I Have a '70 lyle hummingbird and its a solid spruce top and mohagony neck back and sides. My guitar luthier fully inspected it. Mine is in near mint condition and sounds identical to the '64 Gibson Hummingbird my luthier has. He was trully freaked out by this.. ha ha He keeps trying to buy it from me but im affraid im hanging on to mine. It seems there is alot of contradictory information on these guitars. It is super hard to get more than a small paragraph of info on these things. One site out there has several catalogs from lyle guitars but they require a payment or paid membership to view them. If you are interested google lyle guitar catalogs. There is one that sold for 600.00 at joes vintage guitars.com Its Identical to mine. If I find any more info Ill post as discovered.

Compressor pedals add a softening effect too, by reducing the front edge of notes and amplifying their tails. This increases sustain by bumping up the signal as the note fades out. Most compressors allow you to control both the thresholds (upper and lower limits) and the knee (the speed with which the signal is raised or lowered). The big appeal for guitarists is the compressor's ability to simulate the natural compression that tube amps generate when driven at medium to high levels. A good compressor can help thicken up the sound of your guitar and add extra punch to your performance.
Yamaha is well known for the quality of their mass produced and affordable guitars, and they continue to be the brand of choice for students and even for teachers. The Yamaha FGX800C is tasked to represent brand in the sub $300 price range, and judging from reviews, it is doing very well in the market. Everything about this guitar is conventional, from its familiar dreadnought cut-away shape to its comfortable neck and string action. It also comes with built-in electronics that give you 3-band EQ control and a tuner. But what makes this guitar a bit more special is the use of solid spruce with scalloped bracing for the top, which ups the value of the instrument.

I have a beautiful 2003 Ltd and my friend who has played for many years has the Taylor and he ended up borrowing my tak for five months he didn't want to give it back you know the guy has played with some well known folk's so I trust his judgment played with Keith Green and America and I have played over thirty years so I haven't let to many go by without some trial and ownership this tak is as good or better than the best Martin can offer. Ovation can't touch it and of course Gibson is too soft for me I own a fender and a Yamaha 6 and 12 for the money you can't beat a yam and I have played hummingbird to dove guild gretch Washburn breedlove which is a favorite not many I haven't played so with all this my top ten is Takemine Martin Gibson Breedlove Hagstrom Taylor Guild Gretch Washburn and Yamaha. If you can find a Hag it will blow your bag I have a 1971 Hagstrom acoustic I believe it was a demo for Golden Earing it was a gift from an old friend from Deutschland any way I will say ...more


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Fender guitars are the most popular and are considered as one of the best brands in the world. Fender guitar is manufactured by the Fender Musical Instruments Corporation of Scottsdale, Arizona. They are specialized in making stringed instruments and are best in making the solid body electric bass guitars. Fender Musical Instruments Corporation was incorporated in the year 1946 and is a relatively new company, but with the quality of products they make and the success they achieved, Fender is easily the best guitar manufacturer in the world.

What? I have an early 90s pe and I've recorded with it and its one of the best guitars I've ever played. Beutifull clean lp tone and ballsy as when you dirty it up. I also have a pro 2 fullarton which with the fender lace sensor pups I put in it, plays and sounds as good as any strat I've played in thirty years. Check the new arias comming out of the states at the moment and they are really awesome looking guitars. There is also a reason the early ones are known as lawsuit guitars as Gibson though they were so good they had to sue them!
What about Derek Trucks? Mark Knopfler? Trey Anastacio? Chuck Berry? Even Eddie Van Halen deserves some credit–more than John Mayer does for guitar playing. John Mayer's fame as a guitarist piggybacks on his commercial success, which is a result of targeting a demographic of 13 year old girls. He's no doubt a skilled guitar player, but over-rated as a guitarist relative to guys like Van Halen, Knopfler, etc.
The traditional Firebird style pickguard is layered white and black and has Slash's "Skull & Top Hat" log in red. The Mahogany neck is glued to the body with a deep-set neck tenon and has a standard 24.75" scale and a rounded custom "Slash" profile. The Pau Ferro fingerboard has single-ply cream binding with Pearl trapezoid inlays, a nylon nut, and 22 medium jumbo frets along with a 2-way adjustable truss rod. The back of the Firebird's traditional reverse headstock has Slash's Snakepit logo in gold.

Taylor Guitars was founded in 1974 by Bob Taylor and Kurt Listug, and has grown into the leading global builder of premium acoustic guitars. Renowned for blending modern, innovative manufacturing techniques with a master craftsman's attention to detail, Taylor acoustic guitars are widely considered among the best-sounding and easiest to play in the world. The company is a pioneer in the use of computer mills, lasers and other high-tech tools and proprietary machinery, and today, Bob Taylor is widely recognized throughout the musical instrument industry as the visionary acoustic guitar manufacturer.

I have a Mahar bass, the one with the epic (haha) zebra stripes. My wife won it at the state fair in Puyallup throwing balloons or something. She thought it would be cute to have it in my collection. I'm a drummer, but I don't want to miss out on the fun of collecting guitars, why should guitarists have all the fun? Anyway, about the Mahar guitar... it's actually not bad! I pick it up and play it once in a while just for giggles, and have had bass players jam on it. They agree. For throwing some balloons, it's a bargain! Plug it into a decent rig and it doesn't sound bad either. I suppose if you are a virtuoso it would be notable if you had issues with it, but for fun and games it really is better than a toy, like First Act or some junk like that. If you are a beginner, this would be ideal. It plays nicely, and sounds as good as your rig can make it sound. Thumbs up!
Normal people define cool as laid-back, excellent or highly skilled, but most guitarists define cool as Jimmy Page circa 1975 in a black velvet bellbottom suit decorated with embroidered dragons, playing a Les Paul slung down to his knees. As the musical mastermind behind Led Zeppelin, one of the greatest rock bands of all time, Page elevated the guitar riff to an art form, crafting orchestrated overdubbed parts that bludgeoned listeners like the hammer of the gods.
This fuzz sounds great! Different from a standard fuzzface or tonebender sound, and much more musical in my opinion. Not buzzy at all, very smooth. It is not one of those over-the-top fuzz sounds. It's more of a fuzzy overdrive. But really the amount and quality of the fuzz is highly dependent on the transistors. Q1 seems to effect the amount of output, and Q2 changes the character of the fuzz. I tried many combinations and ended up using 2N2222's for both (BC109's also sounded great!). One other ... full review
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Of course, there’s one other reason you might want to grab a mini amp for yourself, and that, perhaps surprisingly, is the sound. Many of the mini amps on the market today are designed and manufactured by the most iconic brands in the industry. That means you can get your hands on some pretty serious tone that may not fill an auditorium, but could be an interesting addition to a recorded guitar track.
One half step down from Drop D. Utilized by bands like Dir En Grey, Our Lady Peace, Your Demise, Oceana, Alter Bridge, Alice in Chains on some songs (like "Them Bones" or "We Die Young"), A Day to Remember (on the song "It's Complicated"), Chevelle (on Sci-Fi Crimes), Of Mice & Men, Deftones (on their Around the Fur album), Evanescence, Paramore, Disturbed, Theory of a Deadman, Puddle of Mudd, Linkin Park, Sevendust, Skillet, Black Veil Brides, Steel Panther (on songs like "17 Girls in a Row" or "Gloryhole"), 10 Years, Black Stone Cherry, Truckfighters, Fireball Ministry, RED on End of Silence, Nirvana on In Utero, "Blew" live performances, "Been a Son", the Nevermind album and also by System of a Down. Also used by Lamb of God somewhat on their albums Wrath and VII: Sturm und Drang, and almost exclusively on their album Resolution. Avenged Sevenfold used this tuning on songs "Scream", "Almost Easy", "Hail to the King", "Requiem" and "Coming Home". Guns N' Roses used this tuning on "Shackler's Revenge" from Chinese Democracy. Metallica use this tuning on their song "Minus Human" off S&M, on Dirty Window from their album St. Anger and live performances of songs recorded in Drop D, Asking Alexandria on their first album (Stand Up And Scream), As I Lay Dying have used this tuning on a few songs. Trivium used this tuning on their albums In Waves and Vengeance Falls. Van Halen on their 1981 song "Unchained". The Presidents of the United States of America use guitars tuned to this tuning with the top three strings removed, although on Freaked Out and Small, regularly strung guitars were used. Tyler Bryant & the Shakedown use this tuning on some songs (like "Heartland" and "Aftershock")

Before we wade in, please note that National Dobro and subsequently Valco, more than most other manufacturers, were notorious for putting together guitars with parts left around. This, combined with the fact that they routinely used components (especially bodies) provided by other manufacturers, means that you are likely to find instruments with details inconsistent with catalog descriptions, and they may just be Kosher.
Which got me to thinking about the history of American guitar companies. Many famous brands of guitars which started production here in the USA now exist as a name being used by an unrelated company for importing guitars into this country. Other brands are still being made but ownership has passed to one of a few big guitar companies. It’s difficult to trace this history without a “score card”.
The one-piece maple neck was discontinued in 1959. From 1959 until summer 1962 the fingerboard was a piece of rosewood milled flat on the underside and glued to the maple. This has become known as a “slab fingerboard”. The slab fingerboard was approx 4.8 mm at its thickest point in the center of the neck under strings 3 and 4. From mid 1964–1979 the rosewood and maple were pre radiused and the fingerboard became known as curved, round laminate or “veneer”, having an even thickness across the neck unlike the previous slab type. This design change was made because Fender encountered problems with some of the necks twisting with the slab design and this new method of construction reduced this problem significantly. Maple fingerboards were available as a special order only. The following year the pickguard design changed to a 3-ply (4-ply on some colors) “multi-layer” with 11 screw holes. After purchasing Fender in 1965, CBS began to offer both a maple neck with a separate glued-on laminated maple fretboard in 1967 (known as a “maple cap” neck) and the rosewood fretboard over maple neck remaining the other neck option. Three years later, the CBS-owned Fender companies re-introduced the 1-piece maple neck after a 10-year absence. The primary reason for the switch to rosewood in 1959 was that Gibson guitars had rosewood fingerboards and customers wanted this. Also, the maple fingerboards discolored very quickly because the old nitro cellulose lacquer was not very durable and wore through on the fretboard very quickly.
A looper allows you to record a musical passage or phrase then play that passage back repeatedly. You can then record more loops and layer them, one on top of the other. Most recording and playback functions are foot controlled, and once you’ve created suitable backing tracks, you can can then play over the repeated passages in real time, creating exciting one-man-band sounds never possible before. Many of the more advanced models include built-in rhythms, custom effects, inputs for vocal mics and other instruments, plus MIDI and USB capabilities so that you can use the looper as part of your digital song-creation and recording processes.

It's not subjective. When you're setting up a guitar you measure the height of the strings, typically you're at about 4/64" for the high E and 5/64" for the low E. You can go above or below the recommendation but if you go too low you can start to get a bit of fret buzz. How low you can go is not a function so much of what guitar you own, but how level your frets are and your neck relief. Most good guitars can be set up to play "fast". Obviously they don't get faster when you paint them fluorescent orange, or make the headstock pointy.

The Line 6 Spider IV is a good option for beginners not entirely sure what they are looking for. The amp models and effects allow it to achieve a wide variety of tones that are appropriate for almost any style of music. The Killer Ant and Hot Rod Pro Junior III do have better tones, but both are more expensive and less versatile. The Line 6 Spider IV is good for guitarists that want to be able to try a bunch of different sounds until they find something they like. It’s a very solid choice for any style of guitarist.
Rounding out our list of the best acoustic-electric guitars, the Yamaha L-Series LL6 is a functional, reliable and great-sounding guitar. The LL6 features a solid Engelmann spruce top that’s treated with Yamaha’s ARE (Acoustic Resonance Enhancement) technology. This gives the guitar the rich tone that you’ll only find on guitars that have aged for many years.

Okay, it is a single-cut and dates back to a similar era, but this single-cut is very different to a Les Paul. The Pro Jet has a basswood body with an arched maple top, and like many of Gretsch’s solidbody electrics, it’s chambered, making it lighter, and, they say, more resonant. It sports a pair of Gretsch’s Black Top Filter’Tron pickups, giving you a bright snap and twang that’ll cut through any mix. In short, it’s incredible. Uncanny, even. For here we are in 2018, and yet you fret a couple of doublestops on the Pro Jet Electromatic and all of a sudden it’s like you’re the Fonz, just waiting for Richie, Joanie and Chachi to show up. The cleans are sharp and jazzy, but just take your amp into overdrive and you’re in rockabilly heaven. The tone is so hot you could grill hamburgers by wafting it in front of the speaker cone. Tex-mex shuffle, country, blues, jazz, rockabilly... You name it, and it’ll play it, retro-style. if you want the versatility and the kudos that comes with a Gretsch, it’s hard to look past that finish, that build, and that tone.
In January 1986, Gibson changed ownership and began manufacturing a range of varied Les Paul models to suit different user needs. The 1980s also saw the end to several design characteristics that were classic to the Les Paul, including the volute and maple neck. However, due to consumer demand, the Gibson Les Paul guitar is available today in an array of choices, ranging from guitars equipped with modern digital electronics to classic re-issue models built to match the look and specifications of the guitar’s earliest production runs from 1952 to 1960.
went to great lengths to get here for a basic set up on a vintage les paul. after 3 months of long waiting guitar was no better off, it was different, but just as bad and completely unplayable. he may have spent 30 seconds tweaking the truss rod, but didn't do the necessary or requested fret leveling to resolve all the dead areas up high. unbelievable after 3 months to have a guitar unplayable after traveling such lengths to get here & back.
As a player and lover of the instrument, I can tell you unequivically that you are all right. Run a line straight into the board and wood doesn't make a difference and you will add effects in your mix. Or stand in front of a Marshall stack with a couple of humbuckers catching the feedback and you appreciate Honduran mahagony for its tone. You can certainly tell a difference in the sounds you make and especially feel the difference in your hands. And if you can't agree on these concepts, you dishonor the instrument and the craft of luthiers. As my buddy Terry keeps telling me, 'Shut up and play.' Peace out fellow geeks.
Want to know more about how to distinguish all these guitars? Until a few years ago there wasn’t a good (or any!) English language reference book for Japanese guitars of the 1960s. But my co-author on this piece, the esteemed Frank Meyers of Drowning In Guitars, has written an excellent primer on this subject which can help demystify the confusion around a lot of these guitars. You can pick up your own copy here.
Ovation backed off from its more exotic design directions and in ’77 introduced two more conservative models, the Preacher and the Viper, and its first solidbody basses, the Magnum I and II. The Preacher featured two equal cutaways, whereas the Viper sported more of a Les-Paul-style single cutaway, though neither would never be confused with a Gibson equivalent. Their shape was, in fact, essentially a downsized version of the Ovation acoustic outline. The Magnum shape was derived from the earlier Breadwinner and Deacon, with more contouring.

With the Seagull S6 Classic, you get an acoustic-electric guitar that comes with a solid design and an impressive sound that will delight, regardless if you’re playing it unplugged or through an amplifier or PA. This model features a cedar top that has been tested for pressure resistance, so you know you have a tough guitar on your hands to use for many years.

Before we wade in, please note that National Dobro and subsequently Valco, more than most other manufacturers, were notorious for putting together guitars with parts left around. This, combined with the fact that they routinely used components (especially bodies) provided by other manufacturers, means that you are likely to find instruments with details inconsistent with catalog descriptions, and they may just be Kosher.


Uh, Roland. I don’t know when was the last time I read about the best amplifiers and one of Roland’s models was not there. That’s not due to their ability to market their instruments to everyone (well, they are good at that too, probably) BUT the main reason why they are always a talk of the town (of a very musical and amplifier obsessed town) is their quality of production. With a lot of expensive amps, they are also graceful enough to give us the MERE MORTALS ability to bath in the glory of what is Roland tone. This CUBE‌-10GX amp is a 10-watt little combo amp with one 8 inch speaker that is ideal for home practice or anyone who needs an inexpensive model that will not ruin their performance. With built-in effects, heavy-duty cabinet design, and a compact construction the CUBE‌-10GX amp might be your best choice for a practice amp that also works as a traveling amp.
It’s curious to note that also tauted in the ’39 Grossman catalog was the National Res-O-Lectric Pick-up Unit, designed to be added to National and Dobro amplifying guitars. This was not sold as an accessory, but had to be factory-installed for $25. On single-cone guitars, the bridge assembly/cover was replaced with the pickup assembly, faced in gloss black Ebonoid. On tricone guitars the pickup would be built in to the silver cover. It’s not clear if these were also mid-’37 developments or if they appeared closer to the ’39 Grossman catalog publication date.
To tell you the truth, in the first few years i started playing, after i learned the use of the switch, I was approach by a man that also a guitarist and asked, "YOur guitar sounds good, I believe it so expensive". Well, I bought the guitar only for $150 dollars, But, I toggled the switch to the right pickup on the right time, makes my guitar sounds like an expensive guitar.
Description: Guitar Type: Acoustic - Body Size: Grand Concert - Top Wood: Solid Sitka Spruce - Back: Mahogany - Sides: Mahogany - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Nut Width: 44.5mm - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 26" (66cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Bracing: X-Type - Hardware: Chrome, Grover Tuners - String Instrument Finish: Light Violin High Gloss Sunburst, Dark Violin High Gloss Sunburst
But having hot tubes is only half the recipe for getting great tone. Room sound is the other ingredient necessary for obtaining a full-bodied guitar track. It didn't take me long to figure out that the guitarists on my formative blues sessions were slyly contributing to my "education" by nudging the mics away from their amps as soon as I left the room. Thanks to their clandestine efforts, my ears opened up to an entire new world of electric-guitar sounds.
Hidesato Shiino (1947–). Music-Trade.co.jp. Dai-Show Corporation. — The person who involved with a lot of remarkable Japanese guitars including: Yamaha FG, Fernandes & Greco models, Morris & H.S. Anderson (named after his son; well known as Prince's Hohner Telecaster), early ESP, Vesta Graham & Vestax (now known as DJ brand), Akai Guitar 1997 series, D'Angelico, etc.
The SG Standard is Gibson’s all-time best-selling guitar. It was conceived in 1961 and originally released as the new Les Paul. It featured distinct horn-shaped cutaways, and the neck joint was moved three frets, which made the guitar lighter and allowed easier upper fret access. In addition to these changes, the body was slimmer than the Les Paul Standard and the neck profile was more slender. However, with Mr. Paul preferring the sturdier design elements of his original model and due to contractual complications, his name was ultimately removed. Where Les Paul saw a mutation of his original design, others saw genius—from ’63 on, the Les Paul name was removed and the SG, or “Solid Guitar,” was born.
Guitar amplifier design uses a different approach than sound reinforcement system power amplifiers and home "hi-fi" stereo systems. Audio amplifiers generally are intended to accurately reproduce the source signal without adding unwanted tonal coloration (i.e., they have a flat frequency response) or unwanted distortion. In contrast, most guitar amplifiers provide tonal coloration and overdrive or distortion of various types. A common tonal coloration sought by guitarists is rolling off some of the high frequencies.

With the SparkFun Proto Pedal you’ll find all the problems of a guitar pedal’s complex framework solved with true bypass and LED switching; a large, open prototyping area equivalent to a standard solderless breadboard; a small prototyping area for power regulation or reference voltages; and six positions to help organize potentiometer wiring. To make your life even easier, not only have we written a complete assembly guide for the Proto Pedal; we have also written two effect circuit guides that utilize the board’s large prototyping area. All of these guides can be found in the Documents section below.
To find which Ernie Ball strings are right for you, the key is experimentation. Figure out which strings sound best to your ear, feel best on your fingers, and most importantly enable you to create the music you want. When you are ready to buy, head over to one of the 5,500 music stores that carry Ernie Ball products. You can discover these stores by visiting our Store Locator.
Many music purists prefer analog effects. Since they don’t use digital conversion, the signal (purists argue) is less prone to loss, and is more pure as a result. It’s true that digital conversion can cause some natural artifacts of the original sound to become lost, and can sound more “processed.” However, as digital technology has evolved, this has become less of a consideration. Digital effects have the advantage of versatility and precision. Today’s multi-effects processors only exist because of digital processing; many effects can be achieved in a single unit through sheer processing power. Digital signals can also be used to control a wider range of parameters.

There is dust or corrosion in the potentiometer behind the knob. You need to turn the volume knob between 1 and 11 over 9000 times to wear the track clean again. . If that does not help taking the electronics tray out of the amp (don't break the wires and don't electrocute yourself) to check if the volume potentiometer has any holes. Using a can of compressed air or non-reactive solvent from an electronics store with the thin nozzle tube supplied, blow or flush out the dust. . If it really annoys you and you can't get rid of it, replacing the potentiometer(s) with new sealed ones will overcome the problem forever. or use standard ones and remember to turn the knobs every week to stop dust from settling. . PS. if it is a high powered amp there will be capacitors inside that can seriously hurt you even when the amp is unplugged.


The one major drawback of Guitar Tricks is the almost overwhelming amount of material that is available. There is a chance that you get distracted into trying out many different styles and techniques. You may find yourself jumping around from song to song and lesson to lesson wanting to see whether you are up to it. As a result you may not be able to follow your curriculum as initially planned. On the other hand, I strongly believe that this will broaden your horizon and make you a better and more versatile guitar player.
Unlike Andrew, before Rocksmith 2014 Carl had never played anything other than a toy-guitar controller. The lessons made it easy to learn the basics—from just holding the instrument properly, to playing basic notes and fingering techniques—all without the pressure of a human guitar instructor's waning patience. Since this was my first experience playing a real guitar, I was eager to learn and didn't mind that the notes scroll horizontally across the screen instead of Guitar Hero and Rock Band's vertical scrolling.
I know this is one of those questions where there's not any one single correct answer, but I'm curious what neck relief specs others are using for their SG? I've read enough articles on the web to acknowledge that there's clearly no consensus, as there probably shouldn't be, considering different playing style, string gauge selection, etc. Yet I still would be interest what others find useful as a starting point. Recognizing that neck relief is just one step (the first) during set-up. According to one useful article that I read (http://mysite.verizo...guitarsetup.htm), when the question was put to Gibson, their response was:
Reverb is one of the most fundamental effects for electric guitar, which is why it is already built into most amps. Reverb adds natural sounding depth to your sound. Used extensively in the recording world, electric guitars do not sound “right” without it. Just a little makes the guitar have more of a natural sound and decay, but you can go to the extremes and get cavernous depth to your sound. Plate and spring are the most common types, but with so many makers coming up with new sonic “spaces” to play in, finding your reverb sound is a priority.
Stompboxes are small plastic or metal chassis which usually lie on the floor or in a pedalboard to be operated by the user's feet. Pedals are often rectangle-shaped, but there are a range of other shapes (e.g., the circle-shaped Fuzz Face). Typical simple stompboxes have a single footswitch, one to three potentiometers ("pots" or "knobs") for controlling the effect, and a single LED that indicates if the effect is on. A typical distortion or overdrive pedal's three potentiometers, for example, control the level or intensity of the distortion effect, the tone of the effected signal and the volume (level) of the effected signal. Depending on the type of pedal, the potentiometers may control different parameters of the effect. For a chorus effect, for example, the knobs may control the depth and speed of the effect. Complex stompboxes may have multiple footswitches, many knobs, additional switches or buttons that are operated with the fingers, and an alphanumeric LED display that indicates the status of the effect with short acronyms (e.g., DIST for "distortion").[5][9] Some pedals have two knobs stacked on top of each other, enabling the unit to provide two knobs per single knob space.
Rounding out our list of the best acoustic-electric guitars, the Yamaha L-Series LL6 is a functional, reliable and great-sounding guitar. The LL6 features a solid Engelmann spruce top that’s treated with Yamaha’s ARE (Acoustic Resonance Enhancement) technology. This gives the guitar the rich tone that you’ll only find on guitars that have aged for many years.
B.C. Rich specializes in guitars for the heavy metal and hard rock crowd. They’ve produced some of the most legendary designs in the history of metal, including the Warlock, Bich, Virgin, and Mockingbird. Their instruments helped to mold the hard rock and thrash revolution of the 1980s and B.C. Rich is still a great choice for any guitarist looking for an instrument that looks and sounds as edgy as possible.
​​Our primary goal here at Top Custom Guitars is to create unique instruments that match our players' personalities. The bond we've formed over the past 15 years with each of our clients has not only fueled the growth and maturity of our instruments, it's fueled our creative growth as a company. YOUR passion drives OUR passion, and because of the individual relationships we build with our clients. Enjoy our galleries and forums, and if you have any questions, ideas, or dreams to share, we’d love to hear them.
One of the earliest tremolo devices goes back several hundred years and can be found on 16th century Italian and German pipe organs. Like modern day samplers, these early organs had several auxiliary stops including drums, birdcalls, drones, bells, and a tremulant — a mechanism that opens and closes a diaphragm to vary the air pressure of the pipes. As the pressure varied, so did the amplitude, allowing for both vibrato and tremolo.
Ooooohhhhh.... I used the Firebird 12 for two weeks on sessions in 1973.... I STILL solo the tracks I used that on... it's the BEST BEST BEST BEST OF ALL TIME !!!!!!!! FOR ANYTHING !!!!..... in fact, as I remember, the octave strings were wound different than the way Ric does it (high-low) and that even added to the incredible sound.....wanna sell the Firebird 12?

CF Martin & Company was established by Christian Fredrick Martin in 1833, is an American guitar manufacturer. It is highly regarded for its guitars with steel strings. Martin Company is a leading manufacturer of flat top guitars that produce top quality sound. They fabricate classic and retro styles of guitars with varied body type and sizes available in 12, 14, and 15-string styled guitars. Top quality tonewood is used after testing the sounds and vibrations produced within a pattern of a time frame. Choose the strings based on the genre of music and style you will play this guitar. The starting price of an acoustic Martin guitar is 23,000 INR approximately.
Our first impression of this guitar was that something must be wrong. Surely this guitar is way more expensive than we thought? We doublechecked and the truth is that it’s just incredible value for money. Both the design and the sound are wonderfully good and we understand why Schecter describe their Schecter Hellraiser guitars as having “raised the bar on sight, sound, quality and affordability”- we totally agree!
The ‘boomer’ kids wanted their own voice and opinions to be heard, they wanted to be taken seriously – and like the quote from the 1966 film ‘The Wild Angels’ which exaggerated this rebellious angst to the extreme “…We wanna to be free to do what we wanna do…”  There was a sense of needing to rebel against ‘The Man’ – basically anyone who told them what to do or how to conform to society respectfully.

This article was extremely helpful for me to understand the 5 way (ok, 3 way) switch. I’ve only previously wired a guitar with one double humbucker, and now I’m going to replace the bridge and neck pickups in an Ibanez that has HSH. The 8 contacts were confusing me since my last wiring job didn’t even involve a switch, but after reading this I know exactly what to do.
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Electric guitars and guitar equipment - want something new? Shop online and in-store for your new guitar setup. Pick from solid body, semi-acoustic, and hollow body styles to get your ideal electric guitar. We stock all the major guitar brands like Fender, Gibson, and Ibanez. Alongside electric guitars, you'll find amps and pedals from Marshall, Vox, and Orange.
Unless you get the guitar that is great for all types of venue, knowing your venue is highly recommended as you might be buying a guitar that has features not suitable or useless to your venue, not only will you be wasting great features for not using it, but you will also be paying for the said features which you will not be using anyway—not practical at all.
If you stick to a simple chromatic scale (all the semitones), you also run the risk of the pitch correction moving the audio to the wrong note if the singer is more than half a semitone off pitch. A user scale, containing only the desired notes, generally works much better. Some systems also allow you to dictate the correct notes via MIDI. If the song contains sections in different keys or that use different scales, it is often simplest to split the vocal part across several tracks and then use a different pitch-corrector on every track, each one set to the appropriate scale for the section being processed.
The more difficult nut to crack in emulating the full drive train of a modern guitar is the instrument itself. That breaks down into two categories -- acoustic and amplified. VSTs and the gear that emulate the performance logic and physics of a guitar can get close to an acceptable reproduction of acoustic instruments but that last mile will be a hard gap to close. That's because the resonate bodies of most instruments -- especially stringed instruments -- are shaped differently than speakers. The materials, the inertial matrix, they're just not the same. The resonance of a stringed instrument originates at a single point of impact with the string, much as a speaker's sound originates at a sort-of single magnetic point, but inertia carries the vibration of a bowed or plucked string through a 3D body to produce 3D acoustics that cannot be exactly matched with a forward facing speaker -- or by speakers facing front and back. Close, but no exact match. We might argue that speakers can render sounds closer than a human ear can detect, but nuanced vibrations picked up in the bones and fluids of the human body could arguably betray a difference.
There is competition for Guitar Tricks and this is a good thing, as this makes sure that they have to keep improving. Prior to starting with Guitar Tricks I bought some lessons from True Fire. While the lessons were good and very well presented they needed to be downloaded onto a PC and could only be played in a special player program. TrueFire also offer an online service that includes group and one-on-one lessons.  Another alternative worth checking out is JamPlay. JamPlay has been continually gaining ground on Guitar Tricks and is worth while checking out. They do not have a free trial period, but you can get started with a very low amount for the first month and they also have some free lessons. Another option is a fairly new program called Infinite Guitar. They seem to be doing a rather good job too and also offer some free lessons.

I am writing this due to the mixed reviews that I read before buying this. This is a really powerful device. I have had a POD 2.0 for years. This is just as good and is also small, portable, and inexpensive. Most of the criticism that I read is that it is not well made and durable. It is well made, but I don't think it is designed for gigging. It is perfect for practicing or interfacing with a home studio. If this is your application, then you will be very satisfied. One other thing that I found true of this and similar devices that I own is that the quality of the headphones makes a big difference. If you use studio quality headphones it will sound great, if you use music player headphones it will just sound good. I haven't ... full review

Consider the MusicMan SR5 20th Anniversary basses, with a "mahogany tone block" channeled into an ash body, running from the neck, through the pickups, to the bridge. I've played several of these basses, and the best two of them were really outstanding (I own one of those). Could be any number of reasons they sound as good as they do, but there you have it.
The S670 QM is a speedster's guitar, with locking tuners and a razor thin "Wizard III" Maple neck, developed by Ibanez to be specifically fast and easy to play. Players with smaller hands or those who like to use their thumb to grab notes on the sixth string will find the neck particularly accommodating. So this model (and many of the Ibanez designs) score high marks for playability.
Compression is somewhat of a utilitarian effect, though I suppose some players see it as a key part of their sound. Essentially, compression is used to even out your sound. In recording situations this means helping instruments blend together by smoothing out the peaks and valleys inherent in the overall frequency spectrum. Louder sounds, like the crack of snare drum or a shout from a vocalist, become smoother, softer and woven into the overall mix.
The brilliance of Guitar Rig is the ability to create so many different tones. This is in large part due to the variety of amps that are modeled in the software. You have a choice between Citrus, Ultrasonic, High White, Tweed Delight, Plexi, and Lead 800, among others. I’m sure you can guess what Native Instruments’ clever amp names translate to in the real world.
Let's look at how the professionals go about combining the close and ambient techniques we've looked at so far, in order to create specific custom setups for different recordings. Joe Barresi, for example, relies heavily on the trusty SM57 and MD421 combination, but he'll choose from a variety of other mics to give character to particular sounds. "The two microphones I use most for recording electric guitars are the Shure SM57 and the Sennheiser MD421, often both, close up, placed at the edge of the speaker, where the speaker centre meets the cone, or, if I'm looking for a more bright sound, dead centre. When I want more low end, I may have an AKG C414 on there, and when I'm after a little more personality, a Neumann U87, backed up a foot, or a ribbon mic, like the Royer 122, or an RCA BK5 or 77."
My brother owns a Norma acoustic guitar modeled on the Gibson Hummingbird. He bought it used in the mid 70s. Solidly built but only average sound. I would guess that like many Japanese made guitars from the 70s, Norma was not a "company," but simply an American sounding brand name chosen by a larger Japanese instrument manufacturer to market their guitars in the USA. I own a mid 70s Penco acoustic, same deal, name was used on Japanese made guitars marketed through the Pennsylvania Music Company, thus Penco.
My first guitar, bought out of an advert in Kerrang over 20 years ago. I think it was branded "Axe" and it had absolutely nothing good about it. Some sort of MDF body, horribly bowed neck (couldn't be adjusted as the truss rod was broken), high frets everywhere (you could pull them out with your fingernails, fortunately), slipping tuners, hopeless bridge, hopeless nut, everything. Nearly put me off playing before I'd got started.

Though he was influenced by everyone from B.B. King to Muddy Waters to Chuck Berry and Bob Dylan, Hendrix’s complete artistic vision included elements of blues, funk, rock, psychedelia and utter chaos. His frequent use of effects like the wah and Octavia pedal, pioneering studio effects like “backward” guitar and flanging, and use of controlled feedback and the tremolo bar added another dimension to his music.

Distortion and overdrive: In the early days of electronic music, vacuum tube amplifiers were used for processing the output electrical signals. Like any amplifier, these tube amplifiers had a maximum amplification above which they began to clip the peaks of the waveforms. While the resulting distortion may have disturbed the electrical engineers, a substantial fraction of the musicians liked the distorted sound and it became part of the musical medium.
Jazz guitars are big bodied, often semi-acoustic, and designed to coax out some wonderfully rich, warm tones. Historically, jazz was played on acoustic guitars. However, in the days before amplification, the guitar often became lost in the mix of the big band sound. Until, that was, the introduction of arch top acoustics. Containing a magnetic pickup, arch tops ushered in a new era of guitar manufacturing. This meant that players could be heard in the way they wanted.
Guitar amplifiers vary widely in price and quality. Many music equipment companies import small, low-powered practice amplifiers for students and beginners that sell for less than $50 USD. Other companies produce expensive custom-made amplifiers for professional musicians, which can cost hundreds or even thousands of dollars (USD). Most combo amplifiers have a carrying handle, and many combo amplifiers and cabinets have metal or plastic-reinforced corners to protect the amp during transportation.
These guitars use very cheap materials. I bought a washburn WM24v PROE for $300 and it come with Mahogany body & neck, phenolic fretboard, emg81/85 and original floyd rose... Ibanez RG costs $400 and comes with basswood body, bolt on maple neck, rosewood fingerboard, shoddy pickups and a licensed floyd that WILL NOT stay in tune. Poor quality for money, if you get a Ibanez go for a fixed bridge/string-thru because their trems are HORRIBLE! Original floyd is the only way to go!

At Ibanez, there has always been a goal to be anything but traditional. For over half a century, Ibanez has been pushing the world of guitar manufacturing forward, consistently breaking new ground. It's this drive that led them to become one of the first Japanese musical instrument companies to make a name for themselves in Europe and North America. With unparalleled commitment to quality, Ibanez Guitars are considered among the upper echelon by musicians of all playing styles around the world. A quick look at some of the musicians who play Ibanez guitars is sure to leave you very impressed. Artists such as Head and Munky of KoRn, Noodles of the Offspring, Mick Thomson of Slipknot, Fletcher Dragge of Pennywise, Steve Vai, and Joe Satriani all trust their sound to Ibanez guitars. Now it's your turn to do the same. Ibanez makes an impressively wide selection of guitars, so you're sure to be able to find one that is perfect for you here. Say, for example, you're a beginner who's looking for a great acoustic guitar? If that's the case, you'll love the JamPack IJV50 Quickstart Dreadnought Acoustic Guitar Pack. This set features everything you need to get started, including a beautiful dreadnought, as well as an electric tuner, a gig bag, a guitar strap, and an accessory pouch. If you'd rather a versatile acoustic-electric, you'll love an option such as the V70CE Acoustic-Electric Guitar. This guitar is highlighted by its outstanding playability and fantastic tone. With an incredible response and dynamic range, this guitar is perfectly suited for small clubs and larger venues alike. Of course, if all you want to do is plug in and pump up the volume, you're going to want to check out the JS1200 Joe Satriani Signature Guitar. This candy apple dream is built with top-tier electronics and sleek overall construction. With a resonant tone an impressive sustain (thanks, in part, to its DiMarzio humbuckers), this guitar is a progressive player's dream. Regardless of your playing style, there's an Ibanez here with your name on it that is ready to be played. With expertise that is second to none, Ibanez is a name you can trust in the music world.
The ‘HSS’ refers to the pickup combination, with a humbucker and two single-coils, which is a versatile arrangement for both clean and distorted playing, especially when coupled with two tone controls and a five-way pickup selector switch. An excellent price for a good brand, and perfect for newbies. Make sure to check out the full review of this guitar.

Rather than superfluous power, I suspect the copywriter really meant something like superior!! However, then again, maybe they did get it right, because they featured a 6A6 preamp tube that was exceptionally weak and microphonic. These amps also had a chassis built in Chicago, by Chicago Electric, with a cabinet made in Chicago, by Geib. These had performance problems and in 1937, National Dobro went back to using Webster chassis with Geib cabinets.
The "Chrome Edition" harmonica is also based upon the MS reed plates. Featuring a crystal glass comb and specially engraved chrome-plated anniversary cover plates. The bottom cover plate has the serial numbers from 1 to 1857. It is also packaged with an anniversary booklet. The "Standard Edition" model features a clear acrylic comb and the top cover plate is specially engraved.
Pitch-shifters work by slicing the incoming audio into extremely short sections (typically a few tens of milliseconds long) and then lengthening each section where the pitch is to be decreased, or shortening each section where the pitch is to be increased. Though cross-fading algorithms and other techniques are used to hide the splice points, most pitch-shifters tend to sound grainy or warbly when used to create large amounts of shift (a couple of semitones or more), though they can sound very natural when used to create subtle detuning effects, using shifts of a few cents. A refinement of the system, designed for use with monophonic sources, attempts to synchronise the splicing process with whole numbers of cycles of the input signal, which makes the whole thing sound a lot smoother but, as soon as you present these devices with chords or other complex sounds, the splices again become audible.
My 15 year old daughter recently renewed interest in the guitar she had bought a few years ago but had never really played much. She was disappointed when she noticed the strings were loose. We brought it here and Ted was so helpful and engaging. He recommended new guitar strings; normally you can buy the strings and do it yourself, or pay them to do it. He readily understood that while my daughter didn't know how to do it herself, she would like to know. He showed both my girls how to string a guitar, talking them through each step while he expertly strung the guitar and got it in perfect tune. Ted teaches guitar and his tutorial was an excellent recommendation of his teaching skills. He also threw in a cleaning cloth and gave us chocolates - how much better does it get than that?! We will definitely be coming back!
The history of Electric Guitars is summarized by Guitar World magazine, and the earliest electric guitar on their top 10 list is the Ro-Pat-In Electro A-25 "Frying Pan" (1932) described as 'The first-fully functioning solid-body electric guitar to be manufactured and sold'.[31] The most recent electric guitar on this list is the Ibanez Jem (1987) which featured '24 frets', 'an impossibly thin neck' and was 'designed to be the ultimate shredder machine'. Numerous other important electric guitars are on the list including Gibson ES-150 (1936), Fender Telecaster (1951), Gibson Les Paul (1952), Gretsch 6128 Duo Jet (1953), Fender Stratocaster (1954), Rickenbacker 360/12 (1964), Van Halen Frankenstein (1975), Paul Reed Smith Custom (1985) many of these guitars were 'successors' to earlier designs.[31] Electric Guitar designs eventually became culturally important and visually iconic, with various model companies selling miniature model versions[32][33] of particularly famous electric guitars, for example the Gibson SG used by Angus Young from the group AC/DC.
Designed by Mesa founder Randall Smith, the amp uses silicone diodes that give it a gain level and feeling all its own. The amp proved especially popular with metal and hard-rocking groups such as Living Colour, Metallica, Tool, Korn, Soundgarden and Foo Fighters. In 2009, Mesa revamped the Dual with a third, dedicated clean channel, making the venerable workhorse more versatile than ever.
Now you see why these Spectrum 5s are so desirable! It is not clear, by the way, how many (if any) were ever made with ebony necks. The few I’ve personally seen had maple necks. Certainly the expense of the ebony would have been enormous and hard to justify on the Teisco brand name. Also, with the density of ebony, the guitars probably would have been hard to balance. In any case, these are the Holy Grails of Teisco!
In the Ethereal reverb, you can layer two delay effects, where both have four different delay types to choose from, via the black button labeled "Delay Modes." These modes allow you to assign different subdivisions to each delay layer which, when stacked on top of the reverb effect, give you some really unique decay sounds that trail off from the initial signal. 

In the early 1960s Rickenbacker history became forever wedded to one of the biggest music upheavals of the 20th century: the invasion of the mop-top Beatles from Liverpool, England. The Beatles used several Rickenbacker models in the early years. Before the group broke up, John Lennon would own at least four. This love affair began in Hamburg, Germany in 1960 when he bought a natural-blonde Model 325 with a Kauffman vibrato. Lennon played the original (which was eventually refinished black but still easily identified by its gold-backed lucite pickguard) on all Beatle recordings and in all concerts until early 1964.
There is a beauty to the guitar-cable-amp approach. It doesn’t get any easier, unless you take up playing the flute. And the lack of toys to mess with will certainly make you focus on playing more. By changing your pick attack, vibrato, or the volume and tone controls on your guitar—you’ll rely on your hands instead of stepping on a box to change tones. I believe it’s beneficial for all of us to just plug straight in at least once in awhile and rock out with unadulterated tone.
Rickenbacker continued to specialize in steel guitars well into the 1950s, but with the rock and roll boom they shifted towards producing standard guitars, both acoustic and electric. In 1956, Rickenbacker introduced two instruments with the “neck through body” construction that was to become a standard feature of many of the company’s products, including the Combo 400 guitar, the model 4000 bass, and, later, the 600 series.
Buy a kit if you want to make things easier. Several companies produce electric guitar kits that include all of the parts you’ll need, prepared and ready to assemble. If you just want to get your feet wet, these can be a good choice. While you won’t get the full experience of making a guitar from scratch, you’ll still get the satisfaction of putting it together and finishing it yourself.[6]

That's what I was thinking. Have you seen what those things go for when one does pop up for sale? It's nothing for those to go for close to $10k. That's insane for something non-vintage, but that's just my opinion. It's a bit excessive for what's essentially a two humbucker shredder, even if it is handmade over the course of nine years and the body is a piece of a 12th century Viking ship that's been soaked in mead for six centuries and aged to exquisiteness or whatever the fuck. I blame Misha Mansoor. He's got a bunch of guitar nerds all fucked up in the head now.
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Fender has shown the spec sheets of its popular Mexican-built Deluxe Series Roadhouse Stratocaster model some love to create a reboot that comes seriously well appointed. The upgraded model features an alder body and bolt-on maple neck, with the option of maple and rosewood fingerboard, finished with satin polyurethane. Keep sniffing around and you'll find other features like the 'Modern C' neck profile, 22 narrow/tall frets, a contoured neck heel, synthetic bone top nut and a set of locking tuners with vintage-look buttons. While the previous editions of the Roadhouse and came with a 241mm (9.5-inch) fingerboard radius, the new model packs a flatter 305mm (12-inch) camber. Yes, the same radius as a Gibson Les Paul, making for easier string bends and lower action. The new Roadhouse features three Vintage Noiseless (1st generation) single coil-sized humbuckers wired to a five-way pickup selector blade switch, and master volume and tone controls. Lurking between the volume and tone knobs is the V6 preamp control, a six-position rotary switch that gives you access to a series of tweaked single-coil tones. Plugging in the Roadhouse reveals a slew of classic Strat tones. The pickups exploit the natural tone and woodiness of the guitar, while the Noiseless aspect lives up to their vow of silence, making them indispensable in a recording situation. As a result, bar metal, this is the best Fender electric guitar for just about all scenarios.
zircon wrote:Is there any particular reason you're opposed to Kontakt libraries? All of the plugins you mentioned are sample-based themselves, with the notable weakness that you would not be able to change the mapping, grouping, programming (etc), unlike with Kontakt. As someone who uses a lot of virtual instruments, I'd say it's always preferable to have a sample-based instrument in an open sampler plugin since you can see what's going on under the hood and change things like envelopes as needed.

Interestingly, it’s the back of this guitar that’s the most visually attractive, with a drop dead gorgeous rosewood fretboard and quilt maple three-piece design. You’ll stare at it for some time before you can bring yourself to flip it over and start playing. That’s not to say the front doesn’t look good - the whole thing feels more upscale than the price.
The process of setting up an acoustic guitar is not exactly the same as it is for an electric. New strings are usually added, and the amount of relief in the neck is adjusted as required, but the bridge adjustments are very different from the setup of an electric guitar. At the bridge of an acoustic, the strings are raised by a piece of plastic or bone that is known as a saddle, and are then anchored by individual pegs that are made of a similar material. When the intonation needs adjustment it usually means that you need to replace the entire saddle. Luckily this is a cheap and easy endeavor that isn’t likely to add to acoustic guitar setup cost. The saddle can sometimes be shaved at the bottom in order to lower the strings’ height (or “action”). Only someone with experience should perform saddle shaving, as it is very important that the saddle bottom remains even and flat. The cost of guitar setup for an acoustic is similar to that of an electric setup, though it may be cheaper at times due to the less complicated bridge.
Besides the guitar just being fantastically sampled and recorded, Silk owes a lot of its realism to the controls in the upper right-hand corner on the main screen. Swing, Timing, Feel, and Variance can all be effortlessly adjusted and do a fantastic job of recreating that natural human touch or really the human flaw.  Timing is my favorite because the ebb and flow of the tempo between individually picked notes really reminds me of my own fingerpicking technique (or lack thereof).
The ’37 Spanish Guitar ($40, $5 for a case) illustrated in both the Sorkin and Grossman catalogs was basically the same as before, but now with plastic button tuners. This still had no f-holes. The previous basic Regal trapeze tail is now shown replaced by a stamped National trapeze. Indeed, despite the fact that catalog illustrations remain retouched versions of the old Regal-made guitars, these probably had Kay bodies and bolted-on National Dobro necks. Gone is the 1/4″ jack in favor of the screw-on microphone attachment. Finally, the new cylindrical-magnet pickup is offered as the “Mated Pick-Up.” This is significant both intrinsically and in light of later Supro features. This pickup is “mated,” i.e., attached by three screws, to the bridge saddle. The pickup sat inside the guitar contained in a wooden box. This was the beginning of National Dobro/Valco’s association with what would later be called the Bridge-Tone under-bridge pickup featured in many of its electric guitars.
this is a really cool product. at first i thought i was disappointed in the drum loop sounds becsuse i thought they sounded too cheesy and not real but when i recorded some music using them along with the songs ive been working on, it turned out sounding pretty good and im happy with it. Also, my bass that sounds to cheap and not so great recording in through my irig2 without any effects module , is drastically improved when i plug it into this NUX-MG20
Before recording, make sure that the guitar is in tune, with a fresh set of strings, and that you check the tuning regularly. New strings always produce a brighter sound and better sustain. If the instrument has been properly set up, string and fret buzz should be minimal; while this type of noise is much less obvious when playing through heavily- distorted or overdriven amplifier settings, it can be very distracting when using clean settings or recording directly.
Standard Series :[1] Brown Sunburst, Black, Arctic White, Lake Placid Blue, Candy Apple Red, Midnight Wine, Copper Metallic SunburstAmerican Standard Series (as of 2012):[1]Black, 3-Color Sunburst, Olympic White, Jade Green Pearl, Charcoal Frost Metallic, Candy Cola, Mystic Red, Mystic Blue (alder), Sienna Sunburst (ash)American Special Series (as of 2010): 3-Color Sunburst, 2-Color Sunburst, Black, Candy Apple Red, Olympic White, Surf Green
Sturdily constructed with a solid basswood body, bolted maple neck and rosewood fretboard, this black electric guitar has an attractive glossy finish. The list of add-ons include a high quality Hollinger BC-08 practice Amplifier (10 Amp), string-winder cable, strap, gig bag and pitch-pipe picks. The intonation as well as playability of the Davison full size electric guitar has been enhanced owing to its single, high quality humbucker pickup, chrome bridge system and diecast tuners. Last but not the least, the practice amp is suitably equipped with a headphones jack for noise-free practice sessions, as well as an overdrive mode for cool distortions!
In all these comments I have seen no mention of Derek Trucks. I hear you on all the big name rock guitarists. Whatever. I see no Brian Setzer either. Older country greats like Merle Travis, Jody Maphis and Hank “Sugarfoot” Garland should be on an all time greats list. Chet Atkins, the one and ONLY Mr. Guitar. Les Paul, Django Reinhardt. Andres Segovia,
During the late 1930s and through the 1940s—the heyday of big band jazz and swing music—the guitar was an important rhythm section instrument. Some guitarists, such as Freddie Green of Count Basie’s band, developed a guitar-specific style of accompaniment. Few of the big bands, however, featured amplified guitar solos, which were done instead in the small combo context. The most important jazz guitar soloists of this period included the Manouche virtuoso Django Reinhardt, Oscar Moore who was featured with Nat “King” Cole’s trio, and Charlie Christian of Benny Goodman's band and sextet, who was a major influence despite his early death at 25.
The main reason this exists is because some players prefer to drive their amplifier's preamp with high gain to achieve distortion instead of using an emulation through a pedal. This means that you can't push modulation and time-based effects into the preamp since distortion will come after them. Again, you can do this but it will sound horrible because it breaks our four main rules above. Nobody wants a muddy, smeared, and washed out tone, and thus the effects loop exists.
RARE Epiphone Vintage FT-150 Bard Lefty Conversion with bone saddle. Spruce top, rosewood back and sides. Medium to low action. Beautiful sounding and playing guitar. Superb projection. Rivals guitars costing thousands.In excellent cosmetic condition with normal fretwear for a guitar it's age, and tiny dings here and there but nothing that stands out and looks gorgeous. Includes original right-handed, adjustable bridge. Includes hard shell case and original right-hand adjustable bridge if you wanna convert it back to a righty!
Whether playing scabrous grindcore in Napalm Death or juxtaposing smooth, almost Pink Floyd–like blues solos over the surgically precise death-metal riffage of Carcass, Steer always managed to find a way to inject some ear candy into genres known for avoiding it. By 1993, when Carcass released Heartwork — its last true death-metal album (before embracing death’n’roll) — Steer had masterminded a hook-filled songwriting style that perfectly balanced metal virility with honest-to-God melody, something countless bands are still attempting to copy.

EMG DG20 David Gilmour Wired Pickguard   New from$329.00In Stockor 8 payments of $41.13 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING Seymour Duncan SH4 JB Humbucker Pickup   New from$79.00In Stockor 4 payments of $19.75 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING Gibson '57 Classic Humbucker Pickup   New from$164.99In Stockor 4 payments of $41.25 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING EMG JH Set Custom James Hetfield Signature Pickup Set   New from$249.00In Stockor 6 payments of $41.50 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING See All Electric Guitar Pickups
DRILLING THE NECK HOLES ON THE BODY Before you do this you can carve down the back of the neck area if that is something you were going to do. If you are just going to leave it flat then that's ok too. The first step if you are using furreles is to map out where you want to place them and then mark the center of the hole where the screw will go. Then take your forstner bit drill enough to fit the furrele inside. Usually you can tell how deep to go if you drill a little at a time, and place the furrele in it to see if it is just low enough in the hole not to see the top of it if you look at the body horizontally or it is flush with the wood. After doing this you can drill the holes for the screws. Use a bit that has the same circumference as the screw including the threading so when you put the scre into the hole it just passes through with out you having to screw it in. Drill in the indention that was left by the tip of the Forstner bit, keeping the drill as straight as possible.
The Squier Deluxe Stratocaster by Fender is another excellent electronic guitar for newbies. The body is made up of basswood which is a soft, light wood with some of the best mid and upper frequency production. A maple neck and fretboard further assists the mid and high range frequency sound. Its C-shaped neck guarantees the best comfort. This guitar features three single coil pickups. One is assigned for master volume control, one tone control for the neck pickup and one tone control for medium pickup. The five-way switch lets you combine these three pickups and produce the widest range of sounds ever!
Ihave a 12 string dorado. I found a guitar that was sold for $299. It's a 12 string acoustic, Gretsch, 1971. Seems like the right period. The problem is that it is called doraldo. One letter out. Rosewood fret board, dot inlays. Exactly the same as mine but different name. Maybe it could be the same? Go to http://www.rabbithillmusic.9cy.com/id2.htm
This product was not working and parts were defect. I don't know how some people made it works. The instruction was terrible and seller's wires description photos are more worse. I did not expect much for this little toy. Just piece of the junk. I was tried to return, but the seller said that I had to pay return shipping and he gave me a fake return shipping address.

For instance, during 1970s and early 1980s, Japanese manufacturer Tokai Gakki produced superb replicas of 1957–59 vintage Les Pauls, and replicas themselves were gradually highly regarded. In the 1980s, to respond to the high demand for vintage models, Gibson itself began to offer a line of “Custom Shop models”, almost accurate reproductions of early Les Paul crafted by the Gibson Guitar Custom Shops.
Searching 'guitar' on YouTube, Google, etc can be overwhelming. Ten billion results come up. I wish we could just be nice to kids with questions. I noticed this answer mentioned "pickups" several times. Kid probably has no idea what a pickup is. My brother showed me the switches, pickups, and explained them to me in five minutes, in person on a real guitar. It was like being taught magic.
We would also recommend starting off with a DIY guitar pedal building kit. We created a list of the best DIY pedal kits here. Places like Mammoth Electronics and Build Your Own Clone (BYOC) have some fantastic sounding kits available – they even come with a step by step guide to lend you a hand along the way. Even Amazon has a killer tube drive pedal kit!
Before being acquired by Gibson in 1957, Epiphone was one of the most popular guitar brands in the market. It competed with highly renowned guitar brands, including Gibson. These days, Epiphone is known for being a more affordable brand of Gibson guitars. They’re great for playing tunes from the 60s. Epiphone produce cost-effective versions or alternatives of Gibson Guitars. Many musicians claim that Epiphones were their first ever instrument. Epiphones tend to be very popular in the entry level market. Epiphones are great for people who are just starting and want a good brand name for their first guitar. So, if you’re looking for a cost effective entry level guitar, Epiphone would be your best choice.
The simplest tone control is the one inside practically every guitar. That knob is a single potentiometer set up as in Figure 1. The signal from the pickup coil goes through the internal impedance of the pickup itself, then to the output jack. The capacitor C and resistor R are in series to ground from the guitar signal. C shunts signals above some cutoff frequency to ground. R prevents this by resisting the signal flow to ground. As R is made smaller, more and more treble is lost. However, the bass level remains at the same volume as it was before the treble cut.
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Much like booster pedals – where its placement depends on what exactly you’re looking to boost – the location of compressors and wah-wah pedals in a signal chain will vary depending on what type of sound you are trying to create. In this case, you are encouraged to experiment with their order and see what you like best. Although as mentioned above, try to keep the wah-wah after tier one effects as they generally do not sound that usable in that order. Compressors, on the other hand, can be placed before any pedal, even distortion, as it shapes the signal rather than modifies it.

One last time we must put aside our expensive tastes and put up with the “economy” version of a guitar that is actually much nicer. The full-scale rendition of Steve Vai’s guitar is, in my opinion, legitimately worth every one of the nearly 300,000 pennies it costs. Per the Ibanez web site, there are a lot of Vai Signature models you can pick from:
An acoustic guitar is a guitar that uses only an acoustic soundboard (the top of an acoustic guitar) to help transmit the strings energy into the air in order to produce its sound. The soundboard will add various tonal qualities due to its own mix of tonewoods and bracing, and the soundboard also has a strong effect on the loudness of the guitar. Without a soundboard, the string would just cut through the air without actually moving it much because it is large, the soundboard can push the air, creating a much louder sound. In addition, the acoustic guitar has a hollow body that resonates, increasing the efficiency of its lower frequencies.

Though comfortable playing many styles, Atkins was most often associated with country music and the acoustic guitar. By using a combination of his fingers and a thumb pick, he created his signature “fingerpicking” sound—a style somewhat inspired by fellow guitarist Merle Travis. Atkins even recorded a duo album with Travis, as well as with other respected guitarist like Doc Watson, Les Paul, Jerry Reed and Mark Knopfler.
We’ve talked about four electric guitars by now. Let us talk about the “Mini” Strat from Squier by Fender. It is a “mini” guitar because it is has a small Strat and therefore, it is literally the best choice electric guitar if you want to buy one for your child. But that does not mean adults cannot use it. If you are a beginner who just wants to practice then this is a great model for practicing your skills.

Many readers will already know that germanium has been the effects buzzword of the past many years. These transistors are considered softer, rounder, more musical. Don’t be fooled: that doesn’t mean they make music all by themselves, you have to make music through them. But that’s not such a bad thing. Open up a Fuzz Face for the first time and you’re likely to be startled by its simplicity, and other early fuzzes like Maestro’s Fuzz-Tone (1963) and Sola Sound’s Tone Bender (1965) are equally basic. As far as the Face goes, you’ll find fewer than ten components on the board, two of them being those crucial AC128 or NKT275 transistors. Interestingly, the Tone Bender originally used two OC75 germanium transistors made by Mullard, the revered British tube manufacturer.
TRUE. Tommy can be good but I find he has a lot of filler and some overly fluffy tunes sometimes. It makes it sound like he’s trying too hard to play it with as many different chords as possible before finally landing the first note. (which is usually late). and for clapton below me I could agree but I think Jimmy Page’s playing is just as good but he’s more reckless. he’s reckless for good reason though, it’s like he’s transfering his feeling to it like Jimi Hendrix would but Page’s guitar sounds like your heart wanting to rip out of your chest to claim your biggest desire once and for all. The kind of vibe when you finally realize your in love after a LONG time of dullness. Jimi is groovy, and Clapton likes to serenade seeming like an old gentle man from any age.
A well-reviewed electric guitar with a high-quality design, the ESP LTD EC-1000 is the best electric guitar for the musician looking to upgrade their sound and achieve an exaggerated tone associated with the world of rock-and-roll. Both the body and neck of the guitar are made from mahogany with a rosewood fretboard, making this guitar lightweight in feel and balanced in design. The 24 frets come in an extra-large size for ease and comfort in chord changes, while the tailpiece and locking bridge make tuning  both easy to achieve and maintain. Output of the sound is well controlled with the toggle switch, and the model comes with two volume controls for different modes of play. Designed for the musicians with years of experience and a desire to play with a harder edge to their sound, the ESP LTD EC-1000 offers high-end features for a reasonable price. We’re huge fans of their entire EC series.
Explore the myriad wood combinations in the Gibson lineup and see what’s right for you. Trying to finetune your tone without regard to what your wood is kicking out in the first place can be a frustrating venture, but learn to work with the organic template of each specific model, and you’re already swimming with the tide. Be at one with the heart of the wood, tune in to the voice that resonates deep within even the unplugged electric guitar, and you will go a long way toward understanding, and crafting, your own unique tone.
Wampler would be considered a boutique pedal manufacturer, which means they'll tend to be a little more expensive, but also more likely to give their products more creative attention and include features like true bypass, which you don't get with Boss pedals. It's also a unique blend of delay layers and reverb tones, which can really draw you in and make you want to deviate from the cheaper reverb pedals.
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Sure, the Teach Yourself to Play Guitar: A Quick and Easy Introduction for Beginners book is for those brand new to the hobby. But experienced players will love the chord chart that comes with it. It includes the basic major and minor ones along with the more uncommon ones for a great reference. Some of the riffs are a bit obscure, but it doesn’t detract much from its value.

More information on Ovation can be obtained from Walter Carter’s book, The History of the Ovation Guitar (Hal Leonard, ’96), although solidbody electrics are not the primary focus, and some inconsistencies exist between the text and the model tables (when in doubt, the text seems to be more reliable). Except for using Carter’s book to confirm some dates and a few details, most of the information presented here was gathered independently prior to publication of that book.
Fuzz Box World – We are dedicated to bringing the highest quality components to builders of guitar and bass effects. We want to be the number one source of parts for electronics diyers. Whether you are a professional boutique pedal builder or a weekend hobbyist, your business is very important to us. We will do everything we can to make sure you are happy with your experience at Fuzz Box World.
Different types of guitars have different sound aesthetics, e.g. different colour-spectrum characteristics (the way the sound energy is spread in the fundamental frequency and the overtones), different response, etc. These differences are due to differences in construction; for example modern classical guitars usually use a different bracing (fan-bracing) from that used in earlier guitars (they had ladder-bracing); and a different voicing was used by the luthier.

Acoustic guitarists can sometimes get left out in the cold when it comes to multi-effects pedals. Fortunately, the team at Boss have been listening to your requests for an innovative multi-effects pedal for acoustic guitar, and ended up creating a complete live performance option for players of all levels. In fact, they’ve crafted the best multi effects pedal for acoustic guitar that you could find in the Boss AD-10 Acoustic Guitar Effects Processor.

The guitar is very light in weight and pretty resonant. At this point they were hard-wiring the cord right into the guitar with a nifty spring strain relief on the plug. This guitar has a brighter sound than my Gretsch and I probably prefer it for ultra-clean work because it has that vintage "thang" going on that some call "mojo." I am, however, trying to get the driven sound sorted at this point because of all the overtones. Now I know what sort of sound the Telecaster bridge pickup was based upon!
Let's begin by getting clear on what we mean by 'effect': an effect is a device that treats the audio in some way, then adds it back to a dry or untreated version of the sound. Echo and reverb are obvious cases, and you can use pitch-shift and pitch modulation in a similar way. 'Processors', by contrast, generally are those devices that change the entire signal and don't add in any of the dry signal. Things like compressors and equalisers fall into this category: as you'll see from the tips and tricks, processors can often be used as effects in their own right, or as part of an effect chain, but until you know exactly what you're doing and what the consequences are likely to be, it is a good idea to stick to these guideline definitions, as they dictate how you can connect the effects into your system.
Lou Reed has been blowing traditional guitar styles to bits since his Velvet Underground days. A fan of Ike Turner's R&B and Ornette Coleman's free jazz, he created epic bad-trip psychedelia on songs like "Sister Ray." "He was rightfully quite proud of his own soloing," wrote fellow New York guitar luminary Robert Quine, "but resigned to the fact that most people weren't ready for it." As a solo artist, Reed kept on ripping up the rulebook: See 1975's Metal Machine Music, a noise opus that took feedback further than Hendrix could have imagined.
Lastly, we have the bread and butter of Schecter’s mid-range selection. Schecter Omen Extreme-6 is one of their oldest and most popular models to hit the market. This guitar brings a decent balance of price, performance and build quality. While it’s not as fancy as the previous models we have mentioned, as soon as you pick it up you know it’s made for serious business.
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Since it was originally introduced in 1975, the Destroyer has become an icon of that era's chapter in rock n' roll history. Over the years it has undergone many incarnations and the perennial classic returns once again. The body and neck of both guitars are made of a tight Mahogany for maximum resonance. The bound rosewood fingerboard is adorned with Jumbo frets. The Destroyer also features Sure Grip III control knobs for no-slip control. It's not called the Destroyer for nothing.", "value":"447.99", "priceMin":"447.99", "priceMax":"699.99", "priceSavingsMaxPrice":"0.00", "priceSavingsMaxPercent":"0", "inventory":"0", "brand":"Ibanez", "reviewStarImageUrl": "https://static.musiciansfriend.com/img/brand/mf/cmn/Sprit-Sm-Stars.png", "reviewStarRating":"5.0", "reviewStarRatingInteger":"10", "reviewHowManyReviews":"3", "usedOrNew":"new", "discontinued":"1", "onOrder":"0", "clearance":"0", "canBeSold":"0", "accessoryCategories":"site1LFMIC,site1HBA,site1LAAA", "stickerText": "", "checksum":"", "priceVisibility": "1"}

Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Maple - Quilted - Frets: 24, Jumbo - # of Strings: 6 - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Floyd Rose Special Tremolo - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Satin Chrome, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Transparent Amber Sunburst, Transparent Black, Transparent Red
All six strings are made from nylon, or nylon wrapped with metal, as opposed to the metal strings found on other acoustic guitars. Nylon strings also have a much lower tension than steel strings, as do the predecessors to nylon strings, gut strings (made from ox or sheep gut). The lower three strings ('bass strings') are wound with metal, commonly silver-plated copper.
Softer Delays: I'll usually have at least a couple of delays as auxiliary effects in a rock or pop mix, but I often find that bringing the general level of the delay as high as I want it makes any transients stand out too much. When I'm sending single notes on a clean electric guitar to a delay line, say, I tend to want to hear a wash of sound, not the rhythmic 'CHA-Cha-cha-cha-cha' of a repeated note attack. For this reason, I'll often put a gate or expander before a delay, with an attack time set to 10ms or so. This is enough to 'chop off' any abrupt transients, and makes the delay sound much smoother. Sam Inglis
But note that guitars in this price range aren’t likely to be without their faults. You will probably need to take them to a local guitar pro for a set-up if buying online, as fret edges may be sharp and the action may be too high or low. Finishes can be a little rough in some places, and you won’t get anything in the way of luxury looks or features – there’s a lot more plastic used in the under $150 range!
Last and not necessarily least, consider the ever-popular closet and sound blanket trick. This involves a speaker cabinet, a closet or large cupboard, and at least a pair of the thick, padded blankets normally used professionally for sound insulation or by moving companies (quilts and regular bedding blankets are ineffective). You'll lose some speaker "air" and room interaction, but you'll be able to crank the amp and avoid unwanted noise complaints. Assuming the blankets are properly placed, the volume level should seem no louder than that of a distant stereo system blaring at someone's party.
Youngman is also known for creating some of the best Frankenstein guitars in the Dallas/Fort Worth area. One of his favorites to build is his custom built Indian Esqu-wire Custom, a monstrous guitar with an SG body, a Telecaster neck and Fender pickups. "It's taking shit and making something playable," he says. And his touch must be golden because guitarslingers like Smokin' Joe Kubek, Bnois King and Rocky Athas each own one of his Frankenstein babies.
“Guitar has always been an extension of my thoughts without having to put it into words,” says Marcus. “It’s a form of meditation allowing my mind to cut off and to speak through the instrument.” Players often say this sort of thing and it’s often nonsense, but before you scoff, listen to the live medley on 2017’s Due North EP and you’ll hear the truth in this statement. A new King is born? We think so.
ESP started life in Japan in 1975 as Electric Sound Products – a single store that provided replacements parts for guitars. These days they are a huge guitar manufacturer and a big name in heavy metal, having supplied guitars for Metallica, Megadeth, and Slayer, among others. ESP also own the subsidiary LTD, who produce low priced, entry-level versions of their guitars.
The steel-string beauty is crafted from solid Sitka spruce on the top, which features solid Indian rosewood back and sides, and a slim mahogany neck and rosewood fretboard. You’ll notice some impressive decoration on the BR-160 (as we mention in our full review), including an exclusive Dalmatian-style tortoiseshell pickguard, accurate 14:1 butterbean-style tuners, and an elaborately decorated motherof-pearl headstock.
Acoustic has never had much of a following amongst guitar players, but they made (original company out of business) some of the best bass amps that were ever made. Advanced solid state construction and creative speaker design finally gave bass players something besides Fenders lame sound and Ampegs wall of mud. To top it all, they are durable, ask my 30+ year old 360. Mosrite and Gibson basses and Acoustic amplifiers, life just doesn't get better.
A passive pickup doesn’t produce a very strong signal, which can result in a small amount of volume and an anemic tone. However, the signal can either be boosted at the p.a., your amp, or the most versatile option' via an Acoustic Preamp. Active pickups don’t require any external technology to boost, though they do require a battery, but some people still use acoustic preamps for the tone shaping and DI benefits..
Rack-mount gear has become somewhat of a lost art for guitar players since the late 90’s. Nonetheless, rack gear is great for people who want programmability of preset tones, the ability to interchange components, and those who love seeing bright lights flicker as all of your gear goes to work! So for the rack-gear heads that still exist on this earth, we’ve compiled what we think are the 10 best rackmount pre-amplifiers of all time.
I have inherited a heater "H300N" acoustic guitar but I can't find any info on it. The most I could find is that it was from the L. D. Heater Music Company that was based out of Beaverton, Oregon. They were best known for being a distributer of Lyle Guitars. Can anyone else offer additional information or where to find it? It's a bueatiful guitar and I want to know more info before I give it to my nephew or sell it.
The following year, the company hired designer Lloyd Loar to create newer instruments.[11] Loar designed the flagship L-5 archtop guitar and the Gibson F-5 mandolin that was introduced in 1922, before leaving the company in 1924.[12] In 1936, Gibson introduced their first "Electric Spanish" model, the ES-150, followed by other electric instruments like steel guitars, banjos and mandolins.

Description: Body: Alder - Top Wood: Maple - Flamed - Neck Attachment: Neck-through - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: U-Shape - Nut Width: 48mm - Fingerboard: Maple - Frets: 24, Jumbo - # of Strings: 7 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Headstock: 4+3 - Bridge: Floyd Rose Speedloader - Bridge Construction: Maple - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: ESP Tuners, Black, 1x Volume Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Dimarzio Crunchlab 7/LiquiFire 7 - String Instrument Finish: See-Thru Black

We think this is one of the best multi-effects pedals as it’s packed to the brim with a range of classic and modern Boss effects. In fact, there’s eight simultaneous effects categories that can work in unison, and each of those categories has multiple effects types within. This means you have access to a vast array of Boss effects as well as COSM amps derived from the Boss GT-100.
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Fender Montara acoustic electric with HSC. Part of the California series made in the early 90's. BEAUTIFUL guitar! See pics. I would describe it as being in excellent condition for its age. Of course there are some minor signs of use upon very close inspection but nothing that jumps out. (2 small dings are shown in pics) All electronics work, could probably use some new strings. If you have any questions please ask!
There are tons of new tidbits of FU-Tone.com news! First off we would like to welcome Stephen “Stef” Carpenter of DEFTONES to the FU family! Recently I started working closely with Rem Massingill (Stef’s Tech) on this monster project. It started as most of these projects do – with lots of conversations and planning before turning the first screw. I work with dozens of techs in this business and I can tell you that Rem is “one of those guys”. He really knows his stuff, is a stickler for details and most importantly he knows TONE! Little did I know what I was getting into and the first two guitars on the slab were ESP 8 String models! This was out of the normal scope of my 6 and 7 string clients… I consider the guitar and guitar tone a never-ending learning process. I am constantly looking to learn from anyone that I can on my journey. Anyone who presents themselves as a know-it-all is full of shit or trying to sell you something (usually both!). After lots of twisting, tweaking and testing we got this off the ground and I am here to tell you that the tone was massive and bone crushing all while having an insane amount of note separation and clarity! Not to mention sustain for days that would make Nigel Tufnell jealous… As I stood on stage with Stef and Rem at sound check in New York while he put the 8 String ESP through its paces, I was pleasantly surprised to hear how brutal the tone was. All of the power and growl of a monster truck with the precision and control of a Ferrari. The smile on Stef’s and Rem’s faces said it all! This was just the first hoop that we jumped through together with a bunch of stuff in the hopper for these guys. If you have not been to a Deftones show on this tour, I highly suggest going out to catch them!
Additionally, George Harrison used a custom-built rosewood Telecaster during the recording sessions for The Beatles‘ Let It Be album (including the rooftop concert), played through aLeslie speaker; Big Twist and the Mellow Fellows guitarist Pete Special frequently had reissue of Harrison’s Tele onstage in the mid-1980s, but rarely played it. Pearl Jam singer and guitarist Eddie Vedder has been known to use a custom black Telecaster with a white pickguard containing a black arrow decal pointing towards a target design under the strings. Guitar virtuoso Chet Atkins, known for the variety of acoustic and electric guitars that he used, occasionally played a Telecaster in his duets with Jerry Reed.[6]

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Behold anther complete package from Les Paul guitar Epiphone series of electric guitar, with everything that you need to start playing right from the onset. For every beginner looking for that perfect set, this guitar they can rely on, not just for its sound quality, but also for the fact that it is a complete package offering lots practicality in terms of mastering the act of strumming and sound generation.
Unfortunately there are a few who are not too happy with with some of the default patches, they caution that the PODHD500X is not a plug-and-play unit. While you can get good tones with a bit of tweaking, you can get even better tones with more experience, so the learning curve can be a bit steep for some. For best results, you ought to research the actual gear that your favorite musicians use, along with their settings and use them as your starting points to creating your own tones. Thankfully, there are user made presets that you can also use as base for your own virtual signal chain.
JS32 Dinky is one of those old school models that has stuck around, and for a good reason. The guitar is similar to the SL2, however it brings a much more neutral experience. It’s all about that Floyd Rose style tremolo bridge, two kicking humbuckers, and a fretboard that is built for speed. While I wouldn’t say it’s the best guitar I’ve ever played, Jackson JS32 Dinky gives its competition a run for their money.
Michael Bloomfield is credited with Eric Clapton for helping seed the renewed interest which compelled Gibson to return the original Les Paul to full production; both musicians began using Les Pauls at about the same time. Bloomfield first played a 1954 Les Paul goldtop (with the strings wrapped around the tailpiece rather than suspended and intonated over a bridge) while with the Butterfield Blues Band in 1966, but he swapped the guitar (plus $100) to guitar technician Dan Erlewine in exchange for a 1959 Les Paul Standard. This guitar was characterised by mismatched volume and tone control knobs (a reflector-topped “tone” knob for the bridge pickup volume, two top-hatted knobs for neck pickup volume and bridge pickup tone, and a cylindrical “speed knob” for the neck pickup tone), a missing cover on the rhythm/treble toggle switch, a truss rod cover with “Les Paul” engraved in script (this feature had originated with the early Les Paul SG models, not the original Les Paul single cutaways), and a crack in the wood behind the tailpiece. Because the guitar was lost in the 1970s (Bloomfield biographers Jan Mark Wolkin and Bill Keenom, in Michael Bloomfield: If You Love These Blues, disclosed that a Canadian venue owner claimed it as compensation after Bloomfield missed a scheduled performance and never reclaimed the instrument), Gibson used hundreds of photographs of the late blues guitarist’s instrument (and consulted with Bloomfield’s family) to produce the limited-edition Bloomfield signature. The company produced one hundred Bloomfield models with custom-aged finishes and two hundred more with the company’s Vintage Original Specifications finishing in 2009. They reproduced the tailpiece crack on the aged version, plus the mismatched volume and tone control knobs and the “Les Paul”-engraved truss rod cover on both versions, while including a toggle switch cover. The headstock was characterised by the kidney-shaped Grover tuning keys installed on the guitar before Bloomfield traded for it, and the pickups were Gibson Burstbucker 1 (at the neck) and Burstbucker 2 (at the bridge).
The valvetronix XL-series builds on the success of the original valvetronix digital amplifier. A range of tube-powered modelling amplifiers, with hi-gain sounds designed to span the entire range of heavy rock music. The XL-series uses VOX's patented Valve Reactor technology, producing the sound and feel of an all-tube amp. Models: AD15VT-XL 15-watt 1×10" speaker, AD30VT-XL 30-watt 1×12" speaker, AD50VT-XL 50-watt 2×12" speakers, AD100VT-XL 100-watt 2×12" speakers.
There were at least three different versions of this guitar with differing knobs, fingerboards, control plates, cord mounting, and trim. One even had a nice rosewood fingerboard with dots. This version was the most monochromatic of the bunch, I suppose. It cleaned up really nicely for these pictures. Okay, so it's an ugly little spud. My wife describes this guitar as "so ugly it's cute," and she fell in love with it in the store for that reason. I like that.

For its tops (soundboards), Ovation used sitka spruce, a wood which Kaman engineers had been using in helicopter blades. In the 1970s, Ovation developed thinner sound-boards with carbon-based composites laminating a thin layer of birch, in its Adamas model, which has been viewed as one of the most radical designs in the history of acoustic guitars. The Adamas model dissipated the sound-hole of the traditional soundboard among 22 small sound-holes in the upper chamber of the guitar, yielding greater volume and further reducing feedback during amplification.[1] The Adamas design strengthened the sound-board, reducing the traditional design’s bracing and hence its weight. In the 1980s, another innovation was the introduction of shallow-bowl guitars, which appealed to electric guitarists.
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