While the modifications described above have all been passive (i.e. they don't require an external power source), active electronics considerably increase the number of possible wiring options. These can range from simple preamps that offer a volume boost and buffer the instrument's signal (to prevent loss of higher frequencies in longer cable runs), to multi-band equalisers and more.[30][31] Enterprising guitarists have even built entire effects processors into guitars, such as the Korg Kaoss Pad.[32]
Here we have another great Yamaha Its Sound is truly WELL beyond its price point someone will be very pleased. aprox..1972-74 YAMAHA FG160 WOW! . ...This is a Gorgeous MARTIN style REPLICA and for the money compares very well to the original in quality materials used..sweet vintage SPRUCE TOP now wonderfully ambered in color from age just too cool, The Back - Sides & Neck are all made from choice AAA Mahogany just what you would expect from an expensive Martin or Gibson...only you would expect to pay much more for one of those , but this is a rare early non "Nippon Gakki" model with the Red Label from Korea.. These early issue Red Label Guitars from Korea utilize the very same materials that were made in Japan. These components were used under strict quality control and 100% assembled in Korea from the very same vintage wood - components & parts as the Japan made Yamaha's. We have had many of these Red Labeled Yamaha's in the 180's & 160's currently and over the years I see up close and in person the very high grade AA mahogany neck s sides & back & the same nice nickel tuners & hardware the very same one piece solid neck no scarf joint at the back of the headstock area like the later Korean & Chinese examples ... This era exhibits just the same just as nice woods as those Japanese big dollar players but " SOME" not all are hidden treasures and are still a real bargain today when compared to the Japanese Red Label versions or a Martin or even Japan made models of this quality...fit & finish & the materials on this guitar are very nice! This guitar does not take the back seat to the Red Label Nippon Gakki version at all. The action is very EZ to play and the TONE is simply wonderful..The Condition is very good++ to excellent vintage it is not mint,and it is not beat..it has natural minor play wear and dings associated with a well loved and played quality guitar it has all the rich patina now of a true vintage acoustic and is quite beautiful in its own right. This guitar has a good history of care its a California guitar where the climate is stable and quite favorable to guitars and was adult owned & loved. This guitar has the preferable a nice MEATY U Shaped Premium Mahogany one piece solid NECK, the frets are still good, The Rosewood is gorgeous too it looks to be Premium grade as well..You will not be disappointed with this guitar at this price the sound is rich like a an expensive $1,000+ guitar, big tone ...no repairs, structural damage..It comes with a new set of Martin strings installed ready to play out of the box. TRULY STUNNING, SEE MORE ... This baby is nice and sweet in person...very nice, , with a classic MARTIN LIKE feel & Sweet-Tone that simply is very hard to beat. The neck is STRAIGHT and the frets are fine w/plenty of life left,this baby plays real nice she stays in tune very well.. .nice workmanship & choice select materials used....You will not be disappointed with this FINE YAMAHA FG160 guitar with NICE TONE & SOUND...its a real Great Player ....This guitars condition is rated at a 8+ Very good+ or better and is very good to excellent condition only a few very minor dings can be seen. this is a real Vintage guitar" and as you can see its in Gorgeous shape!. no known problems cracks-breaks-repairs with no other known issues at all. This one is is 100% READY TO GO!!! its in very good to excellent condition a solid 8+ OR BETTER. This .
When recording an electric guitar, the amp is the instrument as far as the mic is concerned, and mic position is important. While a lot of sound comes direct from the speakers as you'd expect, a significant level is also emitted from the back and sides of the box via panel vibrations. Also, an open-backed cabinet throws about as much sound out of the back of the box as it does out of the front. Choosing a mic for recording electric guitar isn't difficult, as virtually any decent mic of any type can be made to produce usable results. If I were to generalise, I'd say that British recording engineers tend to use cardioid, dynamic models while American engineers seem to prefer capacitor microphones. The dynamic mic produces a solid sound with a smooth high end, while the capacitor mic's increased definition produces a brighter, more open sound when used in the same way. However, the mic position has just as much bearing on the tone as the mic itself.
3.  This one is not so much a customer fix as customer negligence.  A crack in the top of an acoustic that is not addressed right away.  Dirt and grime are allowed into the crack and oxidizes the surfaces so that what could have been fixed with a diamond patch on the inside has now become a fix that includes taking away the rotten wood and inserting a splint.  It can be very difficult to match the new wood with the old, and you better make sure the customer knows that his or her guitar will not look brand new.

In 1957, president Sydney Katz introduced the Gold “K” line of archtop and solid body electric guitars[14] to compete with major manufacturers like Fender, Gibson, and Gretsch. The gold “K” Line featured the Jazz Special, Artist, Pro, Upbeat,[18] Jazz II, and Jazz Special Bass. Gold “K” guitars used the same hardware as top manufacturers. However, there were truss rod and neck issues.[citation needed]
"Emulating guitar sounds is problematic – or it was until Impact Soundworks launched Shreddage. Version 2 for Kompact 5 is rammed full of chords and articulations to get the most authentic sound possible […] The quality of the samples here is really good. Although aimed at Rock and Metal, it lends itself to any genre. For those more accustomed to keys than strings, it is ideal with its impressive soundset and amount of control." CM Reviews (Computer Music)
The Rolls-Royce of multi-effects pedals is the Line 6 POD HD500X. As far as the top 5 pedals in this guide, the HD500X is the most full-featured, most complex, and also the priciest. Despite carrying a higher price tag than the others, it comes very highly recommended and landed a solid second place on our list, and this is mostly due to two things:
Make sure to sit down and strum the notes when trying out a guitar. It should not be hard to push down the strings with your fretting hand, even if you are just starting out. The action should be as low as possible to make learning easy. Make sure to check for loose parts; there should be no rattling noises coming from the inside of the guide or inside of the neck. Also take a business card and run it along the bottom of the bridge to make sure that the bridge isn't coming off. An electronic system is not a big deal when buying an acoustic because it's relatively easy to add an electronic pickup component later on should you decide you need one.
This is essentially the distance measured between the saddle and the nut, or more accurately described as double the distance from the nut to the 12th fret plus some "compensation" added by the position of the saddle. A longer scale length requires higher tension in the strings and results in a brighter tone. A more detailed explanation with examples is presented quite well by Stewart MacDonald and a good description of the implications of different scale lengths can be found on Guitar Player. Guitars based on Stratocaster and Telecaster designs usually have a longer 25.5" scale while Les Paul and SG style guitars are characterized by a shorter 24.75".
Most delay pedals have controls for the number of repeats (called “feedback”), the volume of the repeats and the time between each repeat. Some pedals have what’s called “tap tempo”, where you can tap your foot on the pedal and the delay unit will match the speed of the effect to your foot, allowing you to match the delay time to the tempo of a song. Delay pedals are often used to thicken up heavy lead guitar sounds, or to subtly add more to a simple rhythm guitar part.
The pickups are made with mismatched coils and Alnico magnets and are wax potted to eliminate the ear-splitting squeal during high-gain playing.  The pickups are independently routed through volume and tone controls and the 3-system toggle switch.  You can activate single coil pickups with the push-pull method found on each of the volume controls for coil splitting.

This list kind of blows. There are no greatest guitarists. And I hate how people think guitar is sickly limited to rock guys who in the whole scheme of things are pretty amateur. How about Eric clapton? Heck if Charlie Christian or django rhinehardt had never started playing solos guitar would still be a strict rhythm instrument playing crotchets to emphasise the beat. He had 2 fingers and did more for the guitar than anyone on this list? Especially Tom Morello? How about pat methany, wes Montgomery, pat martino, tal farlow, JOHN MCLAUGHLIN, george benson? Listen to any of those guys and it will completely redefine your thoughts on the guitar. It can so easily be intelligent and soulful simultaneously…
In the guitar’s electronics, the potentiometer and capacitor form a path to ground. The capacitor presents lower impedance to higher frequencies, and vice-versa, so the tone control works by “throwing away” high frequencies. How much of the highs get thrown away is determined by the tone potentiometer, which presents an equal resistance to all frequencies. As you turn down the tone, you decrease the resistance presented by the pot. Low frequencies still find this path to ground to be a difficult one (high-impedance) because of the capacitor, but high frequencies see an easier path than the one into the amplifier (which traditionally has a fairly high impedance load in the transistors of the “pre-gain” stage, around 1Megaohm), and to they take the easier path, reducing the presence of high frequencies that are amplified and output as sound.
A. It is never too late to learn how to play a musical instrument. An acoustic guitar does present some unique challenges for beginners, including the formation of calluses over time. Some working professional guitarists actually develop deep grooves on their fingertips after years of performing. But this is not a requirement in order to become an accomplished amateur guitarist. Practically every musical instrument places some physical demands on players, but developing skills like muscle memory and improvisation are tangible benefits of that extra effort.
Without going into technical details, the amp's power rating is directly correlated to its loudness. This means that the higher the power rating is, the louder the amp can go. But loud is not always better, especially when considering space and noise level restrictions, this is why even those with big wall of amps have a humble practice amp to play quietly with. Low power amps also let you crank the gain at lower volumes, so you can get to your amp's sweet spot without being a noise nuisance. Thankfully, some big amps now come with built-in power attenuators, which give you the option to lower the power rating when needed. Also note that many tube amps are louder than similarly rated solid-state amplifiers.
While Fender specialize in the single-coil pickup, it’s Gibson who are masters of the pickup in general – and it shows when you browse the chart in our dedicated Gibson pickup article. However, you’ll quickly discover that there is no ‘one Gibson pickup’, as the brand offer a wide range including single-coils and humbuckers, medium and high outputs, and vintage and modern tones. You’ll find different pickups on all of Gibson’s famous models, including the Les Paul, Firebird, SG and Flying V. Perhaps they are best-known for their PAF-style humbuckers – an awesome vintage tone that is well-replicated in their famous Gibson ‘57 Classic Plus.
Description: Body: Alder - Body Construction: Solid - Neck Wood: Maple - Frets: 24 - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Headstock: 6 In-Line - Bridge: Floyd Rose Style Locking Tremolo - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Black, Diecast - Pickups: Humbucker - String Instrument Finish: Black Metallic, Pewter Grey Metallic, Emerald Green Metallic
Also, you need to always remember that you will need guitar accessories and essential that specially designed for your electric guitar like a strap, picks, and gig-bag, in addition, a good practice amplifier. On the other hand, probably you don't need to worry as you do get almost all of such thing as the part of a bundled package deal at the time you are shopping for a new one.

Chet was THE best guitarist to ever reach popular standings. That doesn’t include the classical guitarists and jazz guitarists who could play him under the table though. Which gets me thinking, this list would be a lot different if it included people that were in the background, but were easily better than anyone popular. For me chet would still make top 100 even on that list though. That’s gotta mean something…
• Guitar : ELECTRIC SUNBURST captures the sound of a classic guitar, chosen with its rich, warm and versatile sound. The continuous signal path has been retained throughout, including high-quality cables, vintage tube preamps and high-resolution transducers to ensure that every nuance of this legendary instrument was accurately fixed. Since the string holder and neck were recorded separately, you can fully control the balance of the mix. Moreover, a condenser microphone was installed above the strings to capture subtle sound nuances and add punch and realism.
The aim of this paper is to analyze through the finite element method (FEM) the dynamical behaviour of the ligno-cellulose composite plates from the structure of guitar. First it had been done the geometrical modelling of the structures from the plates, as the body of the classical guitar - size 4/4. Then the different structures were analyzed with finite element. The dynamical response had... [Show full abstract]

Epiphone, coolest brand ever. More songs have been written on Epiphone guitars than any other. Sure! Gibson bought & attempted to hijack the Epiphone kudos, but failed, as all that happened was Epiphone became the affordable brand of the people. Gibson & Taylor are by far…so far…the least cool brands ever. I’m telling you, more songs (filled with passion & desperation & anger) have been written on Epiphone guitars than any other, by folk who can’t afford or don’t have a mummy to buy them a Fender strat or Gibson.


Capacitors used in guitar circuits aren’t polarised, so it doesn’t matter which way round you fit the legs - we normally go with the printed side facing out from the pot. They’re measured in microfarads (uF) and will be marked with a number. You can experiment with different values and materials for different results, but if in doubt, just swap it for what you already have.
They say good things come in small packages. Well, "they" weren't wrong! The Orange Micro Terror Guitar Amplifier Head is no bigger than a lunchbox, but packs enough power to stand up to some of the bigger amplifiers out there, especially when you connect it to a 2x12 or even a 4x12 cab. It features a combination of solid state and valve technology and throws out 20w of pure power thanks to the 1 x 12AX7/ECC83 pre amp valve. Easy to use, affordable and even easier to carry around, you can easily gig with this or use it as a practice amp at home when coupled with the custom built Orange PPC108 1x8 Closed Back Speaker Cabinet.
Busker? If you're a busker, you're better off with an amp that does not require a power supply. The Roland Micro Cube is a great little amp, very popular with buskers who require amplification due to its portability, cheap price and the fact it can be powered by batteries! It's pretty loud, too! Here's a great blog on some of the best amps for busking.
Gibson originally offered a single cutaway from the guitar body, so that players could access higher frets.  Notice that Fender includes a double cutaway design so the player’s thumb also has access to the higher side of the neck.  Gibson used “3 On A Side” tuners, so Fender offered “6 Inline” tuning pegs.  It was these choices that created a large part of the visual appeal of the Strat.
Wah-wah: A wah-wah pedal creates vowel-like sounds by altering the frequency spectrum produced by an instrument—i.e., how loud it is at each separate frequency—in what is known as a spectral glide or "sweep".[68] The device is operated by a foot treadle that opens and closes a potentiometer. Wah-wah pedals are often used by funk and rock guitarists.[69]
It also comes in a colour that is unique and leaves most other guitars in the dust - their OPB colour, or Open Pore Black finish. It’s a matte black guitar. Matte (or a satin finish) means that you won’t have the grubby finger marks or oil stains that a glossy finish would have. Plus, if you play for a while and your palms get sweaty, this matte finish won’t be slick and slipper - unlike guitars with a glossy finish.

I play a Tele, but I can’t say I’m in love with it. I have this feeling that a Gibson would sound and play differently – perhaps warmer and more mellow – but I have no factual basis for thinking that. It is based more on who I have seen playing different models, and what style of music they are playing. This is what I think most of the differences guitarists imagine come down to – a lot of preconceived notions, reinforced by vague generalizations (like the ones in this article) and marketing hype. But I readily admit I could be wrong about that.
The Kay guitar company's origins date back to the 1890's, starting with the Groeschel Mandolin Company of Chicago, Illinois. The company's name was changed to "Stromberg-Voisinet" in 1921, and shortlyafterwards, in 1923, Henry Kay "Hank" Kuhrmeyer (the origin of the name "Kay") joined the company and quickly worked his way up to the top. By 1928, Kuhrmeyer had bought the company and that same year the company started producing electric guitars and amps.
If you really want your guitar strings to stand out as well as your playing does, then these colourful options from DR are a novel eye-catcher. For even more fun, stick them under a UV light and they’ll glow, too! They might also serve a practical purpose for beginners, too, as new guitarists can quickly identify specific strings based on their colour.
In addition to tuning and setting their guitar’s pickup configuration and tone control(s), electric guitarists must adjust the sound on their amplifier to achieve their preferred sounds. With the right settings, electric guitar players can play in a variety of styles from country chicken pickin’ to jazz, rock, blues, heavy metal and everywhere in between. This versatility can’t be matched by the acoustic guitar.
Next important control knob is usually labeled as time or rate. This defines the length of echoes in a reverb. You can have them short or you can have them last for a fairly long time. Which side you will lean more towards is going to depend on the nature and tempo of your music. Slower, more subtle riffs can easily deal with long reverb times while faster sections usually work best with short reverb. Again, experimentation is the key here.
The way that manufacturers state the wattage output of an amplifier can be confusing. Amplifier manufacturers may state that a combo bass amp produces 600 watts at 4 ohms and 300 watts at 8 ohms. If the speaker mounted in the combo amp is an 8 ohm speaker, then the combo by itself will only produce 300 watts. This combo amplifier will only put out 600 watts if an "extension speaker cabinet" is plugged into the combo amp with a speaker cable. Plugging a second 8 ohm cabinet in parallel wiring with the combo amp's internal 8 ohm speaker will lower the amp's impedance (electrical resistance or "load") to 4 ohms; at this point the amp will put out 600 watts. Another factor that can make it difficult for bassists to select a bass amp is that different manufacturers may state their amps wattage in Root Mean Squared (or "RMS") and in "peak power". For example, a bass amp ad may state that it produces 500 watts RMS and 1000 watts "peak power". The RMS figure is much more important than the peak power wattage.
It worked like all amps: the guitar in my hands translated the vibrations from its strings through magnetic pickups into a voltage that traveled through the guitar's wiring and out the main 1/4" cable, then the amp picked up the signal and sent it through a coil of wire around a much larger magnet than those in the pickups, and the vibrations of that magnet shook the cone of the speaker, producing sound. The specific vibrations corresponding to those voltages created specific frequencies of vibration through the air, and my 10-year-old ears were hooked.
Lutherie has been my life's work since the beginning. After graduating from Roberto-Venn School of Lutherie in 1992, I set up my first shop in a rental garage, and began designing, building, repairing, and restoring fretted stringed instruments. Aided and abetted by 13 years of employment as a staff guitar repairman at Seattle's Trading Musician, I gained an extensive knowledge of the inner and outer workings of a vast array of instruments.
With a body shape that looks like it could have been cut out by hand using a saw in your garden shed, this Kay Old Kraftsman Sizzler guitar manages to be crude and quite fantastic at the same time. "Old Kraftsman" was actually a brandname used on Kay guitars sold by Spiegel stores. The maple neck gives it a rather Fender-like appearance, but this is in fact a set neck and not a bolt-on. 

When speaking of electric guitars and pickups we are usually talking about magnetic pickups, as they use magnets to convert the vibration of the string into an electric signal, and these can be divided into 2 main types: The Humbucker (Double-coil) and the single coil pickup. Double-coil pickups are basically single coil pickups mounted side by side and the sound they pick up is "integrated" through to the output.
What? I have an early 90s pe and I've recorded with it and its one of the best guitars I've ever played. Beutifull clean lp tone and ballsy as when you dirty it up. I also have a pro 2 fullarton which with the fender lace sensor pups I put in it, plays and sounds as good as any strat I've played in thirty years. Check the new arias comming out of the states at the moment and they are really awesome looking guitars. There is also a reason the early ones are known as lawsuit guitars as Gibson though they were so good they had to sue them!
All I can say is quit wasting $ on new. A new guitar is like a new car it’s gonna lose 20% of its value once you take it out the first time. Unless you are buying a Gibson or fender custom shop etc Just go for what plays and sounds great. Perfect example is the Esp ltd ec401vf or 400. Used $300-400 has stock seymour duncan 59 neck jb bridge or the newer 401 has the dimarzio’s in it. Grovers tuners earvana nut mahogany body. Just an excellent setup for half the price of an epi les paul. Don’t get me wrong I have an Epi les paul traditional pro and it’s a nice guitar but for $750 nah. Since I picked up the 401 I hardly play my jag mustang or either of my epi l.p. or sg. Its just that nice of a guitar. If you are in the market for a les paul style or a new guitar in general take a look at the 400 series it’s a whole lot of guitar for the $
To make it simple, we chose a four-chord song: The Ramones' "Blitzkrieg Bop." At first run-through, the game asked Andrew to play only one note every few seconds. As he successfully hit those, it added more and more until he was playing almost every note. On the next run through, the AI suddenly threw in two-note power chords. Once he mastered those, the game leveled up again, asking him to play every chord of the real guitar track that Johnny Ramone would have played. Finally, we unlocked Master Mode, which challenged us to play the song from memory. Only the measures appeared on the screen—no notes.
The neck is also made of mahogany and is hand set into the body. Looking at the fretboard, we see a standard rosewood design with white binding and classic trapezoid inlays. Epiphone went with a set of Alnico Classic humbucker pickups. These are very close to what the original Gibson solution had to offer. Classic rock and blues just flow out of these, although you are more than free to crank up the gain and blast some heavy riffs.
Relatively new to the amplifier world, Paul Reed Smith is building some of the most interest amps out there. After tapping legendary amp builder Doug Sewell to head design, the company has produced a range of boutique-quality amps for a fraction of the price. The Sonzera 20 is a reliable amp that is incredibly versatile, with a full tube sound similar to American amps from the ’60s.
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Echo is a naturally occurring effect. Since the first days of recording, men have attempted to create an artificial method of duplicating this effect. The first attempt were echo chambers (or rooms) that created a “natural” echo. These rooms still exist at some recording studios. Tape echo effects came next, offering portability and variable rates of echo. These units were often noisy, but are still favored for their warm echo tone. Analog delays solved the problems inherent with tape (bad tubes, noisy tape, and misaligned or worn out tape heads) but had limitations in the length of their delay. Finally, digital delays appeared in the 1980s and offered more delay time and added features, but also came with a more sterile sounding tone. Many digital delays now simulate tape, analog, and digital delays
I have established a broad network of invaluable contacts in the vintage guitar business. Please let me know what you are looking for, and I'll do my best to find it! Also, I am paying the highest prices for clean lefty vintage guitars. Let me know what you have; I'll be happy to work out a deal you will be happy with. I do want to mention that I buy righty guitars on ocassion as well, especially those that can be easily converted to lefty, including Fender Strats and ES-335/345 guitars.
At first this may seem trivial, but a little experimentation reveals that each effect reacts very differently depending on how the original signal has been altered by previous effects in the signal chain. Initially, this can seem rather frustrating; a pedal that sounds awesome on its own can turn your sound into a real mess when combined thoughtlessly with other effects. I’m going to go into the basics of signal flow and cover the fundamentals of setting up a great sounding pedal board. As you would expect, there isn’t any one “correct” way of doing things. You may find that changing the order gives you a completely unique sound, and that’s great. However, if you’re sorting it all out for the first time, this is a good way to start ordering your pedalboard.
ESP LTD is a big name when it comes to the production of electric guitars and has been making quality instruments for over 40 years. The ESP LTD EC-256 Intermediate Electric Guitar is just another example of the genius of ESP LTD. The body of the guitar is mahogany and the neck and fretboard are made out of rosewood. There is also a TOM bridge and a tailpiece attached to this guitar. The pickups of this guitar are the ESP designed LH-150 set. It comes in two color options, black and metallic gold.
Much of this is probably thanks to an outdated a pedal with a two-function switch that is labeled “Chorus” and “Vibrato.” These words will trigger a sigh of awe and wonder from many a guitarist because, of course, they are the labels on the mode switch of the famous Univox Uni-Vibe. This pedal is a good place to start because it was one of the first of the transistorized effects of this type to become widely available, and it occupies a patch of ground all its own in the world of things that go “swoosh”. That said, and despite the name and switch labeling, the Uni-Vibe is more akin to a four-stage phaser than what we today consider to be a chorus pedal, even if that’s the label on its most-loved setting. The deception is forgivable when you remember that the Uni-Vibe’s intention was to reproduce the chorus-type sound—or “chorale” sound, as it was often labeled—produced by a Leslie rotating speaker cabinet used with a Hammond organ. Also, the unit existed before there was much categorization of such things: it was a guitar effects footpedal, it had its own sound… and that was all anyone needed to know. The Uni-Vibe—and the better clones that have followed it down the years—is based around a discrete transistorized circuit with four sets of light bulbs and light cells and a low frequency oscillator (LFO) which does the shifting work to move the peaks and notches. Unlike the drawing-board phaser discussed above, however, the frequencies of each stage of the Uni-Vibe are set differently, so it could be argued that there is indeed more of a chorusing of the sound.
The lowest note on the double bass or four-stringed electric bass is E1, two octaves below middle C (approximately 41 Hz), and on a five-string it is B0 (approximately 31 Hz).[22] The requirement to reproduce low frequencies at high sound pressure levels means that most loudspeakers used for bass guitar amplification are designed around large diameter, heavy-duty drivers, with 10", 12" and 15" being most common. Less commonly, larger speakers (e.g., 18") or smaller speakers (e.g., the 8x8" cabinet, which contains eight 8" speakers) may be used. As a general rule, when smaller speakers are used, two or more of them are installed in a cabinet (e.g., 2x10", 4x10" and 8x8"). For 12" speakers, combo amps and cabinets are available with 1x12" and 2x12"; less commonly, 4x12" cabinets are seen. For 15" speakers, combo amps and cabinets usually have 1x15", although 2x15" and even 4x15" cabinets exist (Lemmy Kilmeister of Motorhead used 4x15" cabinets). A small number of 1x18" bass cabinets are sold (e.g., Trace Elliot).
It features a solid mahogany top, supported by laminate mahogany back and sides, which gives a warmer tonality and a very earthy vibe. It also comes with Graphtech NuBone nut and saddle, a premium feature that you normally have to pay extra to add into your guitar. Giving this guitar its amplified voice is a Fishman Presys II 301T electronic pickup/preamp system that comes with a built-in tuner. On top of all that, the Washburn WL012SE does not skimp on ornamentation, which includes the Washburn Parquet rosette and rosewood bindings.

I am a lawn tennis and guitar playing trainer. I am a college lawn tennis varsity player and became a coach and a trainer of beginners and advance tennis players. I am also a band player and singer performing musical folk, pop, ballad and jazz pub Shakey's Pizza Parlor and chains. I worked with Yamaha Music Corporation as an account representative.
You would probably be better served to specify a budget, then mention the kind of music you want to learn to play and whether you want an electric or an acoustic. As general advice, within any price range probably a general-purpose guitar would be better for you than something meant for a specific purpose - e.g., no pointy lime green electrics. By general purpose I mean guitars like Strats, Les Pauls, and concert-sized acoustics. Nothing particularly fancy.
Wow! I don't even know where to begin... I am using this processor with my new Cecilio electric violin. I learned and trained on classical violin, acoustic, reading sheet music, etc, so I'm pretty new at now playing an electric one hooked up to an amplifier, and even newer at using a pedal/processor. Upon first assembly, I found that many of these effects will probably not be used in the music that I play (worship & praise - old school & contemporary), but others will be very useful to bring a new sound to old songs. Also, some of the effects sound very similar to one another. I haven't yet figured out and tried to edit and save any effects to my liking, so I can't really say how well the MG-100 does in that area. But I must say that I am absolutely in love with the drum machine ... full review
I started out doing pretty much what I do now on an acoustic and transferred it to electric when I was able to get a paper route and buy a crappy red electric guitar. I knew the value of working stripped down and I still do, although in this day and age I've made a lot of records with different sounds. I must say I really love what technology can afford you.
I use a cheap zoom effects box (actually because it has a fabulous digital tuner built-in) and if I want to play at home I plug that into the stereo. Don't have it any louder than you would a CD etc .. (ok maybe a bit ;-) ) gives you the flexibility of all the effects sounds plus because it's stereo (assuming you hve the speakers a few feet apart) you get that feeling of it being "large" when really it's not that loud.

Guitar Center added a replica of the “Black Beauty” Les Paul Custom, with three pickups, that Peter Frampton used as his main guitar from his days in Humble Pie through his early solo career, photographed playing the instrument on the front jackets of his albums Frampton and Frampton Comes Alive. It has all the same qualities such as the three uncovered humbucking pickups and missing pickguard. The Black Beauty was not issued until 1957; however, the one given to Frampton by a fan named Mark Mariana was a 1954 model that had been routed out for a middle pickup.
: : : Does anyone know for sure where these originated. I have been told Vox (the England years) made this flat bodied plank guitar in the skiffle days of early 60's/late 50's. Mine is painted white(by hand) with a large black pick guard that curves to envelope the two chrome "toaster" pickups ,bottom of neck, and three control knobs.The strings have a moveable maple bridge(not secured) and a small chrome hardtail heel.The neck has a zero fret at top and 19 more playing frets.There are dot inlays at the 3rd,5th,seventh,ninth,12th,and 17th frets.The headstock is of natural finish light maple with a top edge cut at a sloping angle like Hofner.It has brass tuning pegs,gears and gear plates and the keys are white plastic.The beautiful short neck is true ,natural maple.Along one of the tuning gear plates is the numbers: 35515 which are etched into the wood. Four bolts without any plate hold the neck base to the plain body and a green decal above the pegs at top face of headstock reads: Shadow. The fret board is rosewoodand is laid on neck without bindings.It has six strings and sounds like a short scale Baritone guitar. It also only has one strap peg at bottom since they used to put the other end of strap on a tuning key. No other holes are seen for any former peg at other end of body(where normally found). Please send any info on this small,early,simple but awesome sounding electric skiffle guitar from England(Vox?).Thanks!!!!! VoteinNovember
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