Guitarists have their own special system of music notation called guitar tablature, or "guitar tabs" for short. Using guitar tabs, a guitarist can play a wide variety of music without ever having to learn how to read standard sheet music. Though guitar tabs aren't a perfect way of describing music, they've allowed newer generations of guitarists to quickly and easily share information about how to play songs across the globe via the internet. Every guitarist should have at least a basic understanding of how to read tablature - it's the de facto shorthand for much of the guitar music you'll find written out online.
This guitar follows after the tried and tested formula of old Stratocaster design, from the double cutaway alder body to the bolt-on maple neck, down to its triple single coil pickup configuration. The scale length follows after traditional builds at 25.5", while the neck profile (modern C) and narrower nut width of 1.65" makes this guitar viable for modern players. While it doesn't have vintage voiced pickups, the default pickups are not so bad either, and will give you the distinctive Strat tone that almost everybody loves.
Dissatisfaction with vintage units of this type usually centers around their limited gain, and their inability to sound truly fierce with Drive cranked up to full. The more exemplary users of this type of pedal, however—such as Stevie Ray Vaughan or Eric Johnson, who were both masters of early Tube Screamers—usually kept the Drive control in the lower part of its range, where the sound remains more natural and, yet again, serves as an excellent pre-boost to drive a good tube amp into distortion when the Level control is set high enough. Some players also find older pedals built to this design to have a distinct midrange hump, a slightly wooly tonality, and/or a lack of low end (as ever, depending upon the ears of the player you talk to). Consequently, a lot of newer makers have accounted for these in their redesigns. Visual Sound’s Route 66 pedal has a Bass Boost switch, Ibanez’s own recent-era TS9DX Turbo Tube Screamer has a Mode control that takes you from classic sounds to settings with more distortion and more low end, and plenty of other makers address both in their variations on the circuit.

The Fender Stratocaster born in the early 1950's in Southern California, and more precisely in Fullerton, near Los Angeles, hometown of the Fender(tm) Musical Instrument Co. Since it's official debut in early 1954, the Fender Stratocaster(tm) has proved to be possibly the most successful electric guitar ever manufactured. Quite a legend in it's own right! The Strat(tm) - as it is affectionately known has to be acknowledged as one of the major landmarks in the history of the guitar. It enjoys a popularity undiminished by time and changing fashions and remains quite clearly a firm favourite among many generations of players, no matter what their style of music....... Fender Stratocaster 'Tex Mex' Jimmie Vaughan signature model - $999


Unlike many of the other pedals, which are designed to create dramatic or exciting effects, these units take care of the less glamorous (but still very important) jobs in creating your tone. Sound-conditioning effects are the ones that will give the finishing touches to your sound, making the difference between “amateur garage band” and “international touring guitarist.”
Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Ash - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 5 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Inlay: Pearl - Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Headstock: 6 In-Line - Bridge: Tremolo - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Black - Pickups: Ibanez - String Instrument Finish: Natural Blue
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If you’re a beginner, you may still be in the process of exploring different playing styles or developing your own. In this case, it’s best to go for a versatile guitar that can accommodate a variety of acoustic playing styles. Fortunately, the guitars on this list are also versatile players. Some, however, may cater to a more specific style. For instance, the Taylor 214ce’s bright sound and the Seagull Maritime’s wider nut make these models great for those who do a lot of fingerstyle playing.


A bass amplifier or "bass amp" is a musical instrument electronic device that uses electrical power to make lower-pitched instruments such as the bass guitar or double bass loud enough to be heard by the performers and audience. Bass amps typically consist of a preamplifier, tone controls, a power amplifier and one or more loudspeakers ("drivers") in a cabinet. While bass amps share many features with the guitar amplifiers used for electric guitar, such as providing an amplifier with tone and volume controls and a carrying handle, they are distinct from other types of amplification systems, due to the particular challenges associated with low-frequency sound reproduction. This distinction affects the design of the loudspeakers, the size and design of the speaker cabinet and the design of the preamplifier and amplifier. Speaker cabinets for bass amps usually incorporate larger loudspeakers (e.g., 15" speakers are more common for bass than for electric guitar amps) or more speakers and larger cabinet sizes than those used for the amplification of other instruments. The loudspeakers themselves must also be sturdier to handle the higher power levels and they must be capable of reproducing very low pitches at high sound pressure levels.
As obvious as it sounds, a tuner (or tuning pedal) is fundamental for your rig. It can also act as a mute switch for changing guitars between songs. These days there are many smartphone apps for tuning your guitar – as well as clip-on tuners – but when you need precision and a clear visual indication of the pitch of your strings, nothing beats a good old tuning pedal. The Boss TU-3 is a classic tuning pedal with lots of useful settings – alternatively, you can check out the CPT-20 by Harley Benton which features true bypass connections and a super large LCD display. Need a smaller footprint? Try the Mooer Baby Tuner!
Join the "Cigar Box Revolution"! This La Vox Cigar Box Electric Guitar is built from a decidedly uptown-looking round box. Neck-through construction means it is heavier than most cigar boxes, and it performs more like a standard electric guitar. Play some raw, smokin' blues, back-alley funk, or whatever else wells up from deep down inside.  More details...
If there is one body shape out there that everyone will recognize, it is this one. In terms of finish, Fender chose a lacquer clear coat to show off the natural wood instead of their usual choice, and it looks pretty awesome (of course there's a 3 tone sunburst and olympic white too). Made of ash, this particular Strat offers a U-shaped maple neck with a maple fretboard that is bolted onto the body. In terms of pickups, we have a set of three single coils belonging to their vintage line. These come with Alnico magnets, giving you that classic tone we all love so much. The hardware follows the canon as well. Here we have Fender's well known synchronized tremolo bridge paired with a set of F tuners on the headstock.
7) Yamaha quality can't be beat. I just returned from my friend's house and noticed his $1,000 Martin box splitting because of the dry Las Vegas climate. And, no I'm not a believer in guitar humidifiers because I believe a guitar should be made for the real world and not so delicate that it needs a humidifier. My friend and fellow old-time musician who has been working at Guitar Center here in Vegas for many years has seen them all come back over time because of splitting or warping except one brand that is... You guessed it, Yamaha! The reason you find them back ordered from time to time is because Yamaha actually gives their wood time to cure properly unlike other manufacturers who tend to rush their products out the door. And, this guitar is for my kid and for travel which means it needs to be exceptionally tough and well-made:)

There’s a huge range of cheap electric guitars out there that would not look out of place on the stages of the world thanks to high quality manufacturing and the brands actually caring about their products – “cheap” does not always mean poor quality and plenty of guitars out there will give you a fantastic playing experience for many years without breaking the bank.


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The Seagull S6 is another very popular choice for those looking for an affordable but great sounding acoustic. Owners claim it sounds as good as guitars in the $800-$1500 range. The S6 has a cedar top with cherry back and sides. It features a wider nut, which means this guitar will be a great choice for those playing finger style or that have larger hands. Owners of this guitar are singing it’s praises, saying that they have no regrets. The sound of this guitar is big, yet soft. Described as being “alive” with tone. Seagull has been making quality guitars at an affordable price for many years, so the S6 will not disappoint. See more on this guitar here.


Most bass amps have only one rated wattage. A small number of amps, such as the Mesa/Boogie Strategy 88 amp head, have switchable wattage. A selector switch on the 88 enables the bassist to choose its full 465 watt power; half power (250 watts); or low power (125 watts). A bassist playing an arena on one night, then a club gig, and then recording in a studio could use full, half and low power for the different volume requirements. The Quilter 800 Bass Block has a "master control" knob which switches between various watt outputs for a similar approach.

Mention the subject of American acoustic guitars and one of the first names that will undoubtedly pop into your head will be C.F. Martin. Not that there aren’t many other estimable names, but Martin, by virtue of its longevity � since 1833 � and incredible quality remains the standard by which almost all steel-stringed acoustics are judged. A pretty impressive achievement.

As music professionals, we're all familiar with guitarists and the rows of pedals they set up on stage at every gig. They're definitely on to something when it comes to effects on-the-fly, but when you're setting up a studio or pro audio rig, there's a simpler solution: multi effects processors. These full-sized units bring a ton of versatility to the table (or, more accurately speaking, the rack) and they can play a crucial role in shaping your own signature sound.


By definition, distortion pedals are designed to adulterate the guitar’s signal in and of themselves. To use a rough analogy to tube amp tone, where overdrives are looking to take you into anywhere from pushed to cranked JTM45 or tweed Bassman, distortions aim to do the Mesa/Boogie Triple Rectifier, Bogner Ecstasy, or six-Laney-full-stacks trick in a 3"x5" box. These pedals unashamedly screw with your sound. They generally filth it up and slap their own notion of the ideal heavy rock or metal EQ all over your tone’s backside. But of course they will also boost the guitar signal as well (depending on the volume/output/level settings), and the sound we associate with them is still some confluence of pedal and amp, not to mention guitar.
I don’t recall how I got his number, but when I called Dana Sutcliffe to talk about what is probably his most famous—at least known famous—guitar, he said we should do lunch. Dana lives just down the road from me in Delaware, so it was an easy meeting. I asked if he’d ever had Vietnamese pho (beef noodle soup, one of the world’s most perfect foods), and since he hadn’t and since he loves to eat, we met one day in one of South Philadelphia’s numerous pho parlors to discuss the genesis of the Alvarez Dana Scoop. It was, as it turns out, all the result of an accident.

I bought this guitar about 1 month ago. I am a small girl 5'2". I just strap this thing on and walk around the house playing. The pickup sounds freaking great hooked up to my Marshall amp. I have several other guitars including a Taylor 210ce which I also love. But this guitar is great for traveling, camp fires, and just plain old jammin. I chose this over the baby Taylor because the Martin had a full heel on the neck where's the taylor baby did not. It also sounded better when I play both the Taylor and the lx1e side by side. I thought that the Martin had a better "feel" to is as well when holding it. It is a travel guitar so it doesn't balance as well when you are standing with the guitar strap but I don't mind that at all. I love this little guy

Gibson guitars are the produce of the Gibson Guitar Corporation which produces guitars and other musical instruments which sell under a variety of brand names. Gibson Guitar Corporation was founded in the year 1890 by Orville Gibson in USA. It is a mass producer of the Guitars and is the most widely used guitars in the world. Gibson guitars are exported all over the world and are considered as one of the best guitar brands in the world. Gibson Guitars actually are the giant guitar company which also owns other brands of guitars. Some of the popular brands which are owned by Gibson are Baldwin, Epiphone, Kramer, Maestro, Slingerlands etc.
Consideration of this takes us back again to Kink Dave Davies: “The blues players were the first to crank it up, and the music had that spirit, that anguish. We used to listen to all those guys. Like John Lee Hooker—he had that buzz, that drive. I used to listen to him and think, ‘What’s he doing there? That’s amazing—how do you get that sound?’ I think all those elements led to me messing around with amplifiers, because all the amplifiers were clean, soulless.”
First, we decided that we're going to limit this guide to floor-based multi-effects units, and we also deliberately included only those with different effect types/blocks. After looking at currently available units, we ended up adding a total of 24 multi-effects pedals to our database. All relevant reviews, ratings, forum discussions, and expert opinions were fed into the Gearank algorithm, which gave us the scores that we used to narrow down the list to just the top 10 - over 5,200 sources were analyzed during this process. We then listed each of them with important specifications and features, along with noteworthy feedback from actual users and expert reviewers. Finally, we decided to make a divide the list into two categories: compact multi-effects pedals (since many are looking for them), and medium to large size ones. For more information about this process see How Gearank Works.
The new AC15 'Twin' retains the all-important dual-EL84, cathode-biased output section of its forebear, but otherwise it's very different. A quick scan across the top panel reveals two inputs for independent access to either normal or top boost channels. One benefit of the bigger, 2x12 enclosure is that it provides ample room for a full-length reverb tank, housed in the bottom. There's also an in-built tremolo effect, with controls for depth and speed. But the whole point of this amp is the pair of 25-watt Celestion G12M Greenback speakers. They are the speaker of rock in so many cases and while purists might hope for Celestion Blues, they would add a good £300 at least to the price; and he increased power handling of two Greenbacks on the end of just 15 watts is quite a tantalising prospect. It's fair to say that even with the master volume set-up, the magic doesn't really start happening until the amp's lungs are at least half way open, but happily, that's not far from perfect for many of today's pub and bar gigs - it may even be too much for some. The AC15 'Twin' does sound magnificent when clean, but listen carefully to those amps or this and it's rarely completely undistorted. That harmonically rich drive that was never supposed to be there is the key characteristic that latter day, non-master volume AC users find hardest to replicate.
To find which Ernie Ball strings are right for you, the key is experimentation. Figure out which strings sound best to your ear, feel best on your fingers, and most importantly enable you to create the music you want. When you are ready to buy, head over to one of the 5,500 music stores that carry Ernie Ball products. You can discover these stores by visiting our Store Locator.
Mark Tremonti is well-known as an avid gearhead and first impressions of the MT 15 are of a purposeful, working player’s tool with no unnecessary bells or whistles. The MT 15 has clean and lead footswitchable preamp channels, with gain and master volume on the lead channel, and volume on the clean channel. Both channels have their own bass, mid and treble controls with a master presence control and a pull boost on the clean channel to add a mild overdriven edge. Around the back things are kept simple with a series effects loop plus a half-power switch which drops the MT 15 from 15 watts RMS down to around seven watts. At first glance there’s no channel indicator, however, when powered up all the MT 15’s valves are lit by LEDs which change colour: red for lead, blue for clean – very visible and very cool. The lead channel has no less than five gain stages and the amount of gain and distortion on tap is huge. However, it’s also been carefully sculpted into a stunning barrage of harmonic filth that flatters every note and power chord. Often, very high gain can easily descend into an unpleasant mush that’s perceived more as noise than music, yet the MT 15 manages to 
avoid this and retains exceptional clarity and articulation. The clean channel offers plenty of headroom to cater for any guitar, while pulling the channel mid-boost function adds a sweet vintage Fender overdrive with a medium-fast response that’s great for country picking or blues.
Nitrocellulose lacquer is prized as a coating by some guitarists as it is thinner than some other coatings, which some claim leads to a better sound (though we’re not going to wade into that argument here). It’s also easy to blend with paints, and easier to repair. It does have its downsides, however. The solvents used in the lacquer can be potentially damaging to the respiratory systems of workers applying the coating during the guitar’s manufacture, and for this reason other options were sought.
Now, to answer your question I would have to point out a series of popular brands and what they are popular for. After that, you make a decision on which one is best for you. You might see where I’m going with this. There is no single best guitar brand the same way there is no single best car brand. But we do have the Ferraris and Lamborghinis, as well as the Toyotas and Nissans of the guitar world!
In the vintage setup, the pickup is wired to the pot lug alone, with the tone control capacitor being attached to the output side. This tends to allow the volume to be rolled off without losing too much high end. This is great for those who play clean rhythm by just lowering their guitar volume as opposed to switching amp channels or turning off a boost pedal. It’s old-school, and it works. The downside is that the tone control sometimes has to be rotated a bit more before its effects are heard.
The original  Owner purchased this guitar new at Ideal Music in Atlanta and loved her for the last 50 years. Vintage 1967 Gretsch 6120 Chet Atkins Nashville model,factory bigsby replaced "kill switch" tip (the white one) I have an original tip now, to lazy to take new pictures...and reproduction armature inside body for string mute / Muffler system...SEE MORE HERE...
Featuring a comfortable neck and solid spruce top, the Epiphone Dove Pro Acoustic-Electric Guitar rings out with full, rich sound. Based on a design going back to 1962, the Dove Pro is equipped with a Fishman Sonicore pickup system that accurately reproduces its acoustic tone when you plug the guitar into an amplifier or PA system to play with amplified instruments. A terrific value.
"Emulating guitar sounds is problematic – or it was until Impact Soundworks launched Shreddage. Version 2 for Kompact 5 is rammed full of chords and articulations to get the most authentic sound possible […] The quality of the samples here is really good. Although aimed at Rock and Metal, it lends itself to any genre. For those more accustomed to keys than strings, it is ideal with its impressive soundset and amount of control." CM Reviews (Computer Music)
• Wound Up: String windings directly affect tone and playability. Round wound strings have more “zing” – sustain, responsiveness and bite. Flat wound strings have a smoother and more consistent tone regardless of attack, which makes them a favorite of jazz players, like the great Gibson ES-350 legend Barney Kessel. Blues guitar kingpin Jimmie Vaughan also uses flat wounds for his vintage tone. And they offer less resistance than round wound strings, so they can be beneficial for rapid, even toned performance and squeak less.

Since 1946, the P-90 has been pleasing guitarists with its vintage-soaked tone, that shares qualities of both single-coil pickups and humbuckers. P-90s are primarily single-coil in their construction (although larger and flatter), and come in a range of different housings. Although they feature a relatively low output, they provide a meatier tone than a single-coil, but with a bit more sparkle than a humbucker, and are therefore very versatile. They have been put to great use in rock, blues and jazz music, with Pete Townshend, Tony Iommi, and Carlos Santana all taking advantage of the sweet P-90 tone. On our chart above, the Seymour Duncan Antiquity is a great example, but check out more P-90 highlights on the dedicated page.

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The Fender Hot Rod Deluxe or its big brother the Deville come to mind. I have a hot Rod Deluxe tube mode 40 watts and it really pumps out the volume. The simple foot switch allows four settings from clean, mean, beyond mean and in your face. It really makes slide guitar sound like a male cat calling to a female in heat. Also, it can be mellow. I have seen many youtube videos with Eric Clapton playing a Tweed Model. I also own a Line 6 Duo Verb, Line 6 DT50, and of course and old US Made Peavey 5150 Eddie Van Halen Signature Model. The Peavey really pumps up the heat and the sustain is as wide as the Grand Canyon.
This is a real nice D-18 it Booms quite nicely with Vintage Tone of that of a much more expensive Big Named guitar for a fraction of what you would pay..its Japanese crafted 29 years ago by the master craftsman in one of the finest Japanese builders factory.. the great Ibanez...the Label inside says... THE MARK OF QUALITY CIMAR Quality Produced under Strict Quality Control by IBANEZ "Made in Japan" Serial # 82110013k ... 1st 2 digits 82 that's the year...now not all Japanese Ibanez old guitars are so great not at all ..many were very low end guitars we saw in the 60's & 70's as a kid myself most were junk or we called them toys.. now that's not true for all of them though I can honestly say that... This is not a cheap guitar nor is it built cheaply ..this example was one of the good impressive one's they used beautiful grade woods on... This particular example it has a Strikingly beautiful straight grained Sitka Spruce Top ... it has ambered nicely now naturally with it's great patina created over the last 29 years . ya don't get that with a new Ibanez or even dare I say Martin with those white looking spruce top "yuck on thanks"... sorry back to this one ... The back sides & neck are all gorgeously grained AA higher grade Mahogany the fingerboard is dark Indian Rosewood with an ebony bridge..even the Original string Pins are aged beautifully amber tipped... I'm lookin pretty hard everywhere and I can not find a crack - separation or a defect to be found anywhere only the most minute microscopic its that clean.... JVG Condition RATED: @ better than average in Excellent used vintage condition wow!..This neck is arrow straight with a perfect medium slim taper neck feels great and action is EZ to play just about perfect...1-11/16ths at the nut very comfortable feel, frets are considered excellent vintage at lest 92%... Comes with a free Chip board case or an optional upgrade to a Hard shell case / ask... Just in.. no pics yet coming very soon stay tuned! Thanks for your interest.

This article was extremely helpful for me to understand the 5 way (ok, 3 way) switch. I’ve only previously wired a guitar with one double humbucker, and now I’m going to replace the bridge and neck pickups in an Ibanez that has HSH. The 8 contacts were confusing me since my last wiring job didn’t even involve a switch, but after reading this I know exactly what to do.

DR Strings makes strings that were specifically designed for drop d tuning, other alternate tunings, and even standard tuning. Known as DDT strings, DR spent over two years perfecting them. DR created a new patent pending method for constructing these strings to ensure great performance with lower pitches. Because of the amazing construction, and their ability to quickly lock into tune so quickly, DR calls their DDT's "Superstrings". Why not try a set? DDT's are available for electric guitar or bass guitar.
Acoustic guitar body sizes and styles differ between manufacturers. The C.F. Martin Company has been at the forefront of setting trends in body styles and sizes, and many companies have followed suit with their standards as a solid foundation,and altering their designs to creat custom sizes and styles. The following describes some of the common acoustic guitar body sizes and styles, and shares a little bit about the sound and tone profiles.   These profiles do not follow Martins standards to a tee, but do exhibit some of the most commonly used acoustic guitar body sizes and styles used, many having been influenced by the Martin Guitar Company.
This guitar is the J Mascis signature, specifically spec’d out by the man at an affordable pricepoint. Jazzmasters will never not be cool, in part because their versatility tends to exceed expectations. Like the Modern Player Tele above, Fender leveraged much-improved Chinese production to bring this in under $500. They also opted for lesser P90 pickups compared to the expected (and usually truly excellent) proper Jazzmasters, but many players won’t notice this.
Palmer is a Miami, FL based guitar maker. They have high end models made in the states and cheap models contracted out to the highest bidder like most guitar maker today. I would say that if you tried to sell one of these, you would most likely not get what you paid for it new because they are simply made cheaply in huge numbers. They eventually turn up at used music shops and garage sales around the country. I wouldn't pay more than $50 for one myself and did just that. They make good campfire guitars.
Every single pickup on this Godin XTSA is awesome in its own right, but the best part of it all is dialing ina combination of the two. By virtue of its quality, it gives plenty of power, possessing a wonderful sounding high end cutting through, which makes it possible for you to hear it over the keyboard and the bass. With this electric guitar, you can get a beautiful acoustic sound and a really fat and great sound as well.
No matter how good a tech may be, his preferences are going to be different than yours on string height, etc. And he is never going to use the exact same amount of pressure fretting a note as you do (affects intonation adjustments). So, the best you can hope for is finding a good tech with good comunication skills, willing to listen to what you want. I'll admit I've never tried to find one, but that sounds more difficult than learning to do the setups yourself, which is what I did.
Birmingham’s Table Scraps add a grunge-y Midlands mud to the garage rock sound established by the likes of 13th Floor Elevators and The Cramps. Guitarist Scott sticks to a “three-pedal limit”, using a Death By Audio Fuzz War (“a versatile monster”), Echo Dream 2 and Boss DD-3 to jarring effect to create freaky, DC59’d melodic lead bursts. As Scott says: “Once you try 12-string everything else only sounds half as good.”
Chord CG-10Classically styled guitar combo in a vinyl covered cabinet with metal corner protectors and basket-weave style grille cloth. Front control panel is recessed with retro "chicken-head" control knobs and additional features for Gain, EQ and outputs. Custom solid-state circuitry is voiced to produce authentic vintage-style clean and driven tones.•Headphone output for practice•Switchable clean and drive channels•Classic styling•Power supply; 230Vac, 50Hz (IEC)•Model: CG-10•Output: 10Wrms•Speaker; 165mm (6.5")•Controls: Gain, drive switch, volume, treble, middle, bass•Connections: Guitar input, headphones out (6.3mm jack)•Dimensions; 290 x 280 x 150mm•Weight: 4.0kg
The PRS McCarty 594 features a double cutaway body style. It has an African mahogany body with a figured maple 10-Top and gloss nitrocellulose finish. The neck is mahogany and is topped with a bound dark rosewood fretboard with a 10-inch radius and iconic bird inlays. The neck sports a new Pattern Vintage neck shape, which is as wide as the standard Pattern neck profile but with just a little extra thickness and a slightly asymmetric carve.
Williamson went on to produce and play on Iggy’s classic solo 1979 album New Values, which features gems like “I’m Bored” and “Five Foot One.” The guitarist also played a key role on the follow-up disc, Soldier, anchoring a punk rock all-star lineup that included ex-Pistol Glen Matlock, Ivan Kral from the Patti Smith Band and Barry Adamson from Magazine. Shortly after Soldier, Williamson took a hiatus from rock to study electronic engineering, becoming Vice President of Technology and Standards for Sony.

The BOSS ME-80 multi effects pedal is an excellent entry point into effects as it contains just about every type of effect you can think of. The ME-80 allows you to chain eight effect groups together in one patch with 36 preset patches allowing you to seamlessly switch from rock to funk to jazz at the push of a footswitch. There are also 36 user patches so you can create your own tone.
You can use compression not only to keep levels under control but also to increase sustain. Sometimes a guitar part will work better in a track if the sustain is created using a little less overdrive augmented by compression rather than relying on overdrive alone. Even a heavily overdriven guitar sound can be made to appear more powerful if compressed, as its average energy level is increased further, though any noise will also be rendered more obvious. Clean guitar parts can also benefit enormously from compression, as it creates a more dense, even sound and can emphasise the picking attack of the notes when a longer attack time is set. Using a faster release time, so as to cause audible level pumping, can make for exciting rock guitar sounds, but some compressors pump more gracefully than others — Dbx models are quite popular in this respect.
*We build all of our Custom Shop and Semi-Custom instruments from scratch and on demand - therefore, Custom Shop and Semi-Custom orders are fulfilled in the order in which they were received. These times can vary due to demand and the custom options you choose. Our production/assemble time frame: 20 - 25 working days since our professional Control Team and Supervisor Engineer will ensure that your ordered guitar is top notch considering the fact that this guitar is intricate to assemble and they check very carefully every detail such as the finish, fret work, pickups, strings. And also, they will test the sound quality. We do not rush up the process of manufacturing your guitar since we would like to deliver to you best quality performance.
Every beginner guitarist deserves to learn on an instrument that's built by experienced craftsman who use only the finest materials. However, for many novice players, it's difficult to know for sure what's considered a high quality instrument. To make things easier, many popular guitar brands offer guitar value packages. These packages consist of all the essential pieces of equipment that a learning guitarist would use in the developmental stages of their playing. Within this section, you'll find more than enough guitar value package options to choose from.
Make sure you have a sharp pair of wire cutters and a pair of those pointy nose pliers for bending and cutting component leads. Don’t forget solder too. There are a whole bunch of solder specifications covering materials, size, process etc. You’ll need rosin core solder. It comes in different thicknesses. 0.031” diameter is a common size, and will work for most pedal projects. Solder is normally sold in reels by weight. A 1/4lb reel will be enough to last a good few pedal projects. Lastly, get lead free, no clean solder. Although not strictly necessary for personal projects, lead-free solder is common now and safer. No clean, means that you can leave the flux residue behind without having to clean it off, and it won’t damage your board.
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The guitar builder for the giants of jazz, Ibanez now introduces the Artstar AS153 Semi-Hollow Electric Guitar, to answer the needs of the working professional player. Crafted from specially selected tone woods, this guitar features a bone nut, ebony fingerboard, hand-rolled frets and Ibanez's famous Super 58 pickups-capable of tone magic any place...  Click To Read More About This Product

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Cort Guitars is known as a South Korean centered guitar manufacturing brand, which provide almost all kinds of guitars for the better music melodies and tunes. They are regarded as among the largest manufacturer of guitars in the world. The company was founded in 1973. Bass, electric and acoustic guitars are produced by this brand. The best models of guitar includes Classic Rock, Aero Series, Hollowbody series, VL, Performer, G series etc. Available price is Rs. 10,449/- onwards (approx). For further information, visit www.cortguitars.com.
Barney Kessel was known for playing his Gibson hollow body jazz guitar and used it almost exclusively on his own recordings. But when it came to rock, pop, r&b and blues recording sessions with the most popular performers of the early '60s such as Elvis Presley, Sam Cooke, Connie Francis, T-Bone Walker, Ike & Tina Turner, Phil Spector, Dinah Washington and Bobby Darin, Kessel turned to his Kay Barney Kessel Artist guitar.
Description: Body: Basswood (Tilia, Linden, Lime) - Neck Attachment: Bolt - Neck Wood: Maple & Bubinga - Neck Construction: 3 Piece - Nut Width: 48mm - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: Jumbo - # of Strings: 7 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Headstock: 7 In-Line - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Black, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: EMG 707 - String Instrument Finish: Black
Pitch shift effects, which includes harmony and octave pedals, are a lot of fun, and add depth and flavor to a guitar player’s sound. The effect works by taking the fundamental note being played on the guitar, and adding another note either above or below the original. Simply adding more notes will often produce odd, off-key notes if you’re not careful. Most modern pitch-shifting effects use advanced technology to make sure the added notes work harmoniously with the original.
Yet another acoustic steel guitar for the right handed guitarists. It has 6 strings and mostly comes in tobacco sunburst without a case. The perfect design makes it suitable for use by beginner guitarists. The sides and the back are made of meranti, with a spruce top. It is quite cost effective, with prices ranging from around INR 8,500 depending on available offers. More about Yamaha F310 TBS can be found on the following website link.
The downside of boosting the volume of an acoustic guitar this way is the fact that every microphone adds a color of its own to the end result, not to mention the preamplifier and any compression and equalization applied. In other words, not only do you have to position the microphone correctly, but you also need to be very careful when choosing which mic to use.
In 1954, Fender introduced the Fender Stratocaster, or "Strat". It was positioned as a deluxe model and offered various product improvements and innovations over the Telecaster. These innovations included an ash or alder double-cutaway body design for badge assembly with an integrated vibrato mechanism (called a synchronized tremolo by Fender, thus beginning a confusion of the terms that still continues), three single-coil pickups, and body comfort contours. Leo Fender is also credited with developing the first commercially successful electric bass called the Fender Precision Bass, introduced in 1951.
I understand and concur with you totally, as a sound man, I love it when everyone is direct, it makes life so much easier. every mike you eliminate adds roughly 3 db headroom overall to the max level without feedback. But as a bassist, and a Chapman Stick player, ampless just feels too flat and lifeless for me. I recently worked a John McLaughlin and Fourth Dimension gig in Bali, Both John, and Gary Husband went direct, it was wonderful. The bassist was amped though, for the same reasons I prefer to be amped If I am playing bass. Nathan East is another who doesn’t like bass in the monitors, preferring the sound and dynamic control of having his own amp. By and large, I find that generally (with some VERY notable exceptions) people who grew up playing concerts “back in the day” prefer amps, subsequent generations of people who grew up playing with small “portable” amps (think SWR, etc.) generally don’t mind going ampless, they have pedal racks, and have the sound they want from that. They don’t miss the air moving on their strings, because they never had it.. Perhaps because I am a dinosaur, I need the feel of 6, or 8 10s behind me, (or at least 2 15s), the resonance effect it has on the strings, makes my instrument come alive and it breathes with a feeling no pedal rack can duplicate. You should see Bootsy Collins’ rig, he had 2 1x18s, 2 2x15s, and 2 4×10 boxes, and that is what he calls his “small gig rig”! I guess I grew up regarding the amp as an integral part of my instrument, without it, playing feels, well, like you don’t have an amp! Even in the studio, I run a DI into the board, but I play through an amp for my own feel. Peas.
Pacifica series of Yamaha electric guitars are the ones you have probably heard of once, mistaken for a Strat a couple of times, but never really considered. Needless to say, that was a mistake. One quick look at Yamaha Pacifica PAC510V OVS reveals why. Before even getting into details it doesn't take much to recognize the apparent quality all around.
A better way to get distortion, of course, is to use guitar effect pedals. Got your hands on some pedals and starting to play around with the sounds you can make? Well, you can still use these tips to further enhance your distorted tone, since the same theory applies. Most distortion pedals have a volume, gain, and distortion knob in addition to whatever additional controls they give you. If you're simply not satisfied with your pedal's guitar distortion, you can turn the gain up and adjust the other settings, just like you'd do on your amp.
Williamson went on to produce and play on Iggy’s classic solo 1979 album New Values, which features gems like “I’m Bored” and “Five Foot One.” The guitarist also played a key role on the follow-up disc, Soldier, anchoring a punk rock all-star lineup that included ex-Pistol Glen Matlock, Ivan Kral from the Patti Smith Band and Barry Adamson from Magazine. Shortly after Soldier, Williamson took a hiatus from rock to study electronic engineering, becoming Vice President of Technology and Standards for Sony.

Johnny Marr is an iconic and influential guitarist best known for his work in the Smiths, which broke up in 1987. His guitar phrases and his genius for crafting textured and tonally rich rhythmic leads has influenced countless rock guitarists of the last quarter-century. Since leaving the Smiths, Marr hasn't exactly been idle or resting on his laurels.

An acoustic-electric guitar has an electronic pickup that’s usually built into its bridge. This pickup is used to capture the sounds produced by the top’s vibrations. This is then transmitted via an onboard preamplifier to an external acoustic guitar amplifier or PA system. But plugging-in is strictly optional. Unplugged, an acoustic-electric guitar typically sounds just like a fully-acoustic guitar.
Here, in this mini guide to acoustic guitar body types, we’ll aim to show you some of the key differences in size, shape, sound and suitability between the major variations of guitar. We’ll look at the history of some of the better known body types, and make recommendations according to the sound you’re going for and the style in which you play. So whether you’re a wispy finger-picker or a hearty strummer, we’ll explain some of the more intricate details of acoustic guitar body shapes.
I'm sorry to disagree Merlin, but the woods used really do make a big difference to the sound of a solid body guitar. Both the neck and body are resonators, the string energy drives the woods which damp some frequencies and use that energy to emphasise the resonant frequencies. That drives the string's vibration through the bridge/nut/fretboard. It's a feedback loop.
The EM-18 came with either a pair of Mighty Mite humbuckers or a pair of DiMarzios. It was otherwise the same as the E-18 with the addition of a three-way mini-toggle coil selector switch which allowed a choice of both or either coil on the lead pickup. This arrangement allowed for a rather remarkable variety of tones, by the way. EM-18 production began in 1979 and some 1,375 were made until the guitar ended in February 1982.

A simple, inexpensive amplifier may have only two tone controls, a passive bass and treble control. In some better quality amps, one or more midrange controls are provided. On the most expensive amps, there may be shelving equalizers for bass and treble, a number of mid-range controls (e.g., low mid, mid and high mid), and a graphic equalizer or parametric equalizer. The amplifier's master volume control restricts the amount of signal permitted through to the driver stage and the power amplifier. When using a power attenuator with a tube amplifier, the master volume no longer acts as the master volume control. Instead, the power attenuator's attenuation control controls the power delivered to the speaker, and the amplifier's master volume control determines the amount of power-tube distortion. Power-supply based power reduction is controlled by a knob on the tube power amp, variously labeled "wattage", "power", "scale", "power scale", or "power dampening".

Clapton is good… not gonna argue that he is an amazing guitarist… but no where near the best guitarist of all time…. Satriani can play ANY clapton riff, solo, song, chord progression, whatever.. Clapton can’t come close to playing any of Joe’s stuff. And most of Claptons best songs are JJ Cale tunes. Cocaine, Layla, After Midnight, etc,…. etc…. Oh and Clapton put out a whole album dedicated to Robert Johnson and admitted that most of the songs are redone and reworked because “the man” Clapton couldn’t play em anywhere near as well as Mr. Johnson.
Low frets aren't a bad idea, and Carvin is a very good brand for guitar, amp, etc. To me, it seems that the neck shape is going to be very important for you. Double-check what Carvin's return policy is, and if you think it will work for you (whatever it is) then I would totally say go for it! The caveat is that I would bring it to your local music store for them to do the setup, setups and intonations usually need to be done after shipping, and you'd need to have it done if you were changing string gauges anyways, so....
Every guitar player loves pedals. We all have at least a handful in our collection and will always try a new one we come across. When you're starting out, you probably know when you need something, but you aren't exactly sure what it is. You may not even know what flanging or phasing actually does to your signal and how that's different from a chorus effect. We're offering below some great effect choices that will add some character without overtaking your sound, so you can really distill out what each of these effects do. While distortion and overdrive have their place (and are usually the effects beginners jump to initially), the following picks offer some other alternatives that will feed your creativity and help get you started.
SJ Series: The SJ is Collings’ version of what is commonly called a small Jumbo. Although the 16 inch lower bout is slightly wider than a dreadnought, and the sides almost as deep, the tight curve at the waist creates in a very different sound chamber. SJs, especially examples in maple, typically have a more pronounced midrange response when compared to a dreadnought.

The playing of (3-5 string) guitar chords is simplified by the class of alternative tunings called regular tunings, in which the musical intervals are the same for each pair of consecutive strings. Regular tunings include major-thirds tuning, all-fourths, and all-fifths tunings. For each regular tuning, chord patterns may be diagonally shifted down the fretboard, a property that simplifies beginners' learning of chords and that simplifies advanced players' improvisation. On the other hand, in regular tunings 6-string chords (in the keys of C, G, and D) are more difficult to play.
Because each of these requires duplicating your signal once or several times, you want to do it after you've added all of the other dynamic, filter-based, and gain effects. There is no sense in trying to get a distortion or equalizer pedal to react to a series of recombined signals when you can take care of that before hand. You'll get much higher quality and accurate modulation out of it this way.
I said to the guy who greeted me at the door: "I'm looking to my buy very first acoustic guitar." And felt a little nervous not knowing anything about playing. Handed him my note card of guitars and he led me into a practice room where he brought the guitars I was interested in and played them for me (since I had zerrrrrooo experience) so I could hear the tone of the guitars. He was very professional, and also took his time making sure that I picked a guitar that I liked. Even gave me a little history about where they are made and how the company sources their wood, etc. Very nice! I forgot his name, but he had curly blonde hair. (If you read this, Hi! And thank you).

In a very basic sense, your pickups create a magnetic field that is disturbed when guitar strings are vibrated above it. This, in turn, converts the vibration of the guitar strings into a current. The current is then sent through to your output jack where the signal then passes through your lead into your amplifier, where it is amplified. Different gauge strings vibrate at different rates e.g. an A string will typically vibrate at 440 cycles per second (440 hertz) which creates a current of 440 hertz in the pickup.
Introduced in 1987 and discontinued in 1994, the Ibanez RG550 remains the childhood sweetheart of many players. Designed as a mass-appeal version of Steve Vai’s famous JEM777 model, it had character in abundance. For this reboot, Ibanez has skilfully managed to extract the very essence of what was so popular about the original RG550 and piece it back together in a way that enhances its legacy. The Japanese-made 2018 vintage is, essentially, a masterclass in everything that is good about shred and metal guitars. The neck feels lithe - your hand glides, rather than simply moving - while the Edge vibrato is rock-solid and the overall craftsmanship is exemplary. Tonally, the RG550 covers a lot of bases. It always did, despite its pointy appearance, meaning you could comfortably stray into all kinds of genres without too much fuss. The US-designed V7 bridge humbucker delivers the razor-sharp riff platform you’d hope it would, while the V8 neck ’pup offers a hint of compression at higher gain settings, which levels lead lines nicely. It is, in the best way possible, everything you remembered from the original, and that makes it one of the best shred guitars available today.

went to great lengths to get here for a basic set up on a vintage les paul. after 3 months of long waiting guitar was no better off, it was different, but just as bad and completely unplayable. he may have spent 30 seconds tweaking the truss rod, but didn't do the necessary or requested fret leveling to resolve all the dead areas up high. unbelievable after 3 months to have a guitar unplayable after traveling such lengths to get here & back. when FINALLY picking up he was running down the stairs leaving early, i barely caught him so didn't get a chance to play it before taking it home, or would have had a chance to address this disappointment. there were dead frets all over the high strings. he clearly didn't perform the service that i paid for. a year later that vintage les paul is still in the same unplayable condition and needs a full service by a real luthier. i am writing this now because i can't even look at this guitar without thinking about this experience, and still can't enjoy playing this very expensive and special vintage piece. i went to great lengths to get all the way to this shop, it was extremely difficult, several trains, a really long walk. then i waited a truly insane 3 months, and then went to the same lengths to pick it back up. he did say to me to bring it back, but that was impossible. never in my life, in NY or LA, or anywhere in between have had to wait more than 1-2 days for any service on any guitar. in my experience he takes on way more work than he can handle and apparently doens't do a thorough job. 3 months is obscene. 1 month is unacceptable. bad experience, 100% waste of time & money. if he refunded my money it would not come close to the amount of time i had invested in getting here & back. truly negative experience. waste of much time.
Kay was founded in 1931 by Henry “Kay” Kuhrmeyer. They supplied guitars to Montgomery Wards and others. During the 1950s their electric guitars were competitors for the Silvertone and Danelectro guitars. The company dissolved in 1968. Kay guitars are not currently in production. However, Kay also produced cellos and basses. Engelhardt-Link purchased the acoustic line of instruments from Kay. These are still being produced in Elk Grove Village, IL.

I received a Dorado 12 string as a birthday present in the late 1990s, installed a passive pickup, and played it around the house and at small venues for fifteen years or more. For an all-laminate, smaller body 12 string with a trapeze bridge, it sounded great. The neck was comfortable, too. I had a 1965 Gibson B-25 12 for a few of those years, but the neck was way fatter than the Dorado, which I passed along to a friend in need. I can't say the Dorado sounded better than the Gibson, but it sure out-jangled it. Wish I still had it!


The far mic will give you a bigger, more heavy-metal type of sound with a more pronounced bottom end on it. The reason for that is low end sound waves take much more distance to fully develop than high end waves. Someone once told me that a low E note on a bass guitar takes thirty-three feet to fully develop. Whether or not that is true will only be known by people who have enough time on their hands to calculate such things. I do know that if you take a tuning fork that's vibrating with a high note and stick it in the imaginary puddle of water, it will generate waves that are small in comparison, and closer together than what a low note will make. Simple physics.
Now you should have all you need to assemble your first effects pedal. Make sure you have a clean, well-ventilated area to work. Wash your hands before you start. If you like, wear some conductive nitrile gloves. Avoid handling components any more than necessary. Contaminants on the components and PCB will make them harder to solder and can cause reliability problems. Certain IC’s can be damaged by static electricity from handling. Solder is hot and creates dangerous fumes so be careful. Follow the instructions carefully, in particular making sure you insert components in the correct places and the correct way around. Many components look alike and some are polarity sensitive, so take your time to get it right. Solder one pin of a component and then double-check it before soldering the rest. It’s much easier to move or remove a component with only one lead soldered to the board.
SOLD OUT: This guitar is very familiar to me as I have had other guitars from another Famous Japanese guitar maker That was known to make this very guitar already I believe this to have been made by those responsible for the Takamine or Mountain ands Tak made for Washburn import, needless to say this is a high quality Well built Japanese copy of the Martin D-19 and is Identical to the Takamine F320. This example was well crafted over 32 years ago making this a true vintage guitar based on the classic These were quite well constructed by any standard fit and finish is excellent typical of this era Japanese crafted and were made with very nice woods too... The top on this guitar is Solid Spruce and is nicely figured and the back sides and neck are all Mahogany, The fingerboard = bridge & head-stock front overlay is rosewood. This combination is know for some sweet mellow tone & good volume...this example is in above average vintage condition its finish still shines like glass and with only a few minor doinks and with its true 32+ years of well taken care of age its natural patina is very nice in deed. This guitar has the 1-11/16ths nut width it’s a comfortable medium profile neck and it plays with ease and has good action, neck is straight with correct relief and frets are still good at 88%. Tuners are original and are working well, no splits or cracks warps or twists or issues of that nature structural integrity is excellent. Volume is very good, tone is sweet, this makes for a very good playing guitar That sounds great and is very enjoyable all round for the player. Vintage tone! .. thanks for your interest if wanted you can contact Joe at jvguitars@gmail.com . .
Despite starting life in Turkey in 1873, Epiphone is actually one of America’s oldest and best-loved musical instrument producers, having moved to this side of the Atlantic in 1903. Although the brand had been making acoustic guitars since 1928, Epiphone was acquired by Gibson in 1957 and soon began producing wallet-friendly versions of Gibson’s most famous models.
Good results are usually achieved using a dynamic instrument microphone placed 6-8" from the speaker, off-center. If more low-end is needed, move the microphone closer in (2-5") for increased cardioid proximity effect. Use your ears or a set of headphones to find the "sweet spot" of the speaker. Consider miking the guitar itself with a small-diaphragm condenser in the area of the picking hand aimed toward the bridge, for extra string texture in the track.
While tube technology is still considered state-of-the-art in countries where a potato is regarded as a square meal, these days solid-state and digital amps offer excellent tone for a lot fewer bucks, and with fewer maintenance headaches. However, tube tone is still considered the standard by many top players. Take a blind listening test, and let your ears be the judge.
I won't lie, I was VERY skeptical ordering this. But I figured that isfits not great, I could sell it. After getting it, this package is amazing for the money. I am definitely keeping it! I own/have owned $5,000+ models and some $100 "disposable" axes and I was shocked at this beautiful guitar. First off, the flamed top is gorgeous. It doesn't have a cheap look to it. The fret board is so so but you cant expect too much here. The frets don't have sharp edges and nicely done. The sealed tuners are smooth and after a minute of the inital tuning (with the included chromatic tuner), I played it for a few hours and it kept proper tune. The overall tone of the guitar is warm and projects well. I got absolutely no rattle or vibration. Then I plugged into the included amp. I will admit, the amp isn't great but but its a free practice amp. So I plugged into my Peavey and man....it sounds awesome. It also came with a so so gig bag, few picks, a strap, a truss rod key, sorta cheap guitar cord, an extra set of strings, and batteries for both the tuner and for the preamp on the guitar. Speaking of that, its a 3 band EQ with a gain control, volume and a battery checker. I paid $140 for all of this and I will say that this is one of the best deals I have gotten in almost 37 years of me playing. If you want a good practice guitar and can even play a show, don't pass this one up. The guitar alone is worth 3x of what the whole package costed me. I think I'll check out more Glen Burton guitars.

And that’s exactly what reverb effects are trying to emulate: the way a single instrument sounds different in different spaces and reflecting off of different materials. Many common environments that reverb units try to emulate are halls, churches, and chambers. There are some pretty unique reverbs like a particle reverb that adds special effects to make things sound more spacey, and there’s even one that attempts to emulate what we imagine a black hole to sound like.
Next popular guitar brands are Gibson Corporation which deals with highly appreciated guitars. It is increasing growing day by day due to its innovative characteristics and awesome product quality. If you are looking for high quality guitar at higher price, then go for Gibson Acoustic Guitar which will fulfill both the requirements. There prices are starting from Rs 49,000 in market.
Many pedalboards on the market are powered. They feed DC power directly from the board to your pedals, eliminating the need for battery changes or external power adapters. This simplifies your setup and minimizes your need for power outlets. Some pedalboards even have a small built-in combo amplifier, making them a great practice and jamming solution.
Effects can inspire you with new creative ideas, or just help you sound like your musical inspirations, go for it. I would urge you to consider a multi-effects unit like a Digitech RP series, or Line6 PodHD series. They can provide you with many options to try before you figure out exactly what you want. Many units can be had pretty cheap used, and as a bonus, most will act as a usb interface, and let you record your playing (for better or worse) to computer. – Michael Cook Apr 29 '13 at 21:39
Guitar has a vicious tone, nice wood, great p[ickups. However the guitar I received has a problem with the volume control acting as a tone knob and also cuts out sometimes. The guitar chord had to be replaced because it was cheap and cut out like a bad phone chord. I have to take it in to a local guitar shop and have the volume control fixed. Not too expensive but some additional cost. I didn't want to send it back as I otherwise love the guitar and didn't want them to send me a different one rather than just repairing it. Plus I don't want to wait that long. But certainly a great guitar for the money. No question.
Surprisingly, perhaps, given their reputation for fragility, ribbon mics also seem to be widely used for electric guitar, with models from Beyerdynamic, Coles, RCA and Royer all putting in appearances. Producers using ribbons include Thom Panunzio, Joe Barresi, Steve Albini, Ed Cherney, Bill Bottrell and Butch Vig — Eddie Kramer even goes as far as to say that "to me, the best guitar mic is the Beyer M160, which I've used for 30 years on Hendrix, on Zeppelin, on everybody."

The first “real” guitar I ever bought for myself as a teenager was an Ibanez RG much like this one, and I played that guitar for almost 10 years before buying yet another Ibanez RG. Note that this model does not have a tremolo, which means great tuning stability and fewer headaches when it comes to changing strings, tuning, and setup. However, you won’t be able to perform any crazy whammy tricks, so be sure you’re okay with that. Mahogany body, two hot humbuckers, jumbo frets, and an ultra-stable 3-piece maple neck. Hard to beat at this price point. Love it.
One detail is the rating, honestly there is no right or wrong here really, it's down to personal preferences. A .022uF capacitor will roll off less treble frequencies than a .047uF, so you'd perhaps notice a more prominent drop in treble when rolling a tone pot down which has a .047uF cap wired to it than you would if it was a .022uF. This to me is an important detail to consider when choosing the right cap for you, but if you're still not sure, the general rule is .022uF for humbuckers and perhaps P90s, and a .047uF is used primarily for single coils. This isn't set in stone though, so perhaps consult your pickup manufacturers recommendations first. If you want any help in choosing the right rating for your harness though, I'm very much here to help, so by all means drop me a message!
Entwistle also experimented throughout his career with "bi-amplification," where the higher frequencies of the bass sound are divided from the lower frequencies, with each frequency range sent to separate amplifiers and speakers. This allows for more control over the tone, because each portion of the frequency range can then be modified (e.g., in terms of tone, added overdrive, etc.) individually. The Versatone Pan-O-Flex amplifier used a different approach to bi-amplification, with separate amplifier sections for bass and treble but a single 12-inch speaker. The Versatone was used by well-known bassists such as Jack Casady and Carol Kaye.

In recent years, convolution reverbs have become both affordable and commonplace. These differ from synthetic reverbs insomuch as they work from impulse responses (or IRs), recorded in real spaces to faithfully recreate the ambience at the microphone's position when the IR was made. Sometimes these are referred to as sampling reverbs but there's no sampling involved as such, even though the process seems akin to sampling the sonic signature of a room, hall or other space.
OK some people will know this already but let’s just be clear about switch terminology. A switch as you see it on the bench in front of you will often be a set of switches, mechanically connected within a single assembly. Wikipedia explains. The important thing to remember is the number of ‘poles’ is the number of switches that you have ganged together off a single lever in the component and the ‘throw’ or ‘way’ part describes how those switches operate.
Anyone who commented that this was a good list needs to reconsider what makes up a great guitar player. It’s about being multi-faceted musician. Creativity, technicality and musicality all come in to play when your talking about the highest quality players. When I listen to a “shredder” like Steve Vai, I think..yes he is fast but his music makes me feel absolutley nothing emotionally. Truth be told…SRV and David Gilmour are probably the only players on this list that deserve to be there.

Guitar picks are really cheap, maybe $.25 to $.50 each. The best way to know which kind you like best is go to a music store and buy $5.00 worth of picks of different thicknesses, sizes and materials, take them home and try them out over the course of the next several weeks or months as you learn to play. There is no right or wrong answer to this question, its all a matter of personal preference. You'll figure out for yourself which you like best.
A range of other effects are used in various genres. "Wah-wah" and "synth" bass effects are associated with funk music. As well, since the 1960s and 1970s, bands have experimented with "fuzz bass" where the bass is distorted either by overdriving the amp or by using a distortion unit. Fuzz bass was used by psychedelic rock bands in the 1960s and early 1970s and in traditional heavy metal bands (Led Zeppelin) during the same era. Octave-generating effects, which generate an octave below the pitch being played are also used by bass players. Many bassists in modern-day hard rock and heavy metal bands use overdrive pedals specifically made for bass guitar. Since the late 1980s, bass-specific overdrive pedals have been available; these pedals maintain the low fundamental pitch. Using a regular guitar distortion pedal for bass would result in the lower frequencies being greatly lessened. Well-known overdrive effects for bass include the BOSS ODB-3 Bass Overdrive[1], Electro-Harmonix Bass Blogger[2], Tech21 Sansamp Bass Driver[3][4], the DigiTech|DigiTech XBD Bass Driver [5], and the Electro-Harmonix Big Muff.
First of all build quality. CTS's sturdy casings, brass shafts and contact patch, solid connections are second to none, and importantly are precision made by a company who have been doing so for a long long time. Fitting a well made pot will mean you'll likely only need to do it once in that guitar, that's important I feel! There are however a lot of different variations of CTS pot, and that is why I now only swear by the 450 Series, and 'TVT' Series, both are constructed with the same components, I like consistency here! Which is why you'll only find these models of pot in my harnesses. I've seen some lower quality series' of CTS pots that have been wildly inconsistent, which I'll get to next..
Years of hard-earned success and fame have not changed his down-to-earth attitude. Even though he has become one of the world’s richest rock stars, he hasn’t married a supermodel or become a pompous art collector. Instead, he’s remained true to his working-class roots, spending his spare time building incredibly cool kustom cars and cruising the streets with his car club buddies, the Beatniks of Koolsville.
The Hi Flyer guitar and bass would be offered pretty much until the end, in ’77. At some point after, probably around ’73 or ’74, the plastic logo was changed to an outline decal logo. Also, at some point the pickups were changed to the distinctive twin-coil humbuckers with metal sides and a see-through pink insert on top. These changes most certainly occurred by the ’76 catalog, when the Hi Flyers were available in four finishes – sunburst (U1815, U1815B), white (U1816, U1816B), black (U1817, U1817B) and a cool natural with maple fingerboard and black dots (U1818, U1818B).

Another thing you might want to remember when getting your very first electric guitar is that you will need some other equipment to go with it. You might need a music stand, an amplifier, a mic for the guitar amp (click for full guide), different pedals, and so on. While these things are normally not included with you guitar purchase, you might at least get a nice case to keep and carry your guitar in.


Without the rhythmic pummel of the Slits, there would be no riot grrl, no Rapture, no Yeah Yeah Yeahs; and without Viv Albertine — who played guitar for this groundbreaking U.K. punk band, and wrote the bulk of their early material — there would be no Slits. Albertine’s unrepentantly unpolished guitar stylings eschewed the high velocities and power-chord assaults of her male contemporaries in favor of trebly, dissonant stabs. It all meshed perfectly with the band’s cheeky, confrontational songs, ultimately turning jagged rhythms into something as provocative and primal as anything punk produced.

In the fall of 1954, Daniel started production of solidbody guitars for Sears, under the Silvertone name. He also produced the same guitars under the Danelectro name, sold to other jobbers. These early models didn't have truss rods but had a 3/4" square aluminum tube beginning at the peghead and through the body to the bridge. The bodies were constructed of solid Poplar wood. The Silvertone models were covered with a dark maroon vinyl covering, while the Danelectro models were covered in a whitish tweed material. Both lines came with either 1 or 2 pickups, concealed under a baked melamine pickguard. Concentric stacked tone and volume knobs were used on the two pickup models only. Notably, when both pickups were used together, the tone was much stronger. This was due to wiring the pickups in series, instead of parallel like most other maker's two pickup guitars.


Now, let’s get to the amplifier. If you’re a traditionalist, this means you aren’t using some kind of high fidelity audio reproduction system to expose that weak signal for the anemic, naked thing that your tone really is at this point. You’re like the rest of us, depending on that signal working with a classic tube guitar amp to shape your sound and help you get awesome and loud. Well, that amp has got a host of things going on. The signal hits the high-impedance input and visits the preamplifier. See, the “natural” sound coming straight from our guitars, as big and tough and old school special as we might think think it is, really isn’t strong enough to directly power the power amplifier. It’s depending on a series of fairly intricate pre-amplifer gain stages to give the Popeye signal the spinach it needs before any filtering or equalization (oh, they don’t use them? Really? What do those knobs marked ‘bass’ and ‘treble’ say? Just because someone leaves them at “5” doesn’t mean they aren’t in use). It then may visit a phase inverter before hitting the tube power amp section, which finally gives you the high current signal to cause those speakers to go back and forth.
The tone controls compensate for and complement the somewhat lifeless and mostly midrange-y character of the average guitar pickup. The gain control, often designed with a pull-boost, basically excites and heats the preamp tubes, which along with judicious use of both the amp and the guitar’s tone controls will begin to produce much of the sonic seasoning and flavor that guitarists and their fans crave as it flows from the speakers.
The pitch shifter effect can also be used to detune or “capo” a guitar without the need to actually retune the instrument.  These detuning type pedals have become prominent in the age of dropped tunings and seven string guitars.  The Digitech Whammy Pedal is the most widely known pitch shifter for guitarists and has been used by players like Jonny Greenwood of Radiohead and Tom Morello of Rage Against the Machine fame.

Like many others, Frenchman Patrice Vigier started with a guitar repair shop before establishing his own company in 1980 in order to introduce his first instruments from the Arpege series. The trapezoidal, neck-through body construction is reinforced by a metallic sublayer. One of the models has a metal fretless fretboard, electronic supply by accumulator and a locking string-through body bridge. The Excalibur series was born in 1991 and features a bolt-on neck and a Floyd Rose tremolo system. Available in different variations, it remains the brand's signature up to this day. Vigier instruments are entirely made in France following a quality-oriented philosophy. Among the artists playing Vigier guitars are Gary Moore and Bumblefoot.
Maton was founded in 1946 as the Maton Musical Instruments Company by Bill May and his brother Reg. Reg was a wood machinist, and Bill a jazz musician, woodwork teacher andluthier who had for some years operated a custom guitar building and repair business under the name Maton Stringed Instruments and Repairs. The name “Maton” came from the words “May Tone” and is pronounced May Tonne.
If there was any doubt left in the late 1950s that the guitar – not the saxophone – was rock & roll's essential lead instrument, Duane Eddy settled the argument: See his 1958 single "Rebel Rouser," curled with country twang and rippling with tremolo. "Chet Atkins used vibrato in a selective way – Duane Eddy used it to thrash the music," says the Kinks' Dave Davies. The impact of Eddy's hits, like "Forty Miles of Bad Road" and "Peter Gunn," would soon be heard in surf music and guitarists such as Jeff Beck and George Harrison.
In order to achieve supreme neck grip comfort, the fretboard edge is finished with a smooth curve that extends from the border between the fretboard and the neck, and then to the surface of the fretboard. The detailed neck shape is precisely carved using a ball mill for ultimate consistency. The width measurements of the fretboard are at 42mm at the nut and 56.4mm at the last fret. These dimensions allow for an easy grip in the lower register, and a more modern feel in the higher register.
Marshall are king when it comes to stacks and rock where fender leads with combos. Marshall offer a wall of sound with punchy lows, strong mids and aggressive highs. But it's not all shrill highs,dial back the trebble a little and you can also get really nice cleans and some real grunt as the crunch sets in. The classic Marshall sound is so coveted that there the market is saturated with imitators. - Antmax
After you've made your selections from the best selection of guitar and bass tabs, you'll want to download the Musicnotes.com apps for your Android, iPad, iPhone, or other device to gain access to your digital library anywhere. The option to print the file is still available, and you will also have all of your sheet music stored in your personal account to access your digital file from any computer or mobile device. If any issues arise, make sure to contact our customer support of musicians, ready to help fellow musicians.
Solid state and modeling amps are great amps to use for practice sessions. As well to bring it for small gigs and recordings that require their services. That is the reason why it is really hard to tell which one is above and try to suggest that a particular amplifier is better than the other. Having an own thing is what really is important here, and besides if you really sound good. The gears you will be playing with will equally sound as great.
FeaturesThe Gibson LogoAngled HeadstockAdjustable Truss RodNew Asymmetrical Neck Profile22-Fret Rosewood FingerboardAlloy Fret WireTrapezoid Inlays Set-Neck ConstructionPlus Maple TopChambered Mahogany BodyPickups: Gibson Burstbucker ProsTonePros Locking Tune-o-matic Bridge and Locking Stopbar TailpieceNitrocellulose FinishBody BindingCustom-Made PotentiometersLocking Neutrik JackLocking Grover TunersRevolutionary Plek Set UpNew Enlarged Neck Tenon
To make the OM more suitable for banjo players, the neck was made narrower and less V-shaped than previous Martins. The fingerboard was narrowed from the then-standard 1 7/8" to 1 3/4" at the nut. In addition to make the OM more banjo-like and to give it a distinctive look, banjo style tuning pegs were used. To do these, the headstock had to be made solid, instead of slotted. Previously Martin headstocks had all been slotted with tuners attached to the side mounted on a single plate for three tuners. No single-unit guitar tuners were available, so banjo pegs were a natural.
Until his death in August 2009, Les Paul himself played his personal Les Paul Guitar onstage, weekly, in New York City. Paul preferred his 1971 Gibson “Recording” model guitar, with different electronics and a one-piece mahogany body, and which, as an inveterate tinkerer and bona fide inventor, he had modified heavily to his liking over the years. A Bigsby-style vibrato was of late the most visible change although his guitars were formerly fitted with his “Les Paulverizer” effects.

When jazz guitar players improvise, they use the scales, modes, and arpeggios associated with the chords in a tune's chord progression. The approach to improvising has changed since the earliest eras of jazz guitar. During the Swing era, many soloists improvised "by ear" by embellishing the melody with ornaments and passing notes. However, during the bebop era, the rapid tempo and complicated chord progressions made it increasingly harder to play "by ear." Along with other improvisers, such as saxes and piano players, bebop-era jazz guitarists began to improvise over the chord changes using scales (whole tone scale, chromatic scale, etc.) and arpeggios.[2] Jazz guitar players tend to improvise around chord/scale relationships, rather than reworking the melody, possibly due to their familiarity with chords resulting from their comping role. A source of melodic ideas for improvisation is transcribing improvised solos from recordings. This provides jazz guitarists with a source of "licks", melodic phrases and ideas they incorporate either intact or in variations, and is an established way of learning from the previous generations of players.
The same kind of automatic difficulty adjustment works in Rocksmith's Lessons feature, which is just what it sounds like: a set of tutorials to teach players everything from how to hold the guitar and basic picking techniques, to how to bend, slide, and hammer on notes. Get them right and you'll advance to ever more challenging material. Struggle, and the oh-so-polite instructor tells you he's just going to slow that riff down a little and give you another crack at it. Herein lies Rocksmith's greatest strength as a teaching tool—it gives you the ability to learn at your own pace without fear of judgment.

Read Full Review If you’re looking for a lightweight guitar aside from a Stratocaster. You prefer the quality of tone produced using humbuckers than a single-coil can deliver. This SG model from Epiphone meets that requirements on the overall sound, playabilty and price that fits the under two hundred dollar budget of a beginner. As well as for seasoned players looking at the market for an affordable studio or back-up guitar to bring on stage.

The first guitar developed was the K1 Series. Launched in 2000, this instrument had a dreadnought cutaway design and used inexpensive materials such as laminated spruce for tops, and sapele for back and sides. Kona Guitars then launched the K2 series after which it diversified, at present offering over 30 models of guitars, ukuleles, violins, and other instruments.
Bracing affects the way the guitar sounds because it changes the pitch or tune that the guitar produces out of the sound hole. Personally I think X bracing is the b est because it produces a more even and better more balance for mids and high notes and just enough bass on the E and A strings that gives a brighter more even tone. Blinded or pessed bracing gives a much deeper sound than x bracing which =less versatility but if you bought a pressed dread knot or anything else you'll still be okay just remember strings make a huge difference and running your guitar to the right amount of tone for any song will work it's just that Taylor produces the best over all guitar itself by better quality woods and they go through ver strict and rigorous testing and inspections before they are sold to retailers and customers. Higher grade parts attention to detail and style of music versatility is why one guitar can cost 3 times as much. Most companies like Taylor is know give warranties or $ back
Okay, it is a single-cut and dates back to a similar era, but this single-cut is very different to a Les Paul. The Pro Jet has a basswood body with an arched maple top, and like many of Gretsch’s solidbody electrics, it’s chambered, making it lighter, and, they say, more resonant. It sports a pair of Gretsch’s Black Top Filter’Tron pickups, giving you a bright snap and twang that’ll cut through any mix. In short, it’s incredible. Uncanny, even. For here we are in 2018, and yet you fret a couple of doublestops on the Pro Jet Electromatic and all of a sudden it’s like you’re the Fonz, just waiting for Richie, Joanie and Chachi to show up. The cleans are sharp and jazzy, but just take your amp into overdrive and you’re in rockabilly heaven. The tone is so hot you could grill hamburgers by wafting it in front of the speaker cone. Tex-mex shuffle, country, blues, jazz, rockabilly... You name it, and it’ll play it, retro-style. if you want the versatility and the kudos that comes with a Gretsch, it’s hard to look past that finish, that build, and that tone.
Bracing affects the way the guitar sounds because it changes the pitch or tune that the guitar produces out of the sound hole. Personally I think X bracing is the b est because it produces a more even and better more balance for mids and high notes and just enough bass on the E and A strings that gives a brighter more even tone. Blinded or pessed bracing gives a much deeper sound than x bracing which =less versatility but if you bought a pressed dread knot or anything else you'll still be okay just remember strings make a huge difference and running your guitar to the right amount of tone for any song will work it's just that Taylor produces the best over all guitar itself by better quality woods and they go through ver strict and rigorous testing and inspections before they are sold to retailers and customers. Higher grade parts attention to detail and style of music versatility is why one guitar can cost 3 times as much. Most companies like Taylor is know give warranties or $ back

The Hummingbird Pro's unique look breaks the typical monotonous appearance of conventional acoustics, and it does so without straying too far from the familiar. It is easily identifiable by its uniquely shaped ornate pickguard, which matches the guitar's faded cherry sunburst finish. Whether you are on stage or just jamming with friends, you can be sure that this acoustic will stand out.
 The type of guitar strings you choose, and how often you change them will not only dramatically affect your tone, but also impact the playability of your guitar. By learning about the different string options available for your guitar, you can find the strings which strike the best balance between great tone and playability. The key components affecting tone and playability come from string gauge, string winding method and the string construction material.
The JX44 Air Control™ allows up to four guitars and six amps to be used at once, as well as a built-in Radial DI, an SGI interface for longer cable runs, and an X-Amp to make the reamping process incredibly efficient. No wonder it won the Music Players ‘Wish I Had One’ award! Pair it with a Headbone amp head switcher and the JDX 48 for the ultimate in control and consistent tone night after night.
The most common way that bass players connect their instrument to their bass amp is by using a 1/4" patch cord, a standard signal cable used in music and audio applications. Some bassists plug their bass into a small wireless transmitter about the size of a pack of cards, which can be clipped to the strap or to their belt. The transmitter transmits the bass signal to a receiver that is plugged into the amp. Bassists playing in large venues with complex stage set-ups, or a stage design where there is a large distance between performers, or players who like to dance or go out into the audience during the performance, may use wireless transmitters to avoid the risk of having their cable become disconnected while they move about on stage and give themselves more freedom. Another reason that some bassists use wireless transmitters is if their stage setup requires a long cable run between their bass and their amp. Long cable runs can weaken the strength of the signal and can adversely affect tone and sound quality.

Resonator guitars are distinctive for not having a regular sound hole instead they have a large circular perforated cover plate which conceals a resonator cone. The cone is made from spun aluminum and resembles a loudspeaker. The bridge is connected to either the center or edge of the cone by an aluminum spring called the spider. The vibrations from the spider are projected by the cone through the perforated cover plate. The most common resonator guitars have a single cone although the original model patented in 1927 by John Dopyera had three and was called a tricone resophonic guitar. Resonator guitars are loud and bright. They are popular with blues and country guitarists and can be played with a slide or conventionally.
This truly is a pleasure writing about the best kept secret in the guitar world. The G&L Legacy Tribute. I own a USA Hamer Gold Top Archtop Standard with P-90's and it's stupendous guitar. But like all Les Pauls and high quality Mahoganies, it has a growl suited for certain kinds of Rock N Roll. However, there is another voice in my guitar arsenal and I only have one other. The G&L Legacy Tribute. This guitar can cover the other half. I bought this used for $299 and four years later I still can't put it down. So I have a $2600 guitar and a $299 guitar and love them equally. What does that tell you about the Legacy Tribute?
My father's Yamaha was bought in the 90's, and was the first guitar steel-string I ever played as a kid. (If you were curious its equivalent to today's model would be the LS6 ARE). To this day I still find myself going back to it. It's little quirks makes it really special, even though I have martins and taylors and even gibsons. There's little nicks and chips in the paint in some places, which really shows it's history. It's also stood the test of time. It still plays great after almost 30 years of being lugged around from place to place, dropped, hit against walls, etc. It's just simply great. - zabathy1
On these guitar tracks, I did use a little bit of the 1176. I don’t overcompress on these tracks, I just basically want to get a little bit more sustain out of the notes, so I have it setup so that there’s plenty of attack that comes through. I’m not trying to control that so much as I am the sustain of the note, and get a little bit more length out of it, though I’m pretty gentle with that. Then it just goes into Pro Tools and I record it as is.
WARTUNG Herzlichen Glückwunsch und vielen Dank dafür, dass Sie sich für ein Produkt von Ibanez entschieden haben. Ibanez legt bei seinen Produkten die höchsten Standards an. Alle Ibanez- Instrumente werden vor der Auslieferung unserer strengen Qualitätskontrolle unterzogen. In dieser Anleitung wollen wir beschreiben, wie Sie das Äußere Ihres Instruments pflegen und Ihre Gitarre in dem Zustand halten, wie sie bei Auslieferung ab Werk war.
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