Been meaning to try this for years.... Should have done it earlier! It really works well for me, despite a puny Atom cpu in an HP netbook and a kludged lead from an electric Ukulele stuck into the microphone socket. Yes, this lash-up can be noisy - the impedances are mismatched, the signal levels too, but a very respectable result indeed. The processing is highly effective and the presets are (of course) variable in their suitability (not every effect is ideal for a ukulele) with gems that include a really decent and surprising choice of autowah effects. Never thought I'd say that. The user interface is logical, but there is a lot of it. That's because it can do so much. Fortunately there is a 'Random' button that creates random new patches for you - keep pushing it and some fun stuff can emerge. Documentation is helpful - press F1 and have a look, it even includes hardware suggestions and hints. I intend to follow that religiously so as to get the best from this gem - and I'll be spending money to get the suggested full fat Behringer interface (~£20) from Amazon, and trying a less-compact machine with some more CPU to see if that adds to the experience. Problems? A couple of the presets do seem to crash Rakarrack - but apart from that irt has been solid. Recommended to give it a go, if you have not already done so. Both guitar an uke work well with this.
Schecter has built a strong reputation for itself as one of the best manufacturers of affordable guitars for musicians worldwide. Their commitment to quality and innovation has made them a leading brand name for high quality guitars that are affordable for every budget. The Schecter Hellraiser C-1 Electric Guitar is one of their flagship electric guitars that not only delivers performance, but also uncompromising quality.
If you are looking into a list of the best guitar practice amps chances are you plan on practicing… a lot. The chances are also high that you are a beginner and the idea of getting yourself into this unknown yet fascinating world is somewhat confusing. While figuring out which guitar you want is a big step forward the next step is not that much easier. You got to find a good amplifier. The market is full of all kinds of amplifiers. Starting from tube amps over $2000 for pre-level players and going down to amplifiers under $100. And yes, maybe $100 amps are not the highest in quality but they do the job, especially if you have done your research.
Guitar brands such as Antoria shared some Ibanez guitar designs. The Antoria guitar brand was managed by JT Coppock Leeds Ltd England. CSL was a brand name managed by Charles Summerfield Ltd England. Maurice Summerfield of the Charles Summerfield Ltd company contributed some design ideas to Hoshino Gakki and also imported Ibanez and CSL guitars into the UK with Hoshino Gakki cooperation from 1964-1987.[3] The Maxxas brand name came about because Hoshino Gakki thought that the guitar did not fit in with the Ibanez model range and was therefore named Maxxas by Rich Lasner from Hoshino USA [4].
In launching the AZ series, the goal was not to merely create a completely new guitar model, but to sculpt a great guitar that can foster the potential of the modern ?third phase' while maintaining traditional elements. Even though Ibanez is thought of as a modern guitar brand, it has decades of accumulated knowledge and a history of pushing the boundaries. The AZ series carries with it all of the hallmarks of these tried and tested Ibanez qualities. The harmonic balance between bridge and ...
bought at a tiny store in holland, back then they said to me the guiter was already 20 years old. he was looking a new, and bought it for 1000,- dutch guildens. thats maybe...445,- euro now. thats nothing compared to the prices they ask for a vox guitar they make TODAY! thay are building guitars again and ask pricies beginning by: 2000,- euro's. I wanna know when my guitar was bild, he has a chrome plate at the back with made by japan on it too.
hey paul. i have a dorado 6 string acoustic. they really are beautiful guitars (for the price and value). if you email me (swiver84@hotmail.com) i will send you pictures of it. i'd like to see some of your dorado as well, i've only seen a couple others on ebay. i lost one on ebay yesterday by 1$! i am still kickin myself in the butt for that one. it went for 36$.
If this were a list of the best electric guitar brands for metal it is very likely Jackson would be near the top. This is a company practically synonymous with metal, and for decades the most extreme players on the planet have looked to Jackson to get the job done. But Jackson also has a strong presence in the rock and hard rock genres, and if that’s your bag you’d be smart to give them a good look.
If the Schecter wasn’t quite fast enough, this lower priced version of Steve Vai’s signature guitar should get the job done. The Wizard III neck is a direct copy from its more-expensive variation, and when combined with the 24 jumbo frets, creates a speed machine. Because Vai himself is a versatile guitarist, though, this guitar can pretty much do it all, though if you like a chunky neck for chords, you’ll have to look elsewhere. You even get the Tree of Life inlay at twice price, which looks great.
Recently picked myself up a second J28SCDL Jumbo, which was set up beautifully and I have to say it truly is an amazing guitar. It could give some of the higher priced guitars a run for its money. Lovely sound, creative design and clearly a lot of guitar for your money. I seriously encourage you not to over look Washburn when looking for a good guitar at an affordable price. Might end up your favorite guitar!
Vintage styling, high quality speakers and that classic Fender cabinet warmth - there's a lot to love about the Fender Bassbreaker 212 Guitar Cab. Perfectly matched with the Fender Bassbreaker 15 & Fender Bassbreaker 45 guitar amp heads. There's 2 x 12 inch, 8 Ohm Celestion V-Type speakers inside and the semi-closed back ensure those rich, low end frequencies are captured. A great addition that can act as an extension cabinet to the Fender Bassbreaker 45 combo/head and the Bassbreaker 18/30 combo. if you want to add that signature fender warmth to your sound, this head is a perfect match to your own amplifier head with a total impedance of 16 Ohms.
OM-42PS: Paul Simon’s signature acoustic model (manufactured in the 1997 model year) is based on the OM-42, which had not been manufactured since 1930. Alterations were specifically requested by Simon himself. From the original planned run of approximately 500, only 223 were produced, making these a collector’s item. A standard version of the OM-42 is in the current range.

The guitar builder for the giants of jazz, Ibanez now introduces the Artstar AS153 Semi-Hollow Electric Guitar, to answer the needs of the working professional player. Crafted from specially selected tone woods, this guitar features a bone nut, ebony fingerboard, hand-rolled frets and Ibanez's famous Super 58 pickups-capable of tone magic any place between "jazz-clean" all the way to "blues dirty." If you're aiming high, Ibanez has an ARTSTAR for you.
Most seven-string guitars add a low B string below the low E. Both electric and classical guitars exist designed for this tuning. A high A string above the high E instead of the low B string is sometimes used. Another less common seven-string arrangement is a second G string situated beside the standard G string and tuned an octave higher, in the same manner as a twelve-stringed guitar (see below). Jazz guitarists using a seven-string include George Van Eps, Lenny Breau, Bucky Pizzarelli and his son John Pizzarelli.
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While the Vox lineup features modern marvels such as the Valvetronix modeling amplifiers, this company is really all about smooth tube overdrive. The AC30 is a rock classic, and one of the most legendary amps ever made. It’s still going strong today, but there are many other Vox models to choose from as well, all built around that amazing Vox tone.
Now, I'm sure that you're all sensibly busying yourselves with making music, so your lives are, frankly, too short to be sifting through more than a half a million words of interviews. Therefore, I'm going to try to digest what I've discovered during this process for the benefit of those less sad than me! I'm not about to dictate which technique is 'best', though, because if reading this many interviews has taught me anything it is that people will always disagree on what constitutes a great sound. Instead I've recorded a number of different audio examples to allow you to judge for yourselves, just as I did, which techniques are likely to make a real difference to your own productions. I've peppered this article with a number of boxes giving details of these files.
Whilst we’re on the subject of practice amps, we have to talk about the amazing BOSS Katana-Mini Guitar Amplifier. This little powerhouse of tone makes our best cheap amps that don’t suck list due to its immense sound, portability and inspiring tones within. Coming straight out of the acclaimed BOSS Katana series, the Katana-Mini uses the authentic multi-stage analog gain circuitry which allows you to select from three classic sound settings - Brown, Crunch, and Clean and enjoy a selection of fantastic sonic options. On top of that you have a classic 3 band EQ to dial in your perfect sound as well as an onboard tape-style delay.

If you are looking for a simple and old school way to spice up your guitar sound, tremolo is a great option. Tremolo lowers the amplitude of your signal at a regular rate. It's like having a machine move your volume knob back and forth rhythmically, and it's one of the first effects that were built into early amplifiers. While simple in concept , tremolo adds a great movement to you tone, in either a subtle or intense way. The choice is yours. On low settings, a pleasant motion effect can add some ear candy to your tone. Set on high, a “stutter” or “chop” effect can add emphasis to a song or riff. Some pedals will even split the repeats in stereo, which adds a genuine vortex to your tone.
Squier Affinity Stratocaster has all the same features of the Fender Stratocaster guitar at a highly affordable price. It has a maple neck and an alder body which gives it a snappy Strat tone. It also has three single-coil pickups that can be manipulated by a 5-way switch. A vintage style tremolo system makes it a great choice for those who like that system.
Part of their Espana series, the Cordoba 45MR is handsome, handmade in Spain, and brings all the character of Spanish guitar music to the player, starting with the idea of using the guitars of the 1880s and 1890s as a model for the appearance and sound. Nylon-string guitars themselves came from Spain, so this is perfect for the player who wants as much connection to tradition and authenticity as possible.
That day, I learned about the array of amazing things you could do with effects pedals. Sure, guitar is about your hands, but you also have to play with your feet. You have to know when a song needs more distortion, and when a song needs a jangly chorus with reverb. Without effects pedals, you’re painting with only primary colors, you’re singing in only a major key, movie-acting with one emotion. Guitar pedals open up a world for you in music. Of course wonderful music has been made in the time before such magical machines existed, and great music will continue to be made without them as well. They’re just tools after all. But what glorious tools they can be.
Introduced in 1948, the Fender Deluxe was praised for its dynamic, harmonically rich overdrive and compression. It was offered in numerous configurations and designs over the years, but the most desirable model is the 5E3 narrow-panel Deluxe, built from 1955 to 1960 and offered in a tweed-covered cabinet. The circuit runs at higher voltages than other models and features a split-phase inverter and driver that add a little gritty breakup at the start of the output stage.
The Neoclassical Speed Strategies for Guitar is another book we’d recommend more for the seasoned player. This one provides an excellent introduction into fingerpicking with helpful illustrations of exactly how to position yourself for the quickest and most efficient playing. It includes lots of helpful examples and exercises to make it easier to master.
Chorus is the sound at the beginning of the Guns ‘n’ Roses song Paradise City. It is a gentle, shimmering effect that is good for arpeggiated chords and adding that little extra to a lead tone (such as in the solo for Smells like Teen Spirit by Nirvana). However, we recommend using it sparingly as it can sound dated and old fashioned if over used (unless, of course, old-school is what you’re going for). Common controls include level (the volume of the effect), tone (affects the EQ of the chorus effect), rate (how quickly the note shimmers) and depth (how large and prominent the shimmering is).
If you want to access some resources that will help dealing with a specific tonal pursuit, piece of gear or other questions related to your rig, I’d recommend giving Guitar Tricks 14-day free trial a test run - there’s no obligations and you’ve got nothing to lose - except two free weeks of one of the most comprehensive and thorough guitar education websites in existence.
For die-hard metal players looking for best electric guitar brands, Dean is another famous name you wish to check. The iconic ML design has become a signature instrument for rock because of Damageplan and Darrel Abbott of Pantera (late). In the ’90s, ML was revived by Dime, and then Dean stretched out the idea while sharpening the designs of it with a modern touch.

Pitch shifter and harmonizer: A pitch shifter (also called an "octaver" for effects that shift pitch by an octave) raises or lowers (e.g. "transposes") each note a performer plays by a pre-set interval. For example, a pitch shifter set to increase the pitch by a fourth will raise each note four diatonic intervals above the notes actually played. Simple, less expensive pitch shifters raise or lower the pitch by one or two octaves, while more sophisticated and expensive devices offer a range of interval alterations. A pitch shifter can be used by an electric guitarist to play notes that would normally only be available on an electric bass. As well, a bass player with a four string electric bass can use an octave pedal to obtain low notes that would normally only be obtainable with a five-string bass with a low "B" string.


A little lighter than the On-stage but equally sturdy is the Gator GFW, at only 8 lb of weight. This doesn’t mean it won’t be able to offer proper support to the heftiest amplifiers, however, since it is rated to hold as much as 176 lb before showing any signs of stress. At this capacity, most people would be able to use it as a chair without any worries.
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Let me tell you about the vintage look at why it is favored among so many musicians and aestheticians around the world. Well, I won’t be able to tell you much about the vintage look in this short text, but what I can tell you is the fact that some of the best looking items out there, and best sounding, are entirely vintage. Well the Vox MINI3G2CL Battery Powered Modeling Amp is one of the vintage looking but entirely modern technology employing amps that produce a great sound while looking positively scrumptious. This small amp avoids the problem of weak low tones that so many other amp have by incorporating a bass boost technology into its construction. As a result we get a small, portable amp with a handsome look and an incredibly well rounded sound, with expressive lows and expressive high both present. And the price point relative to some of the other options on this list makes it a required purchase, unless something else catches your eye that is.

While it might look identical to the RevStar RS420, Yamaha Revstar RS320 is very different. The shape is the same, along with the most of the hardware. However, the tone is a whole different story. While RS420 comes with vintage humbuckers, the RS320 packs a set of extremely hot pups which are more modern. I personally liked this configuration more than the vintage one, simply because it offers extended versatility.
Either today or tomorrow my SSS Mexican Stratocaster will be arriving at my local Guitar Center and I'm not sure if I should pay to get it setup. The guy that worked there, Jon, suggested I get my guitar setup as soon as I go and pick it up since its 50% off for a first time setup. He said the technician would adjust the guitar strings, double check the action or height of the strings or something. It sounds like something I wouldn't really need but then again I'm just a beginner - maybe some of you more experienced guitarists can let me know if Jon was trying to do me a solid or if he was just trying to make a sale. He also said they'd help me get my guitar in tune which was pretty cool.
Sound quality-wise, it’s too close to call. All modern Zoom, Line 6, Boss, and DigiTech multi-effects units sound excellent. Distortion sounds a bit better on the DigiTech, and if reverb is your thing it doesn’t get much better than the Lexicon verbs. The other multi-effects units might be better if you’re looking for more experimental sounds and textures. The DigiTech RP500 tends to be more conservative, and focuses on nailing the classics.

In late 1966, Peter Green had the job of replacing Eric Clapton in John Mayall's Bluesbreakers. Mayall told his producer, "He might not be better [than Clapton] now. But you wait… he's going to be the best." Soon, with the original Fleetwood Mac, he was Britain's most progressive blues guitarist, with a Chicago-informed aggression heightened by the melodic adventure on albums like 1969's Then Play On. Green soon entered a dark age of mental and health problems, returning in the Nineties with more subdued but recognizable gifts.

OK, when the list started it was hard to tell if the author was knowledgeable on the subject because of the automatic “Go To” names. Unfortunately, by the time I got to the end I realized this was the author’s favorites list versus the Top 10 Greatest Guitar Players. Kirk Hammett, Slash, Jack White, Chuck Berry??? You can’t put them on any list and not mention the guy who influenced so many, and who Eric Clapton called the best guitarist in the world, SRV. Richards biggest claim to fame it the amount of drugs he’s done that haven’t killed him,… Read more »

I got the idea for this column while reviewing Universal Audio's Ox Amp Top Box for the May 2018 issue. Ox is an ingenious hybrid of speaker load box/power attenuator and cabinet/mic/room/effects modeler. You use your regular amp, but instead of miking it, you send a direct signal to the DAW or mixing board. You record the sound of your amp, while Ox simulates speakers, mics, and effects.
Potentiometers are used in all types of electronic products so it is a good idea to look for potentiometers specifically designed to be used in electric guitars. If you do a lot of volume swells, you will want to make sure the rotational torque of the shaft feels good to you and most pots designed specifically for guitar will have taken this into account. When you start looking for guitar specific pots, you will also find specialty pots like push-pull pots, no-load pots and blend pots which are all great for getting creative and customizing your guitar once you understand how basic electric guitar circuits work.
Hook isn’t worried the current challenging economic pressures will jeopardize the guitarist’s iconic status. “The guitar hero will never go away,” he said. “People adore this image of the guitarist almost being like a cowboy. You will always see the odd-looking kid walking down the street holding a guitar — there just might not be as many of them.”
While fan-braced modern classical Torres and post-Torres style instruments coexisted with traditional ladder-braced guitars at the beginning of the 20th century, the traditional forms eventually fell away. Some attribute this to the popularity of Segovia, considering him "the catalyst for change toward the Spanish design and the so-called 'modern' school in the 1920s and beyond."[5] The styles of music performed on ladder-braced guitars were becoming more and more unfashionable; and, e.g. in Germany, musicians were in part turning towards folk music (Schrammel-music and the Contraguitar), but this only remained localized in Germany and Austria and became unfashionable again. On the other hand, Segovia was playing in concerts around the world, popularizing his modern classical guitar, as well as a new style of music in the 1920s: Spanish romantic-modern style with guitar works by Moreno Torroba, de Falla, etc. Some people consider it to have been this influence of Segovia which led to the domination of the Torres instrument. Factories all over the world began producing them in large numbers.
The earliest guitars used in jazz were acoustic, later superseded by a typical electric configuration of two humbucking pickups. In the 1990s, there was a resurgence of interest among jazz guitarists in acoustic archtop guitars with floating pickups. The original acoustic archtop guitars were designed to enhance volume: for that reason they were constructed for use with relatively heavy guitar strings. Even after electrification became the norm, jazz guitarists continued to fit strings of 0.012" gauge or heavier for reasons of tone, and also prefer flatwound strings. The characteristic arched top can be made of a solid piece of wood that is carved into the arched shape, or a piece of laminated wood (essentially a type of plywood) that is pressed into shape. Spruce is often used for tops, and maple for backs. Archtop guitars can be mass-produced, such as the Ibanez Artcore series, or handmade by luthiers such as Robert Benedetto.
ZPS (ZERO POINT SYSTEM) OF ZR TREMOLO Main Spring Stopper Tremolo Block Stop Rod With the guitar tuned correctly, adjust the Main Spring make sure that the Stop Rod makes contact with the Tremolo Block and Stopper. If the Stop Rod does not make contact with the Tremolo Block and Stopper, adjust the Main Spring adjustment screw until contact is made.
One other thing to note is during the 1960's there was a lot of consolidation in the Chicago guitar manufacturers. In the 1940's National and Dobro merged to form Valco. One of Valco's sub-brand's was Supro which sold guitars under the Sears moniker Silvertone but they also manufactured guitars for Montgomery Wards as the "Airline" brand (Jack White of the White Stripes plays an Airline "Layfayette" reso-glas guitar) and there were a few other house brands too. In 1968 the conglomerate Valco closed it's doors. Also in 1968 Danelectro was shut down by MCA which had purchased it in 1966. Kay also went out of business and the remains were bought by Teisco. The only major brand that survived the 1960's to continue making these amazing guitars through the early 1970's was Harmony. We believe that's because they were the largest of all guitar manufacturers in the 1960's.
Taming loud guitar playing isn’t the only reason to grab a mini amp, though. These also come in handy when traveling. Sure, you could bring along your acoustic guitar, but that will still make a fair amount of noise in your hotel room, and playing more quietly is less fun. With a mini amp, you can strum as hard as you want to and still control the volume. Many are also small enough to fit inside carry-ons without reducing the space you need for food, a travel pillow, and a good book.

I want to combine an LED circuit with the 5 way selector so that it switches LED colors based on the pickup selected. Position 1 = Red, Position 2 = Purple (1+3), Position 3 =Blue, Position 4 = Green (3+5) and Position 5 = Yellow. The questions I have are: 1. The LED circuit has a 9V battery to light the LED. Would this affect the tone of the guitar. 2. I’ve also heard that this might introduce noise in the guitar circuit. Is this even possible?


And when you shop with Guitar Center, you can search through our entire chainwide inventory and have any item shipped to your local store for free, or directly to your home. Whether you’re a devoted collector, a player looking to get back that one instrument that got away, or an audiophile trying to capture the true vintage sound you’ve always wanted, the Guitar Center Vintage Collection has everything you need. Start searching today.
Les Paul, the legend, designed this guitar. This guitar has had more widespread popularity than the Strat, IMO. Jimmy Page was a huge fan of the Les Paul and the SG. Gibson made the double neck SG on special request made by Jimmy Page which was featured in the song "Stairway to Heaven" in the concert at Madison Square garden. Jeff Beck and Pete Townshend are among other notable people who use the Gibson Les Paul.
Aaron Staniulis is not only a freelance live sound and recording engineer, but also an accomplished musician, singer, and songwriter. He has spent equal time on both sides of the microphone working for and playing alongside everyone from local bar cover bands to major label recording artists, in venues stretching from tens to tens of thousands of people. Having seen both sides at all levels gives him the perfect perspective for shedding light on the "Angry Sound Guy." You can find out more about what he’s up to at aaronstaniulis.com.
I once did a setup on one that belonged to a friend but it was really wrecked so it wasn't perhaps a fair representation. It seemed to be well built though and the neck was nice enough. The tone was decent too although not exciting - exactly what you'd expect from such a guitar. Overall I'd say it was better than the cheaper squiers (SEs, Affinities etc).
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Like Television not too long before them, Fugazi founders Ian MacKaye and Guy Picciotto engaged in a locomotive, dub-influenced dual-guitar shouting match. Though most of the talk around Fugazi inevitably leads back to their founding ethos, that way of thinking and operating permeated the music as well: Together, MacKaye and Picciotto were anti-frontmen, playing like a living, fire-breathing, two-pronged embodiment of democracy.
Most Heroic Moment: The simple, searing lines of 1990’s “Turnover.” D.B.
As I’ve mentioned before, the topic of guitar pedals can really be a rabbit-hole and some people get really, really into them. They are very often the key to the tone you keep chasing after. However, at the end of the day, a lot of your sound depends on your ability to play your instrument, so please don’t neglect practicing your instrument over trying out different effects.
A touring pro friend of my was given one of these years ago by the McPherson company as a promotional endorsement for him to play on stage. After playing his I have wanted one for years. They are indeed expensive, but recently I was able to purchase one. In my 45 years of playing I have always gone through multiple examples of each guitar I've owned before purchasing, and have (and do) own Martins, Taylors, Gibsons, Tacomas, Fenders, Seagulls, Alvarez, Yamaha, etc. which were all really good in their own right. However, nothing I've played has been as good as the McPherson in terms of tone, volume, sustain, note clarity, playability, workmanship; it's useful whether played solo or in an ensemble setting, and for chords or single line playing. It is indeed the last acoustic guitar that I will ever buy.
We’ll round this list off with a slightly different proposition, particularly with jazz in mind. The Fender Classic Series ’72 Telecaster Thinline is a semi-hollow guitar in the guise of a traditional solid body. It features the same body shape and size of a standard Telecaster but has its horizon’s broadened thanks to the internal routing of the wood and attractive ‘f’ hole on the guitar’s top. Two humbuckers – again, not traditional on a Tele – provide exceptional warmth and versatility. Combined with its high levels of construction and craftsmanship this a guitar which will last a lifetime.
the top five in no certain order are…….. JIMI HENDRIX .NIO EXPLANATION NEEDED……..RICHIE BLACKMORE he broght the strat into metal and he led his leads perfectly back into the song ……… .EDWARD VAN HALEN he was the next innovater after hendrix…………DIME BAG DARRELL….he was just plain the baddast ass of them all…………..AND ENGWIE MALMSTIEN he did everything else……..there are lots of great guitar players . but .these five guys set the bar for everyone else
Always use more than one mic, and when possible, double down on the amp as well. This will give you additional options in the mixing phase. You can split the signal to the amp by employing a stereo FX pedal or a DI. The second mic doesn’t necessarily have to be close to the cabinet and can be placed as far as 3 ft away to give you more tonal range.   

Ease of Use: Multi-effects pedals are inherently more complicated to use than individual stompboxes. As such, we value multi-fx units that are not overly complicated, and require hours with the user manual to understand. Look for pedals with intuitive layouts and interfaces. Technology has come a long way, and most multi-effects pedals have good quality sound. To us, ease of use is a huge selling point (probably the most important behind price), and can differentiate the good from the great.


Late 1938: Scalloped "X" bracing with "rear shifted bracing", where position of the "X" moved further than one inch from soundhole (exact measurement varies, for example: a 1941 D-18 has 1 7/8" distance). So the X-braces were moved about 7/8" further down. And the tone bars were angled more parallel with the length of the guitar and further apart. These late-1938 to late-1944 guitars had deeper scalloped braces than the 1938 and prior forward or advanced braced guitars. This gives the late 1938 to late 1944 Martin guitars improved bass response (don't let anyone tell you that war-time Martins are not as good as pre-1939 Martins!)

Best acoustic I've owned. It's an Oregon dreadnought, an all round stunning looking guitar. The sound is beautifully balanced, clear with nice defined bass, sits perfectly in the midrange and projects well without being too bright. It's light weight with meticulous craftsmanship and beautiful timber. When you look at these guitar it's obvious that they are built with a lot of care and attention to detail.


Clean or replace jacks. To clean jacks use solvents such as contact cleaner or other solvents as a spray and spray the metal parts, clean any excess solvent with a rag. To replace jacks first obtain a similar one that complies with your guitar, then soldering in properly. Work in well-ventilated space to avoid harmful fumes from solder or solvents.


I am a beginner and based on your recommendation, I bought the Dummies book, and signed up for Guitartricks.com as well. This combo is turning out to be really effective for me, I haven’t been playing long but I can feel the progress with each passing day. The videos at Guitartricks are my main guide through this maze of learning, and the Guitar for Dummies is my go-to resource for reading about anything I want to find out. I’m sure doing a search on the internet would get me the same result, but the Dummies book is easier to hit up I think, and at least I’m sure it’s accurate.
Here we ( SOLD ) are very proud to offer a USA built Martin Acoustic electric the model # JC-16RGTe.... More info soon to come and more pics as well... near mint condition like new! Everyone from Eric Clapton to Sting to Johnny Lang has played a Martin guitar, and professionals and amateurs alike know the bright sparkle and deep, resonant tone that Martin guitars have become famous for, from the most high end acoustics to the Backpacker. Carefully hand-selected tonewoods, master craftsmanship and beautiful finishes and styles make Martin acoustics a class all their own, and must be played to be believed. Martin sets the standard for acoustic guitars, and since 1833 has been a leader in guitar innovation and craftsmanship. The following info is from Martin. Martin JC16RGTE Features: * CONSTRUCTION: 1 Style; Ply Blocks; Mortise/Tenon Neck Joint * BODY SIZE: D-14 Fret CUTAWAY * TOP: Solid Sitka Spruce * ROSETTE: Bold Herringbone * TOP BRACING PATTERN: D1 Hybrid * TOP BRACES: 1 Style/Scalloped * BACK MATERIAL: Solid East Indian Rosewood * SIDE MATERIAL: Solid East Indian Rosewood * ENDPIECE: White Boltaron® * ENDPIECE INLAY: Black/White Boltaron® * BINDING: White Boltaron® * TOP INLAY STYLE: Multiple Black/White * NECK MATERIAL: Solid Spanish Cedar * NECK SHAPE: Modified Low Oval * NUT MATERIAL: White Corian® * HEADSTOCK: Solid/6 String No Diamond/Standard Taper * HEADPLATE: Solid East Indian Rosewood/ Raised Gold Foil Logo * HEELCAP: Solid East Indian Rosewood * FINGERBOARD MATERIAL: Black Micarta® * SCALE LENGTH: 25.4" * # OF FRETS CLEAR: 14 * # OF FRETS TOTAL: 20 * FINGERBOARD WIDTH AT NUT: 1 11/16" * FINGERBOARD WIDTH AT 12TH FRET: 2 1/8" * FINGERBOARD POSITION INLAYS: 28 Style * FINGERBOARD BINDING: White Boltaron® * FINISH BACK & SIDES: Semi Gloss/ Dark Filler * FINISH TOP: Polished Gloss * FINISH NECK: Semi Gloss/ Dark Mahogany Stain/ Dark Filler * BRIDGE MATERIAL: Black Micarta * BRIDGE STYLE: 1 Style Belly * BRIDGE STRING SPACING: 2 1/8" * SADDLE: 16" Radius/Compensated/White Micarta® * TUNING MACHINES: Chrome w/ Small Knobs * RECOMMENDED STRINGS: Martin MSP 4100 Light Phosphor Bronze * BRIDGE & END PINS: White w/ Black Dots * PICKGUARD: I-02 Tortoise Color * ELECTRONICS: Fishman® Prefix Premium Stereo Onboard Blender .
After you have the hang of mono and stereo miking, room miking, and air guitar, you may be ready for the final frontier of El Gtr exploration. The time-consuming technique that I call "multisourcing" combines all the aforementioned methods, multiplied by the infinite possibilities created by splitting the guitar output and sending it simultaneously to different amps (using, for example, a Whirlwind Selector splitter box).
Previously, Epiphone guitars were considered to be the biggest competitor of Gibson. However, they were later acquired by Gibson who has retained the name of this brand to distinguish them from their pricey brothers. You can certainly consider it a budget-friendly production from the high-end guitar makers. Epiphone, just like the Gibson’s Les Paul, shares the same design but is available at a much lesser price. When it comes to craftsmanship, then we must say that Gibson is much better than this one. Unfortunately, Epiphone utilizes low-quality products such as mahogany and other electronic components.
I listen to a lot of internet radio, from soul to death metal. I think it's good to listen to a wide variety of music, even if you're not particularly into certain genres. Each genre has its own qualities when it comes to guitar, so spend time just... listening. Listen to how rhythms, chords and solos are used. You may not know how they're doing it just from listening, but you might like the sound of something which you'll then be inspired to go and investigate independently.
This Fender Modern Electric guitar features an apine body and mini-toggle-coil-split-switch with modern humbucker pickups. It comes with a C-shaped maple neck, a maple fretboard with 9.5-inch radius consisting of 22 jumbo frets. It has a Stratocaster middle pickup, a three-ply pickup guide and a five-way pickup switching for maximum sound control and sustains.
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The desire for innovative sounds has intrigued musicians in every culture since the dawn of time. Oscillating the volume of a note is an ancient technique — we’ve been able to do it with our voices as long as we’ve been capable of singing. Any musician playing a stringed instrument can create tremolo effect — they simply move the bow or finger back and forth while sustaining a note, as violinists and cellists do. But what about other sounds? How has the addition of mechanical and digital devices changed our music?
This vintage Teisco Del Rey Japanese guitar was made in the 1960s and has a classic sunburst finish and tulip shaped body. Manufactured in Japan by the Tokyo Electric Instrument and Sound Company (yeah, you got it…TEISCo!), the Del Rey measures 37 3/8 inches x 11 1/4 inches at widest and longest points. The fretboard measures 18 3/8 inches in length from the nut to end. My dad bought this one from some guy at his work, who later supplied him with the original whammy bar and headstock hardware which he found later! The relatively small body size of the Teisco Del Rey was appealing to my wife, who was on the lookout for a smaller-sized guitar she could play. My dad replaced the original tuning pegs with much nicer chrome ones from a 1980’s Gibson SG and we took it home. However, she realized that she didn’t care much for electric guitar, so we decided to clean it up and sell it. Everything was in excellent shape, but it did have some electrical issues. The volume/tone pots were filthy and you could hear a wall of white noise as you turned the knobs. At the time, I didn’t know the marvels of Deoxit and contact cleaners, so I didn’t know how easy it would have been to clear that problem up. One of the pickups or pickup selectors also didn't seem to be working. It played OK without noise or distortion when the volume and tone knobs were set to 10 and the pickup selectors set to "black up, white down", but the sound could still fade in and out sometimes if you bumped the buttons or switches the wrong way. Again, simple issues that I could have cleared up with a soldering iron and contact cleaner. In any case, we meticulously cleaned it and put it up for auction. Despite the minor problems, a bidding war ensued and now this Teisco Del Rey Japanese guitar lives in Australia! Overall, the Teisco is a good playing trashy guitar with loads of funky style. Scroll down for more Japanese Guitars from our collection!

Let’s kick things off in style. This guitar is one of Epiphone’s mid range semi-hollow models. As such, it has to meet much more refined standards. Many wondered if Epiphone was capable of delivering such a guitar, but the answer is a strong yes. With its three Dogear Alnico pups, this thing is a beast. If you know how to handle a semi-hollow, you will find that Epiphone Riviera Custom P93 brings a lot of range. At least that’s the type of impression it left on me.
Most guitar especially for those which have more than 1 pickup have selector switch. Attached on the body and normally below the 1st E string on the body of a stratocaster guitar. And on the top shoulder for Les Paul. Its a basic things to understand the switches on which pickups its toggling. First, you need to understand what is the switch for???
The same goes for Electrovoice's RE20, which counts Steve Albini, John Fry, and especially Glenn Kolotkin amongst its friends. "I like to use RE20s on most amplifiers when they're available", says Glenn, "because the quality is great and they can take really high levels. They're very directional and they're great for rock and roll." The mic also exhibits an unusually wide and flat frequency response and is specially designed to resist proximity effect.
Check the action and clearance of the guitar strings by playing it before you begin setup. There should be 3/64-inch between the fret and the string on the treble side, and 5/64-inch on the bass side. Check that there is no buzzing when you play high up on the neck, and that the strings are not too difficult to push. If you hear buzzing, the neck must be corrected for underbow; if the strings are too far from the frets, the neck must be corrected for overbow.

Today I was working on my fave guitar, a James Trussart Steelcaster. Instead of reconnecting my tone pot and capacitor as usual, I ran two wires from the tone pot’s wiper and ground terminals, the spots where the cap normally connects, and soldered them to a little piece of stripboard with sockets for connecting the caps. Then I recorded quick demos for six possible cap values. I started with the two most common values, and then added two lower values and two higher ones.


3) Sound when not plugged in is surprisingly good for a little guitar. Of course, if you're expecting acoustic sound like a jumbo or parlor you will be disappointed because that's impossible for a 3/4 size guitar to match the acoustic sound of larger guitars. However, for a 3/4 size guitar in this price range, it's as good as it gets and I will put this little guitar up against any 3/4 for acoustic sound in this price range.
alright dude, i think this an awesome list. i hate looking things like this and seeing people put crap like slash at number 1 or something. this shows u obviously have great taste in music, but theres just a few things that struck me as odd. 1, no chuck berry. 2, really? john mayer? i admit he has technical skill, but saying hes one of the 10 best guitarists thats ever lived? thats just false. i mean what happened to jeff beck, santana, , eric clapton, harvey mandel, kurt cobain, and even trey anastasio(if that is how its spelled lol). they are all much much better then mayer could hope to be, both musically and technically,.
The conservative way to tell if a Martin is built for steel strings is the bridge. If it's a style 18 or higher and has a belly bridge (and does not have 'banjo' tuners like early OM models), it's pretty much built for steel strings (can't use this indicator on style 17 and lower as these models never used a belly brige until the 1950s). Why? Since Martin didn't implement the belly bridge until late 1929, it's a very conservative indicator that the guitar is built for steel. The belly bridge was the last thing they did to make steel strings usable on their guitars (though certainly many models with rectangle bridges can handle steel strings too.) They started to implement the belly bridge in 1929, and all style 18 models and higher had the belly bridge by 1930. Therefore using the belly bridge as a steel string indicator is a very safe idea (assuming the bridge is original and it's not an OM). Now can steel strings be used on pre-1930 models with a pyramid or rectangle bridge? Maybe, but it's just not as definative and caution should be heeded ("silk and steel" strings would be a good and safe compromise). Note early OM models with banjo style tuners generally should be strung up 'lightly'.
The Model EP-17-T was a regular-sized thinline with a single round cutaway, bolt-on neck, non-dipped three-and-three head, dots, three pickups, adjustable bridge, plain trapeze tail, elevated guard, three rocker switches plate-mounted on the upper shoulder, and controls on a rectangular strip on the lower bout. All three were offered in shaded mahogany finish.
In terms of how the effects and amp models sound, we give the Zoom G3X a 7 out of 10. Most effects sound great and very convincing. All but the most discerning tone snobs would be able to distinguish them from the “real thing.” As is typical for digital multi-effects units, the quality of the overdrive and distortion effects is sub-par. Conversely, delays, reverbs, and choruses sound pretty great. In fact, one recommendation many users make is to start out with the Zoom G3X, and eventually buy a separate dedicated overdrive or distortion pedal, like a Fulltone OCD or Pro Co RAT2. This comment from an owner sums it up well:
JAZZ :Al Di Meola , John McLaughlin ,Wes Montgomery ,Pat Metheny ,John Scofield,Django Reinhardt ,Larry carlton ,Joe Pass,Herb Ellis ,Eddie Lang , and again I still have in mind at least 10 more jazz guitar players that jazz is the hardest and more complex guitar composition and it is an awesome style or kind of music to play just because not everybody play can play jazz.
Many manufacturers abbreviate the number and size of speakers in the name of their equipment. For example, a Fender bass combo amp with two 10" speakers may be called the "Fender 210". Similarly, a Fender cabinet with two 12" speakers may be called the "Fender 212". Another abbreviation that is used is to add the wattage to the name. Thus a 500 watt Yamaha combo amp with two 12" speakers may be called the "Yamaha 212-500".
With the Seagull S6 Classic, you get an acoustic-electric guitar that comes with a solid design and an impressive sound that will delight, regardless if you’re playing it unplugged or through an amplifier or PA. This model features a cedar top that has been tested for pressure resistance, so you know you have a tough guitar on your hands to use for many years.
Earth Quaker Devices – Have you ever heard a song and wondered “how did they get that sound?”. If it was a recent recording there is a good chance these guys were behind it. They make an incredibly wide range of pedals that all go from great quality, usable pedals for almost any style to the weirdest, most wonderful tones that you have never heard before.
For punchy tones and a clear, high tone, you might want to consider the EMG JH James Hetfield Humbucker Set. Designed specifically for Metallica's front man, this set features both a neck and bridge pickup that can be used together or separately. If screaming highs and bluesy lows are what you're after, the Seymour Duncan SH-1 1959 Model Electric Guitar Pickup is a solid choice. Its enameled wire, nickel plated studs and balanced coil windings produce great sustain, making this neck pickup a great addition to your Gibson or Les Paul. For an electric guitar pickup that offers great range for different genres, a Gibson '57 Classic Plus Pickup can help you make your musical mark. This bridge pickup delivers a slightly higher output without sacrificing the rich, vintage tone of your instrument. The Seymour Duncan SH-PG1 Pearly Gates Pickup is another great choice if you want some kick combined with a well-rounded sound. Your choice for an electric guitar pickup really comes down to personal preference and what kind of sound you're looking for. Whether you're jamming in the garage, recording live in the studio or taking centre stage every night, you're sure to find the electric guitar pickup that best suits your needs.
Our production/assemble time frame: 15 - 25 working days since our professional Control Team and Supervisor Engineer will ensure that your ordered guitar is top notch considering the fact that this guitar is intricate to assemble and they check very carefully every detail such as the finish, fret work, pickups, strings. And also, they will test the sound quality. We do not rush up the process of manufacturing your guitar since we would like to deliver to you best quality performance.
The Fender Tele Jr. is a variant of the Fender Telecaster electric guitar that the Fender Custom Shop produced in a limited run of 100 units in the early 1990s. It uses a Telecaster body shape, scale length, and electronics controls (albeit, with a reversed control plate). However, many of its construction and electronic features—for example its set-in neck and P-90-style pickups—are similar to those of a Gibson Les Paul Junior (hence the name) and Gibson Les Paul Special electric guitars.

3) The pedal switch. Placed on the top of the pedal, pressing it with your foot turns the effect on and off. This is where the name “stomp boxes” comes from – you “stomp” the box to turn on the effect. Pedals are most commonly placed on the floor next to each other so they can be toggled with your feet while you play with your hands, but larger units are often placed in large racks on top of one another, as otherwise they would take up too much floor space.


It worked like all amps: the guitar in my hands translated the vibrations from its strings through magnetic pickups into a voltage that traveled through the guitar's wiring and out the main 1/4" cable, then the amp picked up the signal and sent it through a coil of wire around a much larger magnet than those in the pickups, and the vibrations of that magnet shook the cone of the speaker, producing sound. The specific vibrations corresponding to those voltages created specific frequencies of vibration through the air, and my 10-year-old ears were hooked.
Certainly, the response to these innovative guitars at the time gave no indication. They tanked pretty quickly. No one has ever even seen a real Moderne, and players didn’t warm up to the Explorer and V until the 1970s. These models even inspired at least two new American brands – Hamer and Dean – both dedicated to making “improvements” on the Gibson originals. Japanese manufacturers also picked up on the appeal of these designs.
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There are an awful lot of boutique guitar effects manufacturers out there who make pedals designed to create all kinds of twisted and bizarre sounds. Sadly, their products are often very expensive, often prohibitively so — so what about the more budget-conscious would-be sonic terrorist? Well, one option is to 'circuit bend' more conventional (read 'cheaper') guitar effects. The basic idea behind circuit bending is that you experiment with short-circuiting the pedal until it makes a noise that you like, and then solder in a connection, with a switch or potentiometer in place if you think you may want to turn the noise off again at some point.
Here for you is a beautiful Vintage 1964 Epiphone Frontier FT-110 acoustic guitar. This guitar is 100% original and comes along with it's original hard shell case. The guitar plays and sounds just great. These Epiphone guitars were made with a full 25 1/2" scale. The sound is just outstanding and the playability is fantastic. If you have any questions, feel free to either email us at or call .
In January 1986, Gibson changed ownership and began manufacturing a range of varied Les Paul models to suit different user needs. The 1980s also saw the end to several design characteristics that were classic to the Les Paul, including the volute and maple neck. However, due to consumer demand, the Gibson Les Paul guitar is available today in an array of choices, ranging from guitars equipped with modern digital electronics to classic re-issue models built to match the look and specifications of the guitar’s earliest production runs from 1952 to 1960.
"I wanted my guitar to sound like Gene Krupa's drums," Dick Dale said, and the hyperpercussive style he invented for his jukebox wonders – including a juiced-up arrangement of the old Greek tune "Misirlou" – pioneered the sound of surf rock. Dale played as fast as possible, at max volume; Leo Fender once attempted to design an amp that wouldn't be destroyed by Dale's sheer loudness. "His arrangements were really complex, really unruly," said Rush's Alex Lifeson. "It was all staccato strumming reverb, but with a reverb that just sounded so cool."
Description: Body: Maple - Top Wood: Spruce - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 3 Piece - Fingerboard: Ebony - Frets: 22 - Inlay: Pearl & Abalone Block - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge Construction: Ebony - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Gold, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control - Circuit Type: Passive - Pickups: Super 58 - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Vintage Yellow Sunburst - String Instrument Accessories: Hardshell Case
Marshall are king when it comes to stacks and rock where fender leads with combos. Marshall offer a wall of sound with punchy lows, strong mids and aggressive highs. But it's not all shrill highs,dial back the trebble a little and you can also get really nice cleans and some real grunt as the crunch sets in. The classic Marshall sound is so coveted that there the market is saturated with imitators. - Antmax

Here you will find a selection of our most popular brands of acoustic guitars. This range includes Australian manufacturers Maton and Cole Clark, prestigious American companies C.F. Martin and Gretsch as well as fantastic value for money in Fender, Yamaha and Epiphone. We stock guitars ranging from beginner to professional, with and without pickups and in all different shapes, sizes and finishes.
We’ll talk more about the sound quality shortly. To give you a gentle introduction, Line 6 has been in the amp and effects modeling game for a long time. Their POD line of guitar effects processors has been around for a while, and you might be familiar with their Pocket POD. Some of you might also know them for their extremely popular digital delay pedal and looper, the DL4 (an absolute mainstay on pedalboards everywhere). Line 6 makes several multi-effects units, and according to the research we did the POD HD500X (from their POD HD X series) is the one mentioned and recommended most often. They make a rack-mountable version of it, but we’re more interested in the floor pedal unit. This is a multi-effects pedal, amp simulator, incorporates an expression pedal, tuner and looper, and doubles as a USB audio interface, just to name the basics.
A Twitter follower once asked me what electric guitar I’d recommend for a beginner with a max budget of around $200 total (for guitar, amp, tuner, etc.). So, I wrote a blog post for her where I recommended two all-in-one “starter packs” that are a great value for someone with such a low budget. The guitars in those starter packs are worth around $150, give or take.

We are really proud of our instruments, but what makes us most unique is our people, and your access to them. The world is full of faceless guitar companies, most are big conglomerates. We have a team of passionate guitar people and are committed to giving you unprecedented access to our team. Each member of the team is focused on supporting you. We treat each player like a Michael Kelly endorser. We value personal relationships with Michael Kelly owners and work hard to give you a level of service not readily available from other guitar brands or retailers. Let us help you get the right instrument!
70s Morris D-28 Gorgeous Rosewood body Dreadnaught Acoustic Japanes Vintage BOOMER with Martin Set Up Just in folks get the jump on this being processed now- pictured etc measured and pictured We have already set her up with our Martin Bone Nut & Compensated Saddle se as well as upgraded bridge Pins to solid Ebony with Abalone dot with brass ring and of course a new set of Martin Strings 80/20 Bronze 12's.. and this guitar Sounds like a true vintage classic if not familiar with the Morris brand thats ok many are not, I have know of these for 2 decades now many of these were made in the Terada factory in Japan... another name you may not have heard of none the less they are know to make the highest end guitars in Japan in those days and also today, for makers like Ibanez virtually all of their top end guitars like Musicians - Artists - George benson GB line and the old Aria L-5's and Ibanez L-5's and many others continuing on today in that great Custom Shop tradition. This is one of them and is very well constructed with top workmanship and fit and finish build quality is comparable to a Martin- Taylor_Gibson and so on... that is to say no worries this guitar Morris has an excellent pedigree. Guitars of great playability and great sounding what more do you need?.... This guitar was built from woods aged at least 20 years at time of build that was over 40 years ago and just look at its condition to this day... it has truly stood the test of time. See for yourself... it this price range a wonderful classic Dreadnought style Japanese true Vintage guitar in its own right. Great Value and great fun Japanese vintage collectible. For a song. More info soon .
The Venue has an adjustable gain feature designed for acoustics, which is compatible with both passive and active electronic systems. This is, of course, in addition to the five-band EQ we mentioned earlier. For feedback control there's a Garret Null Notch filter and a clipping light that will tell you when you're feeding back or when you need to cut down your output. Other perks include a full chromatic tuner and a boost button that gives you a nine decibel jump, ideal for solos or instrumentals.
First, let’s start with the switch. Like the Gibson-style switch, the Stratocaster’s is used to select between different pickups and combinations thereof. In this picture of Jimi Hendrix and his Stratocaster, the switch is just above the knobs. It’s a little hard to see because of the white pickguard, but if you have this type of guitar, you’ll have no trouble finding it on your own instrument.
I was just old enough to catch the tail end, but many folks remember the days of the record store.  Large vinyl albums, huge artwork, leafing through the stacks….it was a cool time that lasted longer than the days of cassettes, 8-tracks, and CDs.  Nowadays, most music buying is relegated to the online variety.  But there was a time during the 1960s where record stores were THE place to get your music, and musical instruments!That’s right, in window displays or hanging above the stacks of vinyl, guitars like these were waiting for teenagers.  Again, just a cool time!  This Decca guitar was sold through Decca Record stores.  In early 1966, Decca Records jumped into the electric guitar frenzy.  This was around the same time when CBS has bought Fender and only a few years away from MCA buying Danelectro. Curiously enough, Decca Records was a subsidiary of MCA.Anyway, Decca and many other companies saw the potential profits of electric guitar sales and quickly tried to capitalize.  There was a whole line of guitars, amps, and accessories, all imported from Japan.  The entire instrument line was handled through Decca’s 21 branches and distributors throughout the USA, but the company seemed to concentrate on the east and west coasts.  There was also a Decca subsidiary in Canada as well.This particular guitar was made by Kawai, and featured a design that was semi-exclusive to Decca.  Kawai was producing and exporting thousands of guitar to the USA at this time, and Kawai’s prices were very competitive, but Decca decided to go with an (as of this writing) smaller, unknown Japanese company to produce the guitars.  Many of the Decca electrics featured non-adjustable truss rods and just seemed to always be on the “cheap” end.  But some of the them did sound very good.  Sometimes you’ll see some really odd Decca electrics that literally copied the Teisco look from the same time period.  There were also some cool hollow bodies with set neck designs as well as the late 60s  line of guitars, like the DMI 231 pictured below.
A functionally solid-body electric guitar was designed and built in 1940 by Les Paul from an Epiphone acoustic archtop. His "log guitar" (so called because it consisted of a simple 4x4 wood post with a neck attached to it and homemade pickups and hardware, with two detachable Epiphone hollow-body halves attached to the sides for appearance only) shares nothing in design or hardware with the solid-body Gibson Les Paul introduced in 1952. However, the feedback associated with hollow-bodied electric guitars was understood long before Paul's "log" was created in 1940; Gage Brewer's Ro-Pat-In of 1932 had a top so heavily reinforced that it essentially functioned as a solid-body instrument.[2] In 1945, Richard D. Bourgerie made an electric guitar pickup and amplifier for professional guitar player George Barnes. Bourgerie worked through World War II at Howard Radio Company, making electronic equipment for the American military. Barnes showed the result to Les Paul, who then arranged for Bourgerie to have one made for him.
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