Harmonizers blend the note from your original guitar signal with a note shifted to a preset interval. For example, you may set it to a Major 3rd interval and it will create a similar sound as if you played a root-plus-Maj-3rd diad. Harmonizers are pretty diverse effects, but using one correctly obviously means understanding a little about music theory and how scales and intervals work.
We don’t have many cutaway styles or Jose Ramirez guitars in our review list, but this is one of them, and it just happens to be a “hybrid,” or a classical guitar with an electronic pickup. Handcrafted in Spain, the 4NCWE model is a cedar-top with Indian rosewood on the back and sides. Like the other Ramirez guitars we have listed, this comes with a hard-shell case, so you won’t have to worry about the guitar being broken in transit.
: I have a Vox Shadow that's sunburst, white pick guard that surrounds 3 solid chrome face pickups and the middle pick up has "VOX" engraved in it. 3 seperate volume controls and a master volume control. Tuning keys are all chrome, and the green decal on the face of the headstock reads Shadow, JMI Dartford, Kent. Neck is attached withthe help of a chrome plate, on the back side of the 'plank' body is an access plate for the jack that states made in England. Guitar also has the original roller/tremelo tail piece with palm lever. The numbers of 64728 are stamped on the back side of the headstock just below the tuning keys. Finish is beginning to crack a bit but it's all original, right down to the volume pots that have to be cleaned from time to time. It must be a rather unknown line that Vox had as I can't find out much on it either. Had this guitar for many years. Was handed to me in pieces in an old 'cardboard' case, (that has since gone away) put it back together and added it to my "music room".
SCALE LENGTH What is a "Scale Lenght?" The scale lenght is the lenght the string travels between the nut at the top of the fretboard and the bridge at the mid section of the base of the guitar. To determine the scale length of your guitar you would measure from the front part of the nut where it meets the fretboard to the center of the 12th fret on the neck and multiplying that by 2. Add about 3/16" to that on the low e string and taper that to about 1/16" added to the high e string. This is called compensation and that is why you see that tapered line on a bridge. Go to Stewart MacDonnaldfor more info. They also have a Fret Calculator that helps you determine your particular scale length in addition to a page dedicated to helping you out with tons of free info for your guitar building projects.The fret is the metal of nickle wire that is raised up off the fretboard. I would suggest buying a neck that has been pre made from a manufacturer that fits the design concept that you want to go with. I bought mine from Guitar Parts USA for about $70. You can pay anywhere from $50 to $300 for a neck at online retailers, but surf around and make sure you are satisfied with what you get. Guitarpartsusa will tell you to buy an expensive neck if you are building an expensive guitar, not a $70 neck. But for mine the $70 neck works just fine. Once you get the neck in and you determine what the scale length is you can lay it all out on paper. I recomend buying all your hardware, pickups and knobs before you draw your final template. This will allow to place everything where you want it and know what size holes to drill for the electronics and how big the cavites will need to be for them and the pickups.

One last time we must put aside our expensive tastes and put up with the “economy” version of a guitar that is actually much nicer. The full-scale rendition of Steve Vai’s guitar is, in my opinion, legitimately worth every one of the nearly 300,000 pennies it costs. Per the Ibanez web site, there are a lot of Vai Signature models you can pick from:
In any given field there are a handful of companies that rise above the others. This is true whether you are talking about cars or golf clubs or chainsaws, and of course it is true if you are talking about electric guitars. Some brands have proven themselves as the best of the best. They’ve created the most legendary instruments in music history. If you are looking for a new guitar, one of these companies is a smart place to start.
The Omen-6 is a stripped down take on the Hellraiser, with the same sleek double cutaway design and HH (dual humbucker) configuration, but at a more affordable price point. But what's good about it is how Schecter is able to maintain the premium look and attention to detail at this lower price point, including the carved top design. While the name again implies something evil, this guitar is quite good for the price.
Jackson is another great American guitar manufacturer that has been at the peak of popularity a couple of decades ago. These days they are still considered to be an authority in the industry. Current Jackson lineup includes some of their legendary models revamped in a new edition, as well as brand new guitars. People are usually divided when it comes to Jackson, but no one can claim that their guitars are not among the best.
These are the settings I use as my basic rack for adding rock guitar sounds in Cubase, and you might also find it handy as a point of departure, so it's worth saving as a track preset. To do this, right‑click in the audio track containing the 'rack', and choose 'Create Track Preset' from the context menu. When the Save Track Preset dialogue box appears, simply name it and save it: now you can call up your rack for any audio track in any Cubase project!
For this list and those below we are including both new and used sales data. It's also worth noting that we did not combine multiple variations of the same amp like different wattages or cabinet speaker sizes, or the head and combo versions of the same amp, which we consider to be distinct models. We did, however, combine things like different tolex color and other minor cosmetic variations where applicable.

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Since King Crimson‘s first rehearsal in 1969, Robert Fripp has been its distinguishing instrumental voice, a singular blend of distorted complexity and magisterial sustain. That duality is best heard on the most progressive prog-rock album ever made, Crimson’s 1973 thorny-metal classic, Larks’ Tongues in Aspic. Fripp’s most famous guitar line is the fuzz-siren hook in the title track to David Bowie‘s Heroes. Fripp would “start up without even knowing the chord sequence,” said producer Brian Eno, adding that Fripp’s work

From Clean to Modern, chose from 8 amp settings, four modulation effects and four delay/reverb effects, with tap tempo. Its Hi-Fi sound can be sculpted by a three-band EQ, giving it a lovely spacious sound distribution; and special off-stage circuit gives it excellent overdrive qualities even at low, discreet volumes. Finally, its sleek designer looks will fit into any living space, especially with its soft tube glow.
Gibson's first production electric guitar, marketed in 1936, was the ES-150 model ("ES" for "Electric Spanish", and "150" reflecting the $150 price of the instrument, along with matching amplifier). The ES-150 guitar featured a single-coil, hexagonally shaped "bar" pickup, which was designed by Walt Fuller. It became known as the "Charlie Christian" pickup (named for the great jazz guitarist who was among the first to perform with the ES-150 guitar). The ES-150 achieved some popularity but suffered from unequal loudness across the six strings.
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A Phase Shifter creates a complex frequency response containing many regularly-spaced "notches" in an incoming signal by combining it with a copy of itself out of phase, and shifting the phase relationship cyclically. The phasing effect creates a "whooshing" sound that is reminiscent of the sound of a flying jet. This effect dominates the sound in the song Star Guitar by Chemical Brothers. The song was not played with any guitars but you can hear the phasing effect. The instrument being phased was actually a synthesizer. Some electronic "rotating speaker simulators" are actually phase shifters. Phase shifters were popular in the 1970s, particularly used with electric piano and funk bass guitar. The number of stages in a phase shifter is the number of moving dips in the frequency response curve. From a sonic perspective, this effect is equalization-oriented. However, it may be derived through moderate time-based processing. Some phaser pedals include:

Producing one of the most popular clean sounds in rock, you’ll rarely see a solid-state amplifier with as much notoriety as the Roland JC-120. The amp was introduced in 1975, offering pure “JC Clean” sound with 120 watts of power and a built-in Dimensional Space Chorus effect. The JC-120 features dual 12” speakers plus dual power amps that drive the speakers to their full potential for a stunningly clear sound. As a result, the amplifier became a favorite among players like Andy Summers, Robert Smith, Johnny Marr, Jeff “Skunk” Baxter and more.
Due to the acoustic, aesthetic and processing properties (workability, finishing, joints) the wood and the ligno-cellulose composites are the most valued materials for the musical instruments' construction. The guitar is made up of a complex structure, formed by a vertical wall in a curve shape (technologically named "sides") and two faces made up of ligno-cellulose plates, so that it should... [Show full abstract]
In some small to mid-size venues, such as bars and nightclubs, the PA system may not have the capacity to provide the bass sound for the venue, and the PA system may be used mainly for vocals. Bass players in bands that play at a variety of venues, including these types of small to mid-size venues, may need to be able to provide the bass sound for the venue, and so they will require a large combo amp or bass stack with this capability.
Martin guitars have been around for over 180 years, and are widely considered to be some of the best guitars currently in production. The Little Martin is a ¾ scale guitar perfect for kids and beginners with a smaller stature. Featuring professional-grade construction and hardware, the Little Martin has a big sound in a small package. Also great for travel, the compact body stows easily.

Beavis Audio Research – started in 2005 as a hobbyist site to share information on DIY guitar electronics. From the initial few pages of questionable designs, it has grown to a popular place for DIY freaks to visit and learn. Along the way, beavis has evolved into a small company. They strive to advance the DIY ethic and provide resources, tools, kits and products to the worldwide community of gearhounds.
The prototype was introduced at the 2011 NAMM exhibition. Bolan is seen holding the instrument on the outer gatefold jacket of T. Rex, his first album after shortening the band name from “Tyrannosaurus Rex”. The guitar was stolen from Bolan in London, and for the last months of his career he was using a wine-red 1970s Les Paul Standard. Gibson announced the availability of the Marc Bolan signature Les Paul in February 2011.
That said, however, the volume knob can help you conjure a variety of tonal characteristics that can come in handy provided you play with dynamics. Using a volume knob in this context can allow such cool maneuvers as having different tones for verses and choruses, or for various styles of music. To get a handle on how your guitar’s volume dial or dials can affect tone, plug in and fire up your amp until it’s growling with overdrive. Start with your guitar’s volume pot at 10 and begin rolling the dial back in increments. As you go, you’ll hear not only a decrease in loudness, but your sound will clean up and experience variations in its harmonic characteristics.
Great Condition, "335-style" hollow body / Thin-Line, Japanese Electric Guitar by Diasonic. 2-single coil Pick-ups. Great black to red see through Sunburst finish. Bound, Rosewood fingerboard  w/ dot inlays and solid mahogany neck. Four bolt neck joint, double bound body and laminated top, back and sides for excellent long-term durability and great feedback control. "Trapeze" tailpiece w/ rosewood bridge, featuring adjustable string spacing. Separate on/off's for each pickup, Volume and Tone and adjustable truss rod. Very shiny. Finish and wood in great shape. Virtually no wear to finish. All chrome perfect and rust-free. Original pick guard perfect and intact.  Pickup bezels have minor issues, see above photos for details. Plays and sounds great. Whammy bar included! Frets in great shape with minor, virtually no wear. Nice flat frets for speedier action. We have completely done a "Pro" set up on the guitar, including cleaning all the electronics, tightening and lubing the machines, oiling the fingerboard, adjusting the neck and action for great playability (clearance at the 9th fret = .010 when fretted at the first and the body), adjusting / checking the intonation (adjusted perfectly!),  and cleaning and polishing. Plays and sounds great. We also installed a new set of .010 "Round-wound" strings.
Turning our attention to the main controls on the front, it actually doesn’t look as intimidating to use as some owners of it make it out to be. Yes, you can get lost in tweaking and tinkering with amp models and effects until you’re blue in the face - but we actually find the interface to be nice and uncluttered, with all the footswitches and knobs nicely spaced out. On the top left there’s a small screen with some knobs surrounding it, and this is where the majority of your tweaking and editing will take place. Across the top are seven knobs which are meant to replicate what you would find on your amp. If you’re interested in the amp modeling part of the POD HD500X, you’ll appreciate having things like DRIVE, BASS, and PRESENCE immediately available. Two footswitches on the far left of the unit are responsible for up/down menu navigation, eight switches labeled FS1 to FS8 are assignable to individual effects, and finally there are two switches dedicated to the Looper function, and Tap Tempo/Tuner. You can also clearly see an expression pedal built-in on the right of the unit.
A giant when it comes to the British amplification companies, Vox is always in the conversation when talking about great guitar gear. And that’s no different when the conversation is about amps for beginners. As far as bang-for-your-buck options are concerned, the Valvetronix VT20X definitely ranks at the top – and with good reason: it features tube amp sounds, but with the versatility of a modeling amp (which it is). This impressive hybrid boasts 11 onboard models, 13 effects, and 33 preset programs – allowing you an astonishingly wide range of produceable sounds. And you can control the whole thing from your smartphone, making it easier than ever before. Excellent work, Vox.
Some modeling processors fit the palm of your hand and you can place them on a tabletop and punch their buttons to select sounds and effects; some are almost two feet long, weigh as much as 10.5 pounds, sit comfortably on the floor and are operated by foot switches or rows of foot switches called pedalboards. Depending upon how sophisticated, complex and pricey your modeling processor is, you can have a huge sonic palette at your fingertips (or underfoot). Many of these units are MIDI compatible as well, allowing you to stream MIDI data to your computer or other recording device, or trigger other MIDI instruments. Just remember that for performance, you will probably be better off with a processor that is operated by foot switches; this allows your hands to remain free for playing your guitar or guitar synth.
As with other plucked instruments (such as the lute), the musician directly touches the strings (usually plucking) to produce the sound. This has important consequences: Different tone/timbre (of a single note) can be produced by plucking the string in different manners and in different positions. For example, plucking an open string will sound brighter than playing the same note(s) on a fretted position (which would have a warmer tone).
This list is called "best guitar techniques" not hardest guitar techniques, people are looking at some of more shreddy elements first, but many other things are far more important. I think alternate picking is one of the most important because it is the technique that truly gives you control over individual notes (not chords). It is commonly used in both rhythm and lead guitar unlike sweep picking which is only used by shreddicus maximus/l0rd 5hr3dd0rz. All these techniques are important but think of some more basic techniques first.
The most defining feature has got to be the neck. It’s thicker than the standard Strat neck, which gives extra meat to work with when bending those strings. Even the fretboard was designed around this technique, with its narrow frets and flat fretboard. It’s not the cheapest one out there, but Fender Stevie Ray Vaughan Stratocaster is definitely one of the best Strats around.
We specialise in 1960s and 1970s parts and literature, relating to American and European guitars and basses. Specifically Gibson, Guild and Vox. The parts for sale on this site are sorted by brand and type, or you can search for keywords in the box above. We have a lot of parts unlisted on this site - if you do not see the part you need, please ask.
In 1957, president Sydney Katz introduced the Gold “K” line of archtop and solid body electric guitars[14] to compete with major manufacturers like Fender, Gibson, and Gretsch. The gold “K” Line featured the Jazz Special, Artist, Pro, Upbeat,[18] Jazz II, and Jazz Special Bass. Gold “K” guitars used the same hardware as top manufacturers. However, there were truss rod and neck issues.[citation needed]
Solid state and modeling amps are great amps to use for practice sessions. As well to bring it for small gigs and recordings that require their services. That is the reason why it is really hard to tell which one is above and try to suggest that a particular amplifier is better than the other. Having an own thing is what really is important here, and besides if you really sound good. The gears you will be playing with will equally sound as great.
Well that and the effects, but Ample Sound even admits that the effects aren’t the greatest and recommends using another plugin for effects. Them admitting that might put a sour note on your tongue, but when you’re buying a VI in this price range, often it’s better to go for a plugin that is a master of a few components instead of one that attempts it all.
Gilmour was made famous by his haunting guitar scores in Pink Floyd. This “replacement” guitarist surpassed expectations and helped shape Pink Floyd’s unique sound. You can always expect hairs at the back of your neck to stand whenever you hear one of his solos – be it for the first or hundredth time you’re listening to it. All the emotion that Gilmour’s poured into his guitar work lives on in the music and is channeled through anyone who’s ever wanted to cover a Pink Floyd song. I know several guitar players (myself included) who whenever playing the Comfortably Numb solo – whether they are alone in their bedrooms or on stage – have always been unwillingly brought to tears, near the point of crying. How could you not expect things to get esoteric and mystical when it comes to music?

While it may not look like a classic amplifier, if you're into classic rock style tones for home use, the Yamaha THR10C is probably the amp that you really need. Ideally, we would all be rocking with big amps, but not all of us have the space or acoustically tuned rooms to let loose. And since we are using low volume amps more often, Yamaha designed their THR line to be the best in providing you with just that - low volume performance for jamming, practice or recording. The THR10C is part of this line, featuring the same 10W setup and stereo 3" speakers, but with tones that replicate the sound of classic amps. It also houses some essential effects which include reverb, delay, chorus and more. In addition to the usual clean to overdriven tones, Yamaha also equipped this unit with acoustic guitar amp and bass amp models, so you can directly play or record with those instruments. All these features are packed in a distinct and portable profile, and is powered either by the supplied AC adapter or via 8 x AA batteries.
StepFilter ('Filter' category): I'm a huge fan of Roger Linn's AdrenaLinn processor. When I play with groups like Air Liquide, it's the only gear I take other than the guitar, and of course a MIDI cable to sync it from the band's MIDI master clock. You can get many of the same effects from Cubase's StepFilter.The StepFilter offers synchronised filter effects that recall Roger Linn's AdrenaLinn signal processor. StepFilter is basically a tempo‑sync'ed dual step‑sequencer, each with 16 steps, and there's a total of eight patterns. One sequencer controls filter cutoff and the other resonance. The filter response morphs from low‑pass to high‑pass, with a stop along the way for band‑pass. You can also copy a pattern, paste it into a different pattern, and create variations. All of these parameters, including pattern selection, can be used with VST host automation control. If you're into electronic guitar effects, you really should check this out — but also try the Tranceformer ('Modulation' category) and Chopper ('Other' category), which are similar, although Chopper works on amplitude, and Tranceformer syncs a ring modulator's carrier frequency to the project tempo'

Hoshino Gakki also had semi acoustic, nylon and steel stringed acoustic guitars manufactured under the Ibanez name. Most Ibanez guitars were made for Hoshino Gakki by the FujiGen guitar factory in Japan up until the mid to late 1980s and from then on Ibanez guitars have also been made in other Asian countries such as Korea, China and Indonesia. During the early 1980s the FujiGen guitar factory also produced most of the Roland guitar synthesizers, including the Stratocaster-style Roland G-505, the twin-humbucker Roland G-202 and the Ibanez X-ING IMG-2010.

This thing is awesome! For its price you can't find any other processor that can plug into your computer and easily navigate the pedals. To connect to your computer or laptop you will need a standard printer cable (I would pick up one of the amazon basic cables for cheap.) I bought a 10 foot one which is plenty to run from the pedal to my music stand. Also once you are connected to your laptop via the USBcable, all sounds from your laptop will run through your amp/headphones. That confused me the first time when my computer speakers sounded better, haha. If you are curious, It comes with a power supply.
I have never reviewed anything, however felt that I had to share that this is a complete disappointment. I bought it two weeks ago for my daughters birthday and it is already broken. The mechanism to plug the amp line/chord into the guitar broke, rendering it useless. The amp itself is very cheap and the sound quality was a disappointment, crackling when in use. The strap has holes that connect the strap to the guitar, were too big and would not stay fastened so I had to tie the strap with rope to see that it stayed on while she played.
The traditional Firebird style pickguard is layered white and black and has Slash's "Skull & Top Hat" log in red. The Mahogany neck is glued to the body with a deep-set neck tenon and has a standard 24.75" scale and a rounded custom "Slash" profile. The Pau Ferro fingerboard has single-ply cream binding with Pearl trapezoid inlays, a nylon nut, and 22 medium jumbo frets along with a 2-way adjustable truss rod. The back of the Firebird's traditional reverse headstock has Slash's Snakepit logo in gold.
SJ Series: The SJ is Collings’ version of what is commonly called a small Jumbo. Although the 16 inch lower bout is slightly wider than a dreadnought, and the sides almost as deep, the tight curve at the waist creates in a very different sound chamber. SJs, especially examples in maple, typically have a more pronounced midrange response when compared to a dreadnought.
There was a lot of tinkering with the Spanish-style electric guitar in the 1930s and 1940s since the electronics in a hollow-body instrument caused distortion, overtone, and feedback—especially problematic for recording sessions. Historians and guitar enthusiasts enjoy debating over who really developed the first solid-body Spanish-style guitar to resolve these sound issues. The National Museum of American History owns a rare Slingerland Songster made in or before 1939. This model is possibly the earliest commercially marketed solid-body Spanish-style electric guitar.
My brother had the single-pickup (neck) version of this exact guitar c. 1969, badged as a Tempo. I wound up with it but in the ’80s I butchered it into a four-string “piccolo bass” with a sawed-down Badass II bridge, a Bigsby, a Seymour Duncan stacked-coil J-bass pickup, and a set of phase/split switches. I sent it back to him in the mid-’90s and he tossed it. Now that I’ve gotten into guitar over the past few years, I’m sorry I don’t still have it in its original condition. I don’t believe it was ever plugged into a proper tube guitar amp.
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Gibson market the J-200 as the most powerful acoustic guitar on the planet, and we might just agree. It’s so punchy, and has so much presence, both in the low end and right up there with the more sparkling high notes. Combine this with the L.R. Baggs Anthem pickup system, and this is a guitar that is aimed squarely at live performances where the acoustic needs to really make itself heard. It’l
If you are not shopping online, then get to the nearest local instrument store and try out different guitars by playing them while switching between different positions in standing and sitting down. Plug them in and turn them on. Stand in front of a mirror with them on hand. Try holding it up like George Harrison, and downwards like Slash. Its different tires for different cars—so there are no hard and fast rules, but your eyes, hands, and ears will tell you what suits you best.
In 1966, Teisco guitars shed some of its adolescent awkwardness of the early ’60s in favor of a svelter, hipper look. While some of the tubby bodies and monkey grips remained, they were joined by leaner shapes, thin, pointed, flared cutaways and German carve contours. In many ways, the ’66 Teisco line is the quintessential year for Teisco, which is fitting since it would be the last under the original ownership.
I think it's unreasonable at best, and more likely impossible, to say with any confidence "Model X guitar will be eaisest for everyone", because everyone's hands are different sizes, everyone's fingers are different lengths and thicknesses, some people prefer smaller or larger frets, everyone has different preferences with regard to neck profile shape, neck width, neck length, body shape, body weight, bridge design (floating vs fixed, TOM vs hardtail, etc.), not to mention pickup types (single coil vs humbucker vs P90, active vs passive) and control layouts (multiple volume/tone controls vs single master volume/tone controls, blade vs toggle pickup selectors).
In our so-called modern configuration, the tone cap is attached to the pickup before the volume pot. This presents the volume control with a totally different signal, resulting in a more colored sound as you reduce the volume. This can be useful if you like to turn up the guitar to cut through more. For me, the downside is the way it makes the tone control a bit of a hair-trigger affair. If you’re the type who avoids the tone control, this won’t be a factor for you.
For the guitarist who's frequently on the road or often plays out, the pedalboard is an indispensable aid. Many pedalboards include custom-fitted travel cases or gig bags. With your effects already mounted on the pedalboard, performance setups are fast: just unpack the already-configured board, plug in your guitar and amplifier, and you're ready to play.
The way that cabinet manufacturers state the power handling capabilities of a speaker cabinet (or an individual speaker) can also be confusing. An important figure for a speaker cabinet's power handling capabilities is its rated wattage-handling capabilities as "RMS". For example, a bass speaker cabinet's back panel may state that it has a power handling capacity of 500 watts RMS. This means that the speaker can handle an average power, from a power amplifier, of 500 watts. The speaker can also handle occasional peaks or "transient" bursts of higher wattages, so long as these are brief. Where is becomes confusing is that some manufacturers also list "peak power", also called "maximum power", "max power" or "burst power". Peak power is the power-handling ability of the speaker for very short bursts of high-wattage signal. The RMS figure is much more important than the "peak power" or "max power" figure. To add to the confusion, some manufacturers state the "program power" capabilities of their speaker cabinet, which can be a vague and less defined term. Reputable, major manufacturers state the RMS output and/or power-handling capabilities of their gear.

Which tonewood works the best for you will depend on your personal preference as well as the genre of music you're playing. Electric guitar bodies come in a whole range of styles. You have classics such as the Stratocaster and the Les Paul shape, but there's much more out there to explore. Granted, a vast majority of these were heavily inspired by the aforementioned models and you probably don't want to go too far off into the realm of the strange.
Smaller speaker cabinets with one, two, or four speakers, are more commonly used than the 8x10", because while the 8x10" cabinet is able to produce huge volume and powerful bass tone, the cabinets are very heavy and hard to transport. The 2x10" and 4x10" designs are popular for bassists who need less stage volume and an easier-to-transport cabinet to take to rehearsals and gigs. Some bassists own two or more smaller cabinets, such as two 4x10" cabinets. This way, a bassist playing a stadium concert on one day can bring both of her 4x10" cabs, but then if she is playing a nightclub show the next day, or going to rehearsal, she only needs to bring one 4x10" cab.
Guitar effects pedals can range from just £30 each for cheap, Chinese-made copies to over £200 for boutique hand-made pedals with unique sounds. For the average good-quality pedal (made by a company such as BOSS, for example), you’ll be looking at around £50-£100. This might seem like a lot for one effect, but if you’re careful that one pedal could last years.
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On some amps, setting the "gain" or "drive" control above a certain setting causes an overdrive effect, either due to the natural effect of overloading the preamplifier (or the preamp tube on a tube amplifier) and/or due to a distortion effect being turned on. Tube amplifiers typically also have a "standby" switch in addition to an "on/off" switch. Controls are typically mounted on the front of the amplifier near the top of the cabinet; often the knobs are recessed so that they do not project beyond the wooden cabinet, to protect the knobs during transportation. On amplifier "heads", protective metal U-shaped protrusions may be used to protect the knobs during transportation. On some amps, notably Roland models, the knobs and switches may be on top of the amplifier, at the rear of the top surface. Again, the knobs are usually recessed below the top of the wooden cabinet to protect them.
If you really want your guitar strings to stand out as well as your playing does, then these colourful options from DR are a novel eye-catcher. For even more fun, stick them under a UV light and they’ll glow, too! They might also serve a practical purpose for beginners, too, as new guitarists can quickly identify specific strings based on their colour.
I've been playing music my whole life, guitar since 16 (>30 years!!!). I'm used to distortion, delay, and some sort of phase for my unique sound. With this little devil, I make my guitar scream and whine like I'm playng straight from hell! Makes me sound almost as evil as I am in real life. For this DIYer, I have some good noise until I can build all my own pedals. Many presets, I only needed to modify two of the for my sound. Now i can sound like the true 80's hardcore punk and thrash metal songs and sounds that I grue up with.
The Hummingbird Pro's unique look breaks the typical monotonous appearance of conventional acoustics, and it does so without straying too far from the familiar. It is easily identifiable by its uniquely shaped ornate pickguard, which matches the guitar's faded cherry sunburst finish. Whether you are on stage or just jamming with friends, you can be sure that this acoustic will stand out.
An effects pedal signal chain is simply the order in which a series of pedals are connected. If you have ever seen a player use a pedal board, the order of his pedals make up his signal chain. And if by some chance you thought that you can simply place these pedals in any sort of order and still get the same results – think again! Even if you’re just working with two pedals, you will get a different sound depending on the order.

The Effect:These pedals keep the original clarity of your sound intact, depending on how you tune it, you can use a little bit of overdrive, that adds some grit to the signal, with higher tuning you can get relatively more aggressive overdrive sound that’s still tame and if you push your overdrive pedal to the limits you might get a similar sound to that of a distortion pedal’s lower settings. A good overdrive (like the Ibanez TS9 Tube Screamer) is an essential solution for those of you wanting sound enhancement with lower interference, while having the option to add some aggression in your sound, but without taking it to extreme degrees.

The Thunderbird IV was first introduced in 1963 and instantly became one of rock's most recognizable bass guitar designs. For almost five decades, the Thunderbird has powered artists as varied as Nikki Sixx, The Who, Kings of Leon, Cheap Trick, Lynyrd Skynyrd, Steely Dan and The Silversun Pickups. Turn on your radio and you'll hear a Thunderbird bass. Now, Epiphone takes all the vintage mojo of the original Thunderbird IV and sends it flying into the future with Gibson TB Plus humbuckers with ceramic magnets and all the 'Bird's original styling and features intact.


Martin Guitars has a storied history that dates back as far as the mid-1700s when Christian Frederick Martin was born to a family of modest German cabinet makers. At the age of 15, Christian Frederick traveled to Vienna and took up an apprenticeship with a renowned guitar maker, where he flourished in his craft. Years later and after a feud with the Violin Makers Guild, Martin decided to move his business to the United States, opening up shop in New York City. More than 100 years later (and through many trials and tribulations), Martin introduced their signature Dreadnought acoustic guitar, the same shape as the one pictured above. Funny thing is, it was actually based on a defunct style created by another company years prior. Now the standard for acoustic guitar shapes, nearly every manufacturer offers a version of the instrument made popular by Martin. Currently, the brand is run by Christian Frederick Martin IV, the 6th generation of the Martin family – and they’re still making some of the best instruments in the world.


The Les Paul Triumph bass, like the Les Paul Recording guitar was first shipped in 1971, but was based on a slightly older model, the 1969 Les Paul Bass. Functionally, these basses were very similar, although the Triumph did offer low and high impedance operation, without the need for a transformer cable. This owners manual details the basses specifications, suggests a string set, recommended action, and suggests a series of tonal settings for rock, country and solo bass playing.

Using that pickup and gain level, you should be able to hear some guitar distortion. Of course, if that's not entirely satisfactory, there are a few other things you can do. If your amp has tone controls, you can turn up the mid knob to hear the guitar distortion more clearly. If there's only bass and treble controls available to you, you can turn both of these down a little to hear more distortion.


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When you are also tracking a close mic at the same time, you might try variations of the approaches discussed in the sections above on distant-miking or ambient-miking to get a little or a lot more room sound into the brew. This often will capture the best overall sound for a range of musical styles – the close mic delivers punch and plenty of midrange grind (depending on mic choice), while the distant mic – placed from about 12″ away to several feet – adds depth, dimension, and the natural reverberation of the space. After careful consideration for both mic placements (using the “position, listen, re-position” techniques discussed above to find ideal on-the-track sound from each mic), some skill in the mixing process is also often required to make the most of any multi-mic setup. The discussion about phase alignment in the sidebar (“Correcting Phase Issues”) is often a big part of this post-tracking approach to maximizing multi-mic techniques, but also be aware that you can use whatever proportional blend of the two tracks works best, a variety of effects and dynamic treatments on each track, and whatever panning of the pair best suits your overall mix, from dead-on together to any different pan of each within the stereo field.
I just purchased a Lyle acoustic guitar in excellent condition. It's Serial # 204 and Model # 712. The top of the guitar says Lyle with a gold cross-like design up by the tuning keys. It looks like it was painted on the wood by the manufacture. The top tuning key head and neck are the color of milk chocolate with pearl-type fret inlays. The body of the guitar is a light tangerine color showing the natural wood grain under the clear lacquer finish. It has a dark chocolate bridge, and a black pick guard with a white pearl engraved inlay of a floral sprig or vine-type design. There is a set of three circles around the center opening (1 thin black line, a wide band of black and white lines and another thin black line. It has light tangerine and milk to dark chocolate stripped sides and back which is the natural wood grain showing through the clear lacquer finish. JAPAN is engraved on the back of the tuning key head in back.
I suspect this has been done by someone but I can't find any such tests in my quick internet search. Seems to me this is the only way to really settle the debate; the differences may be too small to hear, but regardless if there is differences then the tone is being affected by the instrument. In that case the wood and body design is making the string vibrate differently, which is what the pickup...picks up.
The GrandMeister Deluxe refines the German firm's best-selling compact head, with four flexible channels and a host of built-in effects. Just about everything is MIDI-powered, so you can edit and store presets to your heart's content. The rear panel includes the latest Red Box recording output, and there's also a new improved iPad app that you can use to edit and store presets, either at the end of a lead or using a wireless MIDI adaptor. The GrandMeister Deluxe 40's four channels sound quite different from those of its predecessor: they're more balanced, with slightly less treble emphasis and a smoother but no less powerful bass response. There's plenty of headroom on the clean channel, which dovetails seamlessly with the higher-gain crunch channel. Both clean and crunch are very tweed-influenced, dominated by a warm midrange that's equally flattering to humbuckers and single coils, especially when boosted and laced with a little of the GrandMeister's digital reverb, which can be combined to taste with delay, chorus, flanger, phaser or tremolo. The two American-voiced lead channels have all the gain you could possibly need for almost any musical genre, from classic rock to modern drop-tuned metal, with a nicely sculpted top-end that squeals and snarls on demand. As a do-it-all tool the GrandMeister 40 takes some beating. All of its many features work efficiently and it's hard to point the finger at shortcomings, because there really aren't any.
Building a rare 4005 Rickenbacker takes the hands of a master. And this master has not only built one but also created the "Jazzblaster" line of custom guitars with bodies that resemble Rickenbacker and necks inspired by Leo Fender. He also builds custom basses. "I like building beautiful things," he says. A few of his custom guitars were recently picked up to be shown to rock star royalty like Tom Petty, Lindsay Buckingham and Joe Walsh. He's played and repaired guitars. Steve Stevens, Green River Ordinance, Rocky Athans and Eric Clapton have sought out his services. He's even touched one of Jimi Hendrix's legendary axes.
16-Series: Style 16 guitars were first introduced in 1961. Later, they were the first production Martins to utilize sustainable, native woods such as ash and walnut, as well as the first to implement hybrid A-frame “X” bracing. Today, these models use solid woods such as mahogany, East Indian rosewood, koa, sapele and maple. Models include DC-16RE Aura, OMC-16E Koa, D-16 GT, 000C-16RGTE Aura and the J12-16GT, a 12-string jumbo-size guitar with the series 16 appointments. Most -16 series instruments use the Martin long scale, 25.4″.

Dorado is a line of Japanese made guitars imported and sold by Gretsch in the 70's. I am looking for a 5965 which is the smaller of the steel string line, had a sunburst finish, sealed tuning pegs and an adjustable bridge. The market worth is between one and two hundred dollars depending ....... Please post if anyone knows of a real good one with original case.
In 2000, for the anniversary of the Squier line of Stratocaster guitars, that year’s model was offered in a limited-edition green finish. The “Crafted in China” Squier Affinity Strats are different from their immediate predecessors; most have plywood bodies, larger headstock shapes, and somewhat inferior small parts. The pick guards generally now have 11 holes and screws, departing from the original ’50s style. Many people attribute the Affinity’s decline in quality to the introduction of the changes in 2000. The next major change for the Affinity line was a reduction in body thickness from 1.75″ to 1.5″, noticeable in size and weight.
This specific review is for the full-size guitar, which is 40”, so if you read all the reviews on Amazon, many of them are for the ½ and ¾ size. If you’re an adult with smaller hands, purchasing the smaller sizes may be a better bet than trying to wrestle with a full-size instrument. Size doesn’t necessarily have to do with this guitar model’s tone, which many reviewers say is quite good for the price.

Flanger – Before digital recording was the standard, a common trick used by artists was to touch one of a tape recorder’s reels to slow it down, then let it go so it would catch up with the main track. The result was a sound that could be subtly thicker or downright unrecognizable, and it’s the effect that flangers are designed to reproduce. You can hear Jimmy Page’s use of a flanger on Nobody’s Fault But Mine and Kashmir, by Led Zeppelin.
That said, however, the volume knob can help you conjure a variety of tonal characteristics that can come in handy provided you play with dynamics. Using a volume knob in this context can allow such cool maneuvers as having different tones for verses and choruses, or for various styles of music. To get a handle on how your guitar’s volume dial or dials can affect tone, plug in and fire up your amp until it’s growling with overdrive. Start with your guitar’s volume pot at 10 and begin rolling the dial back in increments. As you go, you’ll hear not only a decrease in loudness, but your sound will clean up and experience variations in its harmonic characteristics.
Hi, it seems like the problem lies in your hands and not in the guitar itself. If you are a beginner, you must start slowly and build up strength in your hands. A good way is to simply buy a "stress ball" or other hand exerciser. A "Gripmaster" one that lets you work each finger individually, which can be very useful, they are available for about $20 at most music stores.

This is also an amazing choice for kids and guitar novices. It comes in many different colors and it is quite easy to set up and tune. Once you manage to tune it, it will run for a long time. It has four tone modes and you can select one of them using a switch. It has one tone knob adjustment and one volume adjustment. It is quite easy to play and also highly comfortable.
If you’ve been playing for a while, chances are pretty good that you’ve probably already built up a collection of four, five or 10 stomp boxes, which now leaves you with the question of how to hook them all up and use them in your rig. Or perhaps you’ve hooked everything up and wondered why you get howling feedback, excess white noise, hum or silence whenever you engage two or more pedals at once.
Low frets aren't a bad idea, and Carvin is a very good brand for guitar, amp, etc. To me, it seems that the neck shape is going to be very important for you. Double-check what Carvin's return policy is, and if you think it will work for you (whatever it is) then I would totally say go for it! The caveat is that I would bring it to your local music store for them to do the setup, setups and intonations usually need to be done after shipping, and you'd need to have it done if you were changing string gauges anyways, so....
The GK Studio mixes traditional flamenco construction techniques, a comfortable body shape and modern Fishman electronics, resulting in an easy to play nylon-string guitar that can be plugged in for stage use. My main concern about this guitar is its slightly thinner body depth, neck and nutwidth(1.96"), but these are calculated tweaks that should make this classical guitar play and feel more akin to conventional steel-string acoustics.
It’s the knob that controls a potentiometer (informally a “pot”) which acts as an inhibitor of sorts (when used in conjunction with a capacitor), bleeding off the high end frequencies of a guitar’s pickup (or pickups) signal that has passed through the volume control and is on it’s way out of the guitar, giving it a “warmth” (think muffled-ish) sound.
This is a musical problem rather than a technical one. Guitarists engage overdrive when they WANT to dominate. That's fine, but don't do it ALL the time! Not if there's an acoustic guitar in the band and you want to hear it! Everyone needs to listen, everyone has to be aware that another player may have something interesting to play, and therefore make space for it. Like turn down or - horror - even stop playing for a bit!
EQ placement is similar. Some players prefer to mold and shape their guitar’s primary tonal character before it is processed by other effects, but others prefer to adjust the EQ of the finished sound (again, placement in front of delay and reverb is preferable). Or maybe your distortion pedal’s EQ controls just don’t have enough bass or treble and you need to tweak its tone a touch more. If you own an EQ pedal, have fun and try placing it in different locations to see what works best for you.
Maintaining these items does help though, perhaps every year or so remove the cover plate or pickguard and clean out any dust building up on the switch and contacts, it'll make them last for years to come so it's worth the minimal effort. You'd perhaps clean the fretboard and frets, so it's worth thinking about the other, hidden, functional parts too. 
The guitar player who makes his guitar sound anything but a guitar. Helicopter rudders, disc scratching, and his use of the kill switch for staccato like guitar riffs has made him probably the most innovative guitar player of our time. He is a guitarist who can take feedback, and ground hum from his own body into coherent music. Be it Rage Against The Machine, or Audioslave you can always see Morello’s signature licks shining through.
This is not a complete list of former or current American guitar companies. Among the omissions are Steinberger electric guitars and basses, now part of Gibson and Carvin, who is still independently owned and sells only direct, not through distributors or stores. I have not included the past great archtop luthiers such as D’Angelico, D’Aquisto or current archtop makers such as Bennedetto. Nor have I included the many smaller USA luthiers who are currently building excellent guitars such as Huss & Dalton, Foggy Bottom or Collings.
All electric guitars have this switch but it varies from guitar to guitar. it is called the pickup selector switch. It is used for deciding on which pickup to use on the guitar. On a les paul style guitar it can be used to select the neck (traditionally rythm pickup), bridge (traditionally used for lead) and both pickups together.\n. \n===\n. \nThat's what it is on a normal Gibson Les Paul. But on a Gibson Les Paul BFG, that is a "kill" switch that turns the guitar off completely. On many Gretsches, the toggle switch is a tone switch flipping between bassier and more trebly sounds. On most Fenders, that switch is down on the lower bout by the volume/tone controls (but on a Telecaster Deluxe, the switch is where it'd be on a Les Paul). Then there are oddities like the Italia Rimini, which has no pickup selector switch -- just individual volume controls for the two pickups.\n. \nEvery guitar has a different design. You'd have to look into every model.

CostHelper Electric Guitar Guide - [New Window] - Find out how much an electric guitar should cost. Get price guidelines and shopping tips for an electric guitar. A basic electric guitar with amplifier and cord starts around $200 to $400 for a beginner's outfit; a better quality kit can run $500 to $2,000, and high-end electric guitars are $2,000 to $5,000 or more for the instrument alone.
Designed in collaboration with the legendary Guns N' Roses guitarist, this limited-edition Slash Firebird won't last long. After all, as Slash himself says, "Who doesn't want a Firebird?" Limited to a production run of just 900, worldwide, this version of the iconic guitar combines tradition, like the reissue Kluson banjo-style tuners, with some of Slash's signature touches like the Seymour Duncan Slash signature Alnico II pickups and flame maple top. Great for rock and blues, don't miss your chance to snap one of these up. Case sold separately.
First off, I would like to say I had a lot of fun building this. Also, my hat goes off to the person that hand wrote all the tiny labels on the parts. With that being said, I couldn't get it to work. No sound at all, and only the light came on when I hit the switch. Now the fact that it didn't work could totally be an error on my part, but who knows. Now what I didn't like about this product is this: the casing is pretty small, so everything is pretty cramped (which may also contribute to why I wasn't able to get this to work, although, if you read other reviews, which I recommend for further useful information, some managed just fine), some pieces were mislabeled (There is a review that sorts this out), and the directions aren't very clear...well I thought they were clear enough, but look where that got me, so be ready for that. So 3 stars for fun, good price, and faster than expected delivery.
Now check both the open and the 12th fret notes again. You’ll have to tune the open string again because by moving the saddle, the tension of the string will have changed and so will need to be retuned. Once you have correctly moved the saddle so that both the open string and the 12th fret are in tune, you can move on to the A string. Repeat until all of the strings have been done. Note that on this particular guitar, the (thick) E, A and D saddles could not be moved far enough forward to intonate correctly, so I had to swap their orientation to give a bit more distance.
Many artists discovered that the 3-way pickup selector could be lodged in between settings (often using objects such as matchsticks or toothpicks to wedge it in position) for further tonal variety, resulting in a unique sound when two pickups are combined. Jimi Hendrix would also move the switch across the settings while sustaining a note, creating a characteristic ‘wobbly’ sound, similar to that created by the wah-wah pedal. This effect can be heard in the Woodstock recording of Star Spangled Banner. Since 1977, the Stratocaster has been fitted with a 5-way switch to make such switching more stable. This switch is the same electrically as the original 3-way, but with extra detents for the in-between settings. Other subtle changes were also made to the guitars over the years, but the basic shape and features of the Strat have remained unchanged. In the 1970s and 1980s, some guitarists began modifying their Stratocasters with humbucking pickups, especially in the bridge position, to create what became known as a Fat Strat. This was intended to provide a thicker tone preferred in the heavier styles of hard rock and heavy metal. The popularity of this modification grew and eventually Fender began manufacturing models with a bridge humbucker option (HSS), denoted and separated from the original triple single coil by the title of “Fat Strat“, as a reference to the humbucker’s distinct sound, as well as models with dual humbuckers (HH), better known as “Double Fat Strats“. Fender also started making Stratocaster pickguards specially designed for guitar bodies routed for HSH (humbucker-single-humbucker) and HHH (humbucker-humbucker-humbucker) pickup configurations.
We selected this guitar as our Top Pick because it’s an instrument that could suit anybody. It has everything you need from your electric guitar and it’s easy to play. A good classic that will stay with you for many years to come. It suits both beginners and guitarists who have been playing for a while. True, a professional guitarist would buy something pricier, but if you’re not super picky this guitar will do perfectly well!

Jazz guitarists integrate the basic building blocks of scales and arpeggio patterns into balanced rhythmic and melodic phrases that make up a cohesive solo. Jazz guitarists often try to imbue their melodic phrasing with the sense of natural breathing and legato phrasing used by horn players such as saxophone players. As well, a jazz guitarists' solo improvisations have to have a rhythmic drive and "timefeel" that creates a sense of "swing" and "groove." The most experienced jazz guitarists learn to play with different "timefeels" such as playing "ahead of the beat" or "behind the beat," to create or release tension.
The three Teisco amps included the Teisco-88, the AMP-71R and the Miny. No details are available on these, but they were fairly rectangular cabinets with top-mounted controls. The Teisco-88 had “Teisco” and a big “88” on the grillcloth. The ’66 model was a tube amp, so this likely was, as well. I suspect the others shown were tubers as well. The Miny had the italicized T logo on the front. The AMP-71R had reverb.
My guitar is in excellent condition and is all mostly original. The tuners are replicas of the original Klusons, and it came with non-original wooden legs. The legs were originally `sold separately, so it’s possible that the original owner opted for cheaper off-brand legs instead. I prefer to use a table-type keyboard stand anyway, mainly because it frees up more space for my feet underneath. This is my primary gigging steel; it’s reliable and versatile, and it usually turns a few heads as well due to its unique appearance. Aside from a broken name badge, it’s in excellent condition; it came with the cleanest original Valco case I’ve ever seen. There is some slight deterioration of the chrome plating, but otherwise there is little wear to be found. I previously owned a Supro Console Eight, and liked it so much that I traded it for the double-neck version. The Console Sixteen is a rare bird because it was produced only briefly; it first appeared in the 1958 Supro catalog and last appeared in 1959.
While the bulk of new players will likely want an amplifier for their electric guitars, acoustic-driven music is still plenty popular amongst players of all skills. And while acoustics are fairly loud on their own, some players still want to pump up the volume from time to time, as well as shape their sound. And you can do all that without sacrificing the warmth of your guitar’s sound with the Behringer Ultracoustic AT108. Perfect for home practices and coffee shop performances, this amp was specifically designed to enhance the volume and tones of an acoustic guitar (or, more accurately, an acoustic-electric). It also has a secondary microphone input to amplify your voice alongside your guitar.
In January 1986, Gibson changed ownership and began manufacturing a range of varied Les Paul models to suit different user needs. The 1980s also saw the end to several design characteristics that were classic to the Les Paul, including the volute and maple neck. However, due to consumer demand, the Gibson Les Paul guitar is available today in an array of choices, ranging from guitars equipped with modern digital electronics to classic re-issue models built to match the look and specifications of the guitar’s earliest production runs from 1952 to 1960.
Boombox Guitar Tuner will get the party started. Just play a note, and it shows. Other guitar tuners don''t use the microphone, like Boombox Guitar Tuner, because it''s written with cutting-edge Flash 10.1 technology. Boombox Guitar Tuner is free to download or use online, so why waste your money on other expensive guitar tuners at the music shop? Try tuning your guitar once using Boombox Guitar Tuner, and you''ll see that it takes just seconds .
This is why I’m nervous when I see a free guitar plugin that actually wants to replace a guitar, which Cute Emily Guitar attempts to do. Now, Cute Emily is the most guitar-sounding of the bunch, but it also has the least amount of controls. This gives you a relatively singular sound and while I commend Big Cat efforts, I stopped using this free electric guitar plugin faster than I did the others.

A more successful early electric was the Ro-Pat-In "Frying Pan" guitar. This was played lap-steel style, and was the earliest I know of that uses something close to the magnetic pickups as they exist in modern guitars. This was conceptualized by George Beauchamp in 1931... he played Hawaiian style, thus the lap steel design. He met Adolph Rickenbacker and together the two worked out the details of the pickup system, and put this into production in 1932... the company name was eventually changed to "Rickenbacher".
An overdrive is almost always at its best played through a tube amp set at medium to upper-medium volume, since the amp itself is doing a major part of the job, the pedal just being the boot that kicks its butt into juicy break-up a little quicker. Conversely, demo one DI’d into a mixing desk or portastudio as described earlier, and in most cases the breed sounds absolutely awful: harsh, raspy, cold, and artificial. It can be a shocking look at the evil side of that $350 vintage Tube Screamer you just bagged from eBay. Now stop crying, and plug it back into your AC30.

Roger Fritz is a professional luthier who makes guitars and basses for musicians like George Harrison and Randy Jackson. Roger is also a bass player who fell in love with the old Kay 1950's bass after having a friend recommend he play one. Roger, who had worked for Gibson in Nashville on their Bluegrass instruments, created his own company, Fritz Brothers Guitars in Alabama is making custom hand-made instruments for professional players worldwide. Roger was so enamored with the sound of the Kay (K162V) Pro Bass that he developed a clone and made them available for sale under the Fritz name. Roger Fritz was the missing link that was needed to make the project a reality: a Luthier that had a love for the instruments to be produced. Roger joined our team in early 2007 to help create and develop all the parts and features that made the Kay products different from all the rest. Most of the parts and molds were no longer available so everything had to be created from scratch. The pickguards, the knobs, the hand wound pickups, the tailpiece, and even the baseball bat style toggle switch cover all had to be manufactured using original parts as templates for the new reissued versions. Finding the parts was difficult and surprisingly expensive since we needed to search stores, eBay and contact collectors to find perfect originals to reproduce. The going price for a good vintage Jazz Special Bass today is $7,000. But after finding the parts and vintage instruments from avid collectors like Gary Walko, Vintage Kay historians like Michael Wright and Jay Scott, and dozens of avid fans, the project was able to take form.

I am writing this due to the mixed reviews that I read before buying this. This is a really powerful device. I have had a POD 2.0 for years. This is just as good and is also small, portable, and inexpensive. Most of the criticism that I read is that it is not well made and durable. It is well made, but I don't think it is designed for gigging. It is perfect for practicing or interfacing with a home studio. If this is your application, then you will be very satisfied. One other thing that I found true of this and similar devices that I own is that the quality of the headphones makes a big difference. If you use studio quality headphones it will sound great, if you use music player headphones it will just sound good. I haven't ... full review

The Red Hot Chili Peppers always knew how to rock a party; it took John Frusciante to turn them into an arena-packing band with a sound they could call their own. Frusciante is a remarkably elastic stylist and a gifted sculptural arranger who pushed the Chilis to explore new worlds without getting in the way of their funk-pumped energy; he beefed up their sound with both well-placed fire (the volcanic, Hendrix-style solo on “Dani California”) and remarkable elegance (the indelible opening chords of “Under the Bridge”).


IN STOCK:,Vintage well built!...Premium build quality by Lyle crsfted in Japan, solid spruce top, high grade quality Mahogany neck see pics. Neck profile is medium profile very comfortable..NEAR MINT JAPANESE VINTAGE GUITAR ...this guitar is like having a new 38 year old guitar it looks so newish... its finish is still very glass like and has been well taken care of over the years well preserved for YOU. The neck angle is PERFECT , frets still are like new still. The action is VERY nice & low and it plays with ease you will be very pleased indeed with its overall condition this is exactly what we look for at JVGuitars to bring you the best near mint vintage. The back and sides are also not your average run of the mill grain but very beautiful vividly wavy grain looking like some exotic woods for sure stained cherry like they would do with mahogany... very nice detail & binding and perfling work overall..this guitar is a real pleasure to play too and sounds wonderful. Anyone would be very pleased and proud to own this nearly 40 year old beauty..
SOLD OUT ...Here is yet another GREAT Sounding and PLAYING Nippon Gakki 000 Red Label made in the famous Nippon Gakki plant in Japan. Absolutely surprising Booming tone from a small package who would have guessed these sound so great... This one is in excellent vintage condition that is to say all the important structural components of this guitar are in good shape that is to say that this guitar has GOOD BONES…. NO CRACKs its neck angle alignment is still good to this day its top is for the most part flat and its Bridge is nice and tight to its top … it appears to be a solid two piece center seam Sitka Spruce top and its cross braced like an old Martin , This guitar is over 40+++ years old and has been played and is not mint of course it has its share of superficial dings and drinks but nothing that can deter its ability to play great and sound great and look Fantastic with its Vintage Amber top and lush PATINA its a classic 000 that has THE SOUND!…. When we received it I loved the sound immediately it was pretty deep and rich sounding for such a small guitar with old cruddy strings I was thinking but like many of these Old Yamaha’s the action was too high so I did have to do our full JVGuitars UPGRADE set-up to it so I stripped its old strings off..its cheap plastic nut & saddle and bridge pins tossed to garbage, its fingerboard was remarkably clean and rut free and the pearloid inlays look great vivid with that patina of 40+ years and the frets were not bad with just minimal groves so I adjusted true rod -leveled -dressed & polished the frets, cleaned fingerboard and Lemon oiled the rosewood fingerboard and the bridge which is crack free as well.. all is looking and feeling great now.. Then using hyde glue installed a Martin Bon nut and a compensated bone saddle was fit following up with a quality set of fancy Rosewood bridge pins with Abalone and brass ring they fit sung for optimum tone resonance transfer. This has made a markable improvement in its resonance and its a bit louder now too SWEET sounding now! When we got this one it has a small chip at sound hole just under the fat bass E string looks like an aggressive finger style did the damage and was at the sound hole edge and I have successfully repaired this same sort of spot before so I wasn’t worried this one was nick named “Chip" for this reason I since repaired the spot using the professional woodworking Mohawk system of melting in a resin bar with jot knife that was spruce color then graining the repair and top coating brush tip matching lacquer to the repair spot area to blend…. its not really noticeable anymore now and is a non issue. I did notice that someone changed the tuners for other old Yamaha FG tuners tiny holes didn't line up but this makes no difference in performance what so ever and is not even noticeable they are Yamaha tuners. Overall structurally this guitar is still in top condition players and it really has that beautiful vintage 40+++ year old Martin like Patina aura about it.... i its VINTAGE PATINA and character is absolutely beautiful this is in the eye of the beholder of course but if your vintage lover you’ll appreciate this instrument for what she is. This Old guitar plays like a $ MUCH more expensive guitar any day... People of all walks of life worldwide on the net are comparing the sound of theirs to a Martin it take years for a guitar’s tone to naturally open up like this guitar has set up and plays and sounds amazing and the price is right Questions or to buy it contact Joe at: jvguitars@gmail.com .
Now I'm talking to the owner of my local mom & pop shop who sold me my Affinty (which is great but the string spacing sucks). Guy is leaning toward making a deal for an Austin. Maybe I'm dead wrong, but I don't like Austins, they are crap IMO. I told him I have some extra cash and maybe we could work something out, but I just feel like this guy has a lousy inventory of cheap guitars and I will be hard pressed to escape with a decent instrument.
Our Most Recommended electric guitar is Yamaha Pacifica Series PAC012 Electric Guitar. Yamaha has been a power player in the music industry for many decades. The Pacific Yamaha Series is one of the best series for the last decade for its high quality tone and amazing play experience. The Yamaha Pacifica Series was designed for the focus of one thing: Yamaha’s customers.

The first Merson guitar advertised in The Music Trades appeared in the December, 1948, issue. This was the Tempo Electric Spanish Guitar which listed at $59.50 plus $11.50 for a Dura-bilt case. The Merson Tempo was an auditorium-sized archtop with a glued-in neck, a harrow center-peaked head which looks almost Kay. The guitar was finished in a shaded mahogany with a pair of widely separated white lines around the edges. Available source material is hard to see, but these appear not to have any soundholes. The fingerboard was probably rosewood with four dots (beginning at the fifth fret). This had a typical moveable/adjustable compensated bridge, elevated pickguard and cheap trapeze tailpiece. One Super-Sensitive pickup sat nestled under the fingerboard, and volume and tone controls were “built-in.”

If you are looking for a specific guitar wiring diagram, I would contact the manufacturer of your guitar. Most guitars have similar style wirings. If you have a Stratocaster style guitar that is made by another company, I would go ahead and just use a Strat wiring diagram. I have listed a few books on electric guitar wiring in my book section. Go to the electric guitar pickup wiring section for more information.

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DIY Pedal Kits – supplies hand made guitar effect pedal kits from the UK. All you need to complete their kits are a small number of basic tools. These are a soldering iron, screwdriver and wire cutters/strippers. In addition, needle nose pliers make things a LOT easier but they aren’t essential. Included in each kit is a pre-drilled metal enclosure, 3PDT true bypass) switches (if applicable), high-quality quarter inch jacks, all wire, solder, heatshrink, components, etc needed for the build, 2.1mm center npower supply socket and full color build guide.
An equalizer (more often called EQ) is the device that allows you to adjust certain frequencies within your tone. The 3-band part implies that the EQ offers three points of control: bass, middle and treble. While 3-band is the standard, you can also have 2-Band EQ (which tend to offer just bass and treble), as well as 4-band EQ, 5-band EQ (low-bass, mid-bass, midrange, upper-midrange, treble) and upwards! Of course, the higher the band, the more versatility the amp offers. But 3-band tends to be the easiest to get to grips with.
While the other digital amplifiers we tried (the Blackstone ID:Core Stereo 10 V2 and the Line 6 Spider Classic 15) offered a similarly wide range of good sounds, most of our panelists preferred the Champion 20 simply because it was easier to use. Lynn Shipley Sokolow preferred the simplicity of non-digital amps such as the Vox Pathfinder 10, but she said, “The Fender is the best of the digitals because it’s easy to understand the controls.”
Jazz guitarists learn to perform these chords over the range of different chord progressions used in jazz, such as the ubiquitous ii-V-I progression, the jazz-style blues progression (which, in contrast to a blues-style 12 bar progression, may have two or more chord changes per bar) the minor jazz-style blues form, the I-vi-ii-V based "rhythm changes" progression, and the variety of modulation-rich chord progressions used in jazz ballads, and jazz standards. Guitarists may also learn to use the chord types, strumming styles, and effects pedals (e.g., chorus effect or fuzzbox) used in 1970s-era jazz-Latin, jazz-funk, and jazz-rock fusion music.
Speaking of versatility, pedals aren't the only type of multi effects units that you'll find here. There are also rack-mounted models like the Rocktron VooDu Valve Online Guitar Multi Effects Processor and the Line 6 POD HD PRO X Guitar Multi Effects. Looking for a case to store your multi effects pedal when it's time to pack up after the show? Check out the Gator G-MULTIFX - Medium Guitar Effects Pedal Bag and the Boss BOSS Bag L2 for starters. There's lots to see here, and it's worth taking the time to have a close look!
too many to the point their incredibly over rated for me personally, there's a world outside of Gibson that cost a fracton as much and will blow peoples heads off. I have a custom 7 string I bought off craigslist someone made that's worth about 500 dollars because I didnt pay for some name on the headstock and so on. All my friends from blues and jazz lovers to metal would rather play my guitar. more frets for soloing than their les pauls active pickups a Floyd rose locking tuners 4 big reasons right there
I personally don't like the shape of the Valkyrie...it just looks odd to me. Try a few Epi's...some are pretty nice. Stay away from the G310s...I suspect they may be made of balsa wood..and the Specials. But the G400s, the customs and the Tony Iommis, all of which I have played, have been pretty decent in terms of fit, finish and sound. I'd really love to play a Prophecy at some point...they look pretty rad.
Some solid-bodied guitars, such as the Gibson Les Paul Supreme, the PRS Singlecut or the Fender Telecaster Thinline, among others, are built with hollows in the body. These hollows are designed specifically not to interfere with the critical bridge and string anchor point on the solid body. The motivation for this can be to reduce weight, to achieve a semi-hollow tone, or both.
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