There are nine types of guitar here: four folk, two classical, one flamenco, one jumbo and one gypsy, as well as a choice of nylon or steel strings. It works like Kontakt in that you have MIDI keys for playing notes and then control keys for the playing articulations, such as legato, palm mute, harmonics, sustain or chord detection. There are different chord types and a strumming engine to recreate the action of playing.
Stewart MacDonnald has a great finishing schedule that I would recomend reading before you start the painting process. You shouldn't need to fill any pores on the neck because necks are usualy made from maple which is a tight grain wood. All that's need for it is a sanding with 220 grit paper unless you want to leave the neck natural and unfinished. I recomend using at least a few coats of sanding sealer of clear gloss laquer to protect the wood fromdirt and grime that comes from playing.
Gauge the target volume of your amp. For home recording, it may not be possible for you to record your wicked guitar solo at the volume you need without being interrupted by family, neighbors, external noises, or a visit from the police due to a noise complaint. If your location is not conducive to recording at your target volume, you might consider:
My question for this forum is this: I currently have a 2011 Fender Blacktop HH Stratocaster. It has the stock five position switch. All of the electronics are imports i.e.Korea, China etc.. I recently purchased a complete loaded pickguard from a Fender American Standard HH Strat. due to the poor overall performance of the Blacktop electronics-pickups included. Since the Amer. Stan. HH has only a 3 pos. switch, can I rewire it for a five pos. switch ( i.e. coil tapping the humbuckers as the Blacktop is configured)? If this is possible, where would I find a wiring diagram for these particular Fender Twin Head Vintage pickups showing them in use with a 5 pos. switch? Thank you for your time and cooperation.
I disagree about Martin being THE BEST ACOUSTIC GUITAR. While Martin is an excellent guitar that is definitely ONE of the best! Taylor is THE BEST FOR THE HIGHER END TO MID PRICE RANGE! A decent TAYLOR will bea Taylor will beat the brakes off a brakes off the same Martin, because they SOUND BETTER and they can be used for more than one or two styles. If you are playing county music the Martin is better, but Taylor will play a lot better sound way better on every other kind of music styl! Buy a TAYLOR

While they may be on the dry side, these books are convenient because they’re always available for reference. In an online class or an app, you might have to go digging through files or lessons to find that one scrap of information that was helpful. You also have to be on your phone or at your computer. For some people, the old way is still the best way.

A 5 way selector is commonly found on guitars with 3 pickups , a humbucker in the bridge , single coil in the middle and a humbucker in the neck. So the 5 way selectors job is to select only one or more pickups at a time to offer different sounds on the guitar. The way the selector is pointed will tell you which pickup is selected and this is common on guitars from all brands. The bottom position is your bridge pickup which is closest to where the strings begin , the middle position is all 3 pickups and the top position closest to the neck is your ....you guessed it neck pickup. The bridge pickup will offer heavier sounds if you play the right notes and the neck for soloing as the output (intensity) of the neck pickup isn't as powerful as the neck for a reason. The more you play the more you'll see uses for switching pickups on the selector. The tone knob on the other hand it depends on how you use it I know a lot of guys who are endorsed and so forth who never touch the tone knob or have guitars built without it , but used properly it can do a lot of stuff from Eric Clapton to Carlos Santana type stuff. you will also see a 5 way selector on guitars with two humbuckers this feature is called a mega or super switch depending on brand. It makes the pickups do different stuff but this feature is usually found on expensive guitars and keep in mind a 3 way blade switch looks like one but only goes in three positions. Bridge , middle and neck.
Still in the line in ’41 was the Supro Amplifier No. 50, now also called the Supreme. This had been given an updated look, with rounded corners on the cabinet and a slight narrowing taper toward the top. It still had the round grill with two horizontal bars. It was now covered in tweed, with a tweedy grillcloth, and a flat leather handle. The oval logo plate still graced the upper left corner. The back exposed the chassis, with twin inputs and volume control on the bottom. It still had five tubes, 12 watts and a 10″ speaker. In April of 1942 the Supreme amp cost $76.50. This amp would make it all the way to the proverbial end of the line.
The OM-28 E Retro is one of the more recent guitars to come from Martin's OM line, and it is the consummate '30s era style acoustic guitar. The company took their time to carefully replicate vintage OM-28 guitars, from the aged solid sitka spruce top and solid East Indian Rosewood back & sides, down to the smallest appointments - resulting in a guitar that not only sounds amazing, but looks museum-level amazing as well.
Arai, Aria, Aria Pro II, Aria Diamond, Apollo, Arita, Barclay, Burny, Capri, Cimar, Cortez (electrics only), Columbus, Conrad, Cutler, Dia, Domino, Electra, Epiphone, Granada, Hi Lo, Howard, Ibanez, Lindberg, Lyle, Luxor, Maxitone (this guitar differs from Tama's Maxitone badge), Mayfair, Memphis, Montclair, Pan, Pearl (electrics only), Raven, Stewart, Tempo, Univox ,Vantage,V entura, Vision, Volhox, Washburn, Westbury, Westminster, Westone
Bass chorus effects use a cycling, variable delay time that is short so that individual repetitions are not heard. The result is a thick, "swirling" sound that suggests multiple instruments playing in unison (chorus) that are slightly out of tune. Bass chorus effects were more common in the late 1980s, when manufacturers such as Peavey included chorus effects in its bass amplifiers. In the 1990s and 2000s, more sophisticated bass chorus effects devices were created which only apply the swirling chorus effect to the higher parts of the bass tone, leaving the instrument's low fundamental untouched.[5]
I string up the guitar and tune it to standard pitch. Put the guitar in playing position and capo the first fret. I hold the 6th string down at the last fret as that is where the neck joins the body. Then I turn truss rod right (clockwise) until there is no relief hardly if any bounce at the 7th and 9th frets using the 6th string as straight edge, don't go too far just maybe a slight tiny bounce because you don't want to backbow the neck. Then I simply turn the truss rod left counterclockwise 1/4 of a turn for relief and that's it. Take capo off and set action at 12th fret with 6th string 5/64 and 1st string 3/64.
Guitar pedals are perfect for this. Firstly, and perhaps most importantly, because you should never try to circuit bend anything mains-powered, they can run off 9V batteries. Secondly, their internal circuitry is usually very simple, and they already have audio I/O. Thirdly, you can get them for almost no money from eBay, and the other tools required — soldering iron, wire, switches, and so on — are also very cheap. There's an almost infinite number of sonic possibilities to be explored here, from finding new ways to process a signal (of course you don't just have to use them with guitars) to creating a machine that goes 'Eeeeeeooooowsquelch blipipipip' in a different way every time you turn it on — and who would say no to that for less than a tenner?
This is an echo effect – every time you play a note it is repeated quieter and quieter, just like an echo. You can get a variety of different delay effects, from old-school “tape” echoes which are said to sound more natural, to analogue delay pedals and more modern digital ones. Digital pedals tend to sound clearer and a little harsher than their analogue cousins, making them more suited to modern styles such as modern metal.
The earliest documented performance with an electric guitar was in 1932, by guitarist and bandleader Gage Brewer. The Kansas-based musician had obtained two instruments from George Beauchamp of Los Angeles, California, and he publicized his new instruments in an article in the Wichita Beacon, October 2, 1932 and through a performance later that month.
We carry many new and ‘lightly’ used instruments. So called “low mileage” instruments, in near mint condition, are our specialty. Currently in house: Santa Cruz, Bourgeois, Eastman, Fender, Larrivee, Martin, Epiphone, Gibson, Gretsch, Guild, Giebitz, Huss & Dalton, Sobell, New World Classical Guitars, Cordoba Classical Guitars, Loar, Recording King, G&L, LsL, Breedlove. Amps from Magnatone, […]
The modern era of Ibanez guitars began in 1957 [3] and the late 1950s and 1960s Ibanez catalogues [1] show guitars with some wild looking designs [2]. Japanese guitar makers in the 1960s were mostly copying European guitar designs and some of the late 1960s Ibanez designs were similar to Hagström and Eko guitar designs. Hoshino Gakki used the Teisco and FujiGen Gakki guitar factories to manufacture Ibanez guitars after they stopped manufacturing their own guitars in 1966 and after the Teisco guitar factory closed down in 1969/1970 Hoshino Gakki used the FujiGen Gakki guitar factory to make most Ibanez guitars.
1. Examples. There are a handful of examples in this book and that's about it. I expected much more in the way of alternate wiring examples but they were only mentioned in passing it seems. Additionally if you're looking for good step by step instructions you wont find it here. The instructions are average at best and never really go deeper than "put this wire here and that wire there" . It's step by step,but just barely. Don't expect any deep explanations on the theory behind why certain wirings do what they do or why they sound the way they do. It's cursory at best.

In 1947, Jerry Wexler, a writer for Billboard Magazine described African American music as ‘Rhythm and Blues’ and its appeal was spreading fast and wide helped by the popularity of the radio DJ. People across the states would tune in to their favourite stations to hear the music they loved. Whether or not the song was performed by black or white musicians became irrelevant.
I have located a semi-hollow body electric Kent guitar that has a body some what like a 335 and the neck like a fender strat. The body is a beautiful natural birdseye maple. She is in awsome shape and plays well. I have the ser# (xxx) 3 digits and I believe that it was made in Japan in the Sixty's. I have no Idea what model it is or value because I can't find out any thing about Kent guitars. I've seen Kent amps guitars & drums but no info. I welcome anything.
Gretsch is one of the oldest manufacturers on this list. It was founded in 1883 in New York City by Friedrich Gretsch. He was an immigrant from Germany and was only 27 at the time he founded the company. Gretsch has a wide selection of both acoustic style and electric style guitars. They have models in just about everyone’s price range. You can buy a Gretsch for under $500 or over $2000. Their style is fairly unique. They have an almost “classical” look to them. Keep in mind that the older Gretsch guitars were not as consistent in quality as they are today. So if you’re looking to buy used, try to keep it so you’re buying guitars that are made semi-recently. On the other hand, you might get lucky and snag a great deal. As expected, their sound is excellent.
Due to distortion's critical function in modern guitar styles, by far the lion's share of stompboxes are distortion units of one kind or another. Most of these feature intensity and tone controls, but often vary wildly in terms of the sounds they create. You'll be amazed at the different types of distortions that can be produced, from rich, creamy, smooth, and melodic sustain to harsh, jagged, and piercing breakup tones. Many distortion units produce a broad range of textures.
I think Washburn is one of the best out there, From their A series, to HM to x series they all rock. I've had a a-10 since 1980 and it plays great! I have also got the reissues still great quality over the years. The only issue I've seen is Washburn's commitment to catch/keep some artist. Either they can't keep um or they don't want to. Can't see it being the later. Its very difficult to try one of their pieces out as their are very few stores that even stock them. In the 80's early 90s they were everywhere, now?

The Basic Principles: A Valve is an extension of the light bulb. Theoretically inside the valve is a vacuum. The hot filament is called ‘Cathode’ (Let’s not forget a T.V. is a’ Cathode ray tube’ ). Around the outside of the Cathode is a cylindrical metal tube called ‘Anode’. When a +Voltage is placed on the Anode and a -Voltage placed on the Cathode, a large current can flow between them, but not the other way around.
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At the other end of the size extreme sits a shape called the parlour. Parlour acoustics are among the smallest in body size you can buy – not counting the modern ‘baby’ guitars – and are typically favoured by players of more low-key, less brash musical styles like folk and indie. Once again, the guitar’s distinctive shrunken body shape is another invention from the CF Martin guitar house, with the guitar’s neck typically joining the body around the 12th fret.
I too have a similar Alvarez made in Japan, 4 digit model no. etc. Mine is a 5059 autumn heringbone model and there is actually a production date on the tag in the sound hole of 1978. The tag is identical to yours as is the headstock logo inlay. Tuners are different however. Based on the similarities to yours I would date it around the same years, '77-'80. I know the model name due to an Alvarez advertisement clipping that depicts the model I have. I too am getting ready to do some much needed TLC to mine as it has been my most loved acoustic for 20 years now. It was a gift from my mother who used it in a country band way back when. These are great guitars that can be bought very cheaply when you can find them. Good luck with the search!
Want to switch from pristine cleans, to vintage crunch, to face-melting distortion within seconds? You’ll probably want a modeling amplifier. Based on digital sound processing, modeling amps will combine many (sometimes hundreds) of iconic, vintage and modern amp sounds into a single unit, easily selectable at the twist of a dial or press of a button. Of course, the downside to modeling amps can be their recognizable digital tone, but when this means you have a whole guitar store worth of amps at your disposal it doesn’t tend to put many guitarists off.
Jump up ^ "New Sales Avenue Opened with Tone Amplifier for Stringed Instruments". The Music Trades. October 20, 1928. This tone amplifier is electrically operated either by alternating or direct currents. It consists of two major units -- an electro-magnetic pick-up and amplifying unit. The electro-magnetic pick-up is built within the instrument and is attached to its sounding board. The unit is connected with the amplifier, which produces the tone and volume required of the instrument.
Deco Tape Saturation & Doubletracker is a unique effects pedal that allows for a wide variety of tonal possibilities.  You can place Deco near the beginning of your signal chain and use the Tape Saturation as a light overdrive.  Or, you can place Deco at the end of your chain, use lower Tape Saturation settings, and provide your entire signal with the tape-like warmth, compression, and added low end harmonics.
The Smiths' guitarist was a guitar genius for the post-punk era: not a showboating soloist, but a technician who could sound like a whole band. As a kid studying Motown records, Johnny Marr would try to replicate not just guitar riffs but piano and strings too, all with his right hand. His voluptuous arpeggios – often played on a chiming Rickenbacker with incredible flow and detailing – were every bit as essential to the Smiths' signature sound as Morrissey's baritone. And he was a tireless explorer: For 1983's "This Charming Man," Marr dropped knives onto a '54 Telecaster, a revelatory incident that Radiohead may have been alluding to in their Smiths-inspired "Knives Out." "He was a brilliant rhythm player, rarely played solos, so full of sounds," said Radiohead's Ed O'Brien – part of an entire generation of British guitarists who took their cues from Marr. "I've been in the studio with him, and there's nothing he cannot do on guitar," said Oasis' Noel Gallagher. "The man's a fuckin' wizard."
Like a door that's repeatedly opened and closed, you'll sometimes need some basic maintenance. Ensure everything is tight, and get some electronic contact cleaner (available at any electronics store), various screwdrivers and wrenches and you can often solve your own problems. It's easier on a Gibson Les Paul (with backplate access to the controls) than on a Gibson ES-335, but it can be done.
In my opinion, I don't think this guitar is quite worthy of all of the rave reviews here, based on the thin sound. I bought this because my Zager needs to go in for new frets and I have to wait until May to get it worked on, and wanted to get something inexpensive to use in the meantime. This is a beautiful instrument, no doubt. The finish is stunning, it's very nicely made and ready to play out of the box, so on that level I would give it 5 stars. But soundwise, for me I'd say 2 and half stars. The bottom end is nowhere to be found. I tried to switch to the same strings I am using on my other guitar and it's no different. This guitar has about the same dimensions as my Zager, but nowhere near the same bass response. It'll do fine as
PICKUP CAVITIES Same basic thing here. Be careful routing as you don't want to go outside you lines. The pickup rings tend to be thin along the outter edge, so if you go outside you lines it will look like there is a hole in the body of the guitar once you fit the rings on. Determine the depth that you will need for the pickups you are using. This is usually based on the length of the mounting screws. You will need enough room for them to fit. I use a 1/4" bit for this as well. You can use a template if you want but I do it free hand because any imperfections will be covered by the pickup rings.
The first successful guitar pickup was developed in the early 1930’s by Rickenbacker® to help amplify Hawaiian lap steel guitars which were popular at the time. The first pickups were single-coils and while they do a good job of picking up the guitar signal they are also susceptible to picking up interference from nearby electrical devices. The Gibson® humbucker (US Patent 2896491) was developed in the 1950’s to eliminate the “hum noises” resulting from electromagnetic interference. The humbucker uses two coils and a pair of pole pieces (having opposite magnetic polarities of each other) for each string. The coils are wound and connected to each other in such a way that the current produced by the moving guitar string in the two coils adds up (in-phase), while the current produced by electromagnetic interference in the two coils cancels (out-of-phase). Not only does the humbucker drastically reduce noise from interference, but it also has a different characteristic sound. The single-coil pickup is commonly considered to have a thin, clear and bright (more treble) sound, while the humbucker is known to have a full, but dark (less treble) sound with more overall signal output.

According to the official information Guitar Tricks has more than double the number of song lessons than any other guitar learning site. It goes on to say that there are more than 600 but I feel that the number could be even higher by now because new songs are added regularly. The songs available on Guitar Tricks are the ones that I want to learn, oldies and modern songs from major artists like The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, Eagles, Blink-182, Extreme, Good Charlotte and many more. Check out this list of Guitar Tricks Artists. Did I mention that lots of songs have a beginner and an advanced level lesson? I just love that the advanced level songs are taught based on the original arrangement and not some vague resemblance used to avoid copyright issues. This is because Guitar Tricks has licenses for teaching the original songs.
The Yamaha's top is constructed of Sitka spruce, a “strong yet elastic” wood that helps the player articulate tone and dynamics. The neck is made of Nato wood, and the back and fretboard are both made of rosewood. One of the best things about the Yamaha's neck and body is the way the two are joined together: via a hand-fitted, dovetail neck joint that uses no metal hardware. This neck-to-body cohesion is ideal for tone as well as the overall stability and durability of the physical instrument.
For many engineers, a simple one-mic technique gives them all the recorded electric guitar sound they need. Dynamic types, such as the ubiquitous Shure SM57, are ideal for capturing loud sounds, as they can handle high SPLs. For a more accurate representation of the amplifier as the human ear hears it in the room, a condenser or ribbon mic can be employed, although care must be taken not to damage the mic with very loud signals. Pointing the mic at the centre of the speaker cone produces the brightest sound, with the sound becoming increasingly warm the further off-centre it’s placed. It’s common to position the mic quite close to the speaker grille, unless a degree of room sound is desired. A good starting point is to place the mic just off-centre, at a distance of between two and six inches.

Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 22 - Inlay: Block - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Tune-O-Matic - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Diecast, Gold, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Black


The 1934-’35 Dobro Hawaiian had the relief sections around a round central bridge/pickup “cover” with a Dobro “lyre” logo between the pickup and the neck. The more-or-less rounded lower bout (cutout at the butt) culminated in two little pointed shoulders, which then tape into the neck, giving it an almost “Spanish” look if you squint and ignore the cast designs. The tapered head had two cutouts in the middle and a triple-stepped top extended on the bass side. The principal difference between this earliest Dobro and the one shown in Gruhn/Carter is the tailpiece, which was a curved, cast-in affair, unlike the rectangular tail on the later version. Also, the side relief panels are painted black, with the whole thing clear-coated to seal it. On this first Dobro electric lap there is no volume control. The jack is on the but, in the bottom cutout, next to the strap button.
Johnny Marr: I'd already played a couple of shows before that with a couple of bands. I'd been in a couple of bands before I met Andy, even though I was fourteen or fifteen at the time. We met in school, Andy and I. I'd been playing in these little kid's kinds of bands at twelve and thirteen. When I got to fourteen and fifteen, I got invited to play in a couple of bands with much older guys.
Tremolo bars - Many lower-end guitars are designed to look cool and are equipped with floating bridges for super tremolo bends and flutter. They look cool , but a sad fact is many of these lower end models have low quality hardware. There is nothing more frustrating than being a newbie, buying a hot looking guitar, and have to fine-tune it every 2 minutes. Avoid this, or buy a decent bridge for around $100.00 extra and install it.
Every guitar player needs a great acoustic guitar – or several – in their collection. Finding the right acoustic guitar for you can be a daunting process even for the most seasoned player. If you are new to shopping for guitars, then it is even more critical that you learn all you can before you make your first purchase. If your first acoustic guitar is not the appropriate choice for you, then it can dramatically reduce the enjoyment you will get out of your instrument. If you are a new guitar player, the wrong guitar can be downright discouraging. You want a guitar that fits you, is effortless to play, and has the rich, beautiful tone you love to make it the instrument you dream of playing hour after hour.
Both pickups were controlled by a separate volume control, with one master tone control. Another toggle served as a coil tap. The Ripley project went nowhere, however, the body styling would reappear on the upcoming Korean Celebrity series. It is very possible, since this shared the Ultra Hard Body model designation and was made in Japan, that the mystery Japanese guitars were essentially the same.
The Jeff Beck Oxblood is available in limited numbers. The first 50 of these historic guitars were aged at Gibson Custom to look like Beck’s original, then signed, numbered and played by Beck himself. The next 100 guitars were prepared with Gibson Custom’s V.O.S. finish, bringing the total run to 150 instruments. Each one also comes with a standard Gibson Custom case.

Pickup selectors can wear out over time. The lugs and the rotating switch can loose their tight connect with years of use. Also, many inexpensive guitars made today use cheap electronic parts. You may just want to upgrade your switch for more control and better selections. It is fairly easy to install a new pickup selector. Here are a few simple steps to replacing your pickup selector.
7 String 8 String Accessories Acoustic / Electric Guitar Acoustic Guitar Alvarez Amplifier Bass Guitar Blackjack Celebrity Classical Guitar Combo Amp D'Addario DN-2411 Dreadnought ebony Effects Electric Guitar Epiphone Fender Floyd Rose Gigbag Guitar Strap Hard Shell Case Hellraiser Ibanez Jackson Larrivee Les Paul Levy's Leathers Maple Lake New Ovation Refurbished Schecter Schecter Guitar Research Signature Solid Body Solid Top Strings Tacoma Takamine USA Used Wechter
“As a general rule, the more powerful the magnet the more high frequencies you’ll get, and also the more low frequencies as well. The high frequencies don’t really need a lot of power to drive them, but the bass frequencies do. However, it’s also down to the coil windings you use and the gauge of wire. So it's not just the magnet that’s responsible for the change.”
To learn how to practice correctly, you can sign up for a FREE No B.S. Guitar membership below. I’ve created this free course to teach you everything you need to know on how to practice correctly (Pit-Stop Practicing). I go much more in depth on the “how to learn” side of things, and you’ll avoid making all the same mistakes I made when I got started.
There are many similarities between the two designs, such as the exquisite detail of the visual appointments, from the bound necks and headstocks to their trapezoid and block inlays.  They both include separate volume and tone knobs for each of the two humbuckers, which can be switched between or used in conjunction with the 3-Way Toggle switch.  Once you get your hands on one, the differences become apparent quickly though.
Unfortunately there are a few who are not too happy with with some of the default patches, they caution that the PODHD500X is not a plug-and-play unit. While you can get good tones with a bit of tweaking, you can get even better tones with more experience, so the learning curve can be a bit steep for some. For best results, you ought to research the actual gear that your favorite musicians use, along with their settings and use them as your starting points to creating your own tones. Thankfully, there are user made presets that you can also use as base for your own virtual signal chain.
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Seagull is a Canadian company that produces hand crafted acoustic guitars. It has solid top guitars which offer richer sound, broader dynamic range, and sound becomes better as time pass by. The neck of the guitar of the seagull guitar has either Silverleaf maple or Honduras mahogany. Silverleaf is less permeable than mahogany that provides an incredibly smooth sensation but has an identical denseness. Some really good guitars from the line up of Seagull are Original S6 Cedar, Entourage Rustic S6, and Entourage Rustic CW QI.
The Yamaha's FG series FGX800C is a perfectly machined instrument. If there is one thing Yamaha is known for, it's the quality of their mass-produced acoustic guitars, which people like to pooh-pooh due to the romanticization of extremely expensive handmade guitars. Yamaha has perfected this machining process to a point where you wouldn't really be able to figure out if the instrument was put together by a luthier or if it was made on a factory floor somewhere. This is the case with nearly every accessible guitar these days thanks to machines reducing errors and driving prices down.

In addition to the 1/4" input for your guitar, you may want to consider amps with better connectivity features like those with built-in USB output for direct recording, footswitch input, aux input for jamming with tracks, and headphone output. Speaking of headphone out, there are some amps that come with built-in speaker cabinet simulated outputs, this subtly changes the resulting sound much like the amp cabinet would without having to actually use the speaker. There are also a number of newer guitar amplifiers that come with Bluetooth connectivity for streaming audio and for software control.
You need to know what colour code your pickup wires are. If the 4-wire pickup is a Seymour Duncan then the link above should work for you, if it’s another brand of pickup then you’ll have to figure out how to correct for the appropriate colour wires e.g. DiMarzio pickups use a different colour code on their wires to Seymour Duncan and they’re all fairly easy to find on the web.
yeah i know the GSP has 2 EQ ( well 3 if i wanted to use up a slot in the OD section ) but i use both EQs on the GSP and i prefer a external eq, that i can adjust on the spot depending on that patch, rather then going in and changing the EQ each time on that patch. I use 3 different guitars each one is totally different in sound, so the external EQ really helps.
The guitar measures 41 inches in length, and it comes with a 25.75-inch scale and 20 frets for various playing techniques. You also get strong D’Addario strings for reliable performances every time, as well as enclosed die-cast gold tuners, so you never play an off note. This dreadnought guitar features a cutaway so you can easily practice finger techniques on the higher frets.
Maton JB6 is a 1970s guitar manufactured by Maton. It features a thin solid body, short scale 24 fret design, two humbucking pickups, two tone controls, one volume, in/out phase toggle for bridge pickup and standard three way pickup selector toggle switch. The body has double cutaways, set neck and heavy metal base plate supporting a stop piece and bridge for increased sustain.
For most applications, all you really need is a guitar input, and an output that you can plug to an amplifier or PA system. Still, it doesn't hurt to have extra input/output options, like a mic XLR input (for vocalists who play guitar), an aux input (for practicing with your favorite tracks), headphones out (for quiet practice and tweaking), stereo output, and many more.

I’m super excited for this post as it’s the culmination of some of the biggest names in online guitar lesson providers coming together to offer their advice and insights on guitar chords. Understanding the right way to play guitar chords is one of the first things you’ll learn as a beginner guitar player. It can also be quite frustrating when you are just starting out.That’s why I decided it would be a great idea to get a bunch of experts together all giving their insight into learning more about the wonderful world of guitar chords. I basically asked everyone two questions:


You’ll find a full slate of dedicated bass stompbox effects as well as many multi-effects pedals and processors. Like their guitar-friendly cousins, bass effects offer most of the same tone shaping capabilities, including chorus, reverbs, delays, phasers, and tremolos. Because of the bass’s unique sound dynamics that reach deep into the lower frequencies, many bass effects are focused around compression and limiters that help keep a lid on destructive subsonic sound waves that can damage gear. Typically, many guitar effects are not optimal when used with a bass.
With its playful old school appeal, many consider the Gretsch G5024E as a fun instrument to practice and perform with. Build quality and aesthetics are often cited in reviews, with many reports of the guitar eliciting positive response from friends and audiences. There are also reports from users who are very happy with both its amplified and acoustic sound.
Build Your Own Effect Pedal. Mammoth Electronics makes an effort to offer our customers a very neatly packaged and personally customizable effect pedal kit. Each guitar pedal kit comes equipped with everything you need to build your own effect pedal as quickly and inexpensively as possible without sacrificing quality. These DIY guitar pedals kits are designed to make building your own effect pedal easy for everyone from the hobby builder to the manufacturer. All parts are labeled and packaged in the kit for easy identification. Enclosures are fully customizable to the user specification and specially wrapped in a protective foam for safe transit. We’ve provided a wide selection for any effect pedal kit needs you might have. From a simple boost pedals, and fuzz pedals, as well as overdrive, distortion, and compression kits. We also have a wide range of modulation kits, including delay, reverb, tremolo, and phaser effect pedal kits. If you need a quick fix or a more complex guitar pedal kit, Mammoth Electronics offers a variety of options making it effortless to build your own effect pedal with a sound quality that will make an impression. We work hard to build relationships with only the best brands for our customers. These strong relationships allow us to provide extremely competitive pricing on all of our DIY guitar pedals kits.. We’re confident you will save yourself money & time if you build your own effect pedal with Mammoth Electronics. Mammoth Electronics offers customized DIY guitar kits and effect pedal kits that allow you to experiment with, create and amplify your own taste of music, without compromising on the sound quality. With added protective layering, these kits are safe for transportation and transit. We’re passionate about helping our customers build the best effect pedal possible so please Check out our Facebook page where you can provide feedback, share tips or ask any questions you might have about your latest projects.
On amps, I think there are alot of affordable yet fantastic amps released in 2017. Try checking out the Boss Katana series, Orange Crush, Marshall Code series, Line 6 Spider V, Fender Mustang which are more in the budget range. Most of the amps I mentioned here are modelling amps, so I think you’ll have a fun time fiddling around with all the pokery jiggery. These amps will hopefully keep you occupied for awhile :)
This type of chip delivers a beautifully coloured representation of your sound. It may not be the most accurate and you are limited in the number of repeats and delay time.These are not to be confused with Tape Echo which was used for a long time in the world’s largest studios. No, these pedals were made out of necessity to take a form of delay on the road easily.
This little-known company is responsible for the St. George badge. This particular badge was made from 1963-1967. It also produced the rare Shiro guitar. It is possible that the company may also be responsible for the Pleasant guitar badge after 1966. This company may have been a small offshoot of Aria Guitar Company, founded by Shiro Arai, but that has not been verified as of today.
Most modern effects use solid-state electronics or computer chips. Some effects, particularly older ones such as Leslie speakers and spring reverbs, use mechanical components or vacuum tubes. Effects are often used as stompboxes, which are typically placed on the floor and controlled with footswitches. They are also built into amplifiers, tabletop units designed for DJs and record producers, and rackmounts, and are widely used as software VSTs.
Using, or not using, some piece of gear doesn’t make a player more genuine, harder, tougher, more real, more natural, or better than players who do. What does make people those things is the honest pursuit of their art, the skills and experience earned from practice and performing, their genuine expression, feeling, and the ability to play something that has an effect on the listener. All of this is MUCH more difficult and real than simply choosing not to use a piece of gear.
SquareTrade Protection Plans are only valid for new or Amazon certified refurbished products purchased at Amazon in the last 30 days. By purchasing this Protection Plan you agree to the Protection Plan Terms & Conditions (http://www.squaretrade.com/terms-standard). Your Protection Plan Terms & Conditions will be delivered via email within 24 hours of purchase

If anybody needs a Bridge, I have a Teisco Roller Bridge for sale, it is a a copy of a Gretsch Roller bridge but includes a solid steel Base like a Rickenbacker Bridge Base. The string saddles are rollers which are adjustable side-to-side for proper string spacing, and each side of the bridge is adjustable for Height. It is in excellent condition, probably from 1965 thru 1968. On a scale of 0 to 10, it is a 8.
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When you shop the huge selection of combo guitar amps at Musician’s Friend we make it easy to hone in on what you’re looking for. Just select the type ( tube, solid state, or hybrid), brand(s), and price range, and voila—up pops a selection fine tuned to your specs. To really fine-tune the process you can also dial in the wattage, type (combo or stack), and speaker size/configuration.
The most basic, original pickup design is a single-coil pickup. It’s composed of a single magnet with fine wire wrapped around it, creating a magnetic field that captures the strings’ vibrations converting them into an electronic signal. Single-coil pickups tend to be bright and crisp sounding. The tone they produce cuts through dense band sounds well, but they are also prone to generating hum and are subject to magnetic interference. Many great artists play guitars equipped with single-coil pickups. Eric Clapton, Stevie Ray Vaughan, John Mayer, Merle Travis and many others are famous for their use of single-coil tone.

Hendrix, Van Halen and, uh, Mozart are the musicians to thank for most heavily influencing death-metal shredder Azagthoth, not that they really come through in the jagged riffs and cheetah-fast solos of Morbid Angel classics like “World of S—t” and “Where the Slime Live.” But that’s because he has blazed a tension-filled style all his own (when he solos, he enters a mystical mind state he calls the “Temple of Ostx”) that is finally getting more praise than early antics like cutting himself with a razor before hitting the stage and extolling Satanism.

Launch price: $779 / £849 | Body: Mahogany with maple top | Neck: Maple | Scale: 25" | Fingerboard: Rosewood | Frets: 24 | Pickups: 2x 85/15 'S' humbuckers | Controls: Volume, tone (with push-pull coil-split), 3-way selector | Hardware: PRS vibrato, PRS SE tuners | Left-handed: Yes | Finish: Fire Red Burst, Tobacco Sunburst, Trampas Green, Whale Blue
I've had my Dorado, model #5986, serial #41 since 1972 and have used it for classical guitar study off and on since getting it as a gift. For what it is, the sound quality and playability are quite good. I'm donating it to a church rummage sale tomorrow (6/3/07) and will remember it fondly. I have an Alvarez Regency, similar to the Dorado, which lacks the sound character.
Depending on the components used in the delay pedal, delays can either sound exactly like the original source sound, or the delays can sound like they have a modulation effect on them. In fact, some of the most popular delay pedals apply a phaser modulation effect on the repeated delay sounds. Stacking different effects on top of one another in a single pedal is not uncommon at all, and delay pedals typically have some other effect added-on.
When the lyrics of hit songs feature your brand by name, as a company, you know you must be on the right track. At nearly 150 years in business, innovation has kept this guitar maker constantly on the list of top acoustic guitar brands. Vintage models are coveted and new designs live up to the classic name and reputation. And with a lifetime guarantee, you know these beauties are built to last.
Inspirational, motivational and light background tune with beautiful and atmospheric melody. Good production audio for the slideshow, presentation, youtube, advertising, business project, motivational and successful videos, inspiring moments, bright achievements, film scores. I used electric guitar, muted guitar, piano, staccato strings, bass, drums, Glock, bright pads.
Most guitars have at least one tone control installed. They can be either assigned to a particular pickup (Strat or Les Paul) or work as master tone control (Ibanez and others). Electronically, it’s a variable low-pass filter. Lower the resistance, more treble gets cut which means that higher pot values will sound a bit brighter (typically 500K vs 250K). Capacitor values usually traditionally range from 0.022uF (22nF) to 0.047uF (47nF) but many people find these values too large and install much smaller caps instead. Values of 10nF, 6.8nF or even smaller are reported to work quite well (I used 10nF in my latest mod). To help you decide between cap values and composition, check out this site. It hosts a couple of useful videos with cap value and composition analysis.

It is typically not possible to combine high efficiency (especially at low frequencies) with compact enclosure size and adequate low frequency response. Bass cabinet designers can, for the most part, choose only two of the three parameters when designing a speaker system. So, for example, if extended low-frequency performance and small cabinet size are important, one must accept low efficiency.[24] This rule of thumb is sometimes called Hofmann's Iron Law (after J.A. Hofmann, the "H" in KLH).[25][26] Bass cabinet designers must work within these trade-offs. In general, to get extended low-frequency performance, a larger cabinet size is needed. Most bass cabinets are made from wood such as plywood. Gallien-Kruger makes a small extension cab made of aluminum.
Another application of a fuzz pedal is available when the user has control over the the amount of feedback signal routed back into the transistor loop while the pedal is engaged. By configuring the feedback to more sensitive levels, the pedal will feed back into itself causing oscillation*. As the pedal oscillates, certain frequencies will be produced, causing a singing sustained note without the guitarist playing anything at all. The player can consequently play over the note produced to cancel out the feedback loop, but once the player stops the pedal will feed back into itself producing the configured signal once again.

The Hal Leonard Folk Harp Method is a comprehensive and easy-to-use beginner's guide, designed for anyone just learning to play folk harp. Inside you'll find loads of techniques, tips, and fun songs to learn and play. The accompanying CD contains 56 demo tracks that cover most of the music examples in the book. Covers: the harp and its parts; sitting with the harp; hand position and finger placing; key signatures and meter signatures; scales and arpeggios; the I-IV-V chords; ostinatos and slides; many classic folksongs; and much more!.


Another thing you might want to remember when getting your very first electric guitar is that you will need some other equipment to go with it. You might need a music stand, an amplifier, a mic for the guitar amp (click for full guide), different pedals, and so on. While these things are normally not included with you guitar purchase, you might at least get a nice case to keep and carry your guitar in.
The ’37 Spanish Guitar ($40, $5 for a case) illustrated in both the Sorkin and Grossman catalogs was basically the same as before, but now with plastic button tuners. This still had no f-holes. The previous basic Regal trapeze tail is now shown replaced by a stamped National trapeze. Indeed, despite the fact that catalog illustrations remain retouched versions of the old Regal-made guitars, these probably had Kay bodies and bolted-on National Dobro necks. Gone is the 1/4″ jack in favor of the screw-on microphone attachment. Finally, the new cylindrical-magnet pickup is offered as the “Mated Pick-Up.” This is significant both intrinsically and in light of later Supro features. This pickup is “mated,” i.e., attached by three screws, to the bridge saddle. The pickup sat inside the guitar contained in a wooden box. This was the beginning of National Dobro/Valco’s association with what would later be called the Bridge-Tone under-bridge pickup featured in many of its electric guitars.
We round off this list with a relatively modern innovation in the world of acoustic guitars; the ‘baby’ acoustic. As usual, Martin and Taylor have led the way with these particular guitars, which are effectively shrunken down dreadnoughts which focus heavily on their portability and the wide range of musical scenarios in which they can be used. Martin had dabbled in this world before, with its rather odd looking Backpacker, but it was with the LX1 – and Taylor’s subsequent Baby Taylor – that the world began to take note.
Variable 1: Speaker size. In Clip 1 you hear similar phrases played through models of four common speaker types. First comes the sort of 10" speaker you’d find in a small Fender Champ-style combo. Next is the 12" speaker of a midsized Fender-style combo, then a 12" Celestion Greenback you might encounter in a vintage Marshall cabinet, and finally the Celestion Alnico Blue from a vintage Vox combo.
In 2007, Gibson announced the idea to create a computerized Les Paul, dubbed the “Robot Guitar” which was released on December 7, 2007. The guitar has a computer integrated into the body with a “master control” knob next to the volume knobs, which can be pulled out, turned, or pressed to issue different commands to the guitar. One of the more notable features is the ability to tune the guitar to standard tuning simply by pulling out on the master control knob and strumming the guitar, while the tuning pegs adjust themselves to standard tuning. Another use of the master control knob is to be able to tune the guitar to alternative tunings, such as drop D, by pressing on the control knob to fit the setting. The new Les Paul has a new custom silverburst blue finish.[30] While the product was advertised in the American popular press as a “world’s first”, similar systems, some external, have been in use for decades.
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[SIZE="2"]Guitar Gear: Gibson '61 RI SG, Dean Cadillac Select, Charvel 475 Special, BC Rich NJ Bich, Gibson Faded V, MIM Strat, Warmoth Tele, LP Copy, Yamaha Acoustic, VHT Pittbull Fifty/ST, VOX VT30, Blackheart BH5H, '72 Hiwatt 4123 Cab, Traynor TS-50, POD XT, 16 ohm THD Hotplate, 80's Peavey Rage combo, Boss ME-50, Russian Big Muff, Graphic Fuzz
Many modern guitar amps also are equipped with multi-effects sections that encourage experimentation. There are also dozens of multi-effects pedals out there that are very affordably priced and offer a complete suite of effects. Most of these amp and effects processors feature presets created by engineers and pro guitarists to sound good at the touch of a button. Many allow you to create your own unique sounds then store them for instant recall. If you're a typical player, you'll adopt and abandon dozens of different effects boxes and presets over your playing career as your style and musical tastes evolve and change.
Multiple stages of valve gain/clipping can be "cascaded" to produce a thicker and more complex distortion sound. In layperson's terms, a musician will plug a fuzz pedal into a tube amp that is being "cranked" to a clipping "overdriven" condition; as such, she will get the distortion from the fuzz which is then distorted further by the amp. During the 1990s, some Seattle grunge guitarists chained together as many as four fuzz pedals to create a thick "wall of sound" of distortion.

Fire Guitar Tuner tunes your guitar in seconds. This tuner tunes makes it easy to play in perfect pitch all the time and eliminates any need to buy those expensive microphone tuners at the music shop. Play a note, and this guitar tuner will display it. And once you''re in-tune, Fire Guitar Tuner will incinerate your mind as it lights ablaze in this Tuner''s fabulous glow animation. Why spend money on a guitar tuner when you can have one for free ?
All-fifths tuning is a tuning in intervals of perfect fifths like that of a mandolin, cello or violin; other names include "perfect fifths" and "fifths".[35] It has a wide range, thus it requires an appropriate range of string gauges. A high b' string is particularly thin and taut, which can be avoided by shifting the scale down by several steps or by a fifth.
Mother-of-pearl rosette inlay. If you’ve had acoustic guitars with mother-of-pearl accents, you’ll appreciate the beauty of the mother-of-pearl inlay around the sound hole. This particular rosette pattern is inspired by the 1920’s Domingo Esteso design, which will be a treat for those who love specific historic details like this. Even if history isn’t your concern, the mother-of-pearl colors enhance the pattern.
Setting up a mic to record the natural acoustic sound of the guitar strings can add percussive character when blended with the amp sound, especially if you are capturing old-school archtop sounds. For best results, the guitar needs to be isolated from the amp to prevent excessive bleed. This technique gives a good front-end attack to the sound and plenty of definition. A small condenser is the best mic for the job, and it’s worth using a high-pass filter as well.
I have a hunch its a cheapo guitar and probably not worth a neck reset. Can't tell if it has a bolt on neck. my other guitars all have more warped soundboards though. The saddle is sort of cradled in wood by the bridge, the angle could be better, but I'm surprised there is any angle considering the saddle only pops out like a millimeter. The bridge curves down towards the pins to provide the angle. It probably has been set up in the past by someone who wanted an acoustic guitar to play like an electric, then it got reversed it later by way of the truss rod.
While these sum up the most significant Gibson tone woods, other species do occasionally contribute to the brew. Swamp ash lends the Les Paul Studio Swamp Ash a degree of twangy sweetness and a round, slightly scooped midrange, while the most common Gibson fingerboard woods, rosewood and ebony, even make their mark on the frequency spectrum. Rosewood generally helps to add a certain thickness and creaminess to the tone—warming up the voice of a maple neck, or adding depth and cohesiveness to that of a mahogany neck—while an ebony fingerboard, long considered an upmarket option, contributes tightness, brightness, and a quick attack.
Finally, you’ll want to make sure you have the accessories you need to get up and playing fast. A strap, spare strings (they do break from time to time), and some plectrums are all essentials – and don’t forget an amplifier! You’ll also want a case (preferably hardshell, but soft and padded will do) to store and transport your guitar, and an electric tuner to keep it sounding good. These can all be picked up from your local guitar store, although if you are starting from scratch, you may want to consider a combo kit, which usually offer good value and convenience.
A second common problem we encounter is a poor mechanical connection. When inserting a cord into a jack, the click you feel is the tip of the cord seating against the metal prong on the end of the jack. With use this prong may spread outward and loose a bit of it's tension. A gentle bend of the prong may be just enough to create a solid connection, however, metal fatigue can dictate the need to replace.
The brands and individual guitars that we have selected are based on a combination of our joint 80+ years of experience and the ratings and feedback from people who have bought them. The leading brands are dominated by Martin and Gibson/Epiphone as you might expect, and there's not a lot of change this year in terms of brands expect that Seagull has earned their way back into this list at the expense of Fender - we had to make the cut somewhere.
Generally, guitarists with an array of pedals like to put their drive pedals first. This includes your overdrive, distortion, fuzz, or boost pedals. Some guitarists have more than one of these, and they usually go at the beginning of your chain. The reason for putting them first in your pedalboard order is because you will be distorting or boosting the purest version of your guitar tone. Putting a delay pedal before distortion means that the echoes from the delay pedal would themselves become distorted, resulting in an unnatural and messy sound. If you’re using an overdrive and a boost, it’s wise to put the boost first – that sends a stronger signal into the overdrive to get the most out of it.

Hendrix, Van Halen and, uh, Mozart are the musicians to thank for most heavily influencing death-metal shredder Azagthoth, not that they really come through in the jagged riffs and cheetah-fast solos of Morbid Angel classics like “World of S—t” and “Where the Slime Live.” But that’s because he has blazed a tension-filled style all his own (when he solos, he enters a mystical mind state he calls the “Temple of Ostx”) that is finally getting more praise than early antics like cutting himself with a razor before hitting the stage and extolling Satanism.

Naturally, if a seller can get more money by calling what they have a “lawsuit guitar”, they’re going to do it. Unfortunately, some writers who should know better have taken to using the term for any old Japanese lookalikes, copys, knockoffs, etc, of (mostly) American guitars. Some sellers are using terms like “lawsuit era” or “pre-lawsuit” which don’t mean anything at all.
All of the guitars on this list except for the Blueridge BR-160 are equipped with an electronics system that make them stage- and studio-ready. You can simply plug and play when you need to perform in front of an audience in a crowded or big venue where there’s a lot of ambient noise. If you don’t need amplification – for example if you’re just practicing at home – these guitars sound great unplugged as well.
Flat tops from 1970 to present are considered to be excellent utility instruments, but are not collectible. Staring in 1976, Martin has been undergoing many changes with numerous reissues, new models, limited editions, etc. Workmanship has improved greatly from the early 1970's, and Martin is now producing some of its best guitars in over 20 years. While not currently collector's items, these intruments have excellent workmanship, sound, and playability.
Tube Is Probably Not The Way To Go – Don’t get me wrong, I am a fan of tube amps. There are a lot of great things about them, but in most cases, tube amps are a lot more expensive than solid-state amps. They are also harder to maintain and keep working. While you might want the tone of a tube amplifier, a chance is you can’t afford it as a beginner and neither do you have to afford it. As a beginner, at least I, did not have enough skills to make full use of tube amps so why spend money on a model that you cannot fully make use of? Apart from that, solid-state, especially practice ones are renowned for their durability. Whether you play it for hours on end or have a small accident you probably won’t damage it (unless you really try).
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In the Guitar Setup course, the third DVD is devoted to acoustic guitar setup. Acoustics are very, very different than electric guitars, when you get right down into the mechanics of them, and as such they truly do need a section of their own in any guitar setup guide. You’ll learn how to setup the action and intonation properly on your acoustic, as well as many other tips and tricks that will help you keep it in top working order.

In order to play your favorite song, you’ll need to learn guitar chords. Use the images and instructions below to learn how to play each chord. The ChordBuddy device can be used for assistance in knowing where to place your fingers In the images the circles represent where you will be placing your fingers (I=index, M=middle finger, R=ring finger, P=pinky). The X’s represent strings that you will not be strumming while the O represents strings that will be played without any frets.


Generally, guitarists with an array of pedals like to put their drive pedals first. This includes your overdrive, distortion, fuzz, or boost pedals. Some guitarists have more than one of these, and they usually go at the beginning of your chain. The reason for putting them first in your pedalboard order is because you will be distorting or boosting the purest version of your guitar tone. Putting a delay pedal before distortion means that the echoes from the delay pedal would themselves become distorted, resulting in an unnatural and messy sound. If you’re using an overdrive and a boost, it’s wise to put the boost first – that sends a stronger signal into the overdrive to get the most out of it.
Why We Liked It - Unless you’re looking for an electric guitar to play genres like heavy metal, chances are you would love this guitar. It just makes us happy and it’s hard to put it down. Fender is a good brand and they offer guitars of very high build quality. It’s available in green, blue and red, so you can really get a guitar that matches your personality and music.
The smallest bass amps, which typically have 10 to 20 watts of power and a small 6.5" or 8" speaker, are known as practice amps. They amplify the instrument enough for individual practice in a small room, such as a bedroom. Practice amps do not typically produce enough volume or low-frequency sound reproduction to be used in a band rehearsal or show. As such, they are mostly used by beginners or, when used by professionals, for warm-up or individual practice. They are more likely than full-size combo amp cabinets to have an open-back design, like an electric guitar combo amp. The use of an open back cabinet in small practice amps makes these models different from most bass combo amps and speaker cabs, which are closed-back (often with bass reflex ports or vents, or less commonly, with passive radiator speakers, both of which are designed to boost the low-frequency response). Some buskers playing on the street for tips may use battery-powered practice amps, a feature available on some models.
The offset body style includes three main instruments: the Jaguar, the Mustang, and the Jazzmaster. While there are definite differences between them, offset guitars all generally have a “jangly” sound. When we say jangly, we mean bright and clear with a subtle mid and low-end response. These guitars are also well suited to rhythm work depending on their tone knobs are adjusted.
This guitar is of the finest, and yet it is only fraction of the cost that you would normally pay. You may be wondering how such an amazing product could be so cheap, it is possible because it has been manufactured in China, where labor is cheap. Cheap labor does not mean that has been compromised; all parts are of the highest. We have our own factory that recreates them. Our version of Custom Shop Guitars is 95% same as the original in terms of quality and design, the parts are made and imported from China, Japan and Korea in order to manufacture the best musical instruments. When purchasing this guitar you can only stand to win. If you are satisfied, you have just saved yourself hundreds of dollars! So go on, treat yourself to the guitar you have always wanted. We use the best pickups; best tuning keys and other hardware. All of our guitars are custom made guitars. The Top Guitars specializes the world’s finest custom guitars, major guitar brands, boutique brands and collectible guitars. Owning the latest state of the art equipment, craftsmanship and skilled technicians. Our products are exported to Southeast Asia, North America and Europe. Our 100% satisfaction guarantee allows you to buy with confidence!
This is a similar model to the one we just talked about. However it’s a more basic version. Aside from a different finish and several other factors, it’s the same guitar. Tone-wise, everything is on point and you can dial in a variety of great tone colors. S series is definitely one of my favorite. I have a lot of hands-on time with them, and they are on my list of favorites.
Alvarez has always been an under-rated brand. Beautiful workmanship, great sound- an excellent value for the money. I have one of the old six string "dove" guitars and a Yairi 12 string: both are close to forty years old and both still sound and look great and have never needed any repairs. I also have an old Martin six string. I have done the "blindfold" test with friends to choose the best sound between the alvarez and the martin - alvarez wins every time.
Lastly, there is a core group of survivors in this company. Nice people but probably not the most dynamic or skilled. That said, they manage to get the job done under some pretty trying circumstances. Getting hired and quitting or getting fired after 6 months makes their job much more difficult because they needed to train you and it takes time away from their work only to have that person leave. If you don't have what it takes to work here then stay away because this causes more harm to all involved including yourself. There are people working under stress with families to provide for who don't need to get hosed by some 'guitar dude" who couldn't cut it. In summary, don't get starry-eyed because you think guitars are cool and that will carry the day. Think about what this place will do to your credentials and ability to move on to the next stage of your career which working at Gibson will force sooner than you expect and by all means, be considerate of those special folks who will have to re-fill the gap after you leave.
: This vintage YAMAHA is one of the greats folks and here for your serious consideration today at Joe's Vintage Guitars.... This is the Classic Vintage Yamaha FG-200 - Nippon Gakki body seems the same specs as the famous FG180...hummm? interesting She's been lovingly played for nearly 40 years,its beautifully aged now with a great feel & patina only found on real vintage guitars of this age and caliber. This guitar really has nicely opened up over the past 40 years and you just don't get booming bassy tone like this one with a new guitar thats for sure. This example is not mint but is beautiful in its own right, it does have a few nicks, dings and wear but nothing really bad at all really she just looks the part of the 40 year old Martin D28 vintage guitsr. A lot of guitar for not a lot of cash... Vintage aint goin down..get her at a great price today! Let me know...thanks for your interest, Joe email me: gr8bids@comcast.net This is an early one from the Nippon Gakki plant and has a surprising boom even for or a 200 same as our great old red lable FG180 for that matter with no real decernable diference. I cannot find a serial number but is believed to be late 60's - early 70's This old girl has Excellent low end sound!!! and tone on this guitar is wonderful - it really booms! Condition: Average vintage wear wich includes minor pick wear, scratches dents & dings for an old vintageguitar. but no cracks to be found, straight neck, trussrod is functioning properly, very good frets still playing well all the way up & down the fingerboard with no funny buzzes or dead spots... Frets 1 - 5 ( cowboy cord area )have medium play wear but still plenty of life remaining no problemo. action is very good at 3/32 1st E string @ 12th fret. Tuners are the original and in excellent working order. Bridge plate is securely fastened to top. We have just as a precationary installed A PlateMate brass plate has now been installed to any prevent further wear to bridge plate which is common among these vintage guitars. This brass plate has also contributed to its big booming tone now is even a more rich sounding competitor to a vintage Martin D-28... FRESH SET UP...with Martin Bone & Saddle... this guitar is a wonderfull fun guitar to play lots of bang for the buck factor here.. This guitar is overall a very solid well built guitar that is standing the test of time it also is a great sounding vintage guitar that plays very nicely. Ya can't go wrong with this wonderful vintage Yamaha FG Nippon Gakki guitar Has a new bone saddle and Martin Silk Steel strings. No case included but will protect and properly package for shipping. PlateMate product works very well and is easily removed if desired. To my ear it enhanced this boom-box's sound quality and is described by the manufacturer as follows: If you want to protect and enhance the sound and tones and balance out string volume of your acoustic guitar, Mitchels Plate Mate is the way to go. Mitchels Plate Mate is a small piece of brass that is applied without using or altering of tools, and is installed as fast as you can change a set of strings. This was invented and patend mainly to prevent damage caused by ball-end strings on the acoustic guitars bridge plate, it is also proven to enhance volume, tones, and balances out string volume by one of the best acoustic guitar makers in the world. Mitchels Plate Mate will protect your guitar from ball-end strings pulling up threw the bridge plate and possibly cracking the bridge or pulling the bridge off the top of your guitar which would be a very expensive repair bill. It also protects your bridge pins, and saddle by making the string windings stay down in the string holes where they belong. I have used Mitchels Plate Mate in guitars priced from $100 to $50,000 it doesnt matter the price just protect your prized posetion or investment. .
A lot of users described the Line 6 Helix Floor as something amazing and too good to be true. Commendations for it's incredible versatility and sound quality are common place, with many describing it as the best guitar multi-effects processor in the market today. There's simply no denying its continued success in the market, along with the high review scores that it continuous to attain. Premiere Guitar properly summed up what most people feel about the Line 6 Helix Floor: "Great sounds. Cool design. Solid construction. Extraordinary connectivity. Good price."
For every guitarist who’s dreamt of combining the biting twang of a Telecaster® with the sleek, ergonomic contours of a Strat, we created this limited-edition guitar: The Whiteguard Strat. Tele hardware, electronics and playing feel? Check. Ash Strat body with lacquer finish and custom-shaped white pickguard? Check. The unique style and sound you can only get from Fender? You better believe that’s a check.
Tony Visconti is also into using ambient mics: "I'm very much a fan of the room sound, too. I always record it if it's a real heavy rock guitar with power chords and crunches and all. I'll go around the room and clap my hands and I say, 'Put the mics there, that's it.' Quite often, I'll turn the room mic towards the studio window, and you'll get a reflection of the guitar sound — not directly facing it, because you're looking for reflections." Although he states in the same interview that he'll try to use a pair of U87s for ambience if possible, he's also mentioned elsewhere using PZM mics as an alternative.

Cort Guitars is known as a South Korean centered guitar manufacturing brand, which provide almost all kinds of guitars for the better music melodies and tunes. They are regarded as among the largest manufacturer of guitars in the world. The company was founded in 1973. Bass, electric and acoustic guitars are produced by this brand. The best models of guitar includes Classic Rock, Aero Series, Hollowbody series, VL, Performer, G series etc. Available price is Rs. 10,449/- onwards (approx). For further information, visit www.cortguitars.com.
In 1966, Vox introduced the problematic V251 GuitarOrgan, a Phantom VI guitar with internal organ electronics. John Lennon was given one in a bid to secure an endorsement, although this never happened.[citation needed] According to Up-Tight: the Velvet Underground Story, Brian Jones of the Rolling Stones also tried one; when asked by the Velvets if it "worked", his answer was negative.[citation needed]
Do you have an old guitar that requires knowing how to repair a damaged guitar body? Read on and learn some neat tricks for repairing body damage on a guitar. Body damage on a guitar ruins the acoustics. Body damage on a guitar body really make it useless in the playing arena. If you are looking to bust out that old guitar but need some handy advice on how to repair some old damage, MadeMan has the fixes for you. This article will give you the fixes for larger damage and the annoying little nicks and teach you the way to repair them.
In 1980, however, Martin had hired another guitarmaker, one John Marshall. Marshall had studied lutherie with Eric Schulte whose base of operation was in the far western Main Line suburbs of Philadelphia around Frazer, PA. Schulte himself had worked with the legendary Sam Koontz, who was responsible for Harptone and some Standel guitars, as well as his own. After learning the tricks of the trade from Schulte, Marshall became involved in the ill-fated Renaissance guitar company of Malvern, PA, just up the road from Frazer. Renaissance, you’ll recall, made those exotic plexiglass guitars and basses in around 1979 (plus a later series in 1980 designed by John Dragonetti). These were designed by John Marshall. Marshall left Renaissance to join Martin, where he was hired to work on the electric guitars which would become Martin’s 28 Series.
Just ask any savvy stompbox builder or low-tuned 7-string player: Sometimes the best way to add power to your low tones is to remove a bit of bass. That’s because the lowest frequencies in your signal disproportionately overdrive your amp and effects. Siphoning off just a bit of bass can add clarity and focus. At extreme settings, the filtering can produce sharp, squawking tones akin to those of a ’60s treble booster pedal (not a bad thing). If you’ve ever grappled with high-gain tones that make your amp fart out, here’s your flatulence remedy.

I figured it was a bad choice of pickups and eventually, with great anticipation, purchased a set of P-Rails after hearing the great demos of them on youtube. I am a pragmatic engineer and used to believe that the tone of an electric guitar MOSTLY came from the pickups. How WRONG was I. The P-Rails sound just as muddy as the JB and M22V (in fact, the M22V should be really bright because it's a lower winding count an lower DC resistance p'up).
If you have been playing for a year or two and are looking at something to replace your current model, it would be wise to save a little more and go for a mid-range guitar that may cost between $300 and $500. On this kind of guitar you’ll notice a big difference in sound, as well as the feel of the instrument and the overall playability. Use this page as a starting point to find something that may suit you. Until then, you are probably best off sticking with your current guitar.
You planned out your hardware but it is best to make the purchase after you know you have the body and neck built and made sure they will fit together. If you have made it to that point, you are ready to put in the hardware components. Realize that you may need to do some basic soldering. If you need some guidance in that area, you can get it in a free course on metalworking.
Tone woods only effect acoustic or hollowbodys. The more dense wood harder tighter grained woods along with steep pitched saddle to stop string angle increases sustain.research labs experimented with marble body's and had tremendous sustain.also effecting sustain is type of neck.ie. bolt on set or thru. A bolt on May have equal sustain to a set if the thickness of body at bolt joint is made thicker but thru are best all have give and takes. Thru are less adjustable and limit repairs. Bolt on offer more adjustment. Set necks can be replaced or reset but cost more to do so. Thick heavy gibson let Pauls are known for the sustain.but endurance limited by heavy weight. It's all matter of choice. Buy usa or if not available japan. Stay away from Chinese or Korean they are bottom feeders
Norma branded guitars all came from the import/distribution company Strum and Drum located in Wheeling, Illinois.  Lots of people think Norma came from Norma Jean (Marilyn Monroe), but actually the Norma name came from the owner of the company, Norman Sackheim!  Norman and his son Ron began to import Japanese guitars around 1965, and continued into the mid 70s.  Initially all Norma guitars were made at the Tombo factory in Japan, but by 67 there were at least 8 different suppliers of Norma guitars!Build quality and construction really varied greatly with Norma guitars, but Norman and Ron did have a good eye for unique designs and many Norma guitars featured some of the coolest shapes of the 60s!  Just like this 4 pickup monster!  What I always liked about Norma guitars were the cool features like neat inlays and interesting pickups.  These darn things just had style!While I was in Japan in 2013, I met with the Japanese buyer of Norma guitars.  A close friend of the Sackheims, this gentleman travelled Japan during the 60s and searched out cool guitars to supply to Strum and Drum.  It was a unique arrangement, and it was simply fascinating to listen about the old days of Japanese guitar production.  When you peruse Norma catalogs, you’ll often see models come and go quickly.  And there were always lots to choose from, year to year.
The Effect: The octave effect does exactly what its name says. It takes the raw signal from your guitar and adds one or more of its copies which are pitch shifted for an octave up, or down. Some models come with both upper and lower octave available, while others allow you to use as many as three octaves. One of the best examples of this type of pedal is the Electro-Harmonix Pitch Fork.

Deco Tape Saturation & Doubletracker is a unique effects pedal that allows for a wide variety of tonal possibilities.  You can place Deco near the beginning of your signal chain and use the Tape Saturation as a light overdrive.  Or, you can place Deco at the end of your chain, use lower Tape Saturation settings, and provide your entire signal with the tape-like warmth, compression, and added low end harmonics.


With the ME-80, Boss has made a unit that’s slightly different than a traditional multi-fx unit. Instead of trying to simplify the interface and make it sparse and clean, it’s immediately evident that there are a LOT of knobs on the front of this unit. The ME-80 is trying to mimic the feel of having a pedalboard full of pedals at your fingertips. This is good, because us guitar players love pedals for exactly that reason - you can just look down at them, twist some knobs, and your tone changes. Instant gratification! Not many guitarists we know like to scroll through endless menus and read text on a tiny screen, much less have to read the user manual cover to cover to understand how to work our gear. We want to twist a knob or two, and we want to play!
The reason why we love this guitar so much is that the top is made from koa wood. What is koa? It’s a Hawaiian wood that has a very special look to it, with an unusual grain pattern. When you have a guitar top made from koa like this, it just looks very organic and natural, so if you don’t like the plastic-fantastic style, then this is the best way to go!
This truly is a pleasure writing about the best kept secret in the guitar world. The G&L Legacy Tribute. I own a USA Hamer Gold Top Archtop Standard with P-90's and it's stupendous guitar. But like all Les Pauls and high quality Mahoganies, it has a growl suited for certain kinds of Rock N Roll. However, there is another voice in my guitar arsenal and I only have one other. The G&L Legacy Tribute. This guitar can cover the other half. I bought this used for $299 and four years later I still can't put it down. So I have a $2600 guitar and a $299 guitar and love them equally. What does that tell you about the Legacy Tribute?
After a peak in the 1970s, driven by the use of several high profile players, another lull occurred in the early 1980s. During that time, CBS-Fender cut costs by deleting features from the standard Stratocaster line, despite a blues revival that featured Strat players such as Eric Clapton, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Robert Cray and Buddy Guy in their choice of the Stratocaster as a primary blues-rock guitar.[citation needed] Yngwie Malmsteen is known for playing a Stratocaster in the Neo-Classical genre.

Taylor, Martin, Gibson all great production brands... Which is better comes done to what you like sonically, visually and of course the feel in your hands. It is also difficult to compare one brand versus another unless you are comparing similar designs using the same tone woods and in the same price range. Anyone espousing one is better than the other without doing this is not being honest with themselves. I own a Martin and two Taylors, all are great and have different voices and feels... Even the 2 Taylors are very different in sound and looks. In the end I vote for Taylor because I like the neck carve and feel that the looks and build quality are a bit better in the $3K - $4 price range. If your looking for something in a lower $500 - $1, 000range you probably should be considering Yamaha or Takamine. Though in the end you get what you pay for.


Mic orientation, or the angle of the mic in relation to the speaker, becomes more critical as the mic is moved closer to the amp. Pointing the mic at the center of the cone will yield more active highs and better transient detail but fewer lows. As you move the mic toward the outer rim of the speaker, maintaining a 90-degree angle with the grille cloth, the low frequencies gradually increase because of proximity effect and other factors, resulting in a sound that may be warmer, softer, or more powerful. Many engineers like to blend these complex characteristics by angling the mic between 30 and 60 degrees off-axis from the center of the speaker.
2. Do your saddles have notches cut into them? If not, then I suspect they could do with some (or if they have, but they're extremely shallow, perhaps they need deepened a little). Just note, however, that this is very easy to screw up and should probably be done by a tech if you're in any way unsure about doing it yourself. Also, you can't just cut a notch in one saddle. You would have to do all of them to the same depth, then raise the bridge a little to make up for the depth you just removed.
With that budget you can look about anywhere you choose. Try epiphone, maybe a boutique builder along the lines of your ideal, even a good kit that you rough in and take to a great tech/Luthier to trim finish….but about the Gibson…play em yourself, don’t get upset by a bunch of rumbling that’s largely bad noise. What your hearing is chatter largely perpetuated by their competition. They had a rough patch when they had ALL their imported wood jerked out from under them do to a screw-up of paperwork, wouldn’t at all surprise me if the government changed the rules and didn’t tell anybody(again). You can imagine what Gibson had to do to stay afloat, compromise was inevitable. I’m sure they more than anyone regret that, but you know everyone else in the industry was plenty happy to keep the scuttlebutt going, they ALL hate you when you’re on top. She. I was with strings and things of Memphis, Gibson came out of packing set up beautifully, usually perfectly in tune or nigh on to it. No other maker came close at all. By the way , I’m not a Gibson guy, the only one I’ve had is for sale, I prefer a more modern platform, that’s just my preference. But I still have to give props where they’re due…say, if your interested in an SG ’67 reissue at a good price, hit me up. I’ll give you the skinny on it, all right and wrong, and beat the brakes off any price from a shop!
The honest truth lies with the listener’s ear and capability to identify a sound with an individual player.  B.B. King was known for his tone and only later revealed his secret mentioned above.  It wasn’t even really a secret; it was more of a physical shortcut that allowed him to express himself.  You should choose what feels and sounds best for your own musical expression.

Some bridges have a lock position and at this point should be engaged. Other floating bridges will need to be stabilized by using pieces of wood fitted inside the cavity (accessed from the back of the body) to prevent the tremolo block from moving. Vintage Fender-style tremolo bridges can be stabilized by fully tightening the spring tension screws. Whatever method is used, the bridge must sit as we will want it to when we are done with the set-up procedure- parallel to and nearly flush with the top- so care must be taken at this stage to get the position of the bridge right.


The best acoustic guitar brands in India are available for beginners to buy. When buying a guitar at a beginner level, it is good to go with the acoustic guitar. This is the type of guitar that is easy to learn and play. The strings are available in various materials. The make, shape, style, and material used in the strings are the features to look at when you buy a guitar. Acoustic, Electric, Spanish Guitar, Steel, Bass, and Resonator guitars are available in India. You can also find twelve string guitars to buy at a few locations in India. You will find amongst this list, best guitar brands in India for beginners as well as advanced learners.
Bowers loves combining incredible chops with strong melodies, and his influences read like a “Who’s Who” of guitar heroes. Included are such high-tech players as Steve Morse, John Petrucci, and Steve Howe. While talking with Frank, I learned that he has had two of his Les Pauls customized to accommodate a push-pull tap switch on their tone knobs. In the normal position he has full control of his Seymour Duncan humbuckers; in the pulled-up position he goes to a single coil “spin-a-split” configuration that allows him to get more of a “Tele” tone at zero—or he can dial in a bit more of the other half of the pickup to emulate more of a P-90 sound. The thinner “Tele-ish” tone cuts better, allowing more clarity on his leads and rhythm patches.
Among other things, they’re extremely reliable, sound great and built like tanks, so you can stomp on them for years and they’ll never let you down. However, collecting them all will cost an absolute fortune. Fortunately, the team at Boss have put together a couple of options for those who want a world of Boss effects pedals at their feet. One option is the Boss ME-80 Multi Effects Processor Pedal.
Some amps have a bright cap on the volume pot. The purpose of this cap is to allow your amp to provide a bright, clear tone at lower settings on the volume pot. The more the pot is increased, the less effect the cap has. When the pot is turned all the way up, it should be completely out of the circuit. Like they do with a bright switch, drive pedals can interact with a bright cap and result in less-than-pleasant drive tones. If your amp has a bright cap and you don’t like the way it responds to some pedals, or you find it excessively edgy at low volumes, consider having a competent amp tech change the bright-cap value or remove it altogether. This can be a worthwhile and easily reversible mod.
If ever there was a candidate for compression, bass is it. This instrument has a wide dynamic range (even more so when slap techniques are employed), but it usually needs to sit at a very steady level in the mix. But should compression be applied during recording, to control the levels going down, or later, during the mix, to insure the best blend in the track? Well, the answer is probably both, but with potentially different approaches to squashing the signal. During recording, a Limiter might be the ticket, to control transient peaks that might overload ADCs, producing pops and spikes that can ruin a take. A classic fast VCA compressor/limiter (like the dbx 160) could be employed to handle peaks, without really reducing the player’s dynamics at this early stage. Then when mixdown rolls around, more gentle compression can be introduced (like the smooth squash of an optical compressor like the LA-2A), to tighten up the dynamics, as needed for that particular mix. Applying the right kind, and amount, of compression/limiting at all stages will assure you get nice clean recordings, that can be properly squeezed into the mix when the time comes. 
So, many engineers add a second mic at the other end of the room, to capture that room ambiance. Put it on a separate track and you can dial it into your overall sound at will. But remember, if you have an acoustically dead room covered with foam tiles, you do not really have a room sound to capture. Stick the amp into a tiled bathroom, that’s a whole different story.
Tremolo is a regular and repetitive variation in gain for the duration of a single note, which works like an auto-volume knob; this results in a swelling or fluttering sound. This effect is very popular in psychedelic and trip-hop music. The speed and depth of the flutter are usually user-controlled.This is a volume-related effects pedal. This effect is based on one of the earliest effects that were built into guitar amplifiers. Examples include:
Automatic Track Creation & Loop Recording: A new layer (track) is created each time you start recording and each time a Riff loops. Stack layers on top of each other (bass, guitar, vocals) to create a Riff. Use looping to create multiple tracks, do multiple takes, etc. Each layer has controls for mixing and effects. (4 tracks with T4, 24 tracks with Standard)

The Hi-Flier guitar, which was possibly built in the Matsumoku factory, underwent multiple phases during the course of its production. Each of the Hi-Flier’s four manufacturing phases came with a variety of feature changes, ranging from simply switching the color of the pickguard to actually fitting the guitar for humbuckers rather than the P90-style pickups it originally came with.


The iconic helmet and armor. The legendary story. The heart-racing combat. Halo has defined a generation of action-packed gaming and online multiplayer gameplay for more than a decade. Now, you can re-experience the thrills, adrenaline and immersive storylines of the Halo franchise, remastered and revamped for the Xbox One. With The Master Chief Collection, you'll not only receive stunning visuals, white-knuckle adventures and deep, rich storylines, you'll have a chance to honor the iconic hero who has been central to so many of your gaming conquests. Featuring a remastered Halo 2: Anniversary, Halo: Combat Evolved Anniversary, Halo 3 and Halo 4, Halo: The Master Chief Collection lets you experience the legendary story of the iconic hero with the full Xbox One treatment. A total of 45 campaign missions and more than 100 multiplayer and Spartan Ops maps await you, as well as an all-new live-action digital series and access to the Halo 5: Guardians beta. Dive into the adventure with Master Chief in Halo 2: Anniversary, which celebrates the 10-year anniversary of the classic game. Lock and load for a fully remastered campaign, or switch between that and the original 2004 version with the Classic mode. Use all-new skills to blast through the campaign, and get ready for the 23 original multiplayer maps, as well as six re-imagined ones, for a thrilling online combat experience. Take advantage of the all-new Master Menu, which lets you play through all four unlocked campaigns, start to finish, or seamlessly jump around as you choose. Be one of the first to experience the next generation of Halo multiplayer with the Halo 5: Guardians beta access. Then, kick back and relax with a thrilling new live-action adventure featuring elite UNSC operatives exploring a strange and treacherous world in the Halo: Nightfall digital series, brought to life by 343 Industries, director Sergio Mimica-Gezzan and Executive Producers, Ridley Scott and Scott Free TV President, David Zucker. Get ready to experience the future — by fully understanding your past.
It's all well and good picking the pioneers of Solo guitar but no way are they at the standard of the guitarists out these days. I do think though that Hendrix definitely should be there. The man's got the best flow I've ever heard. David Gilmour is a must. He knows how to make a solo sound good. Clapton isn't even there? You put Jack White there and Clapton isn't there? Who the hell compiled this thing????
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The semi hollow construction with sapele top and mahogany back body provide a warm tone that resonates nicely, especially when coupled with the Infinity R Humbuckers. The comfortable medium sized frets make the Ibanez 2017 Artcore AS53 Semi-Acoustic Guitar a great option for the jazz and blues players out there and the high-quality hardware such as ART-ST bridge and tailpiece are reliable and hard wearing.

By 1964, most of Orbison’s early rock and roll contemporaries were either dead, strung-out on drugs, in jail or making crappy movies, but Orbison’s musical career still hadn’t reached its peak. In between the ballads, he recorded singles like “Mean Woman Blues” (check his wild guitar solo) and “Oh, Pretty Woman” that showed upstarts like the Beatles, the Animals and the Rolling Stones that Americans still could rock harder than any Brit.


Many musical instruments are works of art, so it’s little doubt that design is very important to a lot of people. Make sure that you really like the way a guitar looks before purchase, because you might be playing it for years. This is one of the reasons the more natural wood colored guitars are always popular - they don’t go out of style or look out of place.
Compressors also have the ability to increase the sustain of notes beyond sounds that are normally usable on the instrument; yet another reason the effect is a popular tool in the soloist’s arsenal. The tiniest signal can be normalized to the same amplitude of a fierce pick attack, and a trailing note will resonate at the exact same volume until the string stops inducing a signal on the pickup.
I play a Breedlove and it compares very favorably with Martin, Taylor, and Gibson while I prefer it to Fender acoustic guitars (I think Fender electrics are much better). Beautiful tone, and in one place where I play I'm not allowed to plug in. At that place, my Breedlove is the only one of my guitars I can get sufficient volume from. My other guitars are a Martin, an Ibanez, and a Schechter. Breedlove should be in the top ten.
At the time of writing, the annual membership is $179.00. This makes it a very low $14.91 per month. If you prefer to pay monthly you can get started with $19.95. There is also a special deal, discount coupon code that will make it even cheaper for the first month. Check further below to find the 60% discount coupon code for the first month’s subscription.
I’m sorry you were disappointed in the videos. I guess your definition of lesson and mine differ. I would define lesson as something that teaches the viewer a new skill or provides them with information they didn’t already possess. I certainly learned a lot from Clapton talking about how he achieved that great tone, from Angus Young explaining his style, and from Slash explaining how he plays American Man.
Continuing to look at the well-known Fender brand, the Stratocaster American Standard is a higher-priced option with necessary features for the seasoned guitarist. This is another one of the most popular electric guitars ever. In terms of build, the body is a mix of ash and alder, creating a balanced tone for both the sharpness of the upper range chords and the dense resonance of the lower range progressions. The modern bridge has an upgrade of utilizing a block infused with copper and steel saddles for strong intonation and an ease in adjusting pitch. The tuners are placed at varying degrees and heights, with this staggered design creating a decreased in reverberation and excess hum so as to focus in on the clarity of the sound. This electric guitar also has a custom designed single-coil strat known as the “Fat ‘50s”, which is intended to create a fuller sound compared to other guitars. With a comfortable ‘C’ shaped design and durable finish, this 22 fret guitar offers desirable features for the guitar enthusiast. If you’re unsure whether to grab this or our previous Fender pick, read this Telecaster vs. Stratocaster sound article for some more info.
For 10" speakers, the most common combo amp and speaker cabinet configurations are 2x10" and 4x10". For speaker cabinets, 2x10" and 4x10" are the most widely used, although 8x10" cabinets are used in stadium concerts, especially in louder rock genres. Other configurations with 10" speakers do exist, but they are less common. For example, there are a small number of 1x10" and 3x10" combo amps and speaker cabinets, and a small number of 6x10" cabinets. Bass speakers are usually made with stiff paper cones. Hartke combo amps and speaker cabinets are unique in that the cone is made from paper, except for the middle, which is made of aluminium. Gallien-Krueger's MB210-II combo amp uses ceramic speakers.
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Edit: After reading everyone's comments I've decided to let the technician give my strat a first time setup and I'll try to absorb any information I can in order to be able to do it myself one day. I realize many of you have some pretty cool guitar shops that'll do a free setup so I'll try to negotiate something. I'll be sure to record the condition of the guitar itself before the setup in case the technician chips it or scratches it. I'll also check out Dan Erlewine's books like the guitarist below suggested. Thank you all for your advice, I really do appreciate it and I hope to be as wise as you all are when it comes to guitars someday.


What makes it truly stand out is the infinite Reverb this pedal provides. If you’re looking to get an all-around “stomp-box” featuring everything you ever wanted with remarkable sound output, this work of art by EH is designed to make you never think about getting another Reverb pedal. It can fit in any form of setup, and it is destined to conquer your flavor.
Given the small amplifier that comes with the Rise by Sawtooth, one would have thought it wouldn’t offer much, but it turns out to be just everything you ever wanted in a beginner or intermediate electric guitar, even as it is capable of giving that adequate sound and melody when connected to the guitar using the connecting cable that comes with it.
Adolph Rickenbacher was born in Switzerland in 1886 and emigrated to the United States with relatives after the death of his parents. Sometime after moving to Los Angeles in 1918, he changed his surname to “Rickenbacker”. This was done probably in order to avoid German connotations in light of the recently concluded First World War as well as to capitalize on Adolph’s distant relation to World War I flying ace Eddie Rickenbacker. In 1925, Adolph Rickenbacker and two partners formed the Rickenbacker Manufacturing Company and incorporated it in 1927. By the time he met George Beauchamp and began manufacturing metal bodies for the “Nationals” being produced by the National String Instruments Corporation, Rickenbacker was a highly skilled production engineer and machinist. Adolph soon became a shareholder in National and, with the assistance of his Rickenbacker Manufacturing Company, National was able to boost production to as many as fifty guitars a day.[4]
Lets face it: when most folks first pick up the electric guitar, the only other gear they think they might need would be an amp, a pick, some cables and maybe some pedals if they are savvy. As these players become more experienced and move from their garage to live music venues and recording situations, they eventually run into some issues and realize there must be better ways to be heard than turning the amp to 11.

The Afterneath gets a place on our favorites list, largely because of the "Drag" feature that allows you to sort of delay the decay of your reverb effect, giving off an ambiance that trails off behind each original note as it bleeds into new notes. It's a very unique reverb effect, which blends particularly nicely with a fretless bass in the example video below. 
The same goes for Electrovoice's RE20, which counts Steve Albini, John Fry, and especially Glenn Kolotkin amongst its friends. "I like to use RE20s on most amplifiers when they're available", says Glenn, "because the quality is great and they can take really high levels. They're very directional and they're great for rock and roll." The mic also exhibits an unusually wide and flat frequency response and is specially designed to resist proximity effect.
The D-120's all-mahogany body strays from conventional spruce top design, which results in a warmer and more articulate tone. This particular tone is ideal for guitarists who sing, and for those who accompany vocals, it also blends well with conventional spruce top acoustic guitars, easily cutting through the mix with its lower-mids emphasized voicing. And since the body is crafted from solid mahogany, you can be sure that the instrument grows with you, sounding better with age.
I bought this Fender acoustic/electric guitar about 9 months ago. It has a wonderful rich tone, is easy to play and is beautiful. The grain on the mahogany is dark and beautiful. It lives up to its dreadnought name and can fill a large living room with its sound. The tone is deep, rich and mellow. Strings are separated enough for easy picking. Tuning pegs are of decent quality and once strings are broken in it stays pretty much in tune. Other than putting on some bronze phosphor strings I did not need to set the guitar up. I really haven't played it much with an amplifier so can't comment on the electronics, other than the built in tuner works well. The hardside guitar case is well padded and looks professional. I was a little concerned about buying a guitar over the
Guitar models currently include the Master Class, American Series, Oregon Series, Cascade series, Atlas series, Passport Plus, and Passport, as well as 12-string models and Bass models. The Voice series, reviewed by Guitar Player in 2012, was praised for the quality of construction and various innovative elements, including a “Tru-Voice Electronics System” which, according to Dave Hunter, “for live performance … comes closer to a seamless acoustic-to-amplified transition than virtually any other flat-top I’ve played.”[2]
Prior to being acquired by Gibson back in 1957, Epiphone once competed with the most popular guitar brands in the market - including Gibson. These days, Epiphone is known for being the affordable sub-brand of Gibson, producing cost-effective alternatives to many of their premium guitars. Many experienced players today credit this brand for manufacturing their first ever instrument, and their popularity in the entry level market continue to soar high.

Thanks for this explanation. I have built a few electric guitars, but they have been in the Gibson style with two humbuckers. I am now working on a guitar with an HSH configuration, so for starters, I needed to understand the basic 5 way switch, which if you just looked at it, it makes no sense. Now I see that the wipers of each pole are on the opposite end of each side.
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