Having a tuner on your pedal board is useful but these days I more often use a clip-on tuner, specifically the TC Electronic Polytune Clip (Buy at Amazon UK, Amazon US). I don't like the main signal to run through the tuner all the time if I can help it (I use the GigRig G2 switching system) but if you don't have that luxury, then look for a tuner with True Bypass like the TC Electronic Polytune 2 (Buy at Amazon UK, Amazon US) or use a Volume pedal that has a Tuner Output (many do these days!).

Finally, the ’37 amplifier illustrated by both Sorkin and Grossman was the Supro Model D Amplifier, a little, dark-covered affair which – at 17″ by 91/2″ – basically looked like a little radio. It had a little metal “suitcase” handle, and the speaker was on the left side of the front. The circular grill hole was broken by two horizontal strips. This had five tubes, eight watts of power output, and an 8″ speaker. Inside were two compartments, one for the chassis and one for the speaker. The cost was $40. The Model D was made, again, by Webster and Bulwin in L.A.


Musicians might not want to be replaced by machines - we (or they, as it were, because I lost whatever musician credentials I might have earned annoying people with my wooden flute as a beggar on the streets of a tourist town when I started programming computers to play music) might make a strong case that no machine can express the human soulfulness of music. It is easy to conclude that, the more of the musical task that is assigned to a machine, the less soul is expressed in the music. Well, great big rock-n-roll wall of sound that all over your acoustic guitar soul. That stack of Fender amps I can hear five miles from the stadium where David Gilmore is strumming a guitar is as much an instrument as was the Shepard's lute - and a much more popular instrument now, for audiences attuned to the daily roar of tires crushing air against pavement.
Thank you Ola and David for this excellent article. The approach is totally scientific: you try to study the impact of one element of a system while keeping the rest of the settings identical (same pickups, same strings, same picking, etc.). The wood used modifies effectively the electrical spectrum composition and therefore the sound we hear. All the difficulty is that the wood is a part of a very complex system (woods combination, building type, pickups, strings, effects, amplification, restitution, etc.) and, without a solid knowledge or skills, it could be difficult to choose the right elements of the system to get what you want…
Firmly intended to compete with Gibson's ES-335, the Starfire IV, V and VI retain plenty of Guild style, not least the more spacious cutaways and the wooden foot tune-o-matic-style bridge. Placed side-by-side with an equally new Bigsby-equipped Gibson ES-335, the Starfire V somehow looks more 'retro', more 60s. The body here is made from mahogany laminates with a distinct striped figure under the Cherry Red finish, which was introduced with the first Starfire. Then, as now, it all creates a different aesthetic to the Gibson ES-335. A major difference is the control set-up, which here augments the Gibson layout with a smaller knobbed master volume control on the treble horn, just behind the three-way toggle pickup selector. The pickups here replicate the early-60s introduced 'Anti Hum Pickups' and are period correct, along with the black plastic, chrome-tipped control knobs. It's a fairly weighty guitar for a semi, thanks to the full-length maple centre-block, and has a classic strapped-on feel. It is, of course, thinline depth and feels every bit an ES-335. It has a 'clean' sound, with low-end definition, slightly bright on the treble pickup with decent sustain and, importantly, a very respectable feedback threshold. It likes volume, and while similarly evocative of virtually all those classic styles, it's the stage version and effortlessly takes you on to early The Who, The Jam or Britpop voices, while seemingly equally at home with rootsy, strummier Americana.
If you have ever played or listened to metal, you probably know about Ibanez. This brand has been around for a while and has become a patron saint of those who like harder sounding music. Built for speed, Ibanez guitars bring are finely tuned instruments which enable the player to explore the limits of their skill. On top of that, any Ibanez guitar is going to be great value for the money.
A. Musical instruments, especially acoustic and electric guitars, are routinely pawned for short-term loans. Buyers prepared to pay cash can sometimes find high-quality acoustic guitars at pawn shops, but there are no guarantees on condition. Furthermore, the seller may or may not be able to provide any technical information or additional accessories.
In low-end instruments laminated or plywood soundboards are often used. Although these materials often impart great strength and stability to the instrument, via layers of perpendicular grains, they do not vibrate the same way that natural wood does, generally producing an inferior tone with less amplification. Instruments with laminated or plywood soundboards should be avoided if possible.
Now we’ve got the basics down, let’s have a look at some simple modifiers to the circuit. This article first shows you how to add a “killswitch” to the guitar, then uses the lessons learned from that process to change that killswitch to a volume control instead. Finally, we’ll find out how capacitors are used in guitar circuits and install our first tone control.

Whether it costs $100 or $1000, the build quality should feel worthy of the money. Naturally with budget models you will find more laminated woods compared the solid woods and exotic materials used in expensive guitars. However, a good model will have laminates that are put together securely and cleanly, with no excess glue or rough spots. Even a good budget guitar will look and feel great.

The Applause line is relevant because the technology used to make the aluminum and foam necks was subsequently applied to Ovation’s final American-made solidbodies, the Ultra Kaman or UK II, which was introduced in 1979. The UK II featured an aluminum frame with a urethane foam (Urelite) body, featuring the usual Ovation shape but with a little Tele-style curve on the upper shoulder and a sharp single cutaway. The top featured a contour like a carved top, although it was molded, of course. The neck was typically Ovation, with a bound 24-fret ebony fingerboard. Pickups had changed to twin-blade humbuckers, still in the smaller Ovation size. Electronics were fairly conventional, with a three-way select, two volume and two tone controls. No reference materials are available to me, but it appears that the earliest UK IIs had a little Les-Paul-style elevated pickguard and hollow bow-tie inlays. Also, the early UK IIs seem to have the plastic and metal bridge assemblies seen on earlier Preachers and Vipers. Later versions have the notched abalone block inlays, no pickguard and all-metal bridge assemblies. This is what makes me think the switch to metal bridges occurred in around 1980. As far as I know, the model name never appeared on the pickguard!


I had a single-minded desire for single-ended tone, but I didn’t want to drop insane moolah on a tweed Champ (or any of the tweed Champ clones out there, or even a tweed Champ kit), cool as they may be. Heck, even a Silverface Champ is going to set you back in the $300+ range these days. And it’s a Fender. Dependable? Yup. Great sounding? Sure. But no one is going to see it and say, “What the hell is that?” Which is part of the fun for those of us involved in the weirdoes and freakazoids of the gear world.

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Since it was originally introduced in 1975, the Destroyer has become an icon of that era's chapter in rock n' roll history. Over the years it has undergone many incarnations and the perennial classic returns once again. The body and neck of both guitars are made of a tight Mahogany for maximum resonance. The bound rosewood fingerboard is adorned with Jumbo frets. The Destroyer also features Sure Grip III control knobs for no-slip control. It's not called the Destroyer for nothing.
MY kid brother has been playing drums since he was a kid , until I snuck him into a bar at 15 one night and he set in with the house band , he played all my music. He was good so he & the lead guitarist clicked & they released a CD that took off & then the guitarist was killed , my brother got a doctorate in music and has played on several good CD's , MTB being but one. he can now play nearly everything and has released two more CD,s ,and owns his own studio , me I'm only an electrician but I understand Harmonic heating in electronics . its right that a watt is a watt,& it's a way to measure power & its sold in kilowatt hours, but even though a watts is a watt when measured, its a measurement of energy , it still depends on how it's used as to how far it goes or what you get from it ,it has a lot to do with how clean or distorted it is as to how loud it seems , people will perceive it differently , the only way to find to find how loud ? a decibel meter, another measurement .
You can use compression not only to keep levels under control but also to increase sustain. Sometimes a guitar part will work better in a track if the sustain is created using a little less overdrive augmented by compression rather than relying on overdrive alone. Even a heavily overdriven guitar sound can be made to appear more powerful if compressed, as its average energy level is increased further, though any noise will also be rendered more obvious. Clean guitar parts can also benefit enormously from compression, as it creates a more dense, even sound and can emphasise the picking attack of the notes when a longer attack time is set. Using a faster release time, so as to cause audible level pumping, can make for exciting rock guitar sounds, but some compressors pump more gracefully than others — Dbx models are quite popular in this respect.
You will definitely want to start slow, with an almost completely dry signal, and start adding some reverb bit by bit. Depending on the type of music you are making, that subtle hint of reverb may be all it takes to get the point across and make that track sound more organic. If you want to take things a bit further, recording a completely dry track and then mixing it with the very same section with added reverb can yield some pretty interesting results. As you have probably noticed by now, experimentation is the key here. The most important thing is to start slow.
While it is fun to kick your amp and make car-crash noises with your reverb unit, a much better use is to add depth and echo to your guitar signal. The effect is similar to playing your guitar in an empty room where the sound bounces off the walls. When you move on to digital reverb pedals you have the option of some truly lush, expansive sounds ranging classic spring reverb, to studio-style plate reverb, to hall and arena-type effects.

The company has been run by the Martin family throughout its history. The current chairman and CEO, C.F. ‘Chris’ Martin IV, is the great-great-great-grandson of the founder. The firm was the first to introduce many of the characteristic features of the modern flattop, steel-strung acoustic guitar. Influential innovations include the Dreadnought body style and scalloped bracing. Some time in the 1970s, Martin bought Levin guitars[1] and around 200 D-18’s were apparently built in Sweden; they are stamped LD-18[citation needed].

This POD 2.0 comes with the unit, power cord, and the live stage footswitch! CAT cable to interface between the POD and FBV foot switch included. Everything is in very good condition! Pictures are part of the description, if you have any questions feel free to message me for more details! From Line 6 web page The industry standard for direct recording in the studio, POD ® 2.0 delivers the tones heard on hit records everywhere. For practice, it's the ultimate way to get inspiring, stage-perfected tones with headphones. In the studio, you can become more productive and creative. You can instantly get the sounds you need! Absolutely No International Shipping Whatsoever, only buy if you live in the mainland USA, No shipping overseas.
Since they entered the electric market, it didn't take long before Ibanez became the patron saint of those who appreciate a heavier sound. Their RG series won the hearts and minds of budget crowds all around the world, mainly due to its great tone and overall performance. Today we are looking at an Ibanez RG421, which follows this core policy precisely.

For example, if the note E (the open sixth string) is played over the A minor chord, then the chord would be [0 0 2 2 1 0]. This has the note E as its lowest tone instead of A. It is often written as Am/E, where the letter following the slash indicates the new bass note. However, in popular music it is usual to play inverted chords on the guitar when they are not part of the harmony, since the bass guitar can play the root pitch.
Recently picked myself up a second J28SCDL Jumbo, which was set up beautifully and I have to say it truly is an amazing guitar. It could give some of the higher priced guitars a run for its money. Lovely sound, creative design and clearly a lot of guitar for your money. I seriously encourage you not to over look Washburn when looking for a good guitar at an affordable price. Might end up your favorite guitar!
	Seagull Maritime	The Seagull Maritime acoustic guitars are made of all-solid tonewoods, making them a great option for those looking for the best acoustic guitar with a full sound. The top is made from pressure-tested solid spruce while the sides are made of solid mahogany wood for a well-balanced tone. The craftsmanship is superb and it has the sound quality to match.	

Hi Jeff. I just wanted to point a couple of things that IMHO are not 100% accurate. Most probably its just to make things not too complicated, but I think is important to notice them. First, resistance is not frecuency dependant, and therefore it doesn´t have any effect on high frecuency content. However, Impedance does, and impedance is the resistance on the AC world (and a guitar signal is an AC signal). Therefore, the reason both long cables and pickups loose high frecuencies as they get longer is because the capacitance in them increases, and capacitors have a certain impedance (once again, resistance in the AC world). So you may actually be true, but its because of impedance created by the capacitance and inductance present on the pickup. Will continue..
First Act is a very peculiar guitar company. They have guitars that sell at Toys R Us that will literally fall apart in your hands. They sell pedals that are a complete joke, leaving you with the impression that they must be a bad, bad joke. Then something strange happened, I did a little research and found some info that was stunning. First Act has a couple of guitar lines that are some of the finest guitars I have ever seen, heard, or even read about. They have guitars that go for $3000 plus and are better guitars than any person commenting on this board will ever have the opportunity of even being in the same room with (including myself) Who would have thought?! Go figure.
From the jazz-tempered Artcore series to the metal-shredding Iron Labels and all of their rocking classic models, Ibanez electric guitars are definitely not confined to any one genre. You can play whatever music you like with the right Ibanez axe, whether you go for one of their off-the-shelf designs or the signature style designated by your favorite guitar hero.
Matsumoku is one of the Japanese manufacturers that did not survive long after the heyday of the 1970s guitar market despite having a long tradition of quality stringed instrument craftsmanship. Matsumoku produced guitars for major manufacturers Greco, Guyatone and Yamaha. Matsumoku made Arai, Aria, Aria Pro II and Aria Diamond badges, with Aria being their primary badge for a majority of this time frame. Badged guitars known to have been made by Matsumoku include Apollo, Arita, Barclay, Burny, Capri, Columbus, Conrad, Cortez (electrics only), Country, Cutler, Dia, Domino, Electra, Epiphone, Granada, Hi Lo, Howard, Ibanez, Lindberg, Lyle, Luxor, Maxitone (this guitar differs from Tama's Maxitone badge), Mayfair, Memphis, Montclair, Pan, Pearl (electrics only), Raven, Stewart, Tempo, Univox ,Vantage, Ventura, Vision, Volhox, Washburn (in 1979 and 1980), Westbury, Westminster and Westone. Possible Matsumoku badges include: Bruno, Crestwood, Conqueror, Eros, Mako, Memphis, Orlando and Toledo.
The Ibanez Artcore line is a beautiful example of modern guitar manufacturing. Normally, hollow-body guitars, even those from Epiphone, provide interesting challenges to companies trying to produce axes on a mass scale, and thus they have to charge a higher dollar. The Artcore series provides buyers with an option to shell out a fraction of the price for a really impressive guitar. The AF55 is a fully hollow option that will make you think you should have paid double for it.
The plectrum, or flat pick, is another key piece of essential equipment. For electric guitars, it tends to be a thin piece of plastic, metal, shell or other material shaped like a teardrop or a triangle. There are also thumb picks mounted on rings and finger picks on the player's fingertips; you'll see electric guitarists using both of these as well as a standard pick. 
Buddy Holly turned a generation of future heroes – George Harrison, Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck – onto the guitar, with an elemental style: an antsy mix of country and blues that merged rhythm and lead; check the push-and-tease phrasing on "It's So Easy," which echoes Holly's growl-and-hiccup vocals. Playing his Stratocaster and fronting a double-guitar-bass-and-drum quartet, Holly essentially invented the rock band. "Listen to the songs on the first three Beatles albums," says John Mellencamp. "Take their voices off and it's Buddy Holly."
When buying your first guitar, it’s sensible to stop and think about what you are buying it for. Is it just something to learn on? Will you be upgrading in a year or two when you start thinking about forming a band, gigging, and recording? If so, you may be better off trying one of these affordable electric guitars, which all offer a solid platform on which to learn.
Along with the Dobro name, OMI was acquired by the Gibson Guitar Corporation in 1993. They renamed the company Original Acoustic Instruments and moved production to Nashville. Gibson now uses the name Dobro only for models with the inverted-cone design used originally by the Dobro Manufacturing Company. Gibson also manufactures biscuit-style single-resonator guitars, but it sells them under names such as Hound Dog andEpiphone. The Dobro was first introduced to country music by Roy Acuff.
The Les Paul guitar line was originally conceived to include two models: the regular model (nicknamed the Goldtop), and the Custom model, which offered upgraded hardware and a more formal black finish. However, advancements in pickup, body, and hardware designs allowed the Les Paul to become a long-term series of electric solid-body guitars that targeted every price-point and market level except for the complete novice guitarist. This beginner guitar market was filled by the Melody Maker model, and although the inexpensive Melody Maker did not bear the Les Paul name, its body consistently followed the design of true Les Pauls throughout each era.
Situated just under the Spectrum 5 were the Teisco K guitars. Indeed, these Ks may have been introduced slightly before the Spectrums, since they appear in a 1966 Japanese Teisco brochure that does not contain the Spectrum. A second ’66 Japanese Teisco brochure contains both Ks and Spectrums. The K guitars were very similar in profile to the Spectrum, except that the horns were not curved, and flared out more or less equally in a more tulip shape, though still pointing slightly inward. These still had the German carve relief, 22-fret rosewood fingerboards, plus the new hooked headstocks. Inlays, however, were dots, and the vibratos were the more pedestrian Japanese version of the Bigsby. Pickguards were the new striped metal affairs introduced the year before, extending from above the strings down through the lower bout control area.
You might have read our review about the C40 GigMaker kit from Yamaha earlier on. This is a similar guitar, but it’s the C40II, and the black color makes it a limited edition instrument. The inlay is less “traditional” looking. Instead of an ornate “rosette” style, the inlay is a stripe pattern all the way around the sound hole, making the guitar look somewhat “jazzy,” to use a more descriptive term. So if this is the look you prefer, read on for more details.
The Meisterklasse is a high-end harmonica on the modular system, made in Germany, featuring chrome-plated cover plates, an anodised aluminium comb, and extra thick 1.05mm nickel-plated reeds. One other feature that sets the Meisterklasse apart from most other Hohner harmonicas are its full-length cover plates, which extend all the way to the ends of the harmonica's comb rather than sharply angling down before the ends to form an adjoining surface parallel to the reedplates and comb. The only other Hohner harmonica possessing this quality is the curve-framed Golden Melody.[25]

After all, we each have our own favorites, whether it be a particular player, style or era. However, that doesn’t mean such a list can’t be based on some element of objective reasoning. To some extent, the proof is in all of us: anyone who picks up the instrument borrows at least a handful of techniques and stylistic tendencies that someone else brought to the table. The key is determining which guitarists have had the most impact among the larger number of players—in other words, who has contributed most across the board to the way we approach the instrument.


Conklin: Conklin is a quite well known brand in the world of high end custom shop guitars. The level of customisation they offer is absolutely amazing. They offer their own body designs or you can submit your own custom body design, as far as design is considered, with Conklin your imagination is your limit. They also offer melted top wherein they combine two or more woods in a seamless way to create a top that looks as if woods have melted into each other, but they don’t stop only at beautiful tops, they even offer option for melted fretboard wherein two are more woods are beautifully combined to create a masterpiece for a fretboard. They use Lundgren pickups as their standard choice. You can even order guitars with special switching configuration customised to your liking. Their neck-through guitars are just excellent, even their bolt-on neck guitars are set precisely and have a nice tapered neck joint which makes you feel as if you’re playing a neck through guitar. The level of craftsmanship on these guitars is just mind-blowing.
Originally designed by John Suhr and Bob Bradshaw (a legend in rack-gear rig building), it can be assumed that this machine was built with superior quality and a ton of tone in mind. Well, boy did it deliver all of that and then some! The first and only CAE rackmounted guitar preamp to ever have been produced was a 2-spacer, featuring 3 independent channels for clean, crunch, and lead. One of the notorious drawbacks with preamps has always been the loss of pick attack. However, the CAE never had this issue, providing a wealth of clarity through every channel, and even cleaning up when you rolled back the volume on your guitar to get those classic tones.

Description: Body: Maple - Top Wood: Spruce - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 3 Piece - Fingerboard: Ebony - Frets: 22 - Inlay: Pearl & Abalone Block - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge Construction: Ebony - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Gold, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control - Circuit Type: Passive - Pickups: Super 58 - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Vintage Yellow Sunburst - String Instrument Accessories: Hardshell Case


The previously discussed I-IV-V chord progressions of major triads is a subsequence of the circle progression, which ascends by perfect fourths and descends by perfect fifths: Perfect fifths and perfect fourths are inverse intervals, because one reaches the same pitch class by either ascending by a perfect fourth (five semitones) or descending by a perfect fifth (seven semitones). For example, the jazz standard Autumn Leaves contains the iv7-VII7-VIM7-iiø7-i circle-of-fifths chord-progression;[80] its sevenths occur in the tertian harmonization in sevenths of the minor scale.[81] Other subsequences of the fifths-circle chord-progression are used in music. In particular, the ii-V-I progression is the most important chord progression in jazz music.
Sometimes, the research we do - such as this hunt for the best multi effect pedal - opens up our world to a piece of gear we did not previously know about, and yet completely blows us out of the water. Such is the case with the Line 6 M5 Stompbox Modeler. This is the second item from Line 6 that made it into our top 5 list (the other one being the high-end POD HD500X). The Line 6 M5 is different than the other multi-effect pedals on our list, as it’s the only one that can only model one effect at a time, and also does not do amplifier modeling. With the other pedals on our list, you could replace your entire pedalboard by having multiple effects active at the same time. The M5 is far more simplistic, only letting you use one at a time. You might be asking yourself why we love it so much - well, it’s not for everyone, but there’s a lot of beauty in its simplicity. Read on to see if this is the right pedal for you.
All I can say is quit wasting $ on new. A new guitar is like a new car it’s gonna lose 20% of its value once you take it out the first time. Unless you are buying a Gibson or fender custom shop etc Just go for what plays and sounds great. Perfect example is the Esp ltd ec401vf or 400. Used $300-400 has stock seymour duncan 59 neck jb bridge or the newer 401 has the dimarzio’s in it. Grovers tuners earvana nut mahogany body. Just an excellent setup for half the price of an epi les paul. Don’t get me wrong I have an Epi les paul traditional pro and it’s a nice guitar but for $750 nah. Since I picked up the 401 I hardly play my jag mustang or either of my epi l.p. or sg. Its just that nice of a guitar. If you are in the market for a les paul style or a new guitar in general take a look at the 400 series it’s a whole lot of guitar for the $
In the late 70’s digital technology boomed and made its way into the guitar community. It first entered in the form as rack units which were expensive and relatively large. As costs came down and the technology shrank, digital delay pedals were introduced into the market by Boss in 1984 with the Boss DD-2. Since then as technology advanced, delay pedals now offer many features in a very small box such as tape echo, analog, reverse delay, modulated delay, and loopers.
I do all my recording through my Axe FX, though there are many ways to USB record to computer. That being said, I plan to play live using my Ax and my other FRFR gear. I’m using a Matrix 1600-watt amp and a Matrix 2×12 (FRFR) cab and will run direct-out to PA when the time comes. I see no reason to lug around a half-stack or stack let alone the consistency and versatility of this setup. This is my first time using FRFR, and was tempted to go with a hi-end head and cabinet combo, but the up front investment will be worth it. I won’t ever have to buy effects pedals or change heads when I want a different sound. I did add a Mission SP-2 expression/volume pedal and also use my old Pod X3 Live for a midi controller. As for volume, I’m confident that my setup will hold its own vs. most other half-stack setups. I may add an Atomic CLR or another Matrix 2×12 (like the one I have) for a monitor later on. Another important factor is my band does cover songs and the Axe setup allows me to tailor my tone to match the bands we cover at the click of a switch. As a guitarist and computer tech/nerd, it doesn’t get any better than this for me. The configuration possibilities are endless.
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Why do these genres not require the use of a tone knob, or sometimes, require a tone knob to be fully open? Well, for metal and hard rock, first of all, most of the tone shaping happens on the amp and/or on the pedals, especially for those who use high gain distortion pedals. The pickups on typical hard rock and metal guitars are humbuckers, which are warmer and have less treble. Couple that with high gain and high output pickups which compress the signal and also take some of the treble away, and keeping the tone knob open becomes that much important so that the tone will not be muddy and keep its cut and punch. For country, well, I guess that’s just *the* sound of the genre, and wide open Telecasters and Stratocasters are the weapons of choice.
G&L is the evolution of Fender guitars, no doubt, is Leo Fender expressed by itself, amazing axe, nice sound, in tune, good wood, my ASAT SPECIAL have bird's eye wood on fretboard that looks and feels amazing, the MFD's pickups rocks! nice playability, nice sound, I'll keep mine a lot of a time, it must be on top 10, underrated guitar in my opinion
Straight away, we have to talk about how good this guitar sounds. Lots of low-end and mid-range acoustics tend to do one tonal area well, but the Martin DRS2 does an awesome job all round. It’s got deep, booming lows, while the highs remain nice and crisp. And of course, all of this is available acoustically or electrically in the dreadnought cutaway acousticelectric guitar.
While it won’t necessarily get you to Hendrix levels, it is a useful approach for beginners who want the focus to be on keeping enough fun and practically in practicing guitar. And while you still absolutely have to practice, this method shows tips and tricks up front to keep learning theory fun. It will also include enough information around traditional arpeggios, tunings, and scales to make sure you will learn music theory.
Build Your Own Effect Pedal. Mammoth Electronics makes an effort to offer our customers a very neatly packaged and personally customizable effect pedal kit. Each guitar pedal kit comes equipped with everything you need to build your own effect pedal as quickly and inexpensively as possible without sacrificing quality. These DIY guitar pedals kits are designed to make building your own effect pedal easy for everyone from the hobby builder to the manufacturer. All parts are labeled and packaged in the kit for easy identification. Enclosures are fully customizable to the user specification and specially wrapped in a protective foam for safe transit. We’ve provided a wide selection for any effect pedal kit needs you might have. From a simple boost pedals, and fuzz pedals, as well as overdrive, distortion, and compression kits. We also have a wide range of modulation kits, including delay, reverb, tremolo, and phaser effect pedal kits. If you need a quick fix or a more complex guitar pedal kit, Mammoth Electronics offers a variety of options making it effortless to build your own effect pedal with a sound quality that will make an impression. We work hard to build relationships with only the best brands for our customers. These strong relationships allow us to provide extremely competitive pricing on all of our DIY guitar pedals kits.. We’re confident you will save yourself money & time if you build your own effect pedal with Mammoth Electronics. Mammoth Electronics offers customized DIY guitar kits and effect pedal kits that allow you to experiment with, create and amplify your own taste of music, without compromising on the sound quality. With added protective layering, these kits are safe for transportation and transit. We’re passionate about helping our customers build the best effect pedal possible so please Check out our Facebook page where you can provide feedback, share tips or ask any questions you might have about your latest projects.
This funky looking piece is a vintage Japanese-built Bruno MaxiTone semi-hollow guitar with a sunburst finish and two single-coil pickups with a 3-way blade pickup switch. We love the old Japanese electric guitars of the '60s where they had great looking retro cosmetics, such as this one with pearloid pickguard as well as pearloid base plates underneath the pickups. The guitar is in good playing condition, the vibrato tailpiece has been anchored with a screw in lieu of the spring, and there is a chip in the plastic mounting piece of the neck pickup. The guitar plays great and has a cool vintage Garage Rock tone to it!
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:I need to know how to get parts for my old kent guitar.I have located a semi-hollow body electric Kent guitar that has a body some what like a 335 and the neck like a fender strat. The body is a beautiful natural birdseye maple. She is in awsome shape and plays well. I have the ser# (xxx) 3 digits and I believe that it was made in Japan in the Sixty's. I have no Idea what model it is or value because I can't find out any thing about Kent guitars. I've seen Kent amps guitars & drums but no info. I welcome anything.
A good question to consider at this point: What the absolute darkest tone you’d ever want from your guitar? I know the two times I’m likeliest to lower the tone pot are when I want a dark, jazzy neck pickup sound, and when I’m trying to get a clarinet-like sound using an EBow. These next examples show how the various caps behave in those situations. We’ll go from lowest value (minimum treble cut) to highest (maximum treble cut).
Guitar technicians need a high school diploma or equivalent, though some community colleges offer programs in guitar technology. Apprenticeships or on-the-job training may also be available. These professionals should have hearing acuity for tone and pitch and the ability to play guitar. They should know how to use electronic tuning devices, as well as hand and power tools. Guitar technicians should also be skilled at woodworking. According to 2015 data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, musical instrument repairs earn a median salary of $35,660.
The electric guitars have to be plugged in for sound to be produced. A cable and an amplifier are a must for them to produce sound. They are largely dependent on some electronic pickups, having between one and three pickups on their bodies, for them to produce this sound. They are relatively much lighter and have lighter gauge strings when compared with their acoustic counterparts. It is therefore a better option for the small statured or small-handed players. Getting comfortable to hold a guitar or fret the notes is quite physically challenging when working with the acoustic guitars than with the electric types.
You have a 2 band EQ as well as independent gain and master controls as well as a headphone/line out jack for either silent practice or recording directly to your audio interface. There’s 10 watts of solid state power flying out of the 6.5" speaker so you’re covered for smaller gigs and practice sessions whilst the classic VOX grille cloth and chicken head knobs provide that unmistakeable VOX look. A fantastic amplifier that will provide you with lush tone and typical VOX reliability – you can’t argue with that for under £70.
If this were a list of the best electric guitar brands for metal it is very likely Jackson would be near the top. This is a company practically synonymous with metal, and for decades the most extreme players on the planet have looked to Jackson to get the job done. But Jackson also has a strong presence in the rock and hard rock genres, and if that’s your bag you’d be smart to give them a good look.
I have a Palmer P 33 acoustic (hand-crafted etc), that I bought second hand about 20 years ago for £80. It still sounds and looks superb and rarely loses its tuning. (Probably better than my newer Tanglewood.) I can't find out anything about it. However, somebody out there must have made it. Surely that somebody knows something about them! Do they never go on the internet! Pete.
Peavy amps are especially well appreciated by the metal community, thanks to their good overall reliability and the high volume of sound some models produce. The 6505 Series is a favorite of metal guitarists due to its power and versatility. This is most often used as a head for double stacks of speakers, but it can also be purchased as a 2×12” and 1×12” combo for convenience.

Launched in the late 1990s the SE models are manufactured in South Korea by a third-party company (World Musical Instruments) then shipped to re-sellers and dealers in the United States. This is a major part of the cost-cutting technique, in addition to a more flat (as opposed to carved) body shape and cheaper pickups/electronics. So be advised, I’m not telling you that you’re getting a $2000 guitar for $600.
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	Gibson Les Paul Standard Electric Guitar	This iconic instrument is regarded by many as one of the best electric guitars in the world because of its looks, sound and feel. The 2019 Gibson Les Paul Standard features a figured maple top, mahogany back and neck, rosewood fingerboard with cryogenically treated frets, calibrated BurstBucker Pro humbuckers and an asymmetrical Slim Taper neck shape for total playing comfort.	

Although not as dominating in amp modeling, Guitar Rig takes the top spot in our guitar effects software list. It leads the pack with its meticulously detailed effects modeling. Its 54 modeled effects closely follow the behavior of legendary stompboxes and studio racks. Even professionals are having a hard time picking out the real pedal against this guitar effect software in a blind test. Its versatile design allows you to chain effects together in virtually any manner, without the hassles of cables, space and budget constraints. It is truly a truck load of gear in one software package. Retail Price: $199.00

With so many options available in the world today, buying a guitar that perfectly represents your own style, tastes, and attitude has never been easier. Whether you're a classical guitarist looking for that perfectly balanced nylon flamenco, or a hard rock enthusiast who needs Pete Townshend crunch combined with Jack White power, there is simply no shortage of axes to choose from.


Taylor, Martin, Gibson all great production brands... Which is better comes done to what you like sonically, visually and of course the feel in your hands. It is also difficult to compare one brand versus another unless you are comparing similar designs using the same tone woods and in the same price range. Anyone espousing one is better than the other without doing this is not being honest with themselves. I own a Martin and two Taylors, all are great and have different voices and feels... Even the 2 Taylors are very different in sound and looks. In the end I vote for Taylor because I like the neck carve and feel that the looks and build quality are a bit better in the $3K - $4 price range. If your looking for something in a lower $500 - $1, 000range you probably should be considering Yamaha or Takamine. Though in the end you get what you pay for.
It’s 1951, a dark, rainy night on the backstreets of Memphis, Tennessee. Ike Turner and His Kings Of Rhythm are packing the gear into the station wagon, getting ready to head off to the studio to record a track for producer Sam Phillips, a track that the Rock and Roll Hall Of Fame will one day honor as the first rock and roll song of all time, ‘Rocket 88.’ (Although, distinctly unfairly, the song will be credited to singer Jackie Brenston and the imaginary band ‘His Delta Cats.’) “The amp—a Fender Bassman—was in the trunk of the car and it fell out, right on the road,” Ike Turner told Guitar Magazine’s Rick Batey in 1998, “and it was raining, so the amp got wet. When we got to the studio and plugged it in one of the tubes went ‘pop.’ We didn’t have no more tubes—so that’s where the fuzz came from.’
Fender California Series Classic This acoustic guitar series will make you swoon with its original Fender body shapes, fully painted tops of solid Sitka spruce and matching Stratocaster-style headstocks. But the California Series Classic models don’t only have the looks; they also have the sound and tonal quality to match. We don’t expect anything less from Fender, and this lineup surely delivers.
"Soft clipping" gradually flattens the peaks of a signal which creates a number of higher harmonics which share a harmonic relationship with the original tone. "Hard clipping" flattens peaks abruptly, resulting in higher power in higher harmonics.[37] As clipping increases a tone input progressively begins to resemble a square wave, which has odd number harmonics. This is generally described as sounding "harsh".
Schecter has built a strong reputation for itself as one of the best manufacturers of affordable guitars for musicians worldwide. Their commitment to quality and innovation has made them a leading brand name for high quality guitars that are affordable for every budget. The Schecter Hellraiser C-1 Electric Guitar is one of their flagship electric guitars that not only delivers performance, but also uncompromising quality.
A bass amplifier or "bass amp" is a musical instrument electronic device that uses electrical power to make lower-pitched instruments such as the bass guitar or double bass loud enough to be heard by the performers and audience. Bass amps typically consist of a preamplifier, tone controls, a power amplifier and one or more loudspeakers ("drivers") in a cabinet. While bass amps share many features with the guitar amplifiers used for electric guitar, such as providing an amplifier with tone and volume controls and a carrying handle, they are distinct from other types of amplification systems, due to the particular challenges associated with low-frequency sound reproduction. This distinction affects the design of the loudspeakers, the size and design of the speaker cabinet and the design of the preamplifier and amplifier. Speaker cabinets for bass amps usually incorporate larger loudspeakers (e.g., 15" speakers are more common for bass than for electric guitar amps) or more speakers and larger cabinet sizes than those used for the amplification of other instruments. The loudspeakers themselves must also be sturdier to handle the higher power levels and they must be capable of reproducing very low pitches at high sound pressure levels.
Combos or extension cabs with more than one speaker might present some phasing issues when miked at a distance. Such phasing is usually heard as softness/“hollowness”/lack of low-end punch in the recorded sound – a sort of “comb filter” EQ effect like you get from a phaser or a cocked wah pedal. Some mic placements using, for example, a 2×12 speaker cab will induce time differences between the waves from one speaker hitting the mic relative to those of the other, and possibly create frequency cancellations that are deleterious to guitar tone. Even when both speakers are of the same make and model, they are likely to perform slightly differently (thanks to subtle variables of the manufacturing process) and to present ever-so-slightly different resonant frequencies, efficiencies, basic tonalities, and so forth. For all of these reasons, extra care is required when placing a microphone at a distance from any multi-speaker cab (close-miking one of the other speakers will all but eliminate such issues, but also eliminates access to the great sounds of distant miking).
Tone wise, flamenco players appreciate the snappy and bright tone that this guitar reproduces, while acoustic guitarists find the playability and feel to be easy to transition to. Whether you want to focus on classical flamenco style, or you are merely looking to the sound of nylon string guitars into your collection, the GK Studio will not disappoint. The combination of its solid European spruce top and Cypress back and sides is a treat to look at and great to listen to. You can visit Cordoba Guitars for the complete specifications. You can also see two more Cordobas in our nylon string guitar roundup.
This Ibanez has a flamed sycamore top, and delivers a well balanced sound unplugged or plugged in. It has a great finish that is referred to as vintage violin. Owners of this guitar say it sounds great as the similarly priced Seagulls and Yamahas. The price has recently dropped on this guitar, which was a pain point for many owners. At $250 it’s a steal given the quality. The onboard pre amp contains a tuner, which is nice for beginners to always stay in tune. The slim neck will also make for great playability. Click here for more pictures and details.

Boogex is a guitar amplifier plug-in with a variety of sound shaping features.  With Boogex it is possible to get heavy distorted sound as well as slight distortion sound.  Boogex is also able to apply any speaker cabinet impulse response (selection of built-in impulses is available).  Processing latency is very modest - 96 samples (2.1 ms at 44.1kHz).  Boogex comes with several example factory presets.

This Fender Modern Electric guitar features an apine body and mini-toggle-coil-split-switch with modern humbucker pickups. It comes with a C-shaped maple neck, a maple fretboard with 9.5-inch radius consisting of 22 jumbo frets. It has a Stratocaster middle pickup, a three-ply pickup guide and a five-way pickup switching for maximum sound control and sustains.
There are of course, other buttons and positions featured on guitars. BB king’s Lucille had a switch to toggle different values for R11 (thus going from moody chords to punchy ‘Lead’ with a finger and no need for extra gear). Advanced guitars may have phase and antiphase switches for humbuckers or dual pickups. The jackson 5 Telecaster I think is an example as it has both a phase and anti-phase wiring on their pickup selector.
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Octave/Pitch Shift – A frequency-based effect that takes the input of your guitar tone and shifts it in pitch anywhere up to an octave above or below. This is useful to simulate a bass guitar line or the higher pitched strings of a twelve-string guitar. Some octave or pitch shift pedals double your guitar tone before shifting making them more akin to Harmoniser pedals.
I don’t have a list of 10 top acoustic guitar brands, but I certainly think Martin would have a place on it, with a focus on their steel string instruments). Wechter may be the foremost manufacturer of resonator guitars. I’ve mentioned Gibson, and would like to add Breedlove as well. I’m quite certain that there are others equally worthy of an acoustic guitar list and I rather hope somebody more knowledgeable than I am will compile one.
The Martin F Series bit the dust in mid-’65, to be supplanted by the somewhat updated, nattier GT Series of bound archtop hollowbody electrics. The first few prototypes were dubbed the XTE Series and produced in 1965. The guitars were renamed the GT Series and swung into production in the beginning of 1966. The GT Series consisted basically of two models, the GT-70 and GT-75. These were thinlines with two f-holes, a 15th fret neck joint (actually more frets were clear of the body), bound 22-fret rosewood fingerboards, dot inlays, and new, bound, wide-flared three-and-three headstocks with a concave curve in the pointed crown.
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The Lotus Vantage copy (Washburn Eagle, Aria Pro II Cardinal series, or Ibanez Artist) double cutaway (batwing) guitar with a solid body, 3 per side tuners on headstock, rosewood fingerboard with brass inlays, brass nut and neck-through construction (though there may have been a bolt-on model). This was usually finished in emerald green, polished mahogany or stained blue/white breadboard style and occasionally gloss white with 2 exposed humbucker pickups.
One step up is the combination of a treble cut and a bass cut, with a single knob to select between them, like the one in the Electro-Harmonix Big Muff (Figure 2). The knob selects a blend of highs left over from the bass cut side and lows left over from the treble cut side. If you make the cut frequencies of the treble and bass sides far apart, you get a persistent midrange scoop, as in the original Big Muff. You can also have the bass and treble sides overlap in the middle and get a midrange hump in response. The near-endless variations you can get by tinkering with the relative values of the parts and the need for only one knob make this a favorite in effects.

Like the others, you also have a doubled signal path and like the flanger, you have a short delay. This time you have a bit of a longer delay which causes a more subtle effect. As its name suggests it offers a choir-like effect that adds a certain level of depth to your tone. It also gives it a unique wavering quality that suits a lot of different styles of music.


Epiphone is one of the oldest and one of the best American guitar companies. It was formed in 1873 and later acquired by Gibson Guitar Corporation, another leading guitar brand. Epiphone has something for every player in every genre. The company offers a wide range of Acoustic and Electric guitar models. The nylon-string Les Paul Ukulele acoustic guitar is of famous vintage and has been the industry leader over the years. It is a superb instrument for the money featuring a mahogany body and neck with rosewood fingerboard having dots inlays. Epiphone guitars have a great demand in the Indian market, which has set standards for the budget-conscious versions of guitars.
Before recording commences, make sure that all of your equipment is in good shape and not producing crackles, hums and buzzes. If you are having problems, they can often be dealt with by using noise-filtering units such as gates and expanders. These are best used before post-recording effects – compression and reverb, for example – are applied, as a compressor will emphasise noise, while a gate might chop off the natural tail of the reverb.
A well-rounded complement of inexpensive microphones for recording an electric guitar would consist of a Shure 57 (a must have), an inexpensive condensor mic or two (I like some of the AKG models like the C-1000 and the C-3000), and an inexpensive compressor/limiter (dbx makes a few models that are a great value). If you have, or can borrow these mics, it almost doesn't matter whether you're recording on a 4-track Porta-Studio or using a Mackie 8-Bus with 24 tracks of adat, your guitar will sound great.

His tone is incredible and he is capable of an extreme vibrato that is perfect for his style of playing.  It’s obvious he’s not working hard for it.  His choices of strings benefit his economy of motion.  Even though he maintains low action on his Fender Stratocasters and even scallops the frets for acrobatic, tight-rope string walking, his ability is only strengthened by the ease of playing light string gauges.


Guitar amps for newbies aren’t going to sound as good as the professional rigs used by advanced guitarists, but surely you don’t expect that for under $100. However, they should still sound good. In fact, in my opinion a starter amp should be good enough that, once you’ve moved to a better main amplifier, you can still use your first amp for practice.
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This guitar has a mahogany neck topped by a 20-fret rosewood fingerboard. It has a scale length of 25.62", while the nut width is 1.69". Since the AW54 is from Ibanez, you can expect the neck profile, string action and overall playability to be comfortable and beginner friendly. Wrapping up this affordable guitar's premium-like specs is its Open Pore Natural finish, which gives the instrument an earthy appeal that's easy on the eyes.
For you, the 15W should be fine for a long time to come. It runs about $215.00 retail but I suspect, like me, you can make an offer on one for less than $200. Many dealers put these up on Reverb or Ebay as “open box” or make an offer. Mine was marked open box but was clearly brand new when I got it. I think I paid $189 for my 15W. By far this series was the best value I have ever seen in an amp. I’ve owned several Fender, Vox, Sundown (smaller 5W) and no name amps. This AV series is super nice.
Basic distortion boxes can be built around a simple network of transistors and clipping diodes, to both boost the signal and alter the waveform. Most units, however, very roughly resemble the standard mass-production overdrives detailed above, with the heavy work done by opamps, some tone-shaping stages, and input/output buffers. The ProCo Rat set the standard for heavy distortion sounds above and beyond the capabilities of the MXR Distortion + and the Ibanez Tube Screamer, although in fact its design is surprisingly similar to the former (discussed above), with silicon diodes in place of germanium, and an added tone control.
Adherence to the Past While acknowledging the impossibility of scientifically proving tone, many guitar players will still argue vehemently for a classic Les Paul crunch, or they’ll get ready to throw down if you claim solid-state amps sound better than valve amplifiers. They will concede the point intellectually, but on a more deeply rooted, emotional level, they can’t get beyond their own perspectives. It’s almost like observing fire-walkers at the circus. Your brain may understand how the technique works and how it can be safe. But your heart and nerves won’t let you take the chance of barbecuing your feet.
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You want this before all of the remaining effects because you want, for example, a distorted signal to be delayed, not a delayed signal to be distorted. You can try it the reverse way but you'll end up with varying results since the gain will change during reverb tails, decaying delay echoes, and crazy chorus or flanger effects. And since these effects in this group rely on gain, you want to feed them a consistent and high gain signal, which gets reduced by other effects.
Half a step up from standard tuning. Used in most of Johnny Cash's music, for "Love Buzz" on Nirvana's Bleach album - apparently by mistake (according to Come As You Are - Michael Azerrad), 3 Doors Down on "Here Without You" (a capo was probably used), Vektor, Soundgarden's "Black Hole Sun" (The low E string was tuned to Eb/D# for a drop Eb/D# tuning), Nickelback on their song "When We Stand Together", Burzum on his first 3 albums, John Fedowitz in his solo project "Ceremony", and Joe Jackson on "Got the Time".

The most basic, original pickup design is a single-coil pickup. It’s composed of a single magnet with fine wire wrapped around it, creating a magnetic field that captures the strings’ vibrations converting them into an electronic signal. Single-coil pickups tend to be bright and crisp sounding. The tone they produce cuts through dense band sounds well, but they are also prone to generating hum and are subject to magnetic interference. Many great artists play guitars equipped with single-coil pickups. Eric Clapton, Stevie Ray Vaughan, John Mayer, Merle Travis and many others are famous for their use of single-coil tone.
We indicate and report to EMS Worldwide Express mail service that the guitar is sent with a lower declared value than the purchased price and as a gift so that there will be a possible exemption on custom clearance fees, taxes or you may need to pay a little amount but it is necessary, or the custom will open the package and revalue the guitar. Based on our experience, the custom fees in the Europe, USA, Canada, Australia and Asia are very minimal since we declared the guitar as a gift and lower purchased price in order to lessen the custom fees or even possible exemption and we have not received complaints from our valued customers regarding custom fees, taxes and tariffs.

Multi-effects processors come in various configurations, too. Some are floor units that have built-in foot pedals and controllers so they can be operated while your hands remain on your guitar. There are rackmount processors (these can be fitted into a rack of recording gear in line with your signal chain) that incorporate a preamp for your guitar. The more sophisticated models have MIDI I/O for connecting guitar synthesizers to keyboards, modules, computers and other MIDI devices and include a divided pickup to attach to your standard guitar. These processors pack effects libraries that offer combinations of effects, amp models and stompboxes that can number in the thousands. Switching can be controlled by onboard knobs, foot controllers or guitar-picking technique. Expect to pay considerably more for a rackmount effects processor, in a range of three- to four-digit prices. 
What? I have an early 90s pe and I've recorded with it and its one of the best guitars I've ever played. Beutifull clean lp tone and ballsy as when you dirty it up. I also have a pro 2 fullarton which with the fender lace sensor pups I put in it, plays and sounds as good as any strat I've played in thirty years. Check the new arias comming out of the states at the moment and they are really awesome looking guitars. There is also a reason the early ones are known as lawsuit guitars as Gibson though they were so good they had to sue them!
Fishman is the main brand that you’ll see manufacturing the electrics, but lots of the bigger guitar brands will also have their own in house products. Higher end guitars are more likely to have specialist or boutique equipment which is generally considered to be better. Gibson using LR Baggs pickups systems is one such example. You can also opt for aftermarket pickups.

The Fender Stratocaster Squier is possibly the most recognizable shape in electric guitar history. The Fender Stratocaster design is mimicked by manufacturers all over the world. Fender produces its own line of budget “Strats” called the Squier series. If you want to start with an electric guitar, chances are you’ll buy something like this for around $130 USD.


The Effect: Metal has become the prevalent genre when it comes to music that involves guitars. Dialing in a proper distortion can make or break the sound of your guitar as well as your entire band. Coincidentally, it’s so easy to go overboard with distortion, all while being certain you are on the right track. The very first step is to get a dist box that is suitable for metal. Something like Electro­Harmonix Metal Muff carries just enough punch to get the job done, but not enough to drown your tone completely with gain. You’ll find this to be a reoccurring theme with a number of great metal dist boxes. At the end of the day, it all comes down to your prowess and skill. Every good metal guitarist know that it’s all about the unity of equipment and knowledge. With that said, these pedals will get you started.
One of the best defining features of Schecter guitars is their build quality. It seems that they always go an extra mile. Schecter’s bodies are solid, made of great tonewood depending on the application, and the array of finishes they offer are just impressive. In simple terms, build quality is not something you need to worry about with this brand.
Next, you will need to adjust the intonation. In this case, the technique is pretty much the same. You will need a small Phillips screwdriver. On the tailpiece side of the bridge in the first case, or the rear of the bridge in the second, there are screws holding the string saddles in place. Check each note by striking the string at the twelfth fret fretted and then unfretted. The unfretted note is the proper one; turn the screws either clockwise or counter-clockwise until the notes match.

Many musical instruments are works of art, so it’s little doubt that design is very important to a lot of people. Make sure that you really like the way a guitar looks before purchase, because you might be playing it for years. This is one of the reasons the more natural wood colored guitars are always popular - they don’t go out of style or look out of place.
This brand is originally from Japan and  Hoshino Gakki owns it. Ibanez activates in U.S.A, Japan, China and Indonesia, and it is one of the largest, recognized names out there. This manufacturer has developed over 300 models of electric guitars and has collaborated with many musicians that have lent their imagination to the making of customized units.
Volume pedals are volume potientiometers set into a rocking foot treadle, so that the volume of the bass guitar can be changed by the foot. Compression pedals affect the dynamics (volume levels) of a bass signal by subtly increasing the volume of quiet notes and reducing the volume of loud notes, which smooths out or "compresses" the overall sound. Limiters, which are similar to compressors, prevent the upper volume levels (peaks) of notes from getting too loud, which can damage speakers. Noise gates remove hums and hisses that occur with distortion pedals, vintage pedals, and some electric basses.
Not everyone has the luxury of drum booths and separate rooms, but isolation boxes are great for isolating guitars during a rhythm track recording. They are also ideal for home recording, allowing a good  volume level without disturbing neighbours. Isolation boxes are commercially available, but can be expensive; try making your own from wood and foam.
It’s hard to conceive a better musical foil for Steven Tyler than his longtime partner and occasional adversary. For more than 40 years, Joe Perry’s monstrous, blues-on-steroids riffs have been Aerosmith‘s bedrock. And his solos, jutting out from “Walk This Way” or slashing boldly through the high-gloss production of later hits like “Janie’s Got a Gun” and “Cryin’,” have a caffeinated energy that’s every bit Tyler’s match. “He had a streamlined style that reminded me of Keith Richards,” said Slash. “And a careless style that’s really cool.”
Ovation backed off from its more exotic design directions and in ’77 introduced two more conservative models, the Preacher and the Viper, and its first solidbody basses, the Magnum I and II. The Preacher featured two equal cutaways, whereas the Viper sported more of a Les-Paul-style single cutaway, though neither would never be confused with a Gibson equivalent. Their shape was, in fact, essentially a downsized version of the Ovation acoustic outline. The Magnum shape was derived from the earlier Breadwinner and Deacon, with more contouring.
Dismantled Fender Telecaster neck pick-up, showing the exposed enammeled, very fine, copper wire, wound on a bobbin around 6 magnets sitting below each string. From Mojo Pickups - 50's Telecaster Rewind. In case you are wondering the metallic case (used to be high-chrome content alloy) acts as a hardware low-pass filter, dispersing the magnetic field of the high frequency vibrations of the string across all 6 poles, but allowing long wavelength, low group velocity, bass frequencies to be captured relatively unhindered— the reason for this is quite complicated and the subject of a solid state physics class which we will not go into here.
I bought this guitar about 1 month ago. I am a small girl 5'2". I just strap this thing on and walk around the house playing. The pickup sounds freaking great hooked up to my Marshall amp. I have several other guitars including a Taylor 210ce which I also love. But this guitar is great for traveling, camp fires, and just plain old jammin. I chose this over the baby Taylor because the Martin had a full heel on the neck where's the taylor baby did not. It also sounded better when I play both the Taylor and the lx1e side by side. I thought that the Martin had a better "feel" to is as well when holding it. It is a travel guitar so it doesn't balance as well when you are standing with the guitar strap but I don't mind that at all. I love this little guy
On the way folks arriving soon stay tuned pics of this made in Japan hand crafted beautiful Exotic Vintage Martin copy will be uploaded soon ... in great players condition original and stock Takamine pickup installed you can plug in at the strap pin jack and go electric and sounds amazing or fully acoustic of course unpluged. You know theses are know for the ultimate beauty of them as well as the Rich complex tone they offer well seasoned instrument of this caliber Japan had to offer in the Lawsuit series days 70-85 or so that have been discontinued decades ago as they say they don't make um like this any more... Stay tuned for another exotic Brazilian Rosewood guitar at JVGuitars.com any questions for Joe email: jvguitars@gmail.com.
I got this guitar just a couple months ago, not knowing much about guitars and not really knowing much about quality or anything I did a lot of research about what would be the best purchase for the right price for a beginner guitarist.. and I stumbled upon the Yamaha FG700, Fantastic reviews and ratings for beginners with great overall quality and overall sound, especially for the cost. I did a bit more research, comparing instruments and what not just to be sure I didn't purchase something that was made out of cardboard and shoe strings when I stumbled upon the Yamaha FG800, which was said to be the upgrade of the 700. I did some reading and though it didn't have as many reviews it was said to have improved sound and durability for the exact same price. Knowing that Yamaha has pretty much always been rather good quality
Ibanez are a Japanese guitar brand founded in Nagoya, Japan in 1957. They began by building copies of Fender and Gibson models, but – a couple of lawsuits later – they started creating their own models, which are now icons in their own right. Their line currently includes their famous Roadstar (RG), the thin-bodied S series, and several artist signature models, including guitars for Steve Vai, Joe Satriani, and Mick Thomson.
One of the best defining features of Schecter guitars is their build quality. It seems that they always go an extra mile. Schecter’s bodies are solid, made of great tonewood depending on the application, and the array of finishes they offer are just impressive. In simple terms, build quality is not something you need to worry about with this brand.
Wah-Wah: For swishy, rounded sounds that sort of sound like the guitar is wailing, a wah-wah pedal employs a sweeping filter controlled by a spring-loaded treadle, creating quirky frequency boosts as you work the pedal up and down. A famous version of this pedal is marketed by one manufacturer as the “Crybaby,” in an attempt to describe its tone in one word. The late Jimi Hendrix used one of these pedals to great advantage.

Basswood comes from Linden trees, and it is soft and easy to work with. A side effect of being soft is that it also dents easy. Because it doesn’t have much of a grain or color, it’s most commonly used on instruments that have an opaque paint-job, though this isn’t always the case (as in the photo above). Basswood has a warm, balanced sound with great mid range and good sustain.
The guitar itself features a resonant and solid American Alder body, maple neck and 2 x single-coil pickups with 1 x humbucker installed with a coil tap function for tonal variety. The guitar is comfortable to play and sounds great especially when you throw some distortion at it through an amplifier. The guitar is budget friendly and ideal for beginners and home recording enthusiasts thanks to its high build quality and comfortable playing experience.
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i'll be 50 yrs old in a few days. i started playing guitar at 8. this is my 30th guitar. i started ordering various guitars from amazon a year and a half ago and have not been displeased at all with any of my orders. i get some for young people who cannot afford to get one for themselves and so have started exploring the guitars in the price range of 80 to 140 dollars. at first glance, it would seem pretty much impossible for any guitars in this price range to be of any worth, but the factories are set up to put out fine instruments now in this price range. i can't recommend this guitar highly enough to convince you what i think of it but i am astounded at the quality, playability and sound of this guitar. it has really good tuners and rings out like a
There are two basic types of pickups for electric guitars, Single Coil and Humbucking (double coil). The most practical difference is that single coils tend to sound crisp and bright while humbuckers tend to sound warmer (for more information see Seymour Duncan's detailed explanation). An electric guitar can have any combination of the two types and the combination on a guitar is described using the first letter of the pickup type in order from the one closest to the bridge. For example a classic stratocaster will be described as SSS meaning all three pickups are single coil. A more recent development is the HSS strat which means it has a Humbucker at the bridge with two Single coils. I've put the pickup configuration of each guitar below in brackets after the model name so you can easily see which pickups each guitar has and in what positing they are.
Jump up ^ Miller, Jim (1980). The Rolling Stone illustrated history of rock & roll. New York: Rolling Stone. ISBN 0-394-51322-3. Retrieved 5 July 2012. Black country bluesmen made raw, heavily amplified boogie records of their own, especially in Memphis, where guitarists like Joe Hill Louis, Willie Johnson (with the early Howlin' Wolf band) and Pat Hare (with Little Junior Parker) played driving rhythms and scorching, distorted solos that might be counted the distant ancestors of heavy metal.
If you’ve never listened to Chet Atkins, you should do it right now. The rockabilly player was a skilled instrumental guitar player, playing most of his songs without any backing from other musicians. For a great sample of his talent, give a listen to his version of “Mr. Sandman.” His alternating thumb rhythm and syncopated melodies are marvels of beauty and precision on the instrument.
Gibson gave this guitar a comfortable V neck profile, which together with shorter 24.75" scale length and 1.725" nut width make this guitar one of the easiest instruments to play in this list. My only complaint with this guitar is its bank breaking price, but this steep price point and exclusivity play an important role in making this iconic instrument more appealing. Start saving now if you want to be one of the privileged few who can play this guitar.

In my opinion, I don't think this guitar is quite worthy of all of the rave reviews here, based on the thin sound. I bought this because my Zager needs to go in for new frets and I have to wait until May to get it worked on, and wanted to get something inexpensive to use in the meantime. This is a beautiful instrument, no doubt. The finish is stunning, it's very nicely made and ready to play out of the box, so on that level I would give it 5 stars. But soundwise, for me I'd say 2 and half stars. The bottom end is nowhere to be found. I tried to switch to the same strings I am using on my other guitar and it's no different. This guitar has about the same dimensions as my Zager, but nowhere near the same bass response. It'll do fine as


Learning just a song won't get you far, there will be a point where you just won't be able to learn a song because of its difficulty. First of all you need to learn some chords, scales and study a bit of music theory. Here's one example: Lets compare a song to a poem. You can learn a poem and keep saying it, but if someone asks you the meaning of the poem, you won't be able to say anything. If you just learn how to play a song without knowing any chords, it won't be any good for you. (Btw sorry for bad English) Also if you know the essentials, learning a song will get easier and easier.

Some steel-string acoustic guitars are fitted with pickups purely as an alternative to using a separate microphone. They may also be fitted with a piezoelectric pickup under the bridge, attached to the bridge mounting plate, or with a low-mass microphone (usually a condenser mic) inside the body of the guitar that converts the vibrations in the body into electronic signals. Combinations of these types of pickups may be used, with an integral mixer/preamp/graphic equalizer. Such instruments are called electric acoustic guitars. They are regarded as acoustic guitars rather than electric guitars, because the pickups do not produce a signal directly from the vibration of the strings, but rather from the vibration of the guitar top or body.

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