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Once you start getting into reverb, it won’t be long before you start noticing different nuances of this effect. A good portion of digital reverbs sound too sterile, while some analog can be too narrow in range. Finding that perfect type of reverberation matters if you are serious about building your guitar tone properly. Built in reverbs you usually see in lower quality amps are good for home practice and not much more. That isn’t to say that the added value of them being available in the first place is a bad thing. No, but you can’t really rely on those reverbs to get you anywhere serious. On top of that, a good analog reverb pedal is a one time purchase.
Using, or not using, some piece of gear doesn’t make a player more genuine, harder, tougher, more real, more natural, or better than players who do. What does make people those things is the honest pursuit of their art, the skills and experience earned from practice and performing, their genuine expression, feeling, and the ability to play something that has an effect on the listener. All of this is MUCH more difficult and real than simply choosing not to use a piece of gear.
Obviously listing something as subjective as musical greatness is tough and inevitably going to cause disagreement, but this is another level. Including John Frusciante and Jack White was a little absurd. Excluding players like Yngvie Malmstein, Dave Mustaine, and Slash was questionable. Excluding Eric Clapton was shocking, offensive, but almost admirable. Very little genre diversity, too. By my count, half of these players are blues or heavily blues-based. The complete absence of heavy metal is glaring. This list is ambitious, but golly, this is pretty darn bad.
Actually it was a rolling stone interview, I don’t remember the exact issue but the reply was Rory Gallagher. I’ve also heard it was Phil Keaggy which is unlikely because he was relatively unknown when Hendrix was alive. I’ve also heard it was Terry Kath, Billy Gibbons, and Eric Clapton. I do know that Hendrix said his favorite guitar player was Gibbons, because he just couldn’t get that sound that Billy gets. As for the Quote……. maybe it’s just folklore… The most likely correct answer is Rory Gallagher though…. it’s even referred to in Rory Gallaghers biography and the actual issue of the rolling stone interview is listed in there. I’ve never heard anyone say that the quote was with Jerry Reed though. But, Jerry Reed is an AMAZING guitar player. He actually wrote alot of Chet Atkins material. As for misquoting Hendrix you may not want to be so quick to point fingers…. I’m pretty sure yours is wrong. 😉
Hi, I’m John Anthony, Playing and collecting Cool Guitars is my hobby, and all of my friends and relatives know it. For the reason, I receive many queries over the phone, email and social media about Best Guitar Recommendation. Which one they should buy now, which will fit them etc. And finally, I created this GuitarListy.com and started putting my suggestions and reviews here.
The tone from a Bourgeois produced with master grade Cocobolo wood using hot hide glue is superior to any guitar I have played, I can get an incredible reverb sound by applying a light percussion on the body with my forearm, this guitar is expensive but worth it. I believe Bourgeois builds 400 guitars per year, the other major producers production is 400 guitars per week.
Distortion and overdrive circuits each 'clip' the signal before it reaches the main amplifier (clean boost circuits do not necessarily create 'clipping') as well as boost signals to levels that cause distortion to occur at the main amplifier's front end stage (by exceeding the ordinary input signal amplitude, thus overdriving the amplifier) Note : product names may not accurately reflect type of circuit involved - see above.[38]
Straight out of the box you have over 68 on-board digital effects, 75 custom designed factory patches for iconic sounds, 5 amp emulations and 5 cabinet emulators, so you’re not going to run out of choices on stage or in the studio. In addition, you have access to the Guitar Lab software app that allows you to download new stomp boxes and patches regularly.

You've bought most ANY new guitar that sells for less than about 700-bucks.  Seriously.  These days there are LOTS of really decent guitars out there in the $300-$500 price range.  Guitars designed well (and by that I mean ripped-off from Leo Fender), with bodies and necks that have been cut precisely by high-end CNC machines, decent hardware, and again a nice CNC-finish on the frets and good-looking automated paint jobs.  All in all, a guitar that plays well, intonates and stays in tune well, and looks great.  But ... sounds mediocre!  Yep, ALL manufacturers skimp on the pickups today, at least on any guitar less that about  $700-$1000.  Great guitar with midlin pickups?  Yea, fix that!
Another way of creating a huge sound is to split the signal from the guitar – most easily achieved via a stompbox with stereo outputs – and send it to two or more amps. All sorts of combinations of sound can be achieved, especially when panning techniques are employed. Of course, each amp can also be multi-mic’d if desired, and some truly three-dimensional results can be obtained. Different effects can be applied to the various amps, while using combinations of clean and dirty amp sounds can be really effective for delivering overdrive with definition, or grit and
Next, squirt your cable and rub it using a clean cloth. To cleanse the amplifier and guitar inputs, compress an area of the clean magazine around a Q-tip. Next, apply a bit of contact cleaner to the cloth, and push it in and out of the inputs to all your guitar gear such as effects pedals, amps, guitar. A point to take note here is that you should use a fresh new section of the cloth for each jack input.

 Great, low priced, vintage project Les Paul "copy" guitar. Guitar as photo'd only. Multi-pieced Mahogany, double bound body with a carved top. Bound rosewood fret board with simulated mother of pearl "block" style fret markers and dot side markers. Frets still in good "playable" condition. Good neck profile. Missing nut and tuning machines on headstock. Pick-ups function but guitar will need to be rewired to work properly and missing toggle will need to be replaced.  Bridge needs work and it has a Gibson style stop tail piece. No gig-bag or case included. Would make a great vintage, Japanese, project / player guitar.
Before Nathan Daniel started the Danelectro company in 1947, he made amplifiers for Epiphone from 1934 to 1946. Epiphone wanted Daniel to make amps for them exclusively, but he preferred to stay independent. Instead he founded the Danelectro company in 1947 and started making amplifiers for Montgomery Ward. By 1948 Daniel expanded and became the exclusive guitar amplifier producer for Sears & Roebuck. At the same time he was also supplying other jobbers such as Targ & Dinner of Chicago.
Description: Body: Basswood (Tilia, Linden, Lime) - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Basswood (Tilia, Linden, Lime) - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 1 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 24 - Inlay: Custom - # of Strings: 6 - Headstock: 6 In-Line, Reverse - Bridge: Tremolo - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Black - Pickup Configuration: S-H - Guitar Features: Pickguard - String Instrument Finish: Five Alarm Red, Desert Sun Yellow, Magenta, Black, White

SOLD OUT: is a faithful D-28 design copy by Takamine Japan , discontinued production decades ago its Beautiful its near mint What more do I need to say besides this one will go quickly! Just in to be processed and pictured it's all original and in TOP condition! Contact Joe to buy this beauty at: jvguitars@gmail.com Pics soon to come do not hesitate your going to love this guitar.
Gibson has been producing the Les Paul Studio electric guitar since 1983. One of the company’s lower-priced models, the Les Paul Studio was designed to attract guitar players who wanted to have the much-admired Les Paul sound without shelling out cash for cosmetic features found in upper-tier models like the Les Paul Standard. This is why the older Les Paul Studio models did not have headstock inlays and binding on the neck and body.
I found one at a local shop, 60's Norma, resembles a Strat LIKE guitar, but with a sweet design... It has two switch where you would fidn hte pickup selector on a gibson les paul. Its got a few nicks and such, but it sounds REALLY good and the guy only wants 60 bucks, I plan on buying it, re-fretting, and doing some custom fix up on the body. And He said pretty much everything is original... A pretty sweet guitar if you ask me... If and when I buy it I'll get a picture, email if interested!

Late 1938: Scalloped "X" bracing with "rear shifted bracing", where position of the "X" moved further than one inch from soundhole (exact measurement varies, for example: a 1941 D-18 has 1 7/8" distance). So the X-braces were moved about 7/8" further down. And the tone bars were angled more parallel with the length of the guitar and further apart. These late-1938 to late-1944 guitars had deeper scalloped braces than the 1938 and prior forward or advanced braced guitars. This gives the late 1938 to late 1944 Martin guitars improved bass response (don't let anyone tell you that war-time Martins are not as good as pre-1939 Martins!)

The second issue of the Les Paul guitar was introduced to the public in 1954. Called the Gibson Les Paul Custom, this entirely black guitar was dubbed the Black Beauty. The Les Paul Custom featured a mahogany top to differentiate the instrument from its Goldtop predecessor’s maple top. It also featured the new Tune-o-Matic bridge design and a pickup with an alnico-5 magnet, P-480, in the neck position. In addition, since 1957, the Custom was fitted with Gibson’s new humbucker pickups, PAF,[16] and later became available with three pickups instead of the more usual two. The three pickup model retained the standard Gibson 3-way switch so not all pickup combinations were possible. The neck and bridge-only settings were retained, but the middle switch position was set to enable the middle and bridge pickups. A common modification was to restore the standard neck/both/bridge switching combination and add a switch to enable the middle pickup on its own.[citation needed] The guitar is wired as a “normal”2 pick up Les Paul except there is a master volume , master tone, (for front and back pu) while the middle pick up has its own volume / tone. this allows the middle pu to turned out of the circuit or mixed with the other two. allowing many different tones.

Launch price: $1,499 / £1,399 | Body: Ash | Neck: Maple | Scale: 25.5" | Fingerboard: Maple/rosewood | Frets: 22 | Pickups: 2x V-Mod Single-Coil Telecaster | Controls: Volume with treble-bleed, tone, 3-way selector switch | Hardware: 3-saddle, strings-through-body Tele bridge with compensated brass saddles, 6-screw mounting with removable modern 'Ashtray' bridge cover | Left-handed: Yes | Finish: Mystic Seafoam, 2-Color Sunburst, 3-Color Sunburst, Black, Butterscotch Blonde, Candy Apple Red, Crimson Red Transparent, Natural, Olympic White, Sonic Gray
Sometimes a guitar needs more than a setup, and actual repairs are required. Guitar setup price is minimal when compared to the price of most repairs, so be sure that the problem is not something that can be easily adjusted before making any patch-ups. The cost of repairs can be virtually any price depending on the damage. Refinishing might be over $100, and if a neck needs replacement due to warping, then the price may be several hundreds of dollars. A cracked neck can be glued and clamped for under $100, but the quality of the guitar is unlikely to be regained with this process.

Coming from Martin's Travel Series, the LX1E Little Martin has smaller proportions, with a total length of 34", body width of 12", shorter scale length of 23" and 1 11/16" nut width. While it can be a bit too small for some, it is easy to appreciate its impressive workmanship, bearing the same build quality and materials as found on their more expensive models. With the LX1E, you can own an affordable Martin guitar that has been proven to be a true workhorse instrument.
Hum: other than singlecoil hum, it is almost certainly caused by a ground issue, either a faulty string ground or ground connection, or a ground loop. I highly recommend going to Star Grounding. Shielding is also recommended. See the guitar nuts site for more information on these topics. Single coils are very succeptable to rf frequencies such as emitted by flourescent lights, tv's, computers, motors etc. Also note that high load or other appliances running on the same electrical circuit can cause noises through your amp.
The coolness in ’38, however, lay in two lap/amp combinations, the Supro 60 Electric Combination and the Portable Supro 70 Electric Combination. Both featured the little pearloid Supro Electric Hawaiian Guitar tucked into an amp-in-case! The Supro 60 featured a rectangular case with an 8-tube amp and 4″ speaker. This amp had to be plugged in, but was definitely boss. The combo cost $60. The Portable Supro 70 combination featured the same amp but operated with batteries (“…available at any radio supply house”). Most folks are conversant with Nat Daniel’s amp-in-cases from the early ’60s, but the idea was actually developed a good 25 years earlier. Actually, Daniel may have invented the first amp-in-case in 1936, with the amps he made for the first Epiphone Electar C steel guitars. These apparently had an amp built into the case, however, they were quickly replaced with a separate Model C amplifier. There’s no evidence that the Supro was a copy of the earlier Epiphone, but the idea was clearly around at the time.
Playing power chords right up at the ‘dusty' end (past the 8th fret) gets difficult, because the frets are so close together. In the next stage we'll learn how to play power chords with a fifth-string root too, which solves that problem. However, it's important not to rush ahead, so make sure you put your effort just into the sixth-string root chords for now.
Other handheld guitar and bass resonators on the market, manufactured under the tradename SRG, produced by Aescher Europa, in Germany, are available in both monophonic (one note at a time) and polyphonic (multiple notes at once) models, which include multiple onboard trigger switch effects, such as HPF (high pass filter) for enhancing harmonics and producing feedback effects, and LPF (low pass filter), producing a bass boost with a cello sound on heavy gauge strings. Later EBow models, such as the plus Ebow, contain a mode slide switch on the back, which allows the player to either produce just sustain or overtone feedback in addition to sustain.[69]
@Ricardo – I recommend placing tuners as close to your original signal as possible at the beginning of your signal chain. An EQ pedal can be placed where you would like to filter your signal to the settings of the EQ which is technically at any point in your signal chain. Try the EQ in different locations and use the setting that works best for your.
Remember when I said that there were 2 amps widely used as practice amps and tools for guitar tech’s? Well, the Orange Micro Crush Mini Guitar Amplifier Combo is the other one. Warm ups before gigs, during set ups and maintenance work, this amplifier is relied upon to provide accurate sound and incredible tone anywhere, anytime. This is one of the best cheap amps available thanks to the fact it’s made by one of the most respected amplifier manufacturers in the world, powered via 9V battery and busts out some seriously amazing clean and dirty sounds.
This is a wide range of electric guitar series that have a stylish body and deliver high-quality sound. Cort guitars are fabricated by South Korean manufactures and have been on the market since 1973. Those who are keen on the appearance of the guitar can opt for this brand of electric guitar. This is an electric guitar that is available at an affordable price range between 10,000 to 40,000 INR.
The question of how far away to place your mic really divides opinions. While Chuck Ainlay's 'just off the grille' seems to express the majority view, Bill Price preferred a position six inches away on the Sex Pistols sessions, while Steve Albini usually starts from around 10-12 inches away. Alan Parsons, on the other hand, avoids close placements: "Every engineer I've ever come across has always had the mic touching the cloth, and the first thing I do is move it away literally a foot. Let's hear what the amplifier sounds like, not what the cabinet sounds like... I might have it even further away if it's a really loud 4x12 cabinet — as much as four feet away." Ben Hillier also extols the benefits of more distant placements, up to six to eight feet, when he's trying to capture his favourite 'amp in a room' sound.
The most important thing to a 5string is the tone ring with a resonator, I've been plays 36yrs. I have an Alvarez Denver belle flat top tone ring, a White Eagle archtop tone ring and my favorite is a Hohner artist flat top tone ring. Regarding a guitar my choice is a Martin D-35 ease of play & tone that is awesome! a 5 string take Many hours & months of practice on your rolls, forward, backward alternating thumb pattern, keeping your timing in check so you do not hit the string with your middle finger out of synch. Good luck have fun, no time better to learn than now!

Smaller-scale instruments are produced to assist children in learning the instrument as the smaller scale leads to the frets being closer together, making it easier for smaller hands. The scale-size for the smaller guitars is usually in the range 484–578 mm (19.1–22.8 in), with an instrument length of 785–915 mm (30.9–36.0 in). Full-size instruments are sometimes referred to as 4/4, while the smaller sizes are 3/4, 1/2 or 1/4.
Most of Peter, Paul and Mary’s work had splendid fingerstyle guitar work. My favorite is “Don’t Think Twice It’s Alright”. Paul Stookey also had some fine acoustic work going solo with stuff like “Sebastian” and “The Wedding Song”. “The Wedding Song” was supposedly “must learn” stuff for aspiring acoustic players in the 70’s (so they could play at their friends’ weddings).
You don’t have a single Guild in your list, but you have Washburns that totally lack any sort of bass response. In fact, I’ve never understood how Washburn could take perfectly good materials like sitka spruce and mahogany, and produce such inferior guitars. You list the Fender fa-100 and stratacoustic, both firewood as far as I’m concerned, but don’t list the outstanding Alvarez AD60 and AD70, two amazing sounding guitars for the money. The Hohner and Oscar Schmidt OG2 are beginner guitars, but I know a lot of people with Yamaha FG800 and FG830 guitars who would be very offended by you saying one of their favorite guitars is for beginners. They are serious instruments, even if they only carry a sub-$300 price tag. They are certainly better sounding than that Taylor Big Baby thing, which I was shocked to hear at GC. Talk about over-rated. But you did get many things right. You gave the Blueridge d160 high marks, though I think the D140 should have been up there, too. Good to see that you gave the FG800 such high marks, but I actually like the FS800 a little better. It’s easier to play and better for fingerpicking. The Ami, Jim Dandy, and Recording King are all over-rated and over-priced. You need to take the Washburns down and put up the Guild M-120, D-120, and D-150. The D-150 may be the best guitar you can buy for under a grand.
Analyzing the notes you are playing plays an important role while you are performing. The built-in chromatic tuner in these pedals shows you the live feed of your notes whether they are sharp, flat or dead. Similarly, one can bypass the currently selected sound fx for maintaining a pure sound when tuning or completely mute the signal for a uniform silence.

Shure SM57.Sennheiser MD421.For a rock sound, many (though not all!) engineers will use a dynamic mic placed close to the speaker (sometimes on its own, sometimes in combination with other mics) like this Electrovoice RE20.Why such a strong preference? These days, force of habit has got to be part of the answer, but there is also a lot about the microphone's frequency response which suits guitar recording. For a start, the sub-200Hz response roll-off reduces low-end cabinet 'thumps', which might otherwise conflict with the kick drum and bass in the mix. This also compensates for proximity boost when the mic is used very close to the speaker cone. However, there's also a slight 'suckout' at 300-500Hz, an area where muddiness can easily occur, and a broad 2-12kHz presence peak, which adds bite and helps the guitars cut through the rest of the track.
A Wiki is a web page that anyone can make changes to. The job of maintaining accurate information is far too monumental for one person, but a community of enthusiasts can maintain many thousands of pages quite easily, each person adding a bit at a time. That's the idea behind iGuide?s "What's It Worth Wiki". The most famous example of a Knowledge Wiki is Wikipedia, of course. But, our vision is that someday iGuide?will become the Wikipedia of Art, Antiques, Collectibles, Memorabilia....and Guitars.
As the text says, the pick wasn’t exactly identical with all the samples. This would make for the differences alone: The movement of the string must not be imagined as a plain two dimensional one. In fact it’s rotating in three dimensions, while the pickup only senses that part of the movement which is perpendicular to the deck of the guitar. The vibrations direction changes all the time and does so for each frequency component (read: harmonics) independently.
Yamaha-C5-Salamander-JNv5.1- Arguably the best free piano on the internet and better than many of the expensive ones as well. Modified for sf2 with five brightness levels with optional resonance and this set includes the new Dark, Mellow and Dynamic Grands.  All in a set at 592mb in size.  This version has the detailed 15 velocity layers for seamless expression.

Alonso de Mudarra's book Tres Libros de Música, published in Spain in 1546, contains the earliest known written pieces for a four-course guitarra. This four-course "guitar" was popular in France, Spain, and Italy. In France this instrument gained popularity among aristocrats. A considerable volume of music was published in Paris from the 1550s to the 1570s: Simon Gorlier's Le Troysième Livre... mis en tablature de Guiterne was published in 1551. In 1551 Adrian Le Roy also published his Premier Livre de Tablature de Guiterne, and in the same year he also published Briefve et facile instruction pour apprendre la tablature a bien accorder, conduire, et disposer la main sur la Guiterne. Robert Ballard, Grégoire Brayssing from Augsburg, and Guillaume Morlaye (c. 1510 – c. 1558) significantly contributed to its repertoire. Morlaye's Le Premier Livre de Chansons, Gaillardes, Pavannes, Bransles, Almandes, Fantasies – which has a four-course instrument illustrated on its title page – was published in partnership with Michel Fedenzat, and among other music, they published six books of tablature by lutenist Albert de Rippe (who was very likely Guillaume's teacher).
Iidi began manufacturing guitars in 1958 in Nagoya, Japan. Iida is still producing guitars, but mostly in their factory located in Korea. They were mainly responsible for producing acoustic and semi-acoustic rather than electric guitars for major manufacturers Ibanez and Yamaha. There is speculation that Iida may have assisted Moridara for a short period in making Morris badged guitars, but that is not verified.
Ostentatious Delays: If you're making very rhythmic music of any kind, it makes sense to use tempo-sync'd delays, to avoid undermining the main pulse. However, simple tempo-sync'ed delays tend to be masked by the main rhythmic stresses, so they sink into the background of the mix unless mixed very high in level, which makes it difficult to create ostentatious delay effects in rhythmic music without swamping your mix. One solution to this problem, very common in trance music, is to set a delay to a three-16th-note duration, which means that although the delay repeats never step outside the 16th-note grid, they'll often miss the main beats and therefore remain clearly audible. Mike Senior
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While the Vox lineup features modern marvels such as the Valvetronix modeling amplifiers, this company is really all about smooth tube overdrive. The AC30 is a rock classic, and one of the most legendary amps ever made. It’s still going strong today, but there are many other Vox models to choose from as well, all built around that amazing Vox tone.

What's funny is that guitars with cheap pickups very often sound better direct than guitars with "good pickups". I have an Epiphone Special I with ( presumably GFS ) P90-style pickups and that thing sounds great direct. It's also fine with a band thru an amp if the band doesn't play too loud - if the band's too loud the low mid buildup means you gotta EQ a lotta bass out and it loses it's girth.
Here’s an interesting (they’re all interesting to me!!!) guitar that shows the evolution of Matsumoku made guitars.  Even the earliest solid body electrics that came out of the Matsumoku plant were made of solid wood and displayed really good wood craftsmanship!  Lots of start up companies went to Matsumoku in the early days because the plant had proper wood drying facilities (if the wood wasn’t dried properly, the guitars often became seriously messed up during the import trip across the ocean).

Univox was not, as you might guess, just another isolated Japanese import, but was part of a much larger story of its importer, the Merson company. And in this context, Univox is a part of the much larger story that included names you probably see everywhere but know little about, since they’re off the beaten path, names such as Tempo, Giannini, Westbury, Korg and much more! You’re going to have to pay attention here, because a whole bunch of familiar and not-so-familiar names crisscross through this story.

In the first part of this two-part article, we look at the original five-way switch and find it lacking for some uses. The 2-pole super-switch steps in to help, and we look at how we would go about wiring a Strat in the standard way using that switch. Once we’ve understood that, we go on to create an interesting alternate wiring scheme for a Strat that wouldn’t be possible with the standard 5-way.
There is traditionally a gap between how we enjoy the sound of our guitars and the way they’re represented plugged in. Enter Yamaha, a leader in stage-ready acoustic technology for decades - and in the A5R ARE, it may have just offered us a very desirable solution. The A5R''s rounded fretboard edges offer an enjoyable playing experience that mimics the feeling of guitars that have been played in to a degree and it has an ethereal quality in the high ranges, even though some treble resonance is traded with the lower action. The A5’s resonance and bright balance is a fine showcase for the clever SRT2 preamp - we actually couldn’t dial in a ‘bad’ sound on it because the treble and bass controls mirror the natural subtlety of the pickup/mic dynamic design. An electro experience that captures the sound of an unplugged acoustic? The SRT2 is one of the closest to get there yet. An update that marks the A Series out as an essential consideration for players who rely on a consistent and controllable stage sound.
When you hit a string it will vibrate. It will continue to vibrate until the energy put into it is expended. Where does that energy go? Well, it is expended through movement. That movement is what the pickup "sees" and translates into sound. In a world where 100 % of the initial energy imparted by the strum to the string was expended through movement, wood doesn't matter.
Tone woods only effect acoustic or hollowbodys. The more dense wood harder tighter grained woods along with steep pitched saddle to stop string angle increases sustain.research labs experimented with marble body's and had tremendous sustain.also effecting sustain is type of neck.ie. bolt on set or thru. A bolt on May have equal sustain to a set if the thickness of body at bolt joint is made thicker but thru are best all have give and takes. Thru are less adjustable and limit repairs. Bolt on offer more adjustment. Set necks can be replaced or reset but cost more to do so. Thick heavy gibson let Pauls are known for the sustain.but endurance limited by heavy weight. It's all matter of choice. Buy usa or if not available japan. Stay away from Chinese or Korean they are bottom feeders
Every guitar player loves pedals. We all have at least a handful in our collection and will always try a new one we come across. When you're starting out, you probably know when you need something, but you aren't exactly sure what it is. You may not even know what flanging or phasing actually does to your signal and how that's different from a chorus effect. We're offering below some great effect choices that will add some character without overtaking your sound, so you can really distill out what each of these effects do. While distortion and overdrive have their place (and are usually the effects beginners jump to initially), the following picks offer some other alternatives that will feed your creativity and help get you started.

Considering that the setup on a factory-fresh guitar might be good or bad (and few music stores bother to do setup on inexpensive guitars), we strongly recommend that you have a new guitar professionally set up, which will likely cost about $50. You can also learn to do it yourself; there are plenty of online tutorials, and even at age 15 I managed to figure out how to set up my first electric guitar with a little guidance from my guitar teacher. It’s a good idea for every electric guitarist to at least learn how to set action (string) height because you will want to adjust this to suit your style and skills as they evolve.
Choosing the right strings for your instrument and your style of playing might not seem like the biggest deal. After all, the Delta bluesmen of the ’20s, ’30s and ’40s often bought used strings at dry good stores for a few pennies, or boiled old strings to brighten them up. And the proliferation of brands on the market can be overwhelming to the point of leading a player to assume strings are as generic as picks – which aren’t really generic at all, but that’s another story.

Ostentatious Delays: If you're making very rhythmic music of any kind, it makes sense to use tempo-sync'd delays, to avoid undermining the main pulse. However, simple tempo-sync'ed delays tend to be masked by the main rhythmic stresses, so they sink into the background of the mix unless mixed very high in level, which makes it difficult to create ostentatious delay effects in rhythmic music without swamping your mix. One solution to this problem, very common in trance music, is to set a delay to a three-16th-note duration, which means that although the delay repeats never step outside the 16th-note grid, they'll often miss the main beats and therefore remain clearly audible. Mike Senior

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