Mike Longworth’s book shows at least three guitar amplifiers carrying the Martin name from the early ’60s. Who made them is unknown… most certainly it wasn’t Martin. In 1961 Martin marketed a pair of combos, the Model 110T and Model 112T. Both had top rear-mounted controls and a very groovy geometrical grillcloths in a sort of M.C. Escher pattern. Presumably the 110 featured a 10″ speaker, while the 112 had a 12″. The “T” suggests a tremolo circuit. In 1962 Martin offered a very cool #700 portable amplifier, a unit ensconced in a leather carrying case, presumably battery-powered.
The Rolls-Royce of multi-effects pedals is the Line 6 POD HD500X. As far as the top 5 pedals in this guide, the HD500X is the most full-featured, most complex, and also the priciest. Despite carrying a higher price tag than the others, it comes very highly recommended and landed a solid second place on our list, and this is mostly due to two things:
"Rocksmith 2014" is geared toward beginners and starts with the basics, like getting your guitar in tune. Then it'll pick a song based on your skill level. The earlier version's "journey" mode has been replaced by a "mission" mode (it is a video game, after all) with tasks like playing a song that "Rocksmith" recommends or hitting 75 percent accuracy. You get feedback after each run through a song, and you have tasks to check off as you play, like hitting five notes in a row. As you succeed, the game throws more tasks and notes at you, adjusting the difficulty as you go.

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Enough with the American brands, haven’t the rest of the world got something to offer? Well, Japan has come up with a few! Ibanez for example offer amazing guitars, and when they first started out the original idea was actually to offer good copies of American electric guitars! Today they have moved on to doing their own thing, and produce excellent guitars.
TonePad – provides ready-to-use layouts and circuit boards for effects and amplifier projects to the do-it-yourself music community. All layouts are provided free of charge and are subject to the limitations set forth on their legal page. Parts are available from Small Bear Electronics, and ready-made PCBs for many projects are now available directly through tonepad.
Because of the miniaturization of all things electronic, you can now get full-sounding, authentic guitar sounds from a unit the size of a disposable camera — as long as you listen to it through headphones (meaning that it has no speaker or power amp of its own). These battery-powered wonders come with belt clips for untethered practicing (great for checking your stage moves in the mirror).

Hybrid picking is a technique that makes use of both the pick and the remaining pick hand fingers. On the surface, it’s more versatile than playing with just with a pick. Digging deeper, you’ll learn hybrid picking has the same, yet different mojo than fingerpicking as well. At the end of the day, this technique is a very powerful one that will enable you to play things that would be otherwise impossible. Be it oddly accented phrases to wide interval licks to more intricate chordal ideas, hybrid picking opens up in credible options.
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This years new Guitar World Magazine Holiday Buyers Guide issue is full of great gear for the upcoming holiday season. The amazing new FU-Tone Design Your Own & the Titanium Bridges are featured and well worth checking out. Make sure you pickup a copy of the new Buyers Guide on news stands today and all of the beautiful women photographed don't hurt either!
“William Kraus, who uses the logo (in highly stylized abalone) “WK” in which both the W and the K seem to be mating or something, is a maker of extremely fine sounding, beautifully hand-crafted guitars, in the traditional design of the great dreadnoughts of the past. This one, however, exceeds all expectations of excellence and beauty in that it has a Honduran rosewood back, sides and headstock overlay. About Honduran Rosewood, according to the website “globaltrees” (edited): Honduran Rosewood is a valuable timber species. Honduran rosewood – a/k/a Dalbergia stevensonii is known only from Belize, Guatemala and southern Mexico. Its valuable rosewood timber is highly sought after for quality products including musical instruments, turnery and carving. Honduran rosewood is reportedly the best wood for marimba and xylophone keys and it has been suggested as an acceptable substitute in guitars for Brazilian rosewood – Dalbergia Nigra — (international trade in which is now banned under CITES). Because it is a Dalbergia, like Brazilian, it sounds absolutely unbelievable!”
An open tuning allows a chord to be played by strumming the strings when "open", or while fretting no strings. The base chord consists of at least three notes and may include all the strings or a subset. The tuning is named for the base chord when played open, typically a major triad, and each major-triad can be played by barring exactly one fret.[60] Open tunings are common in blues and folk music,[59] and they are used in the playing of slide and lap-slide ("Hawaiian") guitars.[60][61] Ry Cooder uses open tunings when he plays slide guitar.[59]
In Part 4 of Gibson’s Effects Explained series we’re going to look at modulation effects. This group includes phasing, flanging, chorus, vibrato and tremolo, rotary speaker effects, and octave dividers, the latter of which I have loosely grouped in here because … well, they don’t fit in overdrive or delay, do they? Later analog versions of the first three of these—phasing, flanging, and chorus—do, as a matter of fact, use much of the same technology as echo and delay units, although with chips having shorter delay times, but it makes sense to include them here because their obvious sonic characteristics are of a type with other units made from very different kinds of circuits. Most such effects were developed in an effort to add depth, dimension and movement to the guitar’s natural sound without necessarily distorting it, strictly speaking. A few noteworthy types also developed from effects that were in use on the electronic organ. This is another big category, so we’ll split it into two chunks.

The Effect: Wah pedals are primarily based on inductors, and later on Fasel inductors – serving as integral parts which play a big role in the outcome of the sound itself. They work on a basic principle, by adjusting a wah pedal’s footswitch your sound frequency’s behavior is modified, resulting in a “wah wah” tone – for further clarification take a listen to “Voodoo Child” by Jimi Hendrix. Naturally, effects may vary slightly or greatly depending on the model in question. Some of the most popular modern wah pedals are Dunlop’s numerous Cry Baby iterations and Vox’ marvelous classic enhanced remakes. The thing that sets wah pedals apart from other types in a unique way, is the fact that they rarely feature any controls, it’s just the footswitch and a dynamic range of impressive funky tones at your disposal.
Our congratulations and deepest thanks on making Ibanez your choice of instrument. Ibanez standards are second to none. All Ibanez instruments are set up to our strict quality control standards before shipping. The purpose of this manual is to explain how to maintain your instrument’s finish and to keep your guitar playing as well as it did when it...
First of all, the pickup configuration is getting into the heavy metal side of things and, like the two previous recommendations, it offers a great introduction into changing your sounds on the fly. You know that expert players are constantly stomping on effects pedals to change the tone of the guitar, but they’re also tweaking the pickup positions, tones and volumes to create unique sounds, too.
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I bought my 10 year old son a digitech RP355 multi effects pedal to use. It's cheap and simple to edit patches for different sounds and you can download patches to get the sound used in some popular songs but the thing I like best about it is the amplifier emulation. After using it for a while my son found he liked the sound of Vox amps so we bought a AC4 and it sounds great. I liked the fender deluxe and bassman amps so I had a deluxe amp circuit built by a local amp guy. Later on you will find that you want to move on to real pedals as they sound better so a multieffects pedal is a good way to sample a lot of different effects in one package. Most multi effect pedals have a sampling function so you can record a short song segment and then the unit will replay it while you solo along. Some also have the ability to record from an outside source and then play it back at slower speed so you can learn tricky licks. Lastly, most units have drum tracks which is a great way to play along and stay on time.
This is another incredible right handed electric guitar from Cort guitars. It mostly comes in red color and has 6 strings. It has its body made of agathis and fret board from rosewood. The fret board is composed of up to 24 jumbo size frets. It is a sassy looking guitar that is quite affordable, with prices ranging from INR 9,999 to INR 10,050. Click below to get more information on the product.
The 1964 TRG-1 was a slightly more asymmetrical variant of the WG body style, with offset double cutaways and offset waists. It had the squared-off Bizarro Strat head introduced in ’63 and rectangular-edge fingerboard inlays. The tail was a primitive top-mounted trapeze. Most of the face of the guitar was covered with a large metal pickguard, which had one two-tone neck pickup. The volume and tone knobs were above the strings, as was a small sliding on/off switch for the amp. In the off position, the guitar played out as a normal electric guitar. Horizontal grill slots were cut into the pickguard, behind which sat a 3-inch speaker. The amp operated on two 9-volt batteries installed in back. The TRG-1 shown in the subsequent ’64-65 catalog had a new, hooked headstock, but all the examples I’ve seen have the squared-off Bizarro Strat head. Also, the model I have has a TRE100 designation on the back sticker, so at least some were called this.
Remember, when you choose to buy an electric guitar by itself (not as part of a ‘starter pack’), you’ll also need to buy an amp, guitar cable, and a tuner. These are extra costs that you should budget for on top of the cost of your new guitar. I recommend that beginners keep their first amp purchase conservative–both in price and size. Here’s what I’d recommend:
Bass amp speaker cabinets are typically more rigidly constructed, with thicker wood and more heavy bracing than those for non-bass amplification. They usually include tuned bass reflex ports or vents cut into the cabinet, for increased efficiency at low frequencies and improved bass sound. Preamplifier sections have equalization controls that are designed for the deeper frequency range of bass instruments, which extend down to 41 Hz or below. Bass amplifiers are more likely to be designed with heat sinks and/or cooling fans than regular guitar amplifiers, due to the high power demands of bass amplification. They are also more commonly equipped with audio compression or limiter circuitry to prevent overloading the power amplifier and to protect the speakers from damage due to unintended clipping in the power amp.
PRS is an American guitar company founded by luthier Paul Reed Smith in 1985. It makes some of the finest high-end electric guitars and custom shop instruments. It was extremely popular in the '90s and eventually spread to Asia, where they started the SE lineup that was more affordable and budget-friendly. However, they are not meant for beginners even though they cost less. They are used by musicians and players of all kinds of genres. The high-end models are classy and can be somewhat expensive.

1960's Harmony H-54 Rocket 2 Redburst- Here's another excellent example of rock-n-roll to jazz all rolled up in one. For not much coin the Harmony Rocket was a great choice of hundreds of thousands from music stores to Sear Catalogs. This guitar is in very near mint condition as you can see. There's just limited amount of wear on tips of headstock with a amlost perfect back. Two great sounding DeArmond Gold Foil Pickups power this baby. Guitar has a 4 bolt neck which was the better neck from Harmony. It's all original, except for the pick guard, which no one can detect. Condition excellent for this great 50 year old beauty. SOLD
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One step up is the combination of a treble cut and a bass cut, with a single knob to select between them, like the one in the Electro-Harmonix Big Muff (Figure 2). The knob selects a blend of highs left over from the bass cut side and lows left over from the treble cut side. If you make the cut frequencies of the treble and bass sides far apart, you get a persistent midrange scoop, as in the original Big Muff. You can also have the bass and treble sides overlap in the middle and get a midrange hump in response. The near-endless variations you can get by tinkering with the relative values of the parts and the need for only one knob make this a favorite in effects.

An awesome acoustic-electric guitar at affordable price! I felt like this is one of my smartest purchase. I have an OM one with very beautiful look - ivory-color spruce top and chocolate-color back and side. The guitar comes with built-in Fishman pick-up and tuner. It has bright and sweet sound on picking, while having strong and resonant sound on strumming. With capo, the tone can be transformed to be soft and deep suitable for sad songs. Most importantly, it is a full-sized guitar playable by a lady with small hand and short arm like me!
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OK, I’ve put a new set of strings on now. We’re now going to carry out the following steps, just like we did in the general electric guitar setup post. 1. Check and adjust neck bow (how straight the neck is) 2. Check and adjust saddle height 3. Check and adjust the intonation (how far back or forward the saddles need to sit at the bridge to keep your guitar as in tune as possible no matter what fret you’re playing)


Its simple yet effective design and revolutionary sound broke ground and set trends in electric guitar manufacturing and popular music. Introduced for national distribution as the Broadcaster in the autumn of 1950, it was the first guitar of its kind produced on a substantial scale. Its commercial production can be traced as far back as March 1950, when the single- and dual-pickup Esquire models were first sold. The Telecaster has been in continuous production in one form or another since its first incarnation.[1] The Fender Telecaster has been mostly used in music genres such as country and rock, but is also sometimes used in blues and jazz.


The National String Instrument Corporation for manufacturing these louder guitars was founded probably in 1927, in Los Angeles, by John Dopyera, George Beauchamp, Ted Kleinmeyer and Paul Barth, when production and advertising began. The company was officially certified as a California corporation in 1928. For a detailed accounting of those early years, I recommend Brozman’s book, The History and Artistry of National Resonator Instruments (Centerstream Publishing, Fullerton, California, 1993). This is a horribly confusing relationship, so stick with me; we’ll try to put it right.
Lyle guitars are among the rarest brands of electric and acoustic guitars in the world. Produced during an indefinite timeline in the 1960s and 1970s in Japan, the history of the Lyle instrument brand remains somewhat of a mystery. Total distribution of Lyle instruments in the U.S. was very limited. The same company that produced many of them, Matsumoku, also produced the more popular Aria brand.
This is a guitar that feels alot like a pre-CBS Fender strat. It has all the tones. If you didn't already know, G&L stands for George and Leo. As in LEO FENDER. The headstock is a little different, but the pickups are great, not Noiseless but definitely not NOISY either. Mine is a physically heavy guitar. It sounds heavy too - in a good way. Still, I can get all the tones I need from all the pickups. I believe that the neck pickup is superior to the Mexican Made Fender Strat. The pearloid pickguard is pretty. These Indonesian made strats sound great. They're made in the same factory as the Squiers but definitely sound different.

If you're getting your amp for the purposes of playing out with a band, it's very tempting to invest in a large amplifier, whether that means a big combo or a half-stack (don't even mention a full stack). I get it; it's what the pros use when they're rocking out at festivals. The reality there is that the vast majority of the time, whenever you see a guitarist with a wall of sound, it's comprised mainly of dummy cabs with no actual speakers. It's for the look.
This is easily the most popular category of effect, and sonically is the natural first-step away from the thin sound of a straight, clean amplified guitar. If a player only owns one pedal, chances are it’s a distortion, fuzz, or booster box, and plenty of players have collections of several or even dozens of units from this genre, and use two or three at a time on their pedalboards for different colors and textures and levels of sonic sizzle. Yep, of the players who want to change their guitar’s pure sound in the first place, more probably want to filth it up than all of the other options combined.
Justin actually has two YouTube channels, one for his guitar lessons and one for teaching particular songs. While his channels are excellent, you’re better off to access them from his website at www.justinguitar.com where you’ll find full, comprehensive menus and links to each video along with explanations of the content. You’ll have no problems of watching a full video, only to discover it doesn’t include what you wanted.
Making their second appearance on our list, Mesa Boogie delivers with the Dual Rectifier Rackmount (appropriately nicknamed the “Racktifier”). This 3-U behemoth is simply a Dual Rectifier Head, and is one of the very few rackmounts to contain a pre-amp and power-amp all-in-one.  The Racktifier is made for those who simply want the dual rectifier sound, but have the “rack-gear bug”.
I haven't listened to all the amps on the list but found the Rivera Knucklehead blew away every Fender, Marshalla and Mesa in the shop when I was testing things out for the clean blues with a PRS. My daughter playfully plugged in a Gretsch baritone, cranked up the gain and Three Days Grace came screaming out with the finest quality. She agreed the Knucklehead was a win.
Hey Johnny, have just been reading your article which I found very interesting. My 11yr old daughter, a great ukelele player & an extremely quick learner, I am thinking of stepping her up to a guitar. The delimar is an acoustic or a bothie acoustic-electric, as she hasn’t established her style of music yet, thought a bothie would give her both options. Am hoping you could express some advise on what could be the best way of approaching this transition and a list of guitars to check out for her. I don’t want to be fooled and purchase a sh*t one so to speak! Greatly appreciate your time and advise. Thanks Jules
Like many others, Frenchman Patrice Vigier started with a guitar repair shop before establishing his own company in 1980 in order to introduce his first instruments from the Arpege series. The trapezoidal, neck-through body construction is reinforced by a metallic sublayer. One of the models has a metal fretless fretboard, electronic supply by accumulator and a locking string-through body bridge. The Excalibur series was born in 1991 and features a bolt-on neck and a Floyd Rose tremolo system. Available in different variations, it remains the brand's signature up to this day. Vigier instruments are entirely made in France following a quality-oriented philosophy. Among the artists playing Vigier guitars are Gary Moore and Bumblefoot.
The Streamliner concept is simple: to create more affordable Gretsch guitars without losing their specific DNA. Two new Broad'Tron humbuckers are controlled in classic Gretsch style by a three-way toggle selector switch on the bass side shoulder, a master volume on the treble side horn, and then a trio of controls by the treble-side f-hole for individual-pickup volume and master tone. The G2622's construction gives a different response and resonance to other new releases from Gretsch and, with these pickups, moves further from the Gretsch sound. And while its construction gives it a more solid, or at least ES-335, character, it's a little more airy and less punchy with a softer, squashier tonality. The beefier pickups certainly don't nail a classic Gretsch tonality - although if that's what you want, the full-size pickups are easy to replace - but they do broaden the sonic potential, especially for more gained styles, while staying close to the classic iconography. If you want a great-value semi-hollow, this is among the best electric guitars for under $500.

This guitar was first introduced in 2014, and has since been one of their more popular acoustics - thanks to its USA hand-crafted quality which you can own for a relatively accessible cost. The guitar is built using North American tonewoods that include solid walnut back and sides, along with a solid Sitka spruce for the top. This configuration, along with Gibson's premium build quality results in a balanced and full sounding acoustic voice, that elegantly matches the vibe of the instrument.
The first model that comes to mind when this British brand is mentioned is the AC-30, which is basically an AC-15 with twice the output power. Launched in 1958, the amp became famous thanks to the Shadows. Vox deeply influenced the sound of the British music explosion in the 1960's, especially due to The Beatles (who were even endorsers of the brand in their early days), the Rolling Stones and the Kinks. Later, many other artists became real AC-30 addicts, like Brian May (Queen), The Edge (U2) and Radiohead. The brand was bought by Korg in 1992 and, although the AC-30 is still in the catalog, additional series have been introduced, like the Night Train lunchboxes or the Valvetronix, which embrace the digital world.
Great playing and sounding bass. The Ibanez BTB series in a 'very playable' 4-string version. Huge tone is delivered via 2 active pickups that feature controls for volume, bass, midrange, treble and balance. We believe the pickups are actually made by Bartolini. 'Locking' 1/4 jack. Solid wood, natural finish body. Rosewood fingerboard on maple neck. Tuning is accomplished via quality, 'sealed' tuning machines. Rock solid and stays in tune. Set up great! Currently has 'nylon wound' strings for a softer 'jazz' tone. Frets show virtually no wear. Body finish has VERY little wear. Includes gig bag.

New Mooer Red Truck Multi Effect Pedal. Mooer Red Truck. The Mooer Red Truck is one of the most full-featured effects strip on the market. Featuring several effects modules within one unit, this is designed for players who prefer the simplicity of single effects over multi-effects and want a portable solution for rehearsals, gigs, or where carrying a lot of gear is an issue.
Distortion and overdrive: In the early days of electronic music, vacuum tube amplifiers were used for processing the output electrical signals. Like any amplifier, these tube amplifiers had a maximum amplification above which they began to clip the peaks of the waveforms. While the resulting distortion may have disturbed the electrical engineers, a substantial fraction of the musicians liked the distorted sound and it became part of the musical medium.
The use of two or more mics is likely to result in other phase issues when these mics are combined in the mix, since they will almost certainly be capturing sound waves that reach the mic capsules at slightly different times. Whether such issues are bad enough to cause a problem (or even be heard) depends on the situation. First, if your two mics sound odd and hollow and/or lacking in low-end from the outset, flip the phase of one (usually via a switch on the preamp or afterward in your DAW) to ensure you aren’t trying to blend two mics that are reverse-phase in the first place. If your two-mic sound goes from hollow and thin sounding to fat and full, you had a reverse-phase issue. If it doesn’t improve – or gets worse – you need to consider other remedies. Once you know that both mics are at least in phase with each other, you can improve their phase relationship even further by moving the position of one around until any other sonic oddities are less obtrusive, which is simply determined by finding a pair of positions that are really smoking tone-wise.

Pressing a string against a fret reduces the vibrating length of that string to the distance between the pressure point and the bridge, thereby controlling pitch. On nearly every Western fretted instrument, the distance between frets is a semi-tone of equal temperament, assuring the easy achievement of strong sounding chords and single notes that fit our hemisphere’s usual expectations for rhythm sounds and melodies. Understanding the virtues and limitations created by the order of frets opens up the door to ways to escape their constricts, like bending strings, playing slide, using whammy bars, delving into extended technique or trying fretless instruments.

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