As a musician for 50 years and a custom builder for 30 years I definitely believe that wood choice has an effect on the tone and sound characteristics of an electric guitar. In my younger years as a cabinet maker, I was helping install a large church pipe organ (Cassavan I believe). The installer from Montreal and I had some discussions about wood and specifically wood properties best for certain applications. He told me that they used poplar for the spacers between the organ pipes because as a good tone wood, sound did not bleed from one pipe to another which is very important with pipe organs. They are the oldest and I believe the largest pipe organ manufacturer in the world and have done a lot of trial and error in this area according to the installer as to what wood works best. I happen to agree with them and agree that poplar is an excellent tone wood and works very well in guitars. Jackson guitars use poplar in there guitar bodies and is a great sounding tone wood. I use it a lot in my custom guitar because of the nice tone it produces.
There is not one standard # of frets, but the three most common are 21, 22 and 24 frets. The extra frets simply mean you can play some additional high notes. If you are just starting out, you will probably be just fine choosing 21, 22 or 24 frets. But, you should probably avoid the fretless option unless you're specifically learning how to play fretless instruments.
I agree that you should spend more on the guitar than the amp, but if you have a nice guitar and a cheap amp, you aren't giving the guitar enough width and breadth of tone capabilities to warrant spending $1500 or more on a guitar. So, if you're going to spend over $1200 on a guitar, don't buy a lousy amp. A Peavy 30 is a decent amp, but is short on breadth of tone as compared to a Fender Deluxe Reverb 22 watt. Marrying the guitar and amp is an important part of the process, they are symbiotic. My advice, as a player for over 40 years is to buy as good a guitar as you can. For beginners, a bad guitar will not get you playing, in fact, the most common reason young novices stop taking lessons is that the cheap junker they got is unplayable, even by professionals. It's hard, not fun, seems like a world of work and they quit. That's not how it's supposed to be. It's a fun thing, so get out there, get a good playable instrument and you are on your way to a lifetime of good times.
Processed Pitch Shifts: Few pitch-shifting algorithms are transparent enough to allow you to transpose anything by more than a couple of semitones without obvious side-effects. If what you're processing is going through an amp modeller, however, you can get away with much more radical changes. You can even do effective swoops and dives in pitch by progressively increasing the amount of pitch-shifting you apply to a note, and pitch changes of an octave or more can sound good, although they probably won't sound natural at these extremes. Sam Inglis
The amps are interesting and also pretty much impossible to I.D. These were, of course, tube amps. Their basic cosmetics consist of two-tone tolex or vinyl covering � contrasting dark and light � arranged vertically with a wide band in the middle, just slightly narrower than the grillcloth. Cabinets had rounded edges, and, in fact, sort of look like ’50s TVs. One was a small practice amp, with two medium sized amps about 15″ or so high, and one humongous amp, complete with six 8″ speakers (which looks like the later HG-8).
We're proud to say that our best assets at Guitar Center Forth Worth are our people. When you come in for a visit, you'll find that our staff aren't just friendly folk - they're also experienced musicians. We know our way around all our new and used instruments and accessories, which is why we've earned the trust of Texan guitar slingers from the famous to the casual. If you're into percussion, you'll also love our impressive vintage drum collection here at Cowtown. Drop by for a face-to-face chat about all we can do for you, or feel free to give us a call at 817-423-3800.
Description: Body: Mahogany - Top Wood: Maple - Curly - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Fingerboard: Ebony - Binding: Natural - Frets: 24, Medium - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge Construction: Ebony - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Gold, Nickel, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch, Waverly Tuners - Pickups: Fralin P-90 - String Instrument Finish: Golden Natural, Winter Solstice, Hickory Burst, Aged Scotch, Faded Onyx - Made In: America
In regards to which is best I personally think you pretty much got it right! Folks can piss n moan all they want but the facts are facts. Gibson, Fender, PRS ect all make fantastic guitars, time-tested tools of the trade. Many of you feel the need to want to publicly put down a certain brand in favor of another, there's good n bad in all of them!! If I could afford a Gibson Les Paul I would get one! Sure I could pull out the plastic n get one but I don't wanna have to do that just yet. I have no shame in purchasing a cheap guitar as long as I like it, to me if a guitar has a good smooth fast neck ......... it's a good guitar!! You can always swap pups n hardware but the neck is a little more complicated. I have a Fender Squire Strat, it is an "E" series Squire, I think it was made from 1984-87, and I can tell you that I will be 50 years old in May of this year and the neck on this Squire is the best I have ever felt on any guitar I have owned!! and yes it was a fairly cheap guitar. Now I hear that the "E" series of Squire Strats are supposed to be highly sought after or something, I don't know all about that, all I know is that I love the way this guitar plays n feels in my hands n riding in front of my belly! So folks don't put a guitar down simply because you can't afford it, like I said they are good guitars for a reason, same goes for the cheap guitars, don't knock 'em 'til you try 'em, there are some mighty good players out there to be had for cheap $$$, bottom line ..... regardless of the name on the head ..... if you can afford it, if it feels n looks the way you like n has a good neck then buy it n give it the love it deserves, it'll love you back in ways you never imagined!! Happy pickin n God bless
I couldn’t find a professional review of the Les Paul Express. The last time we checked, it had earned an average of just 3.8 stars out of 5 in 17 user reviews on Amazon, but most of the complaints I found on Amazon and elsewhere were from people who got samples that weren’t set up well at the factory. This wasn’t true of our sample, but it was true of the other Epiphone sample we received—and it was true of many of the cheap Epiphones I played in stores.
Graph Tech Ratio Locking Guitar Tuners (3+3)   New from$118.96In Stockor 4 payments of $29.74 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING Babicz Full Contact Strat Tremolo   New from$142.95In Stockor 4 payments of $35.74 Free Ground Shipping Gibson Vintage Tuners/Tuning Machines (Set of 6)   New from$89.99In Stockor 4 payments of $22.50 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING Graph Tech Ratio Locking Guitar Tuners (6 In Line)   New from$118.96In Stockor 4 payments of $29.74 Free Ground Shipping See All Electric Guitar Parts
The Squier Vintage Modified Jaguar Bass has major “cool” factor, and the sound holds out, too. With a P-bass style single in the neck position, and a J-bass style single in the bridge position, you’ll actually get the best of both worlds in terms of tonal options on the pickups. You have a choice between basswood (on the sunburst and crimson models) and agathis (on the black model), so there isn’t anything special about the woods they’re using in these basses. But the slim, fast-action, C contour of the maple neck will give you a nice, smooth J-bass feel that plays well above this guitar’s pay grade.
You can choose between tube amps, hybrids, or solid state models. The first are generally viewed as the grooviest. The latter are cheaper, more reliable, and require less maintenance. And the hybrids are often a practical compromise. (Keep in mind that watt for watt, tube amps are much louder than their solid state cousins with similar wattage ratings.)
Teisco first began importing guitars to the United States under their own brand in 1960. In 1964, the company then switched the name of their U.S. brand to Teisco Del Rey. The company was then sold in 1967, and the Teisco brand name stopped being used for guitars sold in the United States in 1969. Guitars were still sold under the Teisco name in Japan until 1977.
I'm only 3 months into this journey to become a musician, so a beginner, but absolutely love everything about this guitar. I messed around in the early 90's on old electric while in college, but never learned chords or any songs. When my wife acquired her old Sears-quality kids guitar from her Mom, I put new strings for something to mess around with on the weekends. Several weeks later, I got a cheap First Act electric for $25. Several weeks later a nice Takamine acoustic as the ears "learned" the notes and chords better. While switching from this quality acoustic guitar to the First Act, it was clearly apparent the First Act was a piece of junk. Notes and chords were just not clear and just not enjoyable to play. Well, this Epiphone is an awesome step forward combined with the Marshall amp. While I want to progress to blues scales in time, I've purposely focused on the major and minor chords and seamless transition between them. This guitar expresses the notes of chords so clearly. What I love most is the ability to slightly modify major chords like from Dmaj to Dsus4 and have it translate so clear as an example. Prior I never used the effects on my Marshall because it just sounded like a mess, but this guitar solves that issue. After a whole weekend of use, it felt like a big leap forward just because of quality. The fretboard layout helped refine the chords I've learned so far, so all strings were clear. Really helped practicing bending, hammer-ons and pull offs too. At any rate, for the money, it's hard to beat. I suspect that if this journey continues a more expensive guitar may be warranted in a few years, but as others have said, this will always be a quality practice instrument. Especially considering we spend every other weekend at our beach bungalow and it is nice not having to transport every time.
What I really want is a pelham blue or mostly-bluish-but-a-little-teal gibson sg with an ebony fretboard. the fretboard is absolutely a deal breaker. i'll probably change the pickups to WRC's so stock pickups are unimportant. Could get a used Elliot Easton, but I'd have to buy it used, sight unseen, and the trem isn't really ideal for how I tend to play, so I was hoping there was someone out there who does this. I am kinda surprised that no one does. It's one of the most iconic designs in history, why no interest in BTOs?
Many Rickenbackers — both guitars and basses — are equipped to be compatible with a “Rick-O-Sound” unit via an extra “stereo” output socket that allows the two pickups (or neck and middle pickup combined/bridge pickup, in the case of three pickup instruments) to be connected to different effects units or amplifiers. Another idiosyncrasy of Rickenbackers is the use of two truss rods (rather than the usual one) to correct twists, as well as curvature, in the neck.
No reference materials are available to me for this early Unicord period of Univox amplifiers, but there was undoubtedly a line. These American-made amps featured tubes and use high-end Jensen speakers. The Univox logo was on the upper right corner of the grille on a large piece of plastic. The cabinet was covered in charcoal-flecked tolex with white beading, with a grey grillcloth. Front-mounted controls included two inputs, volume, tone, tremolo with speed and intensity, plus footswitch jack with footswitch. The jewel light on these early Univox amps was a little red square.
Like Ibanez, Jackson is known for targeting the metal crowd. They have a variety of instruments available from affordable lower-cost guitars to high-end pro/enthusiast guitars. Jackson likes to keep their designs unique. Think of an 80s metal band and what they might be playing. If you thought of pointy guitars with sharp angles, Jackson might be what you’re looking for. Jackson not only sounds metal, it looks metal too. The Jackson King V, for example, is a staple instrument. If you know who Dave Mustaine is, you’ve heard of Megadeth. Because he was a co-founder and its guitarist. He is one of the people who made the Jackson King V as famous as it is. However, the design can be a bit too over the top for some people. Not everyone wants their guitar to be as “loud” as the sound it produces.
Body tops are optional. If you're just starting out, you should either skip this option, or choose the veneer top that appeals to you most. We offer veneer tops (paper-thin layer of wood) and cap tops (thick layer of wood). Most people will add a top to their instrument because of the top’s naturally beautiful appearance. Some people will add a top to their guitar because it can affect the overall sound of the instrument, too (only applies to cap tops, not veneers).
In some small to mid-size venues, such as bars and nightclubs, the PA system may not have the capacity to provide the bass sound for the venue, and the PA system may be used mainly for vocals. Bass players in bands that play at a variety of venues, including these types of small to mid-size venues, may need to be able to provide the bass sound for the venue, and so they will require a large combo amp or bass stack with this capability.
I've got a vox white shadow too though its a crimson/red colour with 2 chrome plated humbuckers, it has one volume pot, two tone pots, 1 toggle switch aswell as 2 further switches to change between pick-ups. It has stamped on the back neck plate "made in japan" I can't seem to locate the serial number though. Would love to know more about this guitar.

In 1947, Jerry Wexler, a writer for Billboard Magazine described African American music as ‘Rhythm and Blues’ and its appeal was spreading fast and wide helped by the popularity of the radio DJ. People across the states would tune in to their favourite stations to hear the music they loved. Whether or not the song was performed by black or white musicians became irrelevant.
One half step down from Drop D. Utilized by bands like Dir En Grey, Our Lady Peace, Your Demise, Oceana, Alter Bridge, Alice in Chains on some songs (like "Them Bones" or "We Die Young"), A Day to Remember (on the song "It's Complicated"), Chevelle (on Sci-Fi Crimes), Of Mice & Men, Deftones (on their Around the Fur album), Evanescence, Paramore, Disturbed, Theory of a Deadman, Puddle of Mudd, Linkin Park, Sevendust, Skillet, Black Veil Brides, Steel Panther (on songs like "17 Girls in a Row" or "Gloryhole"), 10 Years, Black Stone Cherry, Truckfighters, Fireball Ministry, RED on End of Silence, Nirvana on In Utero, "Blew" live performances, "Been a Son", the Nevermind album and also by System of a Down. Also used by Lamb of God somewhat on their albums Wrath and VII: Sturm und Drang, and almost exclusively on their album Resolution. Avenged Sevenfold used this tuning on songs "Scream", "Almost Easy", "Hail to the King", "Requiem" and "Coming Home". Guns N' Roses used this tuning on "Shackler's Revenge" from Chinese Democracy. Metallica use this tuning on their song "Minus Human" off S&M, on Dirty Window from their album St. Anger and live performances of songs recorded in Drop D, Asking Alexandria on their first album (Stand Up And Scream), As I Lay Dying have used this tuning on a few songs. Trivium used this tuning on their albums In Waves and Vengeance Falls. Van Halen on their 1981 song "Unchained". The Presidents of the United States of America use guitars tuned to this tuning with the top three strings removed, although on Freaked Out and Small, regularly strung guitars were used. Tyler Bryant & the Shakedown use this tuning on some songs (like "Heartland" and "Aftershock")
Non Locking Tremolo TREMOLO FAT/SAT MONTAGGIO DEL BRACCIO DEL TREMOLO L'inserimento e la rimozione del braccio del tremolo sono operazioni estremamente semplici. Inserire il braccio nell'apposito foro sulla piastra di base del tremolo. Tirare il braccio per rimuoverlo. REGOLAZIONE DEL BRACCIO DEL TREMOLO (SAT PRO) Per regolare l'altezza del braccio, rimuovere il coperchio della molla del tremolo dal retro della chitarra e utilizzare una chiave a brugola da 3 mm per girare la vite di regolazione dell'altezza sulla parte inferiore del blocco tremolo.
Ibanez are a Japanese musical instrument company. Although Yamaha is a better known Japanese musical instrument company, Ibanez exceeds expectations for electric guitars. This brand of guitars stands out in the world of rock guitars. They gained popularity in the 1980s when they introduced their original designs for guitars based on Steve Vai’s JEM Universal. Their designs have since become some of the biggest selling metal guitars. The Ibanez guitars are used by guitarists such as Steve Vai, Paul Gilbert, and Joe Satriani. In addition, Ibanez guitars tend to be very affordable, giving you a great guitar for a cheaper price.
Semi-hollow Body Guitars: The first and most classic semi-hollow body is the Gibson ES-335, which was quickly embraced with Chuck Berry and later sonically reinvented by Freddie King, Alvin Lee, Larry Carlton and a host of others in the ’60s and ’70s, who pushed semi-hollow Electric Spanish models into the ’60s and ’70s with aggressive technique and tones.
Before I recommended it to him, I went to my local GC and played one through some headphones. I thought it sounded pretty good - and certainly outgunned my Pocket Pod for pure functionality. Is this (or something like it) the be all and and all of tone? Of course not. But this (or something like it) can provide all sorts of options for practicing while leaving your neighbor (or spouse!) in peace.
All of the hardware is gold on this model, and while it’s stock Epiphone stuff rather than licensed equipment, it’s of good quality, and we don’t expect it to be difficult to keep in tune. The eSonic preamp and NanoFlex pickup system are both excellent and really help the guitar to come alive. In terms of looks, there are no particularly notable features, but the combo of gold hardware and florentine cutaway make for an attractive design.
A closer look at a 1981 Gibson Victory MV-II electric guitar. The Gibson Victory MV, or 'Multi-Voice' guitars had very wide tonal palettes; with coil-tapped humbuckers they could produce typical Gibson tones, but were also designed to 'out-Fender' Fender. Two models were launched in the summer of 1981. Whilst the MVX, was designed to do everything a Stratocaster could do, the MVII was 'primarily for the discerning country player' - placing it squarely against the Telecaster.
If you’re interested in learning how to play electric (or even acoustic) guitar, you obviously need to pick up an instrument. But that’s only the beginning of the gear you need to get to shredding. Second only to a guitar itself, you’re also going to need an amplifier – the device responsible for projecting the sounds of your chosen guitar. The problem is: for a beginner, this task is as daunting as it is expansive.
That would work, of course, but the result would be very different. You’d have minimum cut in the center position, with treble cuts of differing size in either direction, depending on the caps’ values. I’m not sure that would be particularly useful — the activity would be the same in either direction up to the point where the value of the greater cap kicks in. (I suppose one advantage would be that you could leap quickly to two “preset” values by turning the pot to minimum or maximum, as if you’d installed to caps on a DPDT switch, as seen here.) Or course, you’d have to worry about centering the pot, unless you could can find a part with a center detente. The resonant peaks, and therefore the overall tone, differ from standard. HOW exactly they differ is one of the things that I’m going to explore. 🙂

The Broadway by Epiphone features a laminated maple body with a select spruce top, producing a bright sound rounded up by the warmer tone of the spruce. It also has a hard maple neck with a Slim Taper C profile, a rosewood fingerboard with block-and-triangle abalone inlays, binding on the headstock, body, fingerboard and around the F-holes, a mother-of-pearl Tree of Life inlay on the headstock, gold hardware, a three-way pickup selector and an adjustable floating tremolo bridge.
This interactive package (complete with a book, an instructional CD, a wall chart poster, a guitar pick and three sheets of fretboard stickers) equips the novice with everything he or she needs--short of an electric guitar and an amplifier--to become competent to play in a band within three months. The course is divided into twelve weekly lessons. Each lesson outlines the objectives of the week ahead and concludes with one of twelve specially commissioned backing tracks over which the novice can use the newly learned techniques. The book concludes with tips how to get the right sound from a guitar, amplifier and effects, as well as tips on forming a band, playing live and recording. If you've ever wanted to play in the band instead of just watching it, now you can!

Hey Frank i removed the pick guard and discovered why they were so tall.I just bought the guitar the day i asked you about it and it was late very late after midnight and i found out someone used pick guard screws to just secure them to the PG…lol And i have it back together correctly installed now.No pictures yet here is a better detailed description.The body is solid wood stained factory dark cherry.Rosewood fretboard semi-enclosed tuners…SSS P/U arrangement in a 3 ply black PG and 5 way switch and probably weighs 8 lbs.Thanks ….Larry
Gibson market the J-200 as the most powerful acoustic guitar on the planet, and we might just agree. It’s so punchy, and has so much presence, both in the low end and right up there with the more sparkling high notes. Combine this with the L.R. Baggs Anthem pickup system, and this is a guitar that is aimed squarely at live performances where the acoustic needs to really make itself heard. It’l
The smallest Taylor guitar available. The Baby Taylor series has been hailed for its easy-to-transport size and affordability. Features include sapele laminate back and sides with an optional Sitka spruce (identified as a BT1) or mahogany top (identified as a BT2). A larger bodied option is also available called the “Big Baby” (BBT introduced in 2002), which is a 15/16-size dreadnought with a neck that is standard scale (25-1/2”) and narrow width (1-11/16”). The Big Baby however only comes with a Sitka spruce top.
While the general purpose is to emulate classic "warm-tube" sounds, distortion pedals such as the ones in this list can be distinguished from overdrive pedals in that the intent is to provide players with instant access to the sound of a high-gain Marshall amplifier such as the JCM800 pushed past the point of tonal breakup and into the range of tonal distortion known to electric guitarists as "saturated gain." Although most distortion devices use solid-state circuitry, some "tube distortion" pedals are designed with preamplifier vacuum tubes. In some cases, tube distortion pedals use power tubes or a preamp tube used as a power tube driving a built-in "dummy load." Distortion pedals designed specifically for bass guitar are also available. Some distortion pedals include:
Effects can inspire you with new creative ideas, or just help you sound like your musical inspirations, go for it. I would urge you to consider a multi-effects unit like a Digitech RP series, or Line6 PodHD series. They can provide you with many options to try before you figure out exactly what you want. Many units can be had pretty cheap used, and as a bonus, most will act as a usb interface, and let you record your playing (for better or worse) to computer. – Michael Cook Apr 29 '13 at 21:39
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Stewart MacDonnald has a great finishing schedule that I would recomend reading before you start the painting process. You shouldn't need to fill any pores on the neck because necks are usualy made from maple which is a tight grain wood. All that's need for it is a sanding with 220 grit paper unless you want to leave the neck natural and unfinished. I recomend using at least a few coats of sanding sealer of clear gloss laquer to protect the wood fromdirt and grime that comes from playing.


It’s not known how long this A group lasted – probably only a couple more years, except for the U-65RN. By ’76, the U-65RN was still around, now promoted with 17 watts, Hammond reverb, tremolo, 10 transistors, and a 12″ heavy duty speaker. This looked pretty much the same, except the logo was reversed in white out of a black metal strip above the grille and the power switch had changed. At some point, the U-65RN was joined by the UB-252 bass amp, offering 20 watts with a 15″ speaker, presumably similar and transistor. These are the only two Univox amps listed in a 1979 price list (contained in the 1980 book), though, as you see over and over, others may still have been available.

: I own a Decca guitar, it is what I learned to play on many years ago. From what little I have gathered about them they were an order by mail brand, and you could only get them from a catolog such as Sears & Roebuck. I havent been able to find a price for them or any ifo on what catalogs they were from. Mine has a Ernie Ball Musicman-like peghead (4 one side 2 on the other) and has a metal pick guard with 2 giant switches which seem to have no effect on tone. It has a brown & yellow sunburst paint job (ewwww).I thought I possibly had the only one in existence, lol, guess not.
Blanket’s richly interwoven cinematic ambient rock has rapidly evolved since last year’s debut EP Our Brief Encounters. We have had a sneak preview of their new material and can confirm it is a sizeable slab of Big Rock that will induce palm-sweat from fans of Lonely The Brave, Nordic Giants and This Will Destroy You. Guitarists Bobby and Simon - the duo at the heart of this sound - are masters of catharsis, bonding warm, cascading lines into structures of true grandeur.
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Hello all. I have a brand name guitar, which was very popular in the 1980s, and still is being manufactured under Gibson today. I didn't see it in your list though. It's a Kramer Stagemaster. It's a beautiful guitar, which I may never part with. Strat-Style with Neck-Thru-Body & Floyd Rose Trem. The headstock states Kramer American. These were passed off as American made models, however I understand that they were actually made in Japan. The style and appointments are strikingly similar to my Ibanez Proline 2550 from the same era, which has 'Crafted in Japan' written on the headstock. I know that Kramer made a lot of American made guitars out of Neptune, New Jersey, however these were all bolt-on neck guitars. Does anyone know where these Neck-Thru Kramers were made, or why they have American printed on the headstock if they are not tues American made guitars?

I sold my Yamaha Pacifica 12 and have been trying to find out more about the Italia Rimini 12, the Schecter TSH-12 Classic(which is the new version and I only saw 2 -both sold) and the Eastwood Sidejack 12. I have the money, but finding anything but the Eastwood online, is rather difficult. I still would like to try them out before buying, if I could.
THE BODY This is where your guitar starts to take shape. After you have finnished your design you will need to trace it onto the wood that you are going to use for the template or body. A solid blank of tonewood that you can get from online retailers like Catalina Guitars can run anywhere in the price range of $70 to $250 depending on what wood you use. Some people will tell you that different wood will produce a different tone. While this is true in some cases like the crisper higher pitch tone of Mapel and the warmer fuller tones of Mahogany, you probably won't be able to tell the differnce between using a lower grade wood versus a higher grade more expensive wood. The only time that I would splurge and buy expinsive wood is if I was going to use a clear finish on the body and all the other parts of the guitar were going to be high end quality parts. For my project I didn't have a lot of money, much less the expensive tools to work with to produce a result that I would want to break the bank on.

Now as for flipping the whole bridge, yes, in some cases this may help you. Try it out and see what happens. Just an extra mm or two could make all the difference. One thing to watch out for, though. The notches on your saddles might not all be the same. Often you will have wider notches for the wound strings and thinner notches for the unwound strings. So you might have to swap these all around.
“If Gibson offers two pickups, let’s have three!”  This simple statement by Leo began a revolution in sound for electric guitarists by offering 3 single coil pickups instead of the usual 2 humbucking pickups that Gibson offered players.  These lower output pickups provided a thinner sound, but with more tonal variants.  Players could now have clear chunky rhythm tones alongside cutting trebly lead tones, while the inclusion of the middle pickup gave players access to the “spongy quack” distinctive of the Stratocaster’s “in between” positions.
A variation on Drop E, A with the G flattened one half step to F♯; this tuning is identical to 6-string Drop A, with two E strings added: one above, and one below. Like Drop E, A; this tuning allows easy fingering on the E since it is a standard fourth interval below the A. It also provides three high strings a fourth apart instead of the usual two. The tuning is used by Infant Annihilator on their album The Elysian Grandeval Galèriarch. A 7-string variation of the tuning without the high E (E-A-E-A-D-F♯-B) was used on their previous album The Palpable Leprosy of Pollution and is used by Enterprise Earth/Delusions of Grandeur guitarist Gabe Mangold.
As music professionals, we're all familiar with guitarists and the rows of pedals they set up on stage at every gig. They're definitely on to something when it comes to effects on-the-fly, but when you're setting up a studio or pro audio rig, there's a simpler solution: multi effects processors. These full-sized units bring a ton of versatility to the table (or, more accurately speaking, the rack) and they can play a crucial role in shaping your own signature sound.
This is an echo effect – every time you play a note it is repeated quieter and quieter, just like an echo. You can get a variety of different delay effects, from old-school “tape” echoes which are said to sound more natural, to analogue delay pedals and more modern digital ones. Digital pedals tend to sound clearer and a little harsher than their analogue cousins, making them more suited to modern styles such as modern metal.
Used as a send effect, a resonant filter can be used much more creatively than as an insert.You get very different results from your filtering depending on where you put the filter in the signal chain. To introduce some real movement into delay lines, for example, place sweeping low-pass filters before the delay. You then get the movement of the dry sound contrasting with the movement in the delay line. If both the filter sweep and the delay lines are tempo-sync'd, you can create interesting effects where the filter appears to be moving up and down at the same time.
The USA-made variants of Jackson guitars are somewhat pricey, yet they are also custom-made. However, you can also find the same options bearing affordable price tags too. These inexpensive models come with slightly downgraded specs as they aim at the beginners and intermediate level guitarists. It means Jackson guitars provide an excellent opportunity to the metal players to choose any of the guitars that fit in their budget and meet their requirements.
It's always hard to rate amps when mixing high gain with vintage, boutique amps and the mass produced monsters, but including S.S. and digital technology seems to be a unrealistic stretch. That being said, this manufacturer is making some of the best sounding vintage type tube amps I've heard to date. their lineup of vintage Fender style amps are all excellent, and considerably more affordable and reliable. If you are a fan of the tweed, black and silver faced gems, you have to give Victoria a try. If you prefer something with a unique spin they make their own unique creations as well and they are all serious tone machines. In so far as tube amps go, these guys are definitely in my top five. Speaking of boutique, where is Carr?
Like most affordable super strat guitars, the Omen-6 has a basswood body, carved into the elegant looking shape that Schecter is known for. The neck is crafted from mahogany and joins the body via a bolt-on joint. It is topped by a 14" radius rosewood fingerboard that has 24 jumbo frets. It comes setup for fast and comfortable playability, with its 25.5" scale length, 1.65" nut width and stylized fretboard markers. Giving this guitar its voice are two Schecter Diamond Plus pickups, which are passive pickups but are still hot enough for driving high-gain pedals and amps.
Rolling Stones best electric guitarist list should've been nicknamed the best average guitarist list. I didn't give this guy the time of day because I thought the bucket thing was to cover up how badly he sucks. Turns out it's the opposite. He's just weird. It's too bad the average person doesn't have the capacity to enjoy this type of advanced music.
In the Guitar Setup & Maintenance course, Greg Voros devotes an entire DVD to electric guitars. Rather than talk in the abstract about setting up all electric guitars, he’s picked two very popular ones to use for demonstration purposes. He’ll teach you how to adjust the action, the bridge, and the pickup heights, as well as how to adjust the neck for precise relief, in order to get the best action possible on your electric guitar.

ANYBODY, OF EVERY ABILITY, CAN PLAY – Designed for every type of learner, ChordBuddy includes modifications that allow individuals of every ability to successfully learn a new instrument. Perfect for use in the music therapy, home, or school setting, ChordBuddy can help individuals learn to play the guitar flat or with two people at a time, making for what is an all-around therapeutic experience.
Yes, most of them are very useful! These days there are hundreds of online tutors offering great guitar lessons. And there’s no need to throw your money at the first offer you see, as a lot of quality instructional and tutorial videos are completely free on platforms such as YouTube. Generally, paid courses tend to be better because they are tested and are well-structured, and – in theory – you should be able to progress faster. But it all depends on your budget and on your will to learn on your own.
Quality replacement pot from Bourns with DPDT pull switch for coil tap or other switched application.   Knurled 1/4" shaft fits most knobs.  Low torque, carbon resistive element, great replacement in many applications using passive humbucker or single-coil pickups.   Note that length of threaded part of shaft is 3/8" - measure to make sure that this is long enough for your application, especially if the pot mounts through the wooden guitar body.   (This pot will not work on Les Pauls, for example).  500K, Special A2 taper preferred by guitar and bass players.  Nut and washer included.   Note: threaded bushing diameter is 3/8", like most 24mm "quarter-sized" pots.   Both pot and switch terminals are solder lugs.   Not designed for PC board insertion.
The Hummingbird Pro's unique look breaks the typical monotonous appearance of conventional acoustics, and it does so without straying too far from the familiar. It is easily identifiable by its uniquely shaped ornate pickguard, which matches the guitar's faded cherry sunburst finish. Whether you are on stage or just jamming with friends, you can be sure that this acoustic will stand out.

When recording an electric guitar, the amp is the instrument as far as the mic is concerned, and mic position is important. While a lot of sound comes direct from the speakers as you'd expect, a significant level is also emitted from the back and sides of the box via panel vibrations. Also, an open-backed cabinet throws about as much sound out of the back of the box as it does out of the front. Choosing a mic for recording electric guitar isn't difficult, as virtually any decent mic of any type can be made to produce usable results. If I were to generalise, I'd say that British recording engineers tend to use cardioid, dynamic models while American engineers seem to prefer capacitor microphones. The dynamic mic produces a solid sound with a smooth high end, while the capacitor mic's increased definition produces a brighter, more open sound when used in the same way. However, the mic position has just as much bearing on the tone as the mic itself.


Mod® Kits are designed to give both novice and experienced musicians the opportunity to build their own amps and effects pedals. All kits come with easy to follow instructions and use point to point wiring. Pre-drilled enclosure and all parts are included. All you need to provide are hand tools, a soldering iron and solder. All of our kits have a build difficulty rating to help you determine which kit is right for you.
:::I just bought one of these guitars at an auction. In Oregon U.S.A. It is a plank, with sunburst finish, 3 chrome toaster style pickups with one cover missing. The varnish has cracks in it like every other old Vox I have seen that date to the sixties or earlier. It has a white pick guard with 3 chrome knurled knobs and an old style switch that turns (not a flip switch) but is missing the knob that I assume is chrome like the 3 volume knobs. I haven't put strings on the guitar yet so I don't know if they are all volume or 1 volume and 2 tone. The roller/tremolo has VOX stamped in big letters and under that it says PAT.APP.FOR in smaller capitol letters. It has a plastic cover plate on the back that is stamped, Made In England. The neck is 19 fret with a fret just under the nut that has no use, as the string would never touch it and the neck is attached with a metal plate. Tuners are a single strap with gears steel not brass with plastic knobs. Just under the tuners on the back the headstock are the numbers 64523. A green VOX decal along with Shadow JMI Dartford Kent on the front. I was suprised to find this guitar, as I had never seen or heard of it before. I can't wait to play it and see how it stacks up to all the other VOX guitars I have and have played. Wish I could find out more about it but this is as close as I have come, so far.
An instant classic, and an easy guitar song that offers a simple, repeated section of just a handful of dyads, or two-note chords. It is one of the most recognizable guitar riffs of all time and it’s great for beginners to learn. The entire section is played with just two notes per chord, and it’s a progression that keeps your fretting hand in just a single section of the neck. Once you learn this riff, it’ll be tough to stop, since it sounds so good, and it’s easy to play. 
There were marked differences between the other Les Paul models and the Les Paul Junior. For instance, although the Junior’s body outline was clearly reminiscent of the original upmarket Les Paul guitar, the Junior issue was characterized by its flat-top “slab” mahogany body, finished in traditional Gibson Sunburst. The Junior was touted as an inexpensive option for Gibson electric guitar buyers[citation needed]: it had a single P-90 pickup, simple volume and tone controls, and the unbound rosewood fingerboard bore plain dot-shape position markers. However, as a concession to the aspirations of the beginning guitarist buyer, the Junior did feature the stud bridge/tailpiece similar to the second incarnation of the upscale Gold-Top.
Hartley Peavey built his first amp in 1957 and decided to establish his own company in 1965. Ever since, he has been the head of one of the biggest audio gear companies in the world. Eddie Van Halen collaborated in the design of the famous 5150 amp, a legendary amp that is still heralded by today's enthusiasts. However, the collaboration stopped in 2004 and the brand had to rename its amp to 6505. Born in the 1970's under the name Vintage, and with a completely different style, the Classic series is still very popular among blues, jazz and rock guitar players. The brand has also developed solid-state amps (the Bandit series) and, more recently, some modeling amps (the Vypyr series).
So last week I wrote about if it made sense to replace the speaker in an amp, or if it would be better to just get a different amp, I'll bet some of ya saw this weeks topic coming, right?  Once again I must begin by stating that even though we design, build and sell pickups here, we will NOT offer biased information (I promise); remember, we are real-world guitar players too.  Yep, we also need to carefully watch how we spend our money lest we find ourselves without a roof over our head!  And I mean really, I could take being homeless ... but I'd NEVER do that to a good GUITAR! Shall we dive in?
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Octave ('Other' category): This effect really surprised me because it tracks well, but inserting the compressor before the Octave plug-in improves the tracking even further. Distorting the post‑octave sound with the AmpSimulator gives a big distortion sound, even with only the Octave 1 level turned up. If you want more of a brontosaurus guitar, turn up Octave 2 as well. In general, I like to leave a fair amount of direct sound in the output mix. You can just as easily go in a cleaner direction by using only the Octave 1 output, and bypassing the AmpSimulator. Select the neck pickup on your guitar, pull back a bit on the tone, and you'll hear a sound that recalls jazz great Wes Montgomery.

The biggest issue when starting out is not to get any bad habits with picking or hand/finger positioning. I'd highly recommend to find a teacher who - not necessarily on a periodical basis - would take a closer look at your progress and technique and make adjustments when needed. There are lots of bad habits that you can get and I'd rather spend some money on lessons than weeks of lifetime to undo those.
These guitars have the smoothest necks. Their oiled and waxed naked necks are the most comfortable necks I have ever played on. They offer a lot of great options, but they especially accommodate those of us with smaller hands. Every Music Man is fully loaded with ergonomic and functional features. No fatigue, they stay in tune well and set up easily.
Anyone who has a Tempest XII probably needs a pick guard. I have a 1966 which was in the case for much of the past forty years. The plastic apparently dried out and "shrunk," causing the two corners to pop off at the screws near the neck. Some guitar repair technicians are good at fabricating pick guards, but most are either woodcrafters or electronics geeks. Please advise how your search has gone. Maybe I'll replace mine, too. RED
One of the best and most affordable gigging amps I have ever played. Blackstar accommodates all styles and budgets and should be in place of line 6. Too many people want traditional tone, but Blackstar brings a new edge to the table and builds extremely reliable tough as nails amps with new ideas like the ID series amps, I own an ht40 and am extremely impressed. Get one.
It’s now time for the most challenging step: fitting everything back into the guitar. Don’t worry: if you did everything correctly up to this point, you shouldn’t have any problems getting it back together. You’ll be using extra wire to pull the electronic parts through the F hole and into their mounting holes on the body. It’s best to start with the component that’s furthest from the F hole, which is usually the jack.

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The guitar is an instrument capable of truly heavenly tones but capturing this sound in a recording is never as straight-forward as you'd think. Here at Prime Loops we've been changing strings, tweaking amps and adjusting mics to deliver only the finest tone imaginable to your DAW! We used a 1985 Gibson Les Paul electric and a Martin DC-16RGTE acoustic with Fishman, Marshall and Orange amps, recorded through an AKG C214 microphone, so STUDIO GUITARS guarantees to make the hairs on the back of your neck stand on end!
This is a solid body bass guitar that has a full deep sound. There is not much middle to it which makes it less defined than a lot of basses but it does suit some music very well. There is a choice of sample sets to choose from in this soundfont. Direct or through my j-station (which makes it sound more like its through an amp), or a mix of the two. The j-station samples are the same direct samples routed out and through the j-station and back in again, which is why it is possible to have a mix of the two. The J-Station samples make a distorted beefy bass sound which can be useful for some music i.e. 3 piece bands where tha bass fills out instead of a rhythm guitar or just for a more lo-fi bass sound. The direct samples are not so distorted and can be used in alot more styles of music. There is a preset that includes slaps and slides etc to help add some realism.
If you haven't tried a higher end Yairi then you have missed it. These are great hand crafted guitars with a very good neck and great sound. They are branded Alverez in the US but be sure it is one of the Yairi made. There are not lots of them made due the the complete hand crafted design. You don't find them in the music stores much but they should be there. I have owned one for many years and have yet to pick up any other guitar that can match it in my opinion
However, even for recording experts who can discern if something was done at Columbia Records Studio A or Olympic or wherever, it’s challenging to define a percentage of influence that the studio provides. “I don’t know that you can measure it in any way. It’s really more an ineffable quality of sound and aesthetics,” Horning Schmidt says. “You can measure frequency response and you can measure decibels but in my research I’ve found that back in the thirties and forties, you had engineers saying ‘you can’t just go by the meters. You have to use your ears.’”
Blending vintage-spec Alnico V single-coil sparkle, chime and quack with contemporary playability and versatile electronics, the Fullerton Standard Legacy from G&L offers superb Made-in-USA craftsmanship at an amazing price. With a stunning metallic lacquer finish over a resonant solid alder body, this instrument looks as good as it sounds, and the Leo Fender-designed PTB (passive treble and bass) system puts an incredibly wide variety of tones right at your fingertips. The Legacy also features Leo's acclaimed Dual-Fulcrum vibrato bridge for incredible tuning stability and quaver to dive-bomb range that's smooth as silk.

Looks like a good guitar. I honestly think that for 90% of the hobbyist players out there, after buying better pickups, the difference between the sound of a Squier and a real Fender is negligible. I could be wrong I guess, but my ear doesn't really pick up enough of a difference to justify the money for a more expensive guitar. The quality of the guitar plays a big part for me. For instance, when I first got my guitar, the frets weren't smooth. Bends sucked because the note had lost it's sound by the time it was bent all the way up. Finally through playing and polishing, they flattened. Now they play really nice. I'm sure that on a new Gibson, that wouldnt happen. Oh well. About the Tele headstock that you didn't like, what don't you like about it? Do you like the gibson style 3 tuners to a side configuration?(like an acoustic?)

When using multiple microphones, always remember to check for phase cancellation, and keep in mind that a 2-8kHz boost is probably all that's necessary at mixdown for enhanced electric guitar presence within a track. A small amount of delay (1ms = 12") on an ambient mic track will increase the perceived ambient distance of the microphone without actually moving the mic. This trick works well when blending close and ambient microphone tracks during recording or mixing.
Luthier Steve Lamb has been providing quality instrument repair in Fort Worth for over 30 years. Steve’s years of experience has provided musicians, collectors, students and friends the information and service necessary to keep their instruments in shape. Lamb’s Music is an authorized service/warranty center for most guitar manufacturers including – Fender, Gibson, Martin, Taylor and more.
When you hit a string it will vibrate. It will continue to vibrate until the energy put into it is expended. Where does that energy go? Well, it is expended through movement. That movement is what the pickup "sees" and translates into sound. In a world where 100 % of the initial energy imparted by the strum to the string was expended through movement, wood doesn't matter.
The 700-series guitars had removeable (loseable) bridge covers. Many of them for sale now are missing those covers and the vibrato arm. There are fewer 800s missing those vibrato arms. If I ever get a 700-series missing the cover and bar, I'll take a look under the bridge and see if any wood was removed. Maybe I can replace the bridge and tailpiece.

I disagree, not saying that you can hear tonewoods but saying that it isnt just the string and pickups that make a difference. There is a huge difference in how a string vibrates and pickups do pickup resonances, otherwise a semi hollow would sound exactly like a solidbody and would never feedback. Get some humbuckers put them in a telecaster and then put them in a 335 and tell me they sound exactly the same. What is important is scale length (string tension), weight and various things like bridge design. Get a hardtail strat with strat pickups and then route it for a trem bridge ... it will sound different, maybe minor or major depending on what but it will change the tone.


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The tone from a Bourgeois produced with master grade Cocobolo wood using hot hide glue is superior to any guitar I have played, I can get an incredible reverb sound by applying a light percussion on the body with my forearm, this guitar is expensive but worth it. I believe Bourgeois builds 400 guitars per year, the other major producers production is 400 guitars per week.
Reading the comments, looks like people dont like Ibanez, in my 15 years of guitar playing I have own three, all mid-lowend models in the RG series, those things are of amazing value they can take a lot of abuse and still sound great. I dare to compare them whit my SL3 jackson a guitar that costed me three times more than any Ibanez I had own, the only big difference are the pickups because other than that the built quallity is much the same and I dare to say Ibanez uses better compenets (frets, pots, switch) than Jackson...
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Confusion sometimes revolves around the distinctions between overdrives, distortions and fuzzes, but in theory each should do approximately what it says on the box—even if some also do a little of the other breeds’ jobs along the way. In the case of overdrive pedals, the intention is often twofold: either to provide a gain boost to “overdrive” a tube amp into distortion, or to approximate the mildly distorted sound of a slightly overdriven tube amp. In practice, most do a little of both. Crank the average overdrive toward the max and it usually coughs up an element of self-generated distortion, which can easily be heard when DI’d into a mixing desk set to well below overload levels; generate enough distortion, and things can also sound a little fuzzy. Despite the gray areas, however, there are definitely distinctions between the types. It all makes some sense if you think in terms of the degree of clipping achieved by the pedal, with overdrives generally being soft-clipping devices and distortions being hard-clipping devices.

This kit contains everything you need to build your guitar.  Just add your finish materials to the body and neck.  These kits aren’t just a collection of random parts- each neck has been custom fitted to the body to ensure a good, snug fit.  Includes a finished, predrilled body, fretted neck, all electronics and hardware. Wood is raw and unfinished, may require sanding and patching or other preparation prior to applying a finish.
There is a historical parallel between musical styles (baroque, classical, romantic, flamenco, jazz) and the style of "sound aesthetic" of the musical instruments used, for example: Robert de Visée played a baroque guitar with a very different sound aesthetic from the guitars used by Mauro Giuliani and Luigi Legnani – they used 19th century guitars. These guitars in turn sound different from the Torres models used by Segovia that are suited for interpretations of romantic-modern works such as Moreno Torroba.
One line bouncing is an "echo." Many lines bouncing randomly is "reverb." If they bounce around for more than a second, it's called reverb. If they bounce around for less than a second, it's Kosher to call it "room ambiance." If the radiating lines are in a room with no reflective walls, they wouldn't bounce back at all, and the room would be called "anechoic." By the way, my imaginary room is only two-dimensional. Real-life rooms are three dimensional.

Compression: A "limiter" is envisioned as a circuit which prevents the output signal from exceeding a certain limit. If it did this by clipping, it would cause distortion, but if it can do it cleanly by just progressively reducing the amplification of the incoming signal, then it may properly be called a compressor. A compressor reduces the overall dynamic range by "compressing" the gain of high amplitude signals while maintaining the design gain for lower amplitude signals.

In order to trigger these notes, a MIDI guitar controller is needed. Alot of work just to recreate what you can do on a real guitar. The only advantage to this technique, is the ability to take a MIDI track, creating this way, and substitute different guitar models to audition what might sound best. Also, the MIDI guitar track can also serve as an educational tool and how a part is performed.
The Squier Bullet Strat Hard Tail Brown Sun Burst is a fantastic option for beginner guitarists out there and those who need an affordable budget friendly option for recording or practising. This guitar makes our cheap electric guitars that don’t suck list thanks to its high-quality basswood body and comfortable “C” shape profile on the neck that is super comfortable to play. This high-quality guitar also includes a set of three standard single-coil strat pickups allowing you to mix up your sound via the 5-way pickup selector. Solid, chrome hardware and a hard tail bridge for added resonance finish off the guitar nicely whilst the budget friendly price tag makes it affordable for everyone. A Fender Stratocaster style guitar at a fraction of the cost.

This is a nice improvement on the ME-70, which I owned previously, except for one thing: plastic expression pedal. That's why it got 4 stars from me. The ME-70 had a metal pedal, and it was substantially larger. This plastic pedal does not have the same feel. Feels chintzy. I was expecting similar quality but in that one regard the quality is inferior to the previous version.
In 1951, this initial rejection became a design collaboration between the Gibson Guitar Corporation and Les Paul. It was agreed that the new Les Paul guitar was to be an expensive, well-made instrument in Gibson’s tradition.[10] Although recollections differ regarding who contributed what to the Les Paul design, it was far from a market replica of Fender models. Founded in 1902, Gibson began offering electric hollow-body guitars in the 1930s, such as the ES-150; at minimum, these hollow-body electric models provided a set of basic design cues for the new Gibson solid-body, including a more traditionally curved body shape than offered by competitor Fender, and a glued-in (“set-in“) neck, in contrast to Fender’s bolt-on neck
8. Fender Champion 40-watt 1x12 ($179.99): If you are looking for a great introduction into the world of Fender tone, you need to look no further than the Fender Champion 40. This solid state amp with Fender classic styling allows you access to a variety of on-board effects like Vibratone, tremolo, delay and many more. The two amp channels allow you to switch between Fender Blackface clean or a variety of different amp voicings, accessing the sounds of other Fender amp greats. The ability to add a footswitch pedal allows you to switch channels and effects with great ease at the tap of a button. There’s a reason why Fender is the go-to company for many of those in the music community.
The Top Guitars specialized only in Custom Made Electric Guitars and Basses - "We will create an instrument that will delight you with exceptional tone and great playability, optimized to your personal preferences and all with the utmost quality, beauty, and rigorous attention to detail. We are experienced builders of custom electric guitar and bass bodies and necks. We craft our exquisite custom electric guitar and bass bodies and necks using a variety of time tested, great sounding woods, offering options that you can not buy off the shelf. We can also build for anyone that has a custom design that they would like built to their specifications. We do our best to meet your dreams continually striving for unattainable perfection.Only the best, one-of-a-kind, and built just for you! "
This beast features a classic Sitka spruce top with a rosewood back and sides combo. We have already mentioned a few guitars that feature these types of tonewood. However, the difference here is that the Martin DCPA4R is a handmade instrument that brings you the craftsmanship of Martin's top luthiers. If you appreciate craftsmanship, you'll love this instrument.
It was also during this time that Perry Bechtel, a well-known banjo player and guitar teacher from Cable Piano in Atlanta, requested that Martin build a guitar with a 15-fret neck-to-body join[citation needed]. Most guitars of the day, with the exception of Gibson’s L-5 archtop jazz guitars, had necks joined at the 12th fret, half the scale length of the string. In keeping with Bechtel’s request, Martin modified the shape of their 12-fret 000-size instrument, lowering the waist and giving the upper bout more acute curves to cause the neck joint to fall at the 14th fret rather than the 12th. Fourteen-fret guitars were designed to be played with a pick and replace banjos in jazz orchestras. Thus, Martin named its first 14-fret, 000-shape guitar the Orchestra Model (OM). Martin applied this term to all 14-fret instruments in its catalogs by the mid- to late-1930s.
Does anyone have one of either of these that they can comment on? I dig the looks of the silverburst (though I also dig the cream/ivory colored ones), and kinda want to have an SG in my posession (thanks to Zappa!). I have read all the positive reviews of Agiles on here, but few mention the Valkyrie...I'm a little worried that it is in the lower end of their price range, so I'm wondering how the hardware/electronics/fit and finish are....I'm aware it's not going to be crazy high end, but I'd like it to be useable (even though I may swap out some parts). Any opinions? Also, what parts would you recommend swapping out? Would an Epiphone be a better deal in terms of fit and finish and stock parts?
This is another classic in Fender's guitar roster. The Squier by Fender, Vintage Modified '51 is another example of how phenomenal Fender is as a company. This guitar is capable of producing versatile tones because of the SH pickup configuration and rotary pickup selector. The neck of this guitar is C-shaped which makes string bending easy as you like. This guitar has a strat body shape which adds to its cool, classic look.
3. Peavey Vypyr VIP 2 40-watt 1x12 ($199): This amp is an all-in-one powerhouse, equally capable of handling electric guitar, bass and acoustic all in one amp. Not only is it capable of effects modeling, it can also handle instrument modeling, giving the player access to acoustic, violin, bass and many other stringed instruments. As far as effects go, it boasts more than 25 effects with controllable parameters and with over 40 watts of power, it’s even ideal for rehearsal.

The U130 Bass Amplifier pumped out 130 watts with five inputs covering two channels (high and low each) and one input that bridged both channels. Channel 1 had volume with push/pull high boost, bass, middle and treble contour controls. Channel 2 had volume, bass and treble controls. Both channels had master volumes, plus two, four or eight-ohm output. Cabinet options included the UFO215 with two Univox Pro Mag speakers in a front-loaded horn cabinet, or the U215 with two 15″ Pro Mags in a “tuned duct” reflex cab.
As discussed, Delay pedals add so much more weight to your sound and gives your guitar a doubling effect, which is really useful to make it sound like there’s two guitars on stage. They’re also great for creating psychedelic sounds and experimenting with riffs. Again, you don’t have to dial in big delay effects and can use the pedal subtly to add resonance.
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hey i have a decca guitar 2 pick ups sight body damage. i bought it for 7 us dollars included amp (amp doesnt work).i put probably 50 dollars into repairs on other thing such as new strings. another repair i made was where the neck connects to the body of the guitar someone unscred that plate pulling the guitar apart shoved "wallpaper or tissue box pieces" in it screwed i back together. i cant find any similar guitars like this in shape. but it has the decca trademark. no model numbers or anything. my guess is someone took a fender body and replaced the neck, becausee the neck doesnt line up with the body. there is 1 tone dial 1 volume control 2 pick ups 6 strings a "whammy bar" which is held up by a thick spring about an inch long. the whammy bar does fold back to the guitar wich caused most of the scratches before i recieved this guitar. please email me if you understand what im saying and have something nice to say especially if it is worth more than $7.50. aain my email adress is nuckthebuck@aol.com. my name is Craig Nuckles.
We are going to start with a Fender amplifier. This Mustang I V2 is a 20-watt combo amp that has won over hearts of a lot of players because of its ease of use and versatility. With one channel that has 24 presets and eighteen amp models you won’t be scrambling for diversity. Apart from that, of course, you get some of the major controls like Gain, Volume, Treble, Bass, Master, Preset Select, Modulation Select, Delay/Reverb Select, Save, Exit and Tap Tempo. The size and price of this model really do not do it justice (I mean, don’t make it more pricey but still). You also will find that this amp features USB connectivity, chromatic tuner and black textured vinyl covering with silver grille cloth that accentuates the simple and elegant look of this model. While 20-watt, as you might know, is not much (unless it’s a tube amplifier) this baby is pretty great if you want it for practice.

Guitars come in two basic flavors: acoustic and electric. From a hardware standpoint, electric guitars have more components and doohickeys than do acoustic guitars. Guitar makers generally agree, however, that making an acoustic guitar is harder than making an electric guitar. That’s why, pound for pound, acoustic guitars cost just as much or more than their electric counterparts. Both types follow the same basic approach to such principles as neck construction and string tension, and so they have very similar constructions, despite a sometimes radical difference in tone production.
Now that you have made it through, if you chose to build a guitar, you are probably going to want to make more. Hopefully some of the info as well as links I have provided has helped to get you started in the right direction. Guitar building is fun and chalenging at the same time, and if your like me you will always want to improve your skills and find something else to try out on your next project. I have added some pictures of some of the guitars that I have made down at the bottom so you can see my progression. So here's to having fun and building a piece of art that you don't just have to look at. Though they do look good hung on a wall!

The Kremona “Sofia” model is handmade in Bulgaria as well with a fantastic support staff to answer any questions, so if you have concerns about items made in China, you can lay those concerns aside. The top is cedar, with an authentic bone nut and saddle, and solid African sapele back and sides complete the look for a very pleasing appearance and sound.

My first guitar, bought out of an advert in Kerrang over 20 years ago. I think it was branded "Axe" and it had absolutely nothing good about it. Some sort of MDF body, horribly bowed neck (couldn't be adjusted as the truss rod was broken), high frets everywhere (you could pull them out with your fingernails, fortunately), slipping tuners, hopeless bridge, hopeless nut, everything. Nearly put me off playing before I'd got started.
Clapton himself has repeatedly called Guy “the greatest living guitarist.” Hendrix literally knelt at Buddy’s feet in the late Sixties, the better to study his riffs. Guy’s secret? He combines an old-time blues feel with the technical facility of a modern guitar player. He was a youngster at the legendary Chess Records in early Sixties Chicago. Fresh up from Lettsworth, Louisiana, Guy was some 20 years junior to giants like Muddy Waters and Howlin’ Wolf, yet old enough and gifted enough to share the studio with them.
The Alvarez AG75CE is on the upper range of $500 acoustic guitars. This particular model is a cedar top with rosewood back and sides. It also features scalloped and forward shifted bracing which makes for a bigger sound. Owners of this guitar are posting rave reviews citing it’s quality of build and great tone. The cutaway is a nice feature for those that want to reach the upper register of the guitar, and it looks cool too! It is a grand auditorium body, which does not quite have the bass of a dreadnought but offers a more balanced sound. Great for singing along. This guitar is a great choice for intermediate players looking to not break the bank.Check it out here.
Ibanez are a Japanese musical instrument company. Although Yamaha is a better known Japanese musical instrument company, Ibanez exceeds expectations for electric guitars. This brand of guitars stands out in the world of rock guitars. They gained popularity in the 1980s when they introduced their original designs for guitars based on Steve Vai’s JEM Universal. Their designs have since become some of the biggest selling metal guitars. The Ibanez guitars are used by guitarists such as Steve Vai, Paul Gilbert, and Joe Satriani. In addition, Ibanez guitars tend to be very affordable, giving you a great guitar for a cheaper price.
The strings movement moves the magnetic field creating current in the coil of the pickup. The string does not create the current the movement does. If you placed a solenoid beneath the pickup and moved the pickup you would also create a current in the coil. If you took the strings off the guitar, and held a hammer head over the pickup and activated the solenoid you would get a current in the coil.
Similar to the hollow body, the semi-hollow body has more resonance than a solid body. However, semi-hollow guitars are designed with a solid center wood block that adds stability and sustain, and helps cut down on feedback. Many blues players like the warmth of the semi-hollow and the increased attack and sustain offered by the center block. Semi-hollow guitars can be great for a wide variety of music - from blues and jazz to punk rock.
Rule 1 - There is a logical order for groups of effects. Some effects remove or add certain amount of frequencies, some change the basic shape of the audio waveform, and others react to the shape and amplitude of the waveform. Those are three main types of effects that logically can't come in any other order than they were just listed, or you end up with amateur results. The reason for that becomes clear in the next rules.

That said, information regarding Asian-guitar production from the 1970s and early 1980s is cloudy at best. Most lower-end Lotus-branded guitars were produced by either Samick or other factories in Korea or Indonesia. However, some of the higher-end Lotus instruments were built by the Cort factory in Korea or by one of three factories in Japan: Yamaki, Matsumoku, and Moridaira.
The instruments have been set up at the factory. However, time, temperature, and transportation are a few of the many things that can cause a guitar to go out of "intonation". We recommend that you get your new guitar set up by a qualified luthier upon delivery. We recommend taking it to a qualified guitar tech for a set up. They will adjust the neck and bridge to take out the buzzing. We ensure that before shipment there is no evident of fret buzz before shipment and the guitar plays beautifully since our professional guitar technicians inspect each instrument by hand, then perform a full, and precision setup. All brand new guitars need proper setup after shipment to suit your personal preference that would strongly correlate to your playing style. We believe that your Local Guitar Shop can properly and safely adjust the truss rod and setup the guitar correctly for issues of fret buzz and bow neck. Truss rod adjustments are made to alter the straightness (flatness) of the neck. Truss rods often require adjusting when temperature and humidity change the amount of bow in the neck. Weather, specifically temperature and humidity, may have a dramatic impact on the way your instrument plays. All instrument woods expand and contract with seasonal actuations in temperature and humidity, and naturally, string height and playing action are affected. The neck needs a simple truss rod adjustment to correct any problems like fret buzz and bow neck which can be easily done by guitar experts. And also, you may adjust the bar of bridge. Please be advised that guitar necks are crafted from wood, and they will sometimes shift during shipping and as the temperature/humidity/elevation changes. An important part of maintaining your guitar is knowing how to adjust the truss rod. When a guitar experiences temperature and humidity swings, such as when seasons change, it can develop a slight bow in the neck that results in a guitar that plays buzzy or is suddenly much harder to fret. If this situation occurs, you can often correct the problem simply by tightening or loosening the truss rod.

This package features an iconic electric guitar—The Les Paul— paired with a great little practice amplifier, the Electar-10, and quality accessories. The Epiphone Les Paul Special II is a versatile guitar that feels comfortable covering most any major style, including rock, blues, punk, classic rock and more. The guitar features a dual humbucker pickup configuration. The package also includes a tuner (very important), guitar picks and free online lessons to get you playing right away. A cable, strap and gig bag complete the package.


Inspirational, motivational and light background tune with beautiful and atmospheric melody. Good production audio for the slideshow, presentation, youtube, advertising, business project, motivational and successful videos, inspiring moments, bright achievements, film scores. I used electric guitar, muted guitar, piano, staccato strings, bass, drums, Glock, bright pads.

The Hi Flyer guitar and bass would be offered pretty much until the end, in ’77. At some point after, probably around ’73 or ’74, the plastic logo was changed to an outline decal logo. Also, at some point the pickups were changed to the distinctive twin-coil humbuckers with metal sides and a see-through pink insert on top. These changes most certainly occurred by the ’76 catalog, when the Hi Flyers were available in four finishes – sunburst (U1815, U1815B), white (U1816, U1816B), black (U1817, U1817B) and a cool natural with maple fingerboard and black dots (U1818, U1818B).
Description: Body: Nato - Body Construction: Solid - Neck Attachment: Neck-through - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 3 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25" (64cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Chrome, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, Kluson Tuners - Pickups: Harmony - String Instrument Finish: Bronze, Black
To answer your question directly, yes, but only from a strictly physical point of view. According to guitar enthusiasts, electric units are easier to handle than their counterparts. The main motif for this has to do with the fact that the acoustic models come equipped with what many describe as heavier gauge strings. Because of this feature, their strings are more difficult to pick and press down.
Pickups are transducers that convert the mechanical energy of a vibrating guitar string into electrical energy by way of electromagnetic induction. It is a fundamental concept studied in physics and electronics that a changing magnetic field will generate a current through a coil of wire. The electric guitar pickup uses permanent magnets and pole pieces to form a steady magnetic field in the vicinity of each individual guitar string. An opposite magnetic polarity is induced in the metallic (steel core) guitar string when mounted above its respective pole piece and when the string moves, the otherwise steady magnetic field changes accordingly. Wire is wrapped around the poles thousands of times to form a coil within the magnetic field to pick up an induced current and voltage.
Fender Hot Rod Series Pro Junior III 15W 1x10 Combo - This tube-driven guitar combo with a 10” Eminence vintage-cone speaker reproduces the harmonically complex output and sensitivity to playing synamics that vintage Fender tone hounds love. Dual 12AX7 preamp and EL84 power amp tubes crank out the same celebrated midrange as vintage combos. Fender has updated the Pro Junior III with an external speaker jack, a more legible control panel, and internal tweaks.
As mentioned, most of the ’50s Teisco guitars were heavily influenced by Gibson-style design. At the very end of the decade or just at the dawn of the ’60s, Teisco guitars began to change to double cutaways and exhibit a playful � if slightly frumpy � more Fender-oriented design aesthetic. This was almost in lock-step with American guitar industry trends. Gibson launched its thinline ES-335 in 1958 and, indeed, changed its single-cutaway Les Paul to the double-cutaway SG in ’61. American manufacturers such as Kay and Harmony quickly followed suit. The Teisco change was a part of the guitar Zeitgeist.
Unfortunately, a simple pickup with a single coil of wire is just as good at picking up stray electrical energy from power supplies and other interference, so it generates a certain amount of unwanted, background noise. Some guitars solve this problem using what are known as humbucking pickups. These have two coils of wire, arranged so they capture double the signal from the moving guitar strings to produce a richer sound. Each coil is wired up so any stray "hum" it captures from nearby electrical equipment is canceled out by the other coil. Most guitars have two or more pickups, which create a variety of different effects. Typically, there's one pickup under the bridge of the guitar (where the strings are supported) and another one slightly higher up at the bottom of the "neck" (the part of the guitar that sticks out of the main body).
Lots of people tend to research for months about which is the best electric guitar when what they really need is to get started playing and practicing. Becoming an elite player requires time behind a solid axe picking and strumming. What a beginner needs is an electric that is generally great so they can learn over time what specific nuances they care about, and that's what we discuss and share today...
Description: Guitar Type: Acoustic Bass - Body Size: Grand Concert - Top Wood: Solid Sitka Spruce - Back: Mahogany - Sides: Mahogany - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Nut Width: 43mm - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Binding: Tortoise - Frets: 22 - # of Strings: 4 - Scale Length: 32" (81cm) - Headstock: 2+2 - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Pickups: Fishman Sonicore - EQ/Preamp: Ibanez AEQ-SP2 - String Instrument Finish: High Gloss Natural
If there was any doubt left in the late 1950s that the guitar – not the saxophone – was rock & roll's essential lead instrument, Duane Eddy settled the argument: See his 1958 single "Rebel Rouser," curled with country twang and rippling with tremolo. "Chet Atkins used vibrato in a selective way – Duane Eddy used it to thrash the music," says the Kinks' Dave Davies. The impact of Eddy's hits, like "Forty Miles of Bad Road" and "Peter Gunn," would soon be heard in surf music and guitarists such as Jeff Beck and George Harrison.

There aren’t that many entry-level to mid-priced electric guitars that can meet the demands of heavy use and/or meet the standards of professional musicians, which makes the PRS SE Standard 24 pretty special. Its tag price is friendly enough for beginners and intermediate players yet it’s packed with features that make it a favorite among pro-level guitarists.
As an acoustic guitar player, and not a very good one at that, I'm always looking for some advantages, and by advantages I mean something that will make me sound better, not necessarily play better. So when I heard about a device that can add distortion, or reverb, or echo effects to an acoustic instrument, without needing to plug in to an external amp, I didn't believe it until I saw/heard for myself.
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When it comes to guitar amplifiers, especially the ones that we love here at PMT, “cheap” doesn’t mean poor quality! Thanks to huge leaps in manufacturing processes, stringent quality control and the fact brands really care about the products they create, you can spend far less on an amplifier and musical instrument these days and still get a fantastic, highly playable and superb quality option for your needs.
Wiring: If you chose the optional snap together wiring, then all of our instruments come pre-wired and pre-soldered, so that you can assemble the instrument without needing to do any soldering. You simply snap a few connectors together to complete the electrical connections before you screw down the pickguard, control panel, and output jack plate. This is detailed on the guitar kit wiring and hole drilling description page. If you would prefer to not have your kit pre-wired and pre-soldered, please let us know.
Living Colour’s Vernon Reid agrees but also speaks to a larger shift. He remembers being inspired when he heard Santana on the radio. “There was a culture of guitar playing, and music was central,” adds Reid, 58. “A record would come out and you would hear about that record, and you would make the journey. There was a certain investment in time and resources.”
The Ibanez AFC95 extends the Japanese manufacturer’s reach well into the future whilst remaining true to its roots. The elegantly styled single-cutaway hollowbody is equipped with forward-thinking appointments that extends the tonal versatility of the hollowbody further than ever before. Sublime hardware includes a delightfully nimble ebony fingerboard, whilst the ebony bridge and AFC tailpiece optimise intonation and sustain superbly.
5. Marshall Code 50 1x12 Digital Combo Amp ($249.99): Marshall is the household name of the amp industry and their inclusion on this list was a definite must. The Code 50 boasts more than 100 presets in an easy-to-transport package. As with most of the amps on this list, the Code 50 also includes a mini USB plug-in for ease of recording, headphone capability for practicing late into the night, and even an aux input for jamming along with music on your smartphone. You can even control it directly via Bluetooth and the mobile app. It also delivers 50 watts through a 12-inch speaker so it’s great for practice or rehearsal.

Very good working condition, this guitar is completely playable and in great condition. All electronics function properly without any issue. This guitar contains very minor cosmetic scuffs throughout, typical wear from a used guitar, nothing at all significant, please see pictures. The body, neck and headstock are all straight and contain zero cracks, bends, or bows. This guitar will come exactly as shown with soft gig bag.
A second common problem we encounter is a poor mechanical connection. When inserting a cord into a jack, the click you feel is the tip of the cord seating against the metal prong on the end of the jack. With use this prong may spread outward and loose a bit of it's tension. A gentle bend of the prong may be just enough to create a solid connection, however, metal fatigue can dictate the need to replace.
Polishing the frets is a whole instructable by itself, but I definitely recommend that you do it at least once a year. It makes the guitar look nice, and it gets some of the oxides off the frets(not sure if it really helps anything, but it sounds helpful, right?). Also, the tape pulls out some of the junk in the open pores of the wood(if your fretboard is rosewood).
1946 to present: Sitka spruce (darker than Adirondack). The change to Sitka happened on the larger "D" models first (in very early 1946). It took Martin a little while to use up all the smaller pieces of older Adirondack red spruce, hence the change to Sitka happend slower on the smaller body models. This is also the reason multiple piece Adi red spruce tops are sometimes seen on 0,00,000 bodies in 1946.
The guitar's contribution to the sound comes from its mechanical construction, including the type of wood used, and the pickup system fitted. The hugely popular Fender Stratocaster uses simple single-coil pickups, which tend to give it a bright, articulate sound that doesn't take up too much room in a mix. Guitars with humbucking pickups, on the other hand, tend to have a thicker, more solid sound that can overpower other guitar parts or other mid-range instrument sounds. Tonal qualities aside, humbuckers by their very nature are designed to reject electromagnetic interference, while single-coil pickups are very susceptible to it. Specialist stacked humbuckers, such as those made by Kinman, Dimarzio, Fender and others, are available for use where something close to the original tonality is desired but without the noise problems, and for serious studio work these are a good option. Note that CRT computer monitors emit a lot of electromagnetic radiation from their scan coils, so a flat-screen LCD display is always an advantage if you need to record guitar into a computer system.
Description: Body: Maple - Body Construction: Semi-Hollow (Chambered) - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25" (64cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Adjustable - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Chrome, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch, Kluson Tuners - Pickups: Harmony - String Instrument Finish: Goldburst, Redburst

It’s probably fair to say that drive pedals of all shapes and sizes outnumber the other types of effects. This is due to the fact that they form the backbone of your overall tone. It’s also probably fair to say that it’s one of the most subjective tonal changes you can implement. One man’s muff is another man’s screamer, so to speak. There are certain classics within the genre which may act as a gateway to stronger forms of grit though. Ibanez’ famous green Tubescreamer pedal is used by countless players on account of its versatility, whereby it can form the basis of a good quality blues tone. Or it can complement a distortion pedal by ‘boosting’ or tightening up the signal. Another favourite is the Electro Harmonix Big Muff, which has been used for decades by players looking to add a distinct fuzziness to their tone.
You may love only one style of music. And that’s fine. But try playing some other styles. Funk maestro Carlos Alomar went through hell on David Bowie’s Scary Monsters (and Super Creeps) album, being asked to play more “grinding” guitar alongside Robert Fripp. “It was very interesting,” says Alomar. “I learned a lot and when I came back to my more natural style, I felt really fresh about it.”

1. (n.) A sweet or agreeable succession of sounds.2. (n.) A rhythmical succession of single tones, ranging for the most part within a given key, and so related together as to form a musical whole, having the unity of what is technically called a musical thought, at once pleasing to the ear and characteristic in expression.3. (n.) The air or tune of a musical piece.
The first step in deciphering the serial number is determining the country or facility in which the guitar was produced. In most cases the country of origin is provided in the same location as the serial number. In cases where you have a serial numbe r but not a country of origin, the origin can sometimes be deduced from the serial number, although in this case it's very helpful if you have at least a rough idea of the date of manufacture.
I always say that Jose Feliciano? is indeed one of the greatest guitarists that’s ever lived. Flamenco, latin, bolero, classical, rock ect ect…. You name it and Jose can play it. Why he’s not on Rolling Stone’s 100 greatest guitarist of all time, is beyond anyone’s guess. dont believe me look up on youtube purple haze, the thrill is gone, flight of the bumble bee, Malagueña under Jose Feliciano. the guy can play anything and make it his own.
Overdrive originally resulted from the natural breakup that occurred when a tube amp received an overly hot signal from a guitar. This pushed the tubes to deliver a subtle, warm breakup. Generally overdrive is a more subdued, natural form of distortion. While you don’t have to use an overdrive effect with a tube amp to get a great sound, the combination of the two can produce a rich, pleasing tone that many guitarists prefer. The first overdrive effects were designed to push more signal into a tube amp, giving it the very throaty, mid-range tone associated with Stevie Ray Vaughan. With that in mind, many of today's pedal makers have created circuitry to add that desired tone when used with a solid state amps as well. Since overdrive is a signal boost, adjustments from your volume knob will create a variety of different sounds.

-Would be nice to edit the string colors, add training modes telling you which finger to hit the note with, how many times to play through a sequence (so you learn/memorize the song, vs just respond to the game - i.e is the chorus sequence repeated 4 times before moving onto the next part of the song?),indicating strumming patterns to help with timing (newbies tend to down pick everything and just pick faster when the notes are closer vs switching to an up-down strum) etc.
MusicPCB.com – offers PCB projects to build guitar and bass effects, and synth modules. All PCBs are professionally manufactured, and include soldermask, a silkscreened component legend, and plated through holes and pads. They are designed to be easy to build, provide simple and clean wiring, to work well with your other pedals, modules, and instruments, and most of all to sound great and provide sounds and features not available in commercial designs. Each PCB comes with a PDF document with wiring diagram, schematic, build notes, and large modding sections with details on how to perform a variety of mods to tailor the design to your needs/taste.
Now that we’re done with the construction, let me discuss the pivotal aspect of playability itself. Having conducted scores of guitar lessons both online and offline, I am for one well aware of the fact that it only takes a few tiresome sessions with a bulky, full size guitar to scare them away from their lessons forever! Therefore, your first ever guitar choice is extremely important. A beginner’s guitar needs to be user-friendly and high on playability. On both these accounts, the Davisson Full Size Black Electric Guitar scores high. Not only is it lightweight and comfortable to wrap your fingers around, but also has a very neat and simplistic design to enables beginners for learning faster. The presence of a single Humbucker Pickup and the invariable absence of a pickup toggle, is not a hindrance but in fact a positive aspect of getting your grasp over your first electric guitar.
We have already covered one Behringer reverb, which was the epitome of affordable and functional simplicity. However, this brand has a couple more aces up their sleeve, including the more advanced RV600 (click for full review). What this pedal offers is a significantly more versatile solution that brings you additional flexibility at a bargain price.
In this section we look at the overall performance of the guitar. How does it feel to play and what does it sound like? The ultimate sound you achieve will largely depend on the amp you play through, but the guitar itself will play a huge part in sounding good. Do the pickups give enough clarity? How comfortable is the neck to get up and down? Is it built for speed? The more expensive a guitar, the better the performance should be, and this is taken into consideration when rating it.
In addition to pickup selection, most guitars will have controls for volume and tone. Volume controls simply regulate the strength of the output signal. Depending on the amplifier, this can control the tone as well as the volume. Most tone knobs control high frequencies and many guitars have separate tone controls for each pickup. This can vary a guitar’s sound between soft, warm, and mellow to a very bright, raw, distorted sound.
More and more are finding themselves downsizing their pedalboards, if not totally swapping all their stompboxes for a multi-effects unit. There are also many who are looking to upgrade their existing guitar processor. Whatever your case may be, it is our intention to help you find one that fits your needs, or at least point you to the right direction.
Electronic instruments are well known for their great versatility and all of the amazing sounds that they can produce. In many cases, those effects all come down to skillful use of the right pedals by a talented musician. When you're equipping your pedalboard, some of the first units you should look at are delay and reverb effects pedals. Delay pedals enable you to put a note on a timer and have it come back a few measures later. They're perfect for holding off a chord, then having it kick back in with a new sound layered in on top of it for cool combination effects. For example, you might mix a long, sustained note together with a more complex riff to briefly become your own rhythm guitarist. You can play a chord against itself to double up into a deeper, richer tone, or even simulate an echo for atmospheric effect.
The simplicity and ergonomic design of the Pacifica PA012 body mirrors that of the PAC112. It is also available in exciting colors to match it perfectly to the player preference. Tonewood for PA012 as specified on the Yamaha catalog can either be in alder, nato or agathis, while the PAC112 is only made in alder wood. Neck for both guitars are made in maple with a satin finish then it is overlaid by a 22 medium frets rosewood fingerboard marked by inlay dots.
More information on Ovation can be obtained from Walter Carter’s book, The History of the Ovation Guitar (Hal Leonard, ’96), although solidbody electrics are not the primary focus, and some inconsistencies exist between the text and the model tables (when in doubt, the text seems to be more reliable). Except for using Carter’s book to confirm some dates and a few details, most of the information presented here was gathered independently prior to publication of that book.

Another option would be to instead buy a mobile guitar interface and download one of the many guitar apps available, but I typically don’t recommend this for beginners. These apps are very robust, and can be a little overwhelming for someone just starting out. First learn how the controls on a real amp affect your tone. Once you’ve grasped these basics (and acquired some basic guitar skills), you can think about buying some fancy apps and effects.
Great website and very informative on readers experiences with Martin guitars. My 1995 Martin HD 35 has been nothing but a problem child since purchased new. The truss rod is frozen and the low e is fully 4/32 above the fret board at the 12th fret..nearly impossible to play fingerstyle. I bought a pak of new bone saddle material from the Martin 1833 shop and lowered it to playable height by making a new saddle…easier to play but considerable difference in tone experienced. String angle at the bridge changed I guess the tonal quality.
Now, in the days of solid state signal processing, outboard units are available to produce a facsimile of the old tube-type distortion. Some units actually incorporate a vacuum tube and do it the old way. Other electronics packages simulate the effect. The "tube-type" distortion is preferrable to many over the kind of distortion produced by solid-state amplifiers because the tubes just gradually rounded over the peaks as they went into distortion, whereas the solid state devices just chop off the tops of the peaks cleanly at the supply voltage point, producing a harsh distortion. One type of distortion device, employed as a distortion pedal, was called a "fuzz box".
This axe is no slave to the past, however, starting with Leo’s PTB™ (Passive Treble and Bass) system which functions on all three pickups for dramatically more variety than the vintage setup. What’s more, the Legacy features a Leo Fender-designed Dual-Fulcrum vibrato, a work of engineering art which allows bending up or down with unsurpassed stability, while offering a silky feel through its beefy aluminum vibrato arm. The Legacy’s hard-rock maple neck features an easy-playing satin finish, while its 12” radius lets you bend notes deeply and its Plek-dressed medium-jumbo nickel frets deliver silky playability. The moment you open the luxurious deluxe Tolex hardshell case, you’ll be greeted with a stunning instrument and delicious aroma that’ll have your pulse racing.
View tab notation as a representation of the guitar's strings. A tab is usually written using six horizontal lines, each corresponding with a string on the guitar. The bottom line represents the lowest, thickest string, while the top string represents the highest, thinnest string. For standard tunings, this means that the lines will represent, from the bottom up, the low E, A, D, G, B and high E strings.
I am old enough to remember Kay guitars back in the 70's. And what I remember of playing them is they were poorly put together, poor action (like mile high action), poor sounding pickups etc...They also seemed to always be the guitars that were the cheapest in all the mom n' pop stores, and the ones that were just sold to students, if they were sold at all. In other words, 

A. Many professional musicians invest thousands of dollars in high-end guitars made from expensive and rare tonewoods. A $100 student guitar made from spruce is not going to produce that level of tonality regardless of the player’s skill level. As a beginner, your main focus should be on skills such as chord formation, fretting techniques, and basic scales. Improving tonality and performance are long-term goals.
Every year we bring a new opening act on tour with us, and every year I have the harsh task of going on stage after some of the finest players in the business. This summer’s tour was no exception. With Montgomery Gentry in the support slot of the Toby Keith Biggest and Baddest tour, I had my work cut out for me. Two of the best axe slingers the music scene has to offer—Frank Bowers and Bo “two-timechampion” Garrett—have some of the greatest chops and sounds on the circuit today.
If a player uses a separate preamplifier and power amplifier, she or he can buy a power amplifier intended for a sound reinforcement system or PA system or pick a power amplifier designed specifically for bass instruments. These preamps and power amps come in two formats: 19 inch rack-mountable units and units with their own wood or metal case. If a player uses a rackmountable preamp and power amp, these units and any effect units, such as an audio compressors, can be mounted in 19" rack mount road cases for safe transport. When a bass player selects a variety of different preamps, effects units and a power amp and puts them all in a rackmount case, this setup is colloquially called a "bass rig". Amp heads with their own wood or metal case may use many of the same appearance and transportation-oriented design features used on combo amps. For example, if a bass amp head is designed with a wooden case, it will typically have a vinyl, felt or sturdy fabric (or painted coating) to protect the wood case during transport; a carry handle; and corner protectors.

Amp Modeling: A multi-effects pedal does not necessarily guarantee that it also includes amp modeling. Amp modeling basically means that, in addition to effects like reverb, delay, chorus, fuzz, distortion, compression, et al. it also has the ability to sound like - or model - various tube and solid-state guitar or bass amplifiers. Amps have a tremendous impact on tone, which is why brands like Marshall, Vox, Fender, Matchless, Mesa Boogie, and many others have cult followings. Copying the true character of an amp in the digital world is admittedly a tall order, and one that multi-effects pedals are not great at; even the best ones struggle. Still, they do a decent-enough job, and you should decide if you want your multi-effects pedal to include amp modeling.
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Why Martin electric guitars have never been more popular isn’t too hard to figure out. Martin, whose expertise has always been in top-notch acoustics, never really put a lot of effort into marketing its electrics. They were always well made, and, especially in the necks, clearly “Martins.” In the final analysis, however, it probably comes down to being victims of the success of their acoustic brothers, and players have just never seemed to warm up to the idea of Martin “electric” guitars. For the savvy collector with a taste for quality and relative rarity, Martin electrics remain excellent and attainable prizes.
This should give you an idea of when the majority of the production for any one model occured (majority meaning more than 5 instruments per year). Note this does not mean a model can not exist outside of these years - it certainly can. Just these are the years recorded by Martin in their ledgers. Note this list (for the most part) does not go past 1969.
The Vox Show Room shows the classic amps behind the British Explosion of sound in the 60's. VOX, at one time was one of the largest musical instrument producers in the world and their products were utilized by almost every major music group during the nineteen sixties. From The Shadows to The Beatles to U2, VOX is the "voice" of generations of musicians worldwide.
Starting in the early '90s, music gear manufacturers began developing digital effects models that aimed to re-create the sounds generated by classic effects, instruments, and vintage amplifiers. This technology quickly expanded to include models of revered amplifier heads, speaker cabinets, microphones, and even specific microphone placements. Many amps and multi-effects units today incorporate a wide range of models, often grouped into categories such as stompboxes, amps, and mics. Over the last decade, Line 6, one of the leaders in this field, has even created guitars and basses that contain modeled sounds of famous vintage instruments. As the technology has grown more sophisticated, models have become more realistic, often very closely resembling the gear on which they’re based.

I bought a Yamaha EC-10 classical at a garage sale for $5.00. It was still in the cardboard box and never played according to the seller. The guitar is full size and looks cool and has real good volume and good bass, but I'd still like to get more bass out of it. I'm thinking of making some modifications to my guitar so that I can fit it with actual bass guitar strings, nylon ones. A friend of mine said I'd wreck up my guitar if I did this. Would I wreck the guitar putting bass strings on it or could I make a bass out of it?

If you play with your guitar’s tone controls all the way up, your tone is going to be trebly and bright — possibly even painfully shrill at high volumes. To get a handle on their range, get a clean sound cooking out of your amp and play at every numeral stop on your instrument’s tone pot dial. And for multi-pickup models, do that for each individual pickup and all the blended settings. Find a few positions you like, and while playing a tune you know by heart, roll to different settings for verses, choruses and solos and see how tonally diverse and interesting things become. On stage this can be a very impressive way to create fresh sounds — subtle, but noticeable — without relying on pedals or amp channel switching.


Folks, it's not a Fender that you're buying here. It's a kids guitar made to the scale of little hands. It will hold a tune once you stretch the strings and intonate it. The amp is a little muddy sounding, but that can be corrected by adjusting the volume levels on the amp and guitar. Don't expect Line6 quality! The wood on the neck we received was actually a very good looking cut of wood. Overall, I'm happy with it.
Flamenco technique, in the performance of the rasgueado also uses the upstroke of the four fingers and the downstroke of the thumb: the string is hit not only with the inner, fleshy side of the fingertip but also with the outer, fingernail side. This was also used in a technique of the vihuela called dedillo[40] which has recently begun to be introduced on the classical guitar.

The lowest note on the double bass or four-stringed electric bass is E1, two octaves below middle C (approximately 41 Hz), and on a five-string it is B0 (approximately 31 Hz).[22] The requirement to reproduce low frequencies at high sound pressure levels means that most loudspeakers used for bass guitar amplification are designed around large diameter, heavy-duty drivers, with 10", 12" and 15" being most common. Less commonly, larger speakers (e.g., 18") or smaller speakers (e.g., the 8x8" cabinet, which contains eight 8" speakers) may be used. As a general rule, when smaller speakers are used, two or more of them are installed in a cabinet (e.g., 2x10", 4x10" and 8x8"). For 12" speakers, combo amps and cabinets are available with 1x12" and 2x12"; less commonly, 4x12" cabinets are seen. For 15" speakers, combo amps and cabinets usually have 1x15", although 2x15" and even 4x15" cabinets exist (Lemmy Kilmeister of Motorhead used 4x15" cabinets). A small number of 1x18" bass cabinets are sold (e.g., Trace Elliot).
A good question to consider at this point: What the absolute darkest tone you’d ever want from your guitar? I know the two times I’m likeliest to lower the tone pot are when I want a dark, jazzy neck pickup sound, and when I’m trying to get a clarinet-like sound using an EBow. These next examples show how the various caps behave in those situations. We’ll go from lowest value (minimum treble cut) to highest (maximum treble cut).

Hybrid amps are a strange beast. As the name suggests, they combine multiple technologies to produce a unique hybrid amp experience. They may use the digital front end of a modeling amp with a tube-based power stage, or a tube preamp with a solid-state power amp. The benefits of this style of lesser-seen amp is that you can sometimes get the best of both worlds, with the awesome tone of a tube amp, but with the processing power of a solid-state amp. These amps tend to be cheaper than tube amps and generally easier to maintain.


Even though the Orange Amps were still neither of the Top of of all lists because the Fender and the Marshall are amongst well known amplifiers for its individual claims in both patent and innovated in each technologies, (Fender corporation claims its first solid body elecric guitar to been market in mass productions and patents, whilst the other one Marshall claims either in terms truest guitar amplifications that also in mass production, so on Marshall claims a patent innovation itself and both of them were been a major direct suppliers on every famous music artists in every decades of music revolutions, on the other hands, the top spots of their hardship innovations were be at their hands, until to theIR last steps of their innovations, let the famous artists decide their demand at their hands whilst on the other side, Orange produces amps with considering a reasonable market on its considerably fine quality products because, the top spots were be still at working, and it means, ...more
Quirks? Some. The old Rola was kind of tired, so I saved it and put in a new Jensen Mod I had laying around (not a bad little speaker, but not a vintage Jensen, either…expect a future upgrade). The 7F7’s are supposed to be very loud and micro-phonic (which was why we don’t tend to see them in guitar amps after the mid-late 40’s), but this one sounds just fine. And they’re cheap, so it’s not like you’re hunting down good EL86’s or anything. Also, one thing that took some getting used to was the tone knob is backwards by contemporary standards. That is, turn the creamy chickenhead to the left, you get more treble (and more drive and volume). Turn to the right, and it gets very bassy and like a chewy jazzy tone.
When the Fender company invented the first widely produced electric bass guitar (the Fender Precision Bass) they also developed a bass amplifier, the Fender Bassman, first produced in 1952. This was a 26-watt tube amplifier with a single 15" speaker. In 1954, the Bassman was redesigned to use four 10" speakers. This speaker cabinet was an open-back design; as such, it had poor low-frequency efficiency and was prone to blowing speakers when used for bass because of the lack of damping. Somewhat ironically, it became very popular as an electric guitar amplifier. The circuit design also underwent repeated modifications. The "5F6A" circuit introduced in 1958 is regarded as a classic amplifier design and was copied by many other manufacturers, such as Marshall.
If you're anything like me, you started out with a basic beginner's guitar, and over time you realized that you were ready for something better. I had a Squier Telecaster(standard series) and I was ready for a change. I was set on a Les Paul of some sort, possibly a used LP Standard. I read tons of reviews, then I started reading some of the Epi Les Pauls(the nicer ones, $400-500).
The Original Blackout humbuckers are designed to be everything metal, handling thick rhythm play and well-defined lead melodies at higher speeds. The tone has an almost shimmering quality, especially on a clean amp setting. The tone profile of both the neck and the bridge version of this pickup emphasize treble with a hollowed out mid-range that helps give you the best of searing leads and heavy power chords.
We spent 46 hours on research, videography, and editing, to review the top choices for this wiki. If you want to become a real guitar hero, you'll need the right ax. Our selection of electric guitars includes something for everyone, from simple, inexpensive options best suited for beginners to top-tier models coveted by amateur and professional musicians alike. We've ranked them all here by playability, tonal range, durability, and style. When users buy our independently chosen editorial picks, we may earn commissions to support our work. Skip to the best electric guitar on Amazon.
The first Hagstrom electrics actually came to the U.S. beginning about 1959, carrying the Goya name imported by New York’s Hershman (Goya acoustics were made by Levin, also in Sweden). These were the now-legendary sparkle-covered hollowbody “Les Pauls” with the modular pickup units. However, while the Goya acoustics continued on in the ’60s (eventually to be distributed by Avnet, the owners of Guild in the late ’60s), the Hagstrom electrics took on their own identity and switched to Merson. The first Hagstrom I guitars were the little vinyl-covered mini-Strats with the “swimming pool” pickup assemblies – basically two single-coil pickups mounted in a molded plastic assembly looking like its nickname, with sliding on-off switches and the Hagstrom fulcrum vibrato (which was also used on early Guild solidbodies). These were followed by similar wood-bodied Hagstrom IIs, then the quasi-SG Hagstrom IIIs in the ’60s. Hagstrom electrics continued to be imported by Merson through most of the ’60s, but by the ’70s distribution had switched to Ampeg, which was responsible for the Swedes, and several thinlines, some of which were designed by Jimmy D’Aquisto. Hagstrom hung around until the early ’80s before disappearing.

If your instrument receives regular maintenance, then you are likely to avoid any unneeded guitar setup cost. A properly cared for guitar will be regularly cleaned, oiled, and treated gently at all times. Of course, this is not possible for all people, as their preferred style of music may negate the ability to treat a guitar gently (metal and punk are good examples). Having the guitar setup can be thought of as maintenance in itself, as it is an invariable need in environments that have inconsistent weather patterns (which would be virtually all of them). The cost of a guitar setup can be insignificant if you maintain it on a regular basis.


Gibson guitars are the produce of the Gibson Guitar Corporation which produces guitars and other musical instruments which sell under a variety of brand names. Gibson Guitar Corporation was founded in the year 1890 by Orville Gibson in USA. It is a mass producer of the Guitars and is the most widely used guitars in the world. Gibson guitars are exported all over the world and are considered as one of the best guitar brands in the world. Gibson Guitars actually are the giant guitar company which also owns other brands of guitars. Some of the popular brands which are owned by Gibson are Baldwin, Epiphone, Kramer, Maestro, Slingerlands etc.
Overdrive distortion is the most well known of all distortions. Although there aren't many electronic differences between a distortion an overdrive, the main audible one is that a distortion does exactly as the name suggests; distorts and clips the signal no matter what volume is going through it, the amount of distortion usually remains relatively the same. This is where an overdrive differs. Most overdrives are built to emulate the sound of a tube amp overdriving and therefore give the player control of the clipping through dynamics. This simply means that the effect gives a clean sound for quieter volumes and a more clipped or distorted sound for louder volumes.
Experience Rockstar Games' critically acclaimed open world game, Grand Theft Auto V. When a young street hustler, a retired bank robber and a terrifying psychopath find themselves entangled with some of the most frightening and deranged elements of the criminal underworld, the U.S. government and the entertainment industry, they must pull off a series of dangerous heists to survive in a ruthless city in which they can trust nobody, least of all each other. Explore the stunning world of Los Santos and Blaine County in the ultimate Grand Theft Auto V experience, featuring a range of technical upgrades and enhancements for new and returning players. In addition to increased draw distances and higher resolution, players can expect a range of additions and improvements including: New weapons, vehicles and activities Additional wildlife Denser traffic New foliage system Enhanced damage and weather effects, and much more Grand Theft Auto V also comes with Grand Theft Auto Online, the dynamic and ever-evolving Grand Theft Auto universe with online play for up to 30 players, including all existing gameplay upgrades and content released since the launch of Grand Theft Auto Online. Rise through the ranks to become a CEO of a criminal empire by trading contraband or form a motorcycle club and rule the streets; pull off complex co-operative Heists or enter radical, adrenaline-fueled Stunt Races; compete in unique Adversary modes; or create your own content to play and share with the Grand Theft Auto Community.
Yes, most of them are very useful! These days there are hundreds of online tutors offering great guitar lessons. And there’s no need to throw your money at the first offer you see, as a lot of quality instructional and tutorial videos are completely free on platforms such as YouTube. Generally, paid courses tend to be better because they are tested and are well-structured, and – in theory – you should be able to progress faster. But it all depends on your budget and on your will to learn on your own.

To answer your question directly, yes, but only from a strictly physical point of view. According to guitar enthusiasts, electric units are easier to handle than their counterparts. The main motif for this has to do with the fact that the acoustic models come equipped with what many describe as heavier gauge strings. Because of this feature, their strings are more difficult to pick and press down.
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For many guitarists, the only thing better than a Gibson Les Paul is a vintage Gibson Les Paul. From stunning museum-quality pieces from the '50s to road warrior axes from the Norlin era of Gibson production in the '70s, there are fresh Les Pauls added to this page every day including Les Paul Standards, Customs, Juniors, and more. Whether you're a veteran Gibson collector or a new inductee to the ranks of Les Paul fandom, you can find your next vintage LP here.

Albert Lee‘s extensive use of the Telecaster earned him the nickname of “Mr. Telecaster”. His acolyte Ronnie Earl (then still Ronnie Earl Horvath) favored a Telecaster during his tenure with Roomful of Blues. Both John Tichy and Bill Kirchen of Commander Cody and his Lost Planet Airmen wielded Teles, as did Chris Hillman and Gram Parsons with the Flying Burrito Brothers. Hugh Cornwell of The Stranglers has used Telecasters throughout his career. Joe Strummer (frontman of the punk band The Clash) used his worn and battered 1966 Telecaster (originally Sunburst but spray painted black) with its distinctive “Ignore Alien Orders” sticker from the beginning of his musical career until the day he died. In January 2007, Fender issued the G. E. Smith signature Telecaster in honor of Smith’s reputation as a modern master of the Telecaster. G.E. Smith was the lead guitarist in the Hall & Oates band and the musical director of Saturday Night Live. Tom Morello of “Rage Against The Machine” plays a black American Telecaster called “Sendero Luminoso” (Shining Path) for songs in drop-D tuning. Jim Root from Slipknot had a signature Telecaster released in 2009. Prince plays a Telecaster in the opening scene of his film, Purple Rain. Singer and Songwriter Jeff Buckley (Son of musician Tim Buckley) played an American Telecaster throughout his career. Lynval Golding, one of the guitarists for 2-Tone band The Specials, used a yellow telecaster throughout his time as a Special. Jonny Greenwood, lead guitarist of Radiohead uses a Telecaster Plus model with lace sensor pickups as his main guitar. British singer and guitar player Anna Calviexclusively plays a Telecaster through a Vox AC30. Danny Jones, of McFly, uses a Telecaster Vintage ’52. Deryck Whibley (frontman and guitarist of the band Sum 41) uses his own signature Telecaster Deluxe, issued in 2005. It features one knob for volume and tone, a single humbucker pickup near the synchronized six-saddle bridge and without the traditional pickup selector switch.


Although this multi-effects pedal is powerful and full of features, it doesn't mean that you’ll have to face those awkward manual reading moments. The ME-70 is like a simple stomp box, each effect section has knob-based controls which makes it easy to dial tones. Similarly, whenever you need to add any effect; just kick press on one of the four foot-switches to fire up the game.
and i dont know how the new ones are, but the only ones, though called AD3000, they weren't like the other 3000 series guitars Agile offered. back then, they came with maple necks. they also came with 3 or 4 piece bodies, while AL3000/3100 etc came with 2. this came with a matching headstock, which only the 4000 series offered....so its almost as if the AD3000 was a missing link between the different series of guitars....

Vox quickly grew. In 1964 Tom Jennings, to raise capital for JMI's expansion, sold controlling interest in JMI to the Royston Group, a British holding company, and sold American rights to the California-based Thomas Organ Company. Displeased with the direction his old company was taking, he left the company in 1967, which was around the same time that Marshall overtook Vox as the dominant force in the British guitar amplifier market. While Royston's Vox Sound Equipment division set up new operations in the Kent town of Erith, Tom Jennings set up a new company in his old Dartford location, joined later by Dick Denney. Jennings Electronic Industries operated for several years, making an updated and rebadged version of the AC30 along with other amplifiers, as well as a new range of organs.
Get a custom drawn guitar or bass wiring diagram designed to your specifications for any type of pickups, switching and controls and options. Just complete the guitar wiring diagram order form with your custom specifications and our designers will do the rest. Our custom diagrams are easy to read, affordable and delivered by email for FREE! To order a custom diagram, select the number of pickups on your instrument below and complete the diagram order form.
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In addition to pickup selection, most guitars will have controls for volume and tone. Volume controls simply regulate the strength of the output signal. Depending on the amplifier, this can control the tone as well as the volume. Most tone knobs control high frequencies and many guitars have separate tone controls for each pickup. This can vary a guitar’s sound between soft, warm, and mellow to a very bright, raw, distorted sound.
For years, Schecter has provided a nice counterpoint to the various Les Paul and Strat look-a-likes on the market (many of which are very good) at an affordable pricepoint. As my local guitar shop owner once said, for the money, they might make the best all around guitar south of $1,000. You can spend more than that, but the point is, they don’t skimp downrange.
We selected this guitar as our Top Pick because it’s an instrument that could suit anybody. It has everything you need from your electric guitar and it’s easy to play. A good classic that will stay with you for many years to come. It suits both beginners and guitarists who have been playing for a while. True, a professional guitarist would buy something pricier, but if you’re not super picky this guitar will do perfectly well!

Anytime you hear a screaming or raunchy sounding harmonic by way of loads of gain come jumping out of your speakers, it’s likely a result of pinch harmonics. Pinch harmonics follow the same basic idea of harmonics, except this time the contact is made with the skin of your pick hand thumb right after picking a note. Where you do this determines the pitch of the harmonic.
Of course, the big news was the introduction of the Spectrum 5. This had a slim, highly contoured body with a pointed upper horn pointing up and a hooked lower horn. The body featured a German carve relief along the edge. The head was the new hooked kind from ’64-65, while inlays were triangular “picks,” sort of like Kays of the time. Pickguards were two-part plastic covering the entire area under the strings, with volume and tone controls and stereo and mono jacks. The “vegematic” push-buttons came in five groovy colors.
Beginning about 1975, Hoshino began introducing original guitar and bass models to the market. At first, their original designs were subtle variations on the copy models. For example, the "Custom Agent" (model 2405) was basically a Les Paul with a fancy scroll headstock, a fancy pick guard, and, yes, fancy inlays on the neck and body. The Professional model 2671 was a Les Paul with a "vined" neck and a fancy headstock. But soon, the overall shapes of the guitars changed, and models known as the "Weir" (after Bob Weir of the Grateful Dead), "Artist" and "Musician" were introduced. By 1978, Hoshino had ceased production of all of its copy models and was truly producing 100% original designs. These guitars are not just beautiful, but are some of the best crafted guitars of all time, by any manufacturer, and represent the pinacle of guitar-making skill and quality.
Agreed too that almost any guitar will benefit from a good setup, but there's no getting around plywood and cheap pickups. If I pick up a guitar and the action is so bad you need vice grips to play it, it can't speak well for the manufacturer. Yes, you can make plywood sing I suppose, but I can make mahogany, adler, korina, maple or just about any other wood sing a heck of a lot easier than plywood.
According to the official information Guitar Tricks has more than double the number of song lessons than any other guitar learning site. It goes on to say that there are more than 600 but I feel that the number could be even higher by now because new songs are added regularly. The songs available on Guitar Tricks are the ones that I want to learn, oldies and modern songs from major artists like The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, Eagles, Blink-182, Extreme, Good Charlotte and many more. Check out this list of Guitar Tricks Artists. Did I mention that lots of songs have a beginner and an advanced level lesson? I just love that the advanced level songs are taught based on the original arrangement and not some vague resemblance used to avoid copyright issues. This is because Guitar Tricks has licenses for teaching the original songs.
The 2008 Les Paul Standard is outfitted with locking tuners from Grover, which deliver ease of use through a standard tuner and positive locking mechanism that securely locks each string in place. Simply insert each string through the string hole, turn the dial on the bottom of the tuner to lock the string, and begin tuning. Each string can be tuned to pitch in less than one complete revolution of the post. These Grover machine heads feature completely sealed components with an improved 18:1 tuning ratio.
I just recently started to try to" really learn" to play guitar. I've known a few "not too difficult" songs for years. Now at 45yrs. old I bought a couple of cord books and it's bittersweet. It's such a wonderful feeling to play songs all the way to the end with a friend of mine who told me years ago that I had a good natural musical ability. I've learned more in 3 or 4 months than in 25 years. But enough about that... I was handed a jumbo GUILD from I believe around the early 70's. I've never heard anything like it. I must have one!!!
The Ibanez AFC95 extends the Japanese manufacturer’s reach well into the future whilst remaining true to its roots. The elegantly styled single-cutaway hollowbody is equipped with forward-thinking appointments that extends the tonal versatility of the hollowbody further than ever before. Sublime hardware includes a delightfully nimble ebony fingerboard, whilst the ebony bridge and AFC tailpiece optimise intonation and sustain superbly.
Blend potentiometers (essentially two potentiometers ganged on the same shaft) allow blending together two pickups in varying degrees. The operation is the same as in a balance control found in stereo equipment – in the middle position (often marked with a detent) both pickups supply their full output, and turning the pot in either direction gradually attenuates one of the pickups while leaving the other at full output.[13][29]
While larger frets do seem to result in a rounder tone, perhaps with increased sustain too, they also yield a somewhat less precise note than narrower frets—at least, as examined “under the microscope.” Unless it is very precisely shaped, and frequently dressed, the broad crown of that jumbo fret can “blur” your note ever so slightly, which might even be part of the sonic appeal for some players—the way, for example, a tweed Deluxe is a little blurrier or hairier at most volume settings than a blackface Deluxe. Be aware, however, that the phenomenon can work against some sonic goals too.
On entering a studio, some guitarists ask if they should leave off the effects they normally use and add them in later. Of course, this can be done; however, if the effects are integral to the desired sound and you are ‘playing’ the effect as much as you are the instrument – fuzzboxes, heavy spring reverb, long delays and so on – it might be difficult to create the right feel during the take without them. If there is uncertainty as to whether the effects are spot-on, split the signal to retain the option of reworking the sound during the mixing process.
Presuming it is at least theoretically possible to digitally document in computational language every nuance of Eddie Van Halen's performance, the other aspect on the rendering side of the best-most-real equation is the guitar - from the pick or fingers on the strings, to the resonance of the wood body, the dynamics of pickups, the amps, the effects and such other processing gear.
Pete Cornish (Pete Cornish Ltd.): “Compressors should be first in line from the guitar. Do not use a volume pedal first, as this will defeat any compression, and leave the system with maximum noise if the volume pedal is reduced to zero. I tend to connect any distortion devices and high-gain pedals first in line, and the lower-gain pedals later. I have found that the higher-gain devices control sustain, and the lower-gain devices control the tone if they are connected in this order. Modulation devices can come next.

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Nickel finish Frequensator style split trapeze tailpiece. This split fork design originated on archtop models from the 40's. The difference in fork length alters string tension behind the bridge to add depth to the bottom strings and brilliance to the top strings. Width of plate with mounting screws = 2 17/32 in. (64.3mm). Length of mounting bracket side with mounting holes = 1 39/64 in. (41mm) from end to bend Length of mounting bracket from bend to trapeze hook tops = 1 13/64 in. 30.5mm.) Length of short trapeze to top of string retainer bar (not including nut heights) = 2 1/2 in. (63.35mm). Short bracket width = 1 3/64 in. (26.65mm). String Bracket width = 1 3/16 in. (30.35mm). Length of long Trapeze section including string bracket = 6 in. (152mm). Widths of each trapeze and string bracket are equal.
-Would be nice to edit the string colors, add training modes telling you which finger to hit the note with, how many times to play through a sequence (so you learn/memorize the song, vs just respond to the game - i.e is the chorus sequence repeated 4 times before moving onto the next part of the song?),indicating strumming patterns to help with timing (newbies tend to down pick everything and just pick faster when the notes are closer vs switching to an up-down strum) etc.
Kadence guitar has soothing sound quality with a bright tone, which indicates you have to go for higher gauge strings if you need bass-heavy sound output. This guitar is manufactured in our home nation – yes in India! was established in -2006. They produce an acoustic range of guitars that are available at a starting price of 5000 INR. approximately. Guitars in this brand that have a superior quality of sound start from 10,000 INR.
One day I went over to hang out with a friend on Long Island’s prestigious, luxurious north shore. He was also an amateur, aspiring, guitarist, and perhaps slightly more advanced than me – after all, he wrote a solo, even if it didn’t belong to a song yet. But he was very excited when I arrived and wanted to show me something cool in the family room. When I stepped inside, what did I see strewn about the floor but a whole bunch of effects pedals surrounding his electric guitar like a battalion about to march on and conquer a fierce enemy.
This is a product of Colorado USA, every detail of this guitar was hand painted with waterproof organic non led based paint. It is brand new fully functional acoustic guitar. Become the center of attention on your party with this beautifull vibrant instrument. Perfect for a present (Christmas, Valentine, or b-day) for your loved one, family or a friend. Come in to the magic world of music with this beautifull hand painted acoustic guitar. Fill the positive energy of Marcy's artistic story through your song.  The artist Marcy Snow all the way from Colorfull Colorado presents you this unique hand painted acoustic guitar .
All Gibson-brand guitars are currently made at three facilities, depending on the type of guitar. Solid body electric guitars such as the Gibson Les Paul and the Gibson SG are made in Nashville, Tennessee. Semi-acoustic guitars such as the Gibson ES Series are made in Memphis, Tennessee. Full acoustic guitars such as the Gibson J Series are made in Bozeman, Montana. The Nashville and Bozeman facilities are off-limits to visitors, but the Memphis facility gives regularly scheduled factory tours.
Roland has come a long way from its humble beginnings back in the early '70s as a rhythm machine manufacturer. The company grew to produce various other instruments and amplifiers, and is now one of the biggest music gear manufacturers in the world. With so many guitar brands under their name that could produce amps for them - like Boss and Line 6 - they still take the effort to build their own branded amps, and the success that they are enjoying is proof that they are doing the right thing. Their most popular amp is still the Roland Jazz Chorus, as used by artists like Albert King, Andy Summers, Metallica's James Hetfield and Kirk Hammett, Robert Smith of The Cure, Jeff Buckley and many more. These days they have a variety of amplifiers in the entry to mid-tier market, most of which continue to garner great reviews.
Potentiometers are used in all types of electronic products so it is a good idea to look for potentiometers specifically designed to be used in electric guitars. If you do a lot of volume swells, you will want to make sure the rotational torque of the shaft feels good to you and most pots designed specifically for guitar will have taken this into account. When you start looking for guitar specific pots, you will also find specialty pots like push-pull pots, no-load pots and blend pots which are all great for getting creative and customizing your guitar once you understand how basic electric guitar circuits work.
This has always been one of the most revered brands of guitars amongst professional musicians. They sell one of the most affordable and durable electric guitars. The acoustic and classic guitars sold by this brand are ideal for students and beginners. The dreadnought sized body with cutaway has a Sitka spruce top with nato back & sides. The neck has 20 frets & dot inlays on the fretboard and made of nato. The bridge and fingerboard are made of rosewood. Yamaha’s own System55T. The starting price of a Yamaha acoustic 6-string guitar is 6990 INR.approximately.

Not all guitars sound the same. The type of pickups, strings, wood, and body style all dictate the sound a guitar makes. One of the most important decisions a guitarist can make is whether to get a solid body, semi-hollow, or hollow body guitar. A solid body has a cutting tone with plenty of sustain, whereas a hollow body has a warmer, more rounded sound.

One look around our shop and you'll see that we're serious about offering our customers a large selection of instruments, equipment and gear. You'll find both new and used instruments, and our top-notch staff are here to help you choose exactly what fits your needs, preferences and budget. If you're interested in learning new skills and techniques, check out the group workshops we host on a regular basis. We cover a wide range of music topics, so stop by and see what class we're holding next. Can't make it in? Give us a call at 505-889-6300, and we'll be happy to answer all your questions.
Get a ruler (or straightedge if you want to be all fancy) that is at least as long as the neck, but not so long that it reaches all the way from the nut to the saddles (and watch it doesn’t lean on the pickups or pickup surrounds either). If you can’t get one between these lengths, and are willing to sacrifice a ruler, get one that’s too long and cut it to length. Alternatively, you can just cut a little out of one edge so that you can still make full use of the other edge of the ruler. Now lay the edge of the ruler along the frets (don’t rest it on top of the nut, saddles, pickups or pickup surrounds).

If you never intend to do octave high vibrato bar stuff or play music in the style of bands like PANTERA (hard, fast metal, with lots of high note bending leads), or Jimi Hendrix (psychedelic rock), then exclude any floating or fancy bridge (also called a tailpiece). Non-floating tail pieces are usually more stable (keeping tune and intonation) and cheaper to buy.
I know a lot of you out there fancy yourself as “tinkerers”, and many of you may actually be quite good at handling repair work to your own instruments, but I’ve always been more of the kind who loves to find a good repair person. Number one, if the repairer doesn’t do the right job, or there are problems with the work they did, they have to own up to it, and make sure it’s done right until you are fully satisfied. Then of course, if they are actually a selected and accredited repair person for a given guitar company, it’s even better to bring them the guitar, rather than trying to take matters into your own hands.
My mom just gave me a Norma FG12 acoustic guitar my father bought for her back in the day. It is in the original box and i honestly doubt it ever made it out of the box! It appears in pristine condition but I know absolutely nothing about guitars. I really don't care to learn how to play it. I would like to sell it but have absolutely no idea how much it is worth nor know the best place to try to sell (?ebay perhaps) Any suggestions/thoughts would be most appreciated. Thanks!
Hey Omer, I'm not really doing much to the nut here other than widening the slots, so I don't need to measure any heights, etc. For that reason it doesn't matter when I do it. However, if you were to do a proper nut job, then yes, you should probably do that after setting up the other stuff (if you suspect you're having any nut issues, then just put a capo on the first fret and set everything else up first). But if you have no reason to suspect a bad nut, I'd advise you to just leave it alone.
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The “Studio” model was introduced in 1983, and is still in production. The intended market for this guitar was the studio musician; therefore, the design features of the “Les Paul Studio” were centered on optimal sound output. This model retained only the elements of the Gibson Les Paul that contributed to tone and playability, including the carved maple top and standard mechanical and electronic hardware. However, the Studio design omitted several stock Gibson ornamentations that did not affect sound quality, including the binding on the body and neck. The two notable exceptions to this are the Studio Standard and the Studio Custom. Both models were produced in the mid-1980s, and included body and neck binding, though with dot fingerboard inlays instead of more ornate trapezoids. The first Studios from 83 to 86, except for Studio Standard and Studio Custom, were made with alder bodies rather than mahogany/maple. The current Studios come with a chambered mahogany body with either a maple or mahogany cap. The entry level Les Paul Studio “faded” has a chambered mahogany body and top and a satin finish and is the lowest priced Gibson USA Les Paul.
when FINALLY picking up he was running down the stairs leaving early, i barely caught him so didn't get a chance to play it before taking it home, or would have had a chance to address this disappointment. there were dead frets all over the high strings. he clearly didn't perform the service that i paid for. a year later that vintage les paul is still in the same unplayable condition and needs a full service by a real luthier.  
It would not be a lesson on electric guitars and DIs without mentioning Radial’s JDX 48. This DI box, designed to be positioned between an amplifier’s head and speaker, allows for the direct amp sound to travel to the PA and monitors for a more realistic snapshot of the guitar tone. The magic occurs as the JDX 48 is wired to capture both the signal coming from the guitar amplifier head and the back-electromotive impulse from the loudspeaker. The JDX 48 also allows for 100% consistent tone between shows which is impossible with the many variables related to microphones.
The woods used on the body and neck are worth considering too, although are unlikely to be a defining factor when you consider your purchase. Basswood features heavily as the body wood of many guitars in this price range because it’s affordable and has decent tonal properties. You will also find cheaper to produce woods like poplar and alder, although the traditionally more premium mahogany is also found on affordable guitars these days.
This doesn’t mean that our reviews are of no use to you, because there are so many electric guitars out there, and if you know what to look for when you get to the music shop and have a few models in mind, then that makes it a lot easier. And of course, if you don’t have a music shop nearby and need to order one online it’s always good to do your research. It’s a good thing we’ve already done that for you, then!
The three Teisco amps included the Teisco-88, the AMP-71R and the Miny. No details are available on these, but they were fairly rectangular cabinets with top-mounted controls. The Teisco-88 had “Teisco” and a big “88” on the grillcloth. The ’66 model was a tube amp, so this likely was, as well. I suspect the others shown were tubers as well. The Miny had the italicized T logo on the front. The AMP-71R had reverb.
But opposites not only attract—sometimes they also make groundbreaking music together. This is certainly true of Zoom’s collaboration with Doe and Cervenka. Since that band broke up, Zoom has gone on to do session work with everyone from the late John Denver to the Raconteurs. He’s also become semi-legendary as a guitar amp hotrod guru, having tweaked circuitry for Jackson Browne, the Black Crowes, Los Lobos, L7 and Social Distortion, among many others.
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