitar was used, and I paid $50.00. Now, I play a Gibson Song Writer, $3500.00. Hope this helps.
Although early Les Paul imitations in the 1960s and 1970s, such as those made by Höfner, Hagström, Harmony Company and Greco Guitars differed from Gibson’s design, with different electronics, and even bolt-on necks, in the late 1970s some Japanese companies came very close to perfecting copies of the original 1958–60 Standards. These guitars later became known as “lawsuit” guitars. The lawsuit was brought by the Norlin Corporation, the parent company of Gibson guitars, in 1977, and was based on an Ibanez headstock design that had been discontinued by 1976. Ibanez settled out of court, and by 1978 had begun making guitars from their own designs.[citation needed]
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Standard eight-string tuning. Used by Scar Symmetry on the song "The Three-Dimensional Shadow" from the album Holographic Universe (album) and "Mechanical Soul Cybernetics" from the album Dark Matter Dimensions, Deftones, Periphery on "Ji", "Overture", "Extraneous", "22 Faces", "Four Lights" and "Stranger Things", by Fear Factory on "Mechanize", "Metallic Division", "God Eater" and "Soul Hacker" and by Devil You Know on some songs.
You are sure to find a Gibson in any guitar brand comparison list that you come across. This guitar manufacturer is the oldest producer of solid-body electric guitars. The first guitar was manufactured by Les Paul himself, and the company's signature model is, in fact, also a Les Paul model. It was the first company to introduce the double coil pick ups or the legendary 'humbucker' for rock music. The guitars by Gibson made rock and roll possible. Like Fender, Gibson is also a universally popular guitar brand whose guitars are known for their high treble and melodious tones. The company also has a bass series. It has remained consistent as far as styles and designs are concerned. Other famous electric guitars from Gibson include the SG, Flying V, Explorer, ES-335, and Firebird, and classic acoustics include models like the Hummingbird.
Steel-string Acoustic Guitar The steel-string acoustic guitar is a modern form of guitar that descends from the classical guitar, but is strung with steel strings for a brighter, louder sound. The most common shape is the dreadnought (originally developed by C.F. Martin & Company), which incorporates a deep soundbox and a smaller and less pronounced upper bout, giving it a wedge-shaped appearance. Other popular body styles include the larger jumbo body shape, as well as the smaller auditorium (000) body style and even smaller grand concert (00) body style. Check out the Martin Ed Sheeran X Signature Acoustic Electric for a smaller body type with a punchy sound.

After the success of the DD-500, RV-500 and MD-500 units, Boss's GT-1000 is a floorboard combining all three. Sleek and modern, it's a formidably robust beast. To the rear, there’s the usual array of inputs and outputs, including USB recording out and an input for an additional expression pedal plus jacks to insert two mono pedals, or one stereo external pedal and a nifty send for amp channel-switching. In terms of editing, it’s not the most intuitive. For example, when you switch between patches in a bank, you’re not just turning off, say, a ‘Tube Screamer’, but switching to a different chain that doesn’t have a gain block - standard in rack-style processing, but tough for beginners. Sounds-wise, the 32-bit, 96khz sampling finds the GT-1000 punching above its weight, and on the effects side, there’s a wealth of modulations, delays, reverbs and drives. If you run a larger, more traditional pedalboard, perhaps the so-called ‘Bossfecta’ of the MD, RV and DD 500-series units would provide more flexibility, but for most players, the GT-1000 is a highly practical solution. 

Description: Guitar Type: Acoustic/Electric - Body Size: Dreadnought - Top Wood: Spruce - Back: Mahogany - Sides: Mahogany - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Neck Attachment: Set - Nut Width: 43mm - Fingerboard: Rosewood - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 26" (66cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Rosette: Pearloid - Hardware: 1/4" Output, Chrome Tuners, XLR Output - EQ/Preamp: Ibanez AEQ200T - String Instrument Finish: High Gloss Natural

Yeah. The tremolo sound from the intro? That was four Fender Twin Reverbs. Myself controlling the speed of two of them and the producer controlling the speed of the other two. So two amps were recorded on one side of the stereo and the other two on the other side. I recorded the part on the tape without the tremolo, and then I sent the part from tape out to four amps, and he controlled two, and I controlled the other two.


Before deciding on how to go about mic’ing the amp, listen to the sound in the room. If the guitar is being recorded as part of a rhythm track in the same room as drums and other instruments, the only option may be to use a close-mic’ing technique, unless you don’t mind dealing with the other instruments bleeding into the guitar track. Recording guitars in isolation, as an overdub, presents more options for ambient room mic’ing. Experiment with mic positioning to achieve the right amount of room sound and the desired bass and treble response. Distance-mic’ing in a very live-sounding room can create an appealing slapback echo-type sound, while close mic’ing gives you absolute flexibility in the mix.   
If you are interested in a more a price friendly model, it is recommendable that you give this model produced by Davison Guitars a good look. According to its manufacturer, the unit comes shipped with a handful of useful accessories such as a practice amp, a case, a strap cord and a very practical DVD that is said to help beginners play the instrument in no time.
Dr Doug Clark-"I stumbled onto your site while looking for an entry-level classical guitar for my grandson in Denver, Colorado. Regrettably, I'm not resident in England (though I've been there many times), otherwise I'd be on your doorstep tomorrow morning. That said, might you have any acquaintances in America (firms similar to yours) whom you could recommend? We're limited at this point (8th form next year, at Denver School of the Arts), to around $300 US. Any advice or recommendation you can offer will be greatly appreciated. Watched Harry and Meghan's wedding twice! Wish them both, and England itself, a wonderful decade ahead. PS: I took up steel string acoustic guitar at about age 60. Hence my email "handle". Still working on my skills and loving it."
Description: Body: Maple - Body Construction: Semi-Hollow (Chambered) - Top Wood: Spruce - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Block - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25" (64cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Chrome, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, Kluson Tuners - Pickups: Harmony - String Instrument Finish: 3-Color Sunburst
Bell's journey to become a guitar master began with a car running over him as a child. He was an aspiring baseball player just shy of his 13 birthday and left with a fractured skull that ended his future career. So he picked up the guitar and fell in love. He's been building and repairing guitars since 1975. Today, he's running Bell's Custom Guitars on the side and repairing guitars at Murphy's Music in Irving.
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Subsequent years brought new company ownership to the Gibson Guitar Company. During the “Norlin Era“, Gibson Les Paul body designs were greatly altered, most notably, the change to the neck volute. Because the Les Paul had the reputation of having an easily broken neck joint, the volute strengthened the neck where it joined the headstock to avert breakage. To further increase the strength, the neck woods were changed from mahogany to a three-piece maple design. The LP body was changed from a one-piece mahogany with a maple top into multiple slabs of mahogany with multiple pieced maple tops. This is referred to as “multipiece” construction, and sometimes incorrectly referred to as a “pancake” body. The expression “pancake body” actually refers to a body made of a thin layer of maple sandwiched between two slabs of mahogany, with a maple cap. The grain of the maple was placed at 90 degrees to that of the mahogany. The “pancake”-like layers are clearly visible when looking at the edge of the guitar. This process is also known as “crossbanding”, and was done for strength and resistance to cupping/warping. Crossbanding was phased out by 1977.
Welcome to Lefty Vintage Guitars, a site specializing in buying, selling, trading, and consigning high-end lefty guitars. I have been collecting vintage guitars for over 20 years, including Fender and Gibson electrics and acoustics primarily from the 1950s, and 1960s. I also collect high-end modern era lefty guitars, including Gibson Historics and Fender Custom Shop guitars. The rarer, the better! Please browse the Sold Gallery and Showcase Instruments to get an idea of the wonderful guitars I have acquired and sold to happy clients!
By 1941, much of the pre-war Supro line had disappeared, to be replaced with what would eventually turn out to be a good portion – and look – of the post-war Supro line. Gone were the Supro Avalon Spanish, the acoustic resonators and the nifty amp-in-cases. The Supro Avalon Hawaiian was gone, in name, though its spirit was directly inherited by another lap, the Clipper. Also gone were the mated pickups in favor of a more traditional design with exposed polepieces. These with some variations, would prevail for the next decade or more.
The body was perfectly flat and the sanding sealer that was on it was great. I however in wanting a finish that was like a mirror used a enamel filler primer. The body was then shot with 6 coats of enamel black, wet sanded, and hung up to cure for 2 weeks. After curing the body was then shot over a matter of another couple of weeks with 10 coats of clear (remember that temperature and humidity have an effect ... full review
Although Orbison’s good friend and Sun Records labelmate Johnny Cash may be known as “the Man in Black,” Orbison habitually dressed from head to toe in black in the early Sixties, a decade before Cash adopted his dark uniform. Even Orbison’s raven hair and impenetrable jet Ray-Bans were blacker than the cover to Spinal Tap’s Smell the Glove, adding to his alluring persona as a mysterious, brooding artiste.
PRS Guitars was founded in 1985 by Paul Reed Smith in Maryland, USA. They build high-end guitars, even if they also have a more affordable Asian range (the SE series). The most popular PRS endorser is Carlos Santana, but we could also count Dave Navarro and Al Di Meola among them. Santana's guitar is equipped with dual-coil pickups and a mahogany body with maple top. It looks a bit like a Les Paul with two cutaways. And the sound is closer to a Les Paul than to a Fender.
I heard off of a great guitarist years ago when I asked him about fender and gibson he said they were expensive and not great and also said the Gordon Smith guitars played and sounded great and as they never advertised and were a small builder in the uk the cost was cheap for the quality of the guitar. A players guitar rather than a fancy looking guitar thats all show and less go. I think they are the price of a mim strat but great hardware not chinese.
DESIGN AND PLANNING It is best to pre-plan your design concept so you can correct any mistakes on paper before you get to the wood and can't go back. Sketch out some design concepts on paper then, once you have decided on something,lay out a couple of pieces of poster board to draw the body shape out on. You can let you imagination go wild or if you perfer stay with a more traditional design. For this particular guitar I built, I chose to go with a PRS style body design. To get the measurment correct, I pulled a picture of the guitar I was modeling it after from a guitar catalog that was taken straight on and not from the side. I then scaled up the guitar by marking out a grid on the picture and transposed it to some poster board that I had drew a larger grid on. I knew that the pickup rings measured 3 1/2" by 1 1/2" and thats what I used to scale the picture up and get the proportions correct. Another method is to project the image on a wall and trace it to the poster board if you happen to have a projector but I like to draw my template out freehand. You don't have to use this method for the design if you want to come up with you own unique style. Just make sure that take all the parts that will go on to your guitar into consideration first like the neck postition, pick ups and knobs.
Or course, you have a repulsive snobs on here that can't acknowledge the truth that the list above correctly consists of quality, popular choices. I'd never play a Dean, a Parker, or a Godin. I'm so glad you love them, but you're a minority. The Gibsons and Fenders are tried and true designs. That's why the majority play them. They're actually good guitars, at least the equal of the snobs-are-us suggestions above. Having limited funds to spend, and wanting to ensure that a quality guitar with quality tone is aquired, I would go with a Fender or a Gibson without hesitation. I'm not a snotty nosed rich brat like most of the above put-downs and belly achers; I'm a 50+ mature adult who knows how to play and I play good, thank you. Not because I say, but because that's what others say. Fender and Gibson are overall the best guitars on the market for the average person of means and talent, unless you're rich and can afford something above $5000.00. Otherwise, calm down, remove the pentangle from your rectum, and relax. Is it really that important to you? THEN OPEN YOUR OWN WEBSITE AND PREACH ABOUT IT. This has been a public service message...Billy
Kadence is an Indian manufacturer of musical instruments. They provide high-quality guitars at affordable prices. The wide range of guitars offered by Kadence starts from low-budget Frontier series of Acoustic guitars. The Slowhand series of premium Acoustic guitars having superior sound high quality finish. Kadence has become a favourite and one of the best guitar brands in the Indian market with its good quality products. The great look and feel and available at affordable prices make these guitars invaluable.
: : "Later, in the '70s, a line of low-priced Japanese-made instruments were imported and sold under the Dorado name in an effort to compete with the flood of imports inundating the market. Flattop acoustics and solidbody electrics alike were sold under the Dorado name. None hold much in common with Gretsch's own guitars." Also, that Gretsch had been sold to Baldwin prior to 70's; reacquired
Whether your style is searing rock or acoustic folk, the right guitar will help you sound and feel like a superstar. From acoustic guitars to electric hybrids to bass guitars, there’s a guitar designed exactly for the way you play. You’ll be rocking out in no time when you choose a guitar from Best Buy’s selection of top brands like Fender, Yamaha, Squier, Schecter, Mahalo, Dean Guitars and more.
G&L, owned by Leo Fender, is yet another brand producing quality guitars. (Of course, when it is owned by the same owner as that of Fender, one can expect the extent of quality of these guitars.) Many of the G&L guitars seem to relive the Fender classic designs with some improvisations in style. Thus, this brand can indeed be considered an excellent alternative to Fender. Instead, in many instances, you will find G&L outnumbering Fender.

No tricks here, the volume control allows you to adjust the output level of your signal. But, unlike your amp's gain setting, the best signal-to-noise ratio will be achieved with the pot all the way up. If you have more than one volume knob, it means each controls a pickup. Middle positions can be useful with amps that don't have too much power and distort very easily or to get a crunch sound with a fat saturation. We can also use it as an effect by turning the knob progressively and playing a chord to make it appear (or disappear).


The next step is to figure out what gauge, or thickness of string is best suited to your playing ability and style. Thinner gauges are easier to fret and bend, and may be better suited for beginners, until callouses build up on the fingertips. Heavier strings tend to produce greater volume and fuller tone. Nylon strings are typically categorized as light, medium or heavy tension. Steel strings for both electric and acoustic guitars are categorized by the gauge, or thickness of the lightest string, the high E string, measured in thousandths of an inch, with .09 being a common size for an electric set. A set of electric strings may be labeled .09-.042 - this is the gauge of the lightest and heaviest string in the set. Acoustic sets are a little thicker, so a typical medium-gauge set might be .012-.054.
Guitarists don’t have to just look on in envy as pianists lead the holiday sing-a-longs this Christmas. Our selection of holiday Guitar Tabs include traditional classics we all love like “O Holy Night” and “Carol of the Bells” and the pop favorites that just wouldn’t be the same without a guitar, like “Jingle Bell Rock” and “Happy Xmas (War is Over)” by John Lennon. But if you just can’t get enough of those traditional Christmas classics, you can pick up our collection of ’Christmas Favorites for Guitar.’
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Power valves (tubes) can be overdriven in the same way that pre-amplifier valves can, but because these valves are designed to output more power, the distortion and character they add to the guitar's tone is unique. During the 1960s to early 1970s, distortion was primarily created by overdriving the power valves. Because they have become accustomed to this sound[dubious – discuss], many guitar players[who?] favour this type of distortion, and thus set their amps to maximum levels in order to drive the power section hard. Many valve-based amplifiers in common use have a push-pull output configuration in their power section, with matched pairs of tubes driving the output transformer. Power amplifier distortion is normally entirely symmetric, generating predominantly odd-order harmonics.
You can think of these as distortion pedals turned up to 11. Usually, a fuzz pedal comes in as an accent for solos and intros, since its effect is so strong that it could overpower the rest of the band otherwise. You can hear an example of fuzz in the classic recording of Jimi Hendrix playing The Star-Spangled Banner at Woodstock. This is a good type of pedal to try out as an introduction to more powerful effects.
If the Schecter wasn’t quite fast enough, this lower priced version of Steve Vai’s signature guitar should get the job done. The Wizard III neck is a direct copy from its more-expensive variation, and when combined with the 24 jumbo frets, creates a speed machine. Because Vai himself is a versatile guitarist, though, this guitar can pretty much do it all, though if you like a chunky neck for chords, you’ll have to look elsewhere. You even get the Tree of Life inlay at twice price, which looks great.
"Mangoré, por Amor al Arte" is the title of the 2015 movie, the real life story of Agustín Barrios, an influential and important composer and classical guitarist from Paraguay. Born in Paraguay in 1885 talented Agustín was persuaded in his young adult age to move to Buenos Aires, the cultural hub of South America. In Argentina he began an affair with the beautiful Isabel but,...
The other US-based manufacturers were from Chicago Harmony (formerly owned by Sears), National-Dobro (Supro/Valco) and Kay. Chicago was the largest guitar manufacturing area of the US at the time. The only other manufacturer of Silvertones during this period was the Japanese-based company, Teisco (or Teisco Del Ray as it was formerly called). Teisco created some of the wildest designs for Silvertones, in our opinion. The earliest model was the TG1. This was the first guitar to incorporate an amplifier and speaker into the body of the guitar. Although some people look down on the Japanese guitars we think they've got some really interesting sounds and innovations not found on American made guitars.
While it may not look like a classic amplifier, if you're into classic rock style tones for home use, the Yamaha THR10C is probably the amp that you really need. Ideally, we would all be rocking with big amps, but not all of us have the space or acoustically tuned rooms to let loose. And since we are using low volume amps more often, Yamaha designed their THR line to be the best in providing you with just that - low volume performance for jamming, practice or recording. The THR10C is part of this line, featuring the same 10W setup and stereo 3" speakers, but with tones that replicate the sound of classic amps. It also houses some essential effects which include reverb, delay, chorus and more. In addition to the usual clean to overdriven tones, Yamaha also equipped this unit with acoustic guitar amp and bass amp models, so you can directly play or record with those instruments. All these features are packed in a distinct and portable profile, and is powered either by the supplied AC adapter or via 8 x AA batteries.

This is another classic in Fender's guitar roster. The Squier by Fender, Vintage Modified '51 is another example of how phenomenal Fender is as a company. This guitar is capable of producing versatile tones because of the SH pickup configuration and rotary pickup selector. The neck of this guitar is C-shaped which makes string bending easy as you like. This guitar has a strat body shape which adds to its cool, classic look.
This is not a complete list of former or current American guitar companies. Among the omissions are Steinberger electric guitars and basses, now part of Gibson and Carvin, who is still independently owned and sells only direct, not through distributors or stores. I have not included the past great archtop luthiers such as D’Angelico, D’Aquisto or current archtop makers such as Bennedetto. Nor have I included the many smaller USA luthiers who are currently building excellent guitars such as Huss & Dalton, Foggy Bottom or Collings.
The varying amplified current of the valve is connected through the first coil of wire (primary) and creates a varying magnetic field. The varying magnetic field created by the primary coil, causes electricity to be generated in the second coil of wire, which is wound tightly around the first. Electricity is transferred to the second coil only when the magnetic field is changing, not stationary. The iron core of the transformer keeps the magnetic field contained so little is lost. The transfer is very efficient. The secondary coil is connected directly to the speaker. The reduced secondary voltage is adjusted by the ratio of turns between the 2 coils. Eg 1,000 turns on the primary and 100 turns on the secondary would change the voltage 10:1. Most output transformers have a turn’s ratio of approx 20:1.
Naturally, if a seller can get more money by calling what they have a “lawsuit guitar”, they’re going to do it. Unfortunately, some writers who should know better have taken to using the term for any old Japanese lookalikes, copys, knockoffs, etc, of (mostly) American guitars. Some sellers are using terms like “lawsuit era” or “pre-lawsuit” which don’t mean anything at all.
With Guitar Tricks I get everything I need in one place. The core learning systems for beginners, for blues rock and country, the songs, the genre specific exercises, an active user forum and a series of tools. I specifically like the Jam Station tool. It includes a number of backing tracks in different keys and tempos for most of the genres being taught on the Guitar Tricks platform. With Guitar Tricks I get everything I need in one place.Other useful tools included are a scale finder, a metronome, a chord finder and a fingerboard trainer. Guitar tricks is continually improving. A new interface has just been added that makes it look more modern and very attractive. The core learning system lessons are also updated on an ongoing basis. This allows them to incorporate the latest teaching methods and keep the lessons modern and relevant.
This is worse than the Rolling Stones magazine’s list. Paco De Lucia, Django Reinhardt, Andres Segovia, Sabicas, Wes Montgomery, Joe Pass, Jeff Beck, David Gilmour, Jimi Hendrix, John Williams (no, not the movie score composer) IMO the top ten. It’s much harder to play jazz, flamenco, and sometimes classical, than it is to play blues or rock. These guitarists are all infinitely greater than Jack White, John Frusciante, Tom Morello, or John Mayor.
Bought a Tubemeister 18 Twelve about three years ago. Love the size, and options of this amp. Primarily use it at home. Replaced a Fender and a Marshall combo amps with this one. Really like the sound, but recently blew a power tube as well as a fuse, and capacitor as a result. Replaced the Chinese power tubes with JJ's, when professionally repaired. All seems well, but wonder about the reliability of this amp in the long run. My tech recommended changing the tubes every year or two, especially if using the power soak feature. Running it really hard by doing so. Also, read that it generates more heat inside the cab (no vents. closed back). Overall still like the amp, but after dropping $200 to repair, after spending $800 on the amp.. having second thoughts of long term reliability. Not using the power soak very much any longer, and keeping a better eye on the TSC (tube safety control)... not sure if it actually did what it is suppose to. To me... less features and simplicity could be ...more
This legendary thinline electric guitar has been in continuous production since 1958 and has been updated for 2019. The new Gibson ES-335 Figured has the classic semi-hollow body construction with a chambered maple center block with a three-ply AAA-grade figured maple/poplar/maple top and back. Its bracing is made of quarter-sawn Adirondack spruce. The center block and bracing are both thermally engineered.
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Let’s learn the basic layout of Tabs. When you take a look at a Tab that you want to learn you will most likely see some standard notation on top and the Tab on the bottom. The six strings of the guitar are represented by the six horizontal lines of the Tab. The top line represents the high E string of the guitar and the bottom line represents the low E string of the guitar. This can seem a bit counterintuitive to some people so just remember that the top line is the thinnest string and you will be good to go.
I keep coming back to this point because it’s absolutely essential: learn how to solo over chords. I don’t mean simple chord arpeggiating, even though that has its place, too. If you can follow the chord changes with smooth, soulful playing, you will never be fenced in. You can drop into any style, any band, and any situation. Most of us get stuck playing a given scale pattern for years before something shakes us up. Make this the foundation of your learning with this book.
While you can learn on any of these, we recommend a solid-body guitar, which includes all the models featured on this page. The main advantage of a solid body guitar for beginners is that they are easier to control in front of an amplifier. By this we mean you are unlikely to experienced squealing feedback from the amp, which can be a big annoyance when it happens all the time. Solid body guitars are often simpler to hold as well, as hollow models tend to be a bit bigger in size.

One of the first solid-body guitars was invented by Les Paul, though Gibson did not present their Les Paul guitar prototypes to the public as they did not believe it would catch on. The first mass-produced solid-body guitar was Fender's Broadcaster (later renamed the Telecaster) first made in 1948, five years after Les Paul made his prototype. The Gibson Les Paul appeared soon after to compete with the Broadcaster. Another notable solid-body design is the Fender Stratocaster, which was introduced in 1954 and became extremely popular among musicians in the 1960s and 1970s for its wide tonal capabilities and comfortable ergonomics.

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