Some early Valco instruments continued to make it into the marketing pipeline – early on, at least. Probably as a sign of the increasing difficulty in getting product, the Spring/Summer 1942 Sears catalog sported a full complement of Supro guitars, essentially the ’41 line, all labeled with the newly-chosen Sears brand name, Silvertone. Shown in the ’42 Sears catalog were the Supro Capitan and Supro Rio, now renamed the Silvertone Crest (carved torch logo) and Silvertone Spanish (no logo), respectively. The Capitan had a standard trapeze tailpiece rather than the Dobro variety, with permanent cord coming out of the top of the lower bout!
Hollow: Although a bit more rare than the previous two, it may be exactly what you’re looking for if it fits your style. Hollow body electric guitars sound a lot like acoustic guitars, giving us that brighter sound but having trouble with higher volumes since feedback is likely to occur (especially in medium to higher volumes). It has a round and full tone with great bass response, giving jazz players a big grin when they hear it.

When it comes to combo amps, the speakers included will usually give you a good idea of what to expect in terms of power and performance. While bass amps are in a category of their own, guitar combos tend to use speakers of anywhere between 3″ right up to 15″. Obviously, the bigger the speaker, the better suited it is for the stage, while having more than one is an instant upgrade to the power available.
Daisy Rock? Sounds like guitars for girls or something. It is! Daisy Rock is a company dedicated to empowering girls and young women and giving them the resources they need to learn to play the guitar. They have starter, short-scale acoustic guitars for little girls, and some really cool electric guitars in the shapes of hearts, butterflies, and flowers.
The "Slide Guitar Extension Nut" presents a bad case of convenience to the manufacturer (only having to make one size) disguised as a convenience to the customer (pretending one size fits all). This thing is not very versatile. With an outer string spread of 1.75", it's made for a wide guitar neck so if yours is only average, the outer strings will be suspended off to the sides of the overall width of the neck. That's not insurmountable but it's also not something every budding slide player wants to tolerate.
Epiphone was once among the most significant competitors of Gibson. Later on, Gibson acquired them and, now, Epiphone form sits budget-friendly. However, the popularity of Epiphone as one of the best electric guitar brands was always there owing to their affordability and near to top-notch quality. Thus, choosing an Epiphone Les Paul guitar doesn’t mean you have to compromise much on the tone and specs. In fact, you get a guitar with specs comparable to Gibson – that too – on a much cheaper rate.
Moreover, it can hand a wide range of musical styles and techniques. In most cases they're more popular with classic rock and blues fans, perhaps the Stevie Ray Vaughan or Eric Clapton enthusiast. However, there have been players over the years who have used Stratocasters in much heavier styles of music. Billy Corgan and Jim Root are just a couple that come to mind.
I don't need freaky pointy demon guitar graphics or anything like that.....this $249 Agile makes my mouth water. For the price of two cheap pedals or one great pedal it's a guitar that you could work with. Ibanez makes the stylish P90 Jet King for about $375...If I were on a tight budget I'd rather have the basic Agile. Yes I'm aging! Get off my lawn you Jet King kids!!
I have a Palmer P 33 acoustic (hand-crafted etc), that I bought second hand about 20 years ago for £80. It still sounds and looks superb and rarely loses its tuning. (Probably better than my newer Tanglewood.) I can't find out anything about it. However, somebody out there must have made it. Surely that somebody knows something about them! Do they never go on the internet! Pete.

The Tube Screamer pedal has a long list of iconic users including Stevie Ray Vaughn, Gary Moore, John Mayer, Joe Bonamassa, The Edge and many more. As such, it is only expected for a company like Ibanez to take advantage of its popularity to extend their reach in the amplifier market - resulting in the creation of the Tube Screamer Amp (TSA) series. The Ibanez TSA15H leads the series in terms of ratings, with its compact yet versatile head profile while having the same combination of tube amplification and built-in tube screamer circuitry. At its core are two 12AX7 preamp tubes and two 6V6 power amp tubes, a standard configuration that sounds good on its own. Its standout feature is the implementation of a Tube Screamer circuit, which comes complete with the same controls as the iconic green pedal it is based on.

Major-chord progressions are constructed in the harmonization of major scales in triads.[21] For example, stacking the C-major scale with thirds creates a chord progression, which is traditionally enumerated with the Roman numerals I, ii, iii, IV, V, vi, viio; its sub-progression C-F-G (I-IV-V) is used in popular music,[22] as already discussed. Further chords are constructed by stacking additional thirds. Stacking the dominant major-triad with a minor third creates the dominant seventh chord, which shall be discussed after minor chords.


The PRS Silver Sky is the result of a close collaboration between Grammy Award-winning musician John Mayer and Paul Reed Smith. More than two and half years in the making, the Silver Sky is a vintage-inspired instrument that is at once familiar but also newly PRS through and through. This model was based off of Mayer and Smith’s favorite elements from 1963 and 1964 vintage instruments, resulting in an idealized version of a vintage single-coil guitar. The attention that was paid to every detail sets this guitar apart.
Searching for something to give them a boost, in July ’68, Ovation introduced its first electric guitars – the Electric Storm series. Two models were available initially, the Thunderhead and the Tornado. These were f-hole semi-hollowbody thinline, equal double-cutaway guitars with German-made bodies, bolt-on Ovation necks, and Schaller hardware. Most had Schaller pickups with metal covers, a row of poles along each edge, and split, small, black inserts in the middle. Each was available with or without vibrato.

A different take on the standard tone control is the Varitone circuit sometimes used on Gibson guitars (such as the Blueshawk). The Varitone is actually a variable notch filter consisting of one of several capacitors (selected with a rotary switch) in series with an inductor, forming an LC circuit.[15] When placed between the signal and ground, this circuit starts to attenuate frequencies around its resonant frequency, as determined by the following formula:
Before we wade in, please note that National Dobro and subsequently Valco, more than most other manufacturers, were notorious for putting together guitars with parts left around. This, combined with the fact that they routinely used components (especially bodies) provided by other manufacturers, means that you are likely to find instruments with details inconsistent with catalog descriptions, and they may just be Kosher.
Be careful. Don't be rash. With the quality of Gibson's 2016 guitars, you should never have too many problems but... if in doubt with an older guitar, take it to a guitar repair pro. You won't need to do it often at all. And it's best to book-in your guitar with an explanation of what you think is wrong. Basic premise: T.L.C. for your guitar, and you'll feel the love back. Oh, and keep your guitar clean!
A common misconception of the Lyle brand, among others, was that Norlin sued Matsumoku for copying their designs and shut them down. The actual lawsuit was indeed filed by Norlin, only not against Matsumoku but Elger/Hoshino--the American division of Ibanez--over elements of the Les Paul and SG guitar designs that Norlin/Gibson had since claimed as a trademark. The case was eventually settled out of court. Japanese companies preemptively altered the designs of their guitars in such a way that they would not be "exact" copies of Gibson guitars. The true story of the demise of the Lyle brand is largely unknown to this day.
As I look at all the guitars you fellows have its a pleasure to see so many . to bad I live to far to visit Indianapolis IN .I have a 3/4 Stella that is about 69 years old that I got when I was about ...4 years old . Uncle John Hinson gave it to me for Christmas and I played the heck out of it. At about 12 years old I played in a theater here and was called Mevis Fresley . Rock and Roll and Country . So much fun I had for about a year then Momma and Dad said I had to quit as I was getting to popular, Oh well it was fun while it lasted.. Haven't met Pat Stockdale in person but that child can play a pretty Guitar. Good luck to you all Betty McLevey See More
Yamaha’s also excel in terms of their playability, which is an especially important characteristic for beginners. Too many players sacrifice quality to save money on their first guitar, with the result being that they now have to deal with difficult playability that poses extra challenges to the learning process and can sour the learner’s experience with the new instrument. Yamaha offers an enticing balance between cost and quality.

The key difference between an electric guitar and an acoustic is how they make a sound. Electrics use pickups and acoustics rely on a ‘soundboard’ a hollowed out body, and a sound hole to amplify the vibration of the strings. The most important difference though is what you want to sound like and what you prefer. A guitar that you want to pick up and play will always be one that makes you practice more – which is the only way to get better at guitar!


By the mid 1990s Korean instruments were rising in price as Korean labor rates and other costs went up. Many Korean and Japanese companies set up factories in Indonesia to take advantage of reduced costs there and Fender set up their Mexican factory to take advantage of reduced labor rates in a setting very close to their USA factory. With modern CNC equipment and Korean and Japanese ownership and management, it was possible for Indonesian factories to very quickly turn out good student- and intermediate-grade instruments. In my experience, however, none of the Indonesian products rival the quality of the better Japanese or Korean guitars. The new Mexican Fender guitars give excellent "bang for the buck" and in many cases play and sound better than the later CBS-made American Fenders.
Guitar amplifiers vary widely in price and quality. Many music equipment companies import small, low-powered practice amplifiers for students and beginners that sell for less than $50 USD. Other companies produce expensive custom-made amplifiers for professional musicians, which can cost hundreds or even thousands of dollars (USD). Most combo amplifiers have a carrying handle, and many combo amplifiers and cabinets have metal or plastic-reinforced corners to protect the amp during transportation.
The new AC15 'Twin' retains the all-important dual-EL84, cathode-biased output section of its forebear, but otherwise it's very different. A quick scan across the top panel reveals two inputs for independent access to either normal or top boost channels. One benefit of the bigger, 2x12 enclosure is that it provides ample room for a full-length reverb tank, housed in the bottom. There's also an in-built tremolo effect, with controls for depth and speed. But the whole point of this amp is the pair of 25-watt Celestion G12M Greenback speakers. They are the speaker of rock in so many cases and while purists might hope for Celestion Blues, they would add a good £300 at least to the price; and he increased power handling of two Greenbacks on the end of just 15 watts is quite a tantalising prospect. It's fair to say that even with the master volume set-up, the magic doesn't really start happening until the amp's lungs are at least half way open, but happily, that's not far from perfect for many of today's pub and bar gigs - it may even be too much for some. The AC15 'Twin' does sound magnificent when clean, but listen carefully to those amps or this and it's rarely completely undistorted. That harmonically rich drive that was never supposed to be there is the key characteristic that latter day, non-master volume AC users find hardest to replicate.

The best is a personal idea. Clapton & VanHalen can make a Walmart Special sound good. Paul Reed Smith made a guitar out of plywood purchased at HomeDepot and it didn't sound bad. IMHO Gibsons are too heavy, Fenders are like broom handles, Suhrs are Fender copies, BC Richs sound like muddy water, and Jacksons are just plain ugly. But if you like 'em, that's fine with the rest of us. I do laugh at people who shell out major $$$ for an axe and they still suck at playing. Dream on.


The switches and jack sockets are important in a reliability sense first and foremost I feel. In a play-ability sense, you want a firm feeling, accurate switch and one that lasts well with regular use. You want a jack socket that doesn't fall apart or get too crackly over the years of years, they take a lot of abuse! So here there's no 'magic vintage tone' secret, I would just recommend quality switches from the brands renowned for their years of producing reliable items. I trust and use those from Switchcraft, Pure Tone, Oak Grigsby & CRL. All very solid, well made items that last really well. In particular, I've been predominantly using a multi contact jack socket made by a company called 'Pure Tone'. Please forgive their brand name, as this isn't some tone transforming jack socket, but it is a common sense improvement of an old design which is great. It features 4 points of contact for the jack connector, two for the hot, two for ground. 100% greater surface area, giving it a firmer seat on the jack connector and a sturdier, more reliable connection which is a no brainer upgrade in my opinion.
To find which Ernie Ball strings are right for you, the key is experimentation. Figure out which strings sound best to your ear, feel best on your fingers, and most importantly enable you to create the music you want. When you are ready to buy, head over to one of the 5,500 music stores that carry Ernie Ball products. You can discover these stores by visiting our Store Locator.
Replace components. From plugging in and unplugging my guitar so much, the stock input jack lost its grab. So I had an extra Radioshack one lying around, and I soldered it in. Now all my cords are held tight. I also had a problem(common with Teles as I understand it) with my input jack "cup" coming out with wires and all. Once you take a look at how it's held in there, it's an easy fix.
A few guitars feature stereo output, such as Rickenbacker guitars equipped with Rick-O-Sound. There are a variety of ways the "stereo" effect may be implemented. Commonly, but not exclusively, stereo guitars route the neck and bridge pickups to separate output buses on the guitar. A stereo cable then routes each pickup to its own signal chain or amplifier. For these applications, the most popular connector is a high-impedance 1⁄4 inch (6.35 mm) plug with a tip, ring and sleeve configuration, also known as a TRS phone connector. Some studio instruments, notably certain Gibson Les Paul models, incorporate a low-impedance three-pin XLR connector for balanced audio. Many exotic arrangements and connectors exist that support features such as midi and hexaphonic pickups.
Flanging: This effect involves mixing two copies of the same signal with one of them slightly phase shifted. Historically, it had its origin with studio engineers using reeel-to-reel tape recorders. They would make a copy of a tape and then feed the original and copy together to a recorder, having placed a pencil on the flange of one tape to slightly alter its speed. The slight speed change would not be enough to cause notable delay, but would be enough to cause the two waves to be "out of phase" with each other. The effect is described as a king of "swirling" sound, with notable pitch oscillations if it became more extreme.
The fact that there are a lot of us belies a truth about learning guitar: It’s kind of frustrating. Unless you’re moving to guitar from some other kind of musical training, there’s a lot to adjust to right out of the gate. While a piano can sound reasonably good if you simply press a key, playing that same note on a guitar requires you to hold both hands the right way, situate the guitar properly, and make sense out of holding a pick.
This tuning may also be used with a capo at the third fret to match the common lute pitch: G-c-f-a-d'-g'. This tuning also matches standard vihuela tuning and is often employed in classical guitar transcriptions of music written for those instruments, such as, for instance, "La Canción Del Emperador" and "Diferencias Sobre Guardame Las Vacas" by Renaissance composer Luis de Narváez.

First, you need to determine what type of guitar you have - acoustic nylon, acoustic steel string, or electric. You want to be sure to use the correct strings for your particular guitar. Acoustic guitars that require nylon strings, such as classical, flamenco and some folk guitars, generally have lighter tops, or soundboards, with less internal bracing than those found on steel-string acoustics, and stand the risk of serious damage if fitted with steel strings. Steel-string acoustics are designed to withstand the added stress that steel strings exert on the top, bridge, nut and neck, and won't sound very good with nylon strings, if they even fit. Electric guitar strings must be made of ferromagnetic metals like steel and nickel, so they can interact with the magnetic pickups, while acoustic-electric guitars typically use a different type of pickup which senses vibrations from the bridge, so acoustic strings may just have a steel core wound with a phosphor bronze alloy wrap for bright tone. Guitars with whammy bars might require a few extra steps to keep everything stable, so check your manufacturer's instructions or look for online videos.

Here we have another Vintage Japanese GREAT find this example a beautiful pretty much exact copy of a vntage Martin D-45 ... this is a very High Quality built Lawsuit era Aria Pro II Model AW40. Made in Japan. From information on the Internet concerning dating these, the guitar's serial number would lead to 1976 manufacture. However, I could not find the AW40 model cataloged until the late 70's... but its a 76.. is consistent with all others. THIS is one beautiful guitar! it exudes fine detailed craftsmanship this was Aria's flagship dreadnought of this time period with D41-ish features. From an original vintage Aria catalog, AW40 features include: "Dreadnought sized, Solid Sitka Spruce top, Solid Brazilian Rosewood back and sides, bridge fingerboard and veneer headstock overlay with MOP logo, Marquetry Purfling" ( Top looks to be solid with the sides & back appears to me to be laminated )The catalog can be viewed at matsumoku.org, a site that deals with the history of Matsumoku made instruments like Aria, Electra and others. This guitar has the Martin classic snowflake mother of pearl inlays, abalone binding and rosette, and fully bound headstock and gorgeous rosewood fingerboard. Headstock also has a Rosewood overlay. The bookmatched rosewood on the back side is especially easy on the eyes. The guitar is all original with no repairs and with original tuning keys. It is in JVG Rated condition as excellent used vintage 8.8/10 WoW...its 35 years old and the woods have opened up now like fine wine the tone is richer & mellowed as only time can provide. No cracks or repairs ever. It plays very well with good action and has a nice warm rich tone. The Neck is arrow straight. Frets have minimal wear with no buzzing anywhere on the fingerboard....this is the one! At this link you can view more pictures of this guitar please cut & paste the following link: https://picasaweb.google.com/gr8bids/AriaPro2AW40D45BrazilianRosewood?authkey=Gv1sRgCOmS2c3RvMGpUg#slideshow/5609409732594635106.
Gitar Tricks are listening (see quote in bold) and as a result I have upgraded my Review Rating of this awesome Online Guitar Training Program. My previous review highlighted problems with the Video Loop Feature and the lack of Speed Control I am so happy that Guitar Tricks have released an immensely improved Video Player with faster video loading time, more accurate and reliable A/B looping and added a Video Timeline Preview that displays thumbnail images of the video at various points as you hover over the timeline. Another feature of the new player is the ability to adjust the speed via the Slow Motion feature.
The SG retains a similar dual-humbucker configuration as the Les Paul Standard but it truly has a life and style all its own. Due in part to its aggressive style, impressive mid-range bite and thunderous output, the SG has become synonymous with rock ’n’ roll. The Gibson SG is one of only a handful of models that has never been out of production since its introduction in the early ’60s.
Or course, you have a repulsive snobs on here that can't acknowledge the truth that the list above correctly consists of quality, popular choices. I'd never play a Dean, a Parker, or a Godin. I'm so glad you love them, but you're a minority. The Gibsons and Fenders are tried and true designs. That's why the majority play them. They're actually good guitars, at least the equal of the snobs-are-us suggestions above. Having limited funds to spend, and wanting to ensure that a quality guitar with quality tone is aquired, I would go with a Fender or a Gibson without hesitation. I'm not a snotty nosed rich brat like most of the above put-downs and belly achers; I'm a 50+ mature adult who knows how to play and I play good, thank you. Not because I say, but because that's what others say. Fender and Gibson are overall the best guitars on the market for the average person of means and talent, unless you're rich and can afford something above $5000.00. Otherwise, calm down, remove the pentangle from your rectum, and relax. Is it really that important to you? THEN OPEN YOUR OWN WEBSITE AND PREACH ABOUT IT. This has been a public service message...Billy
Originally delay was achieved using a loop of magnetic tape - first on improvised arrangements with a reel-to-reel recorder, and later on dedicated machines. The tape would pass through a recording head, then a playback head, then an erase head. The timing of the delay could be adjusted by moving the heads, or changing the speed of the tape. Tape adds its own colour to sound, so the echo would have that added warmth.
Teisco produced guitars that were sold in the U.S. as Teisco del Rey as well as Silvertone, Beltone, Duke, Decca, Heit Deluxe, Jedson, Kimberly, Kingston, Lyle, Norma, Tulio and World Teisco, as well as some of the early Kents. At various times Teisco guitars were made for and sold under the now well-known Ibanez name. They have developed somewhat of a cult following in the U.S. which has resulted in some unrealistic prices for some models.

If anyone has earned the right to two spots on this list, it’s Fender. Sitting squarely at the top of the guitar and amp game, this Southern California company might be at their peak at this very moment – and that’s a very good thing for you, if you want to get into playing guitar. This Super Champ X2 amp is a hell of a value, boasting the welcome bounce of Fender’s signature sound in a package that wont break the bank. And what’s even cooler about it is that it has 16 different amp modeling selections – meaning you still get the warmth of tube amplification with the right amount of modeling amp versatility. It also comes with two channels that can be controlled via an optional footswitch, and it’s equipped with a USB port for easy and quiet recording.


Decide between mic recording or using a direct box (DI). Recording the sound of your electric guitar by miking your amp is a great way to simulate studio quality sound. However, this will require expensive equipment, like a quality amp, microphone, and potentially sound dampening equipment or material. On the other hand, you can plug your guitar right into a DI to record your guitar.[1]
The Les Paul body style actually encompasses a few different designs: solid, solid-arched, and solid-chambered. Solid Les Pauls are made from a solid piece of wood, with some having a significantly arched top and a maple cap and some lacking a curved top and the maple cap. Chambered Les Pauls are arched, but the inside of the body is chambered, so there are a few cavities underneath the top.
*When the item leaves our warehouse, they are generally shipped to EMS Worldwide Express Mail Service and it would usually take 7 – 10 days to United States. We ship our products from Mainland China where our manufacturing factory is located. We will inform you once your order has been shipped and we will be providing you with the tracking number so you can conveniently monitor the shipments progress on EMS Worldwide Express Mail Service website or SF Express and USPS and Parcel Force website.
Founded in 1902, Gibson began life producing mandolins and other instruments, before making hollow-body electric guitars in the thirties. Their first solid-body guitar came in 1952 – the Les Paul, which remains one of the most iconic guitars in the world. They are also well known for pioneering some classic guitar shapes such as the SG, the Explorer, and the Flying V. Used by everyone from James Hetfield to B.B. King, Gibson’s are manufactured in three American factories – two in Tennessee and one in Montana.
The first Touch Guitar Invention started in 1959 with the filing of patent #2,989,884 issued in 1961 as the first touch tapping instrument which could be played on two separated necks Simultaneously by muting the strings at the distal end of the neck along with numerous other claims. Until 1974 it was known as the DuoLectar and with a new patent "the "Electronic Mute" has been known as the "Touch Guitar. It is held in the normal way over the shoulder and design with the left hand playing the lower bass neck in a traditional way and the right hand playing over the top on a neck which has a wider string spacing allowing the hand to be used in both vertical and horizontal angels to the strings. It is absolutely off at all times, until Touched or picked.
Working with Dimebag Darrell Abbot, Rex Brown, Mike Scaccia, Scott Shelby and others, this guitar master has had to work overtime to keep up with these guitarslingers' abuse. These guys make their guitars scream on stage, and it's King's job to make them sing again. "Everbody knows -- other than Scott -- that they're at my mercy when it comes to working on their guitar," he says. "That's why I'm not out on the circuit. I'm pretty picky about which guitar players I work with." (Although Darrel and Mike are no longer with us - may they ignite heaven with their notes - Scott is still tearing it up with Warbeast.) Rabid Flesh Eater, Warbeast, Rigor Mortis, Pantera, this guy has worked on some brutal guitars. "If you're going to buy a Cadillac, put the right parts on it" is one of his mottoes.
Fender guitars are generally equipped with single coil pickups, resulting in a brighter tone compared to humbucker pickups, for instance. This is part of Fender’s charm, and contributes to the characteristic tone of their instruments. Single coils are designed to cut through the mix with their bright sound, but a drawback is that this can cause issues with humming (1).
I bought my first guitar several years ago and I’ve been happy with the purchase. But recently I’ve thought about buying a used guitar if I happen to find a good guitar at a bargain at a music store or pawn shop. I like the advice you gave for buying a used guitar: that I should stick with well-known brands and inspect the fret boards, neck, and other parts for needed repair. I’ll keep these tips in mind the next time I visit a guitar shop.
“Stoner rock” has to be the most useless classification in the long history of futile attempts to describe what music sounds like. (What rock isn’t stoner rock, amirite?) Despite the misleadingly mellow connotation, the term is really just shorthand for Josh Homme’s thick-necked guitar playing, first in Kyuss, but more famously in Queens of the Stone Age, blending ’70s-vintage proto-metal sludge with high-desert lawlessness, Black Sabbath playing Jesse Pinkman’s house party. Tall, ginger, and wielding a sense of humor as dry as his Mojave stomping grounds, Homme doesn’t exactly look the part of an alt-metal godhead, which only makes the poison easier to swallow.
 You will not grow here or learn anything that will be useful in any other company unless they employ 1950's management techniques. Maybe a screenwriter for "Madmen" would find some material here but as someone trying to grow their career you won't learn anything useful. The pay will be no better than your last job minus your previous bonus and 401k match which to my knowledge they do not contribute. So next question, your not making any more money and probably less, not learning anything useful and will need to explain why you left after 6 months, how are you going to position this to beat the competition going after your next job?
The good people at Cordoba, therefore, sought to make a Spanish-style guitar with the traditional sound of a Spanish guitar, but the slimmer body and slightly narrower neck of a steel-string. They also added in a Fishman-Presys module for switching the guitar from an acoustic sound to an electric (including a built-in tuner), hence the “Fusion” in the model name.
The 1934-’35 Dobro amplifier was a square cabinet covered in imitation leather with a leather suitcase handle, the eight corners protected by metal bumper guards. The grill was curiously covered with a down-sized version of a Dobro resonator plate cover, probably made by Rickenbacker. It had back-mounted controls, five tubes (5Z3 rectifier, 56 and 79 preamps, and two 2A3 power outputs) and a 12″ Utah speaker. This amp was built for Dobro, with the cabinet coming from Bulwin of Los Angeles and the chassis coming from Webster of Racine, Wisconsin.
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