{"eVar4":"vintage: guitars","eVar5":"vintage: guitars: electric guitars","pageName":"[gc] vintage: guitars: electric guitars: kent","reportSuiteIds":"guitarcenterprod","eVar3":"vintage","prop2":"[gc] vintage: guitars: electric guitars","prop1":"[gc] vintage: guitars","evar51":"default: united states","prop10":"brands","prop11":"kent","prop5":"[gc] vintage: guitars: electric guitars","prop6":"[gc] vintage: guitars: electric guitars","prop3":"[gc] vintage: guitars: electric guitars","prop4":"[gc] vintage: guitars: electric guitars","channel":"[gc] vintage","linkInternalFilters":"javascript:,guitarcenter.com","prop7":"[gc] vintage"}
While many individuals who want to become guitar technicians dream of working with big-name bands, it is more realistic to work with smaller bands first to gain experience. Local bands often need extra help with many of the technical aspects of show production. Techs may be asked to perform other tasks besides guitar maintenance, such as stage set-up and breakdown, driving the tour bus and selling merchandise. All of these activities can provide techs with invaluable knowledge regarding staging live performances.

Yamaha is likely a good place for acoustic players as well, as the company offers a number of solid entries in this category. Despite the friendly price, Yamaha consistently puts out quality instruments that feature not only sturdy construction, but sound quality good enough to give the big guys a run for their money. The FG800 is one of the best rated acoustic guitars out there, with a price tag that’s viable for just about any budget. Their acoustic guitar starter packs are great for beginners as well (5).


While Gibson are the creators of the original J2000 jumbo-sized acoustics, the company’s reasonably priced sister company Epiphone do a range of acoustics which are perfect for players looking to dip their toes in the water. The Epiphone EJ2000 is identical in dimensions and appearance to its more costly sibling, yet offers the perfect entry guitar for budding rhythm players.
London and Tokyo’s vintage street-racing motorbikes have inspired the designers, and the guitars from the Revstar collection look and sound accordingly. The idea is to have a diverse range of guitars so that you can be sure to find one that suits you perfectly. They even claim that this guitar is so good that you will consider it to be your other half (maybe even your better half).

For a novice like me, hitting those notes is no easy task. On my first brush with "Rocksmith 2014," I tackled Arctic Monkeys' "R U Mine?" This included a lot of missed notes and looking at my hands to find the right frets. But after playing the song a few times, it got easier and easier - even with the inclusion of more notes to master and more frets to find.


When it comes to its dimensions, all interested buyers should know that it is quite sizeable on the exterior (the unit has the following external measurements 40″ length x 12″ (upper bout)/ 15″ (lower bout) width x 3″ height). Likewise, the bag is quite spacious on the inside (39.5″ length x 12″ (upper bout)/ 14.5″ (lower bout) width and 2.5″ in height).
Ultimately, you want to make the best purchase for the person who will be playing the guitar while staying within your budget. As we recommended in the beginning, it’s good to get an idea of what the player is looking for. Find out what styles they like, and his or her favorite music. Looks are important too! The right guitar in the right color could make all the difference.
The first successful guitar pickup was developed in the early 1930s by Rickenbacker® to help amplify Hawaiian lap steel guitars which were popular at the time. The first pickups were single-coils and while they do a good job of picking up the guitar signal they are also susceptible to picking up interference from nearby electrical devices. The Gibson® humbucker (US Patent 2896491) was developed in the 1950s to eliminate the "hum noises" resulting from electromagnetic interference. The humbucker uses two coils and a pair of pole pieces (having opposite magnetic polarities of each other) for each string. The coils are wound and connected to each other in such a way that the current produced by the moving guitar string in the two coils adds up (in-phase), while the current produced by electromagnetic interference in the two coils cancels (out-of-phase). Not only does the humbucker drastically reduce noise from interference, but it also has a different characteristic sound. The single-coil pick up is commonly considered to have a thin, clear and bright (more treble) sound, while the humbucker is known to have a full, but dark (less treble) sound with more overall signal output.
Rack-mounted effects processors are another option, and are often used in pro and home studios as well as in stage rigs.. These effects units offer the same options as floor-based pedals and multi-effects units. They are simply mounted in a rack, and usually can be controlled with a foot pedal or the controls on their front panels. Newly developed iOS app-based and DAW-based effects add even more options to how you go about building an effects collection.
Though he was influenced by everyone from B.B. King to Muddy Waters to Chuck Berry and Bob Dylan, Hendrix’s complete artistic vision included elements of blues, funk, rock, psychedelia and utter chaos. His frequent use of effects like the wah and Octavia pedal, pioneering studio effects like “backward” guitar and flanging, and use of controlled feedback and the tremolo bar added another dimension to his music.
{ "thumbImageID": "Player-Precision-Bass-Maple-Fingerboard-Black/L21559000004000", "defaultDisplayName": "Fender Player Precision Bass Maple Fingerboard", "styleThumbWidth": "60", "styleThumbHeight": "60", "styleOptions": [ { "name": "Polar White", "sku": "sku:site51500000219917", "price": "649.99", "regularPrice": "649.99", "msrpPrice": "650.01", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Fender/Player-Precision-Bass-Maple-Fingerboard-Polar-White-1500000219917.gc", "skuImageId": "Player-Precision-Bass-Maple-Fingerboard-Polar-White/L21559000005000", "brandName": "Fender", "stickerDisplayText": "", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Player-Precision-Bass-Maple-Fingerboard-Polar-White/L21559000005000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Black", "sku": "sku:site51500000219923", "price": "649.99", "regularPrice": "649.99", "msrpPrice": "650.01", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Fender/Player-Precision-Bass-Maple-Fingerboard-Black-1500000219923.gc", "skuImageId": "Player-Precision-Bass-Maple-Fingerboard-Black/L21559000004000", "brandName": "Fender", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Player-Precision-Bass-Maple-Fingerboard-Black/L21559000004000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Buttercream", "sku": "sku:site51500000219915", "price": "649.99", "regularPrice": "649.99", "msrpPrice": "650.01", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Fender/Player-Precision-Bass-Maple-Fingerboard-Buttercream-1500000219915.gc", "skuImageId": "Player-Precision-Bass-Maple-Fingerboard-Buttercream/L21559000002000", "brandName": "Fender", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Player-Precision-Bass-Maple-Fingerboard-Buttercream/L21559000002000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Tidepool", "sku": "sku:site51500000219921", "price": "649.99", "regularPrice": "649.99", "msrpPrice": "650.01", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Fender/Player-Precision-Bass-Maple-Fingerboard-Tidepool-1500000219921.gc", "skuImageId": "Player-Precision-Bass-Maple-Fingerboard-Tidepool/L21559000001000", "brandName": "Fender", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Player-Precision-Bass-Maple-Fingerboard-Tidepool/L21559000001000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "3-Color Sunburst", "sku": "sku:site51500000219916", "price": "649.99", "regularPrice": "649.99", "msrpPrice": "650.01", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Fender/Player-Precision-Bass-Maple-Fingerboard-3-Color-Sunburst-1500000219916.gc", "skuImageId": "Player-Precision-Bass-Maple-Fingerboard-3-Color-Sunburst/L21559000003000", "brandName": "Fender", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Player-Precision-Bass-Maple-Fingerboard-3-Color-Sunburst/L21559000003000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } ] }
Amongst the best guitar brands in India for acoustic guitars, Martin is one that stands out. Martin is one of the best known brands for its steel-string guitars. It is a leading manufacturer of flat top guitars which produce top notch sound quality. However, the company is best known for their signature dreadnought acoustic guitar with X-bracing. It is truly one of the best guitar brands for some of the best quality guitars in the market.
The epic storylines, adrenaline-pumping action and explosive thrills are back. The Fallout franchise returns with Fallout 4. Grab your controller and get ready to dive back into the enveloping storyline of this legendary series. Get ready to return to the epic, award-winning franchise with Fallout 4. This newest chapter brings an all-new open-world environment to life, and has been created by Bethesda Game Studios, creators of Game-of-the-Year-award winners Fallout 3 and The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim. Will you be prepared for the next Fallout installment?
Description: Body: Basswood (Tilia, Linden, Lime) - Body Construction: Solid - Neck Attachment: Bolt - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 24, Jumbo - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 7 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Bridge: Tune-O-Matic - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Chrome, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch, Grover Tuners - Pickups: Dean - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Metallic Cherry, Metallic Black, Transparent Red
Blueridge makes some excellent acoustic guitars, many of them based on historic designs. So, what does that mean? Many players feel that acoustics made in the early days after the dreadnought design had been created used better construction methods, qualities and materials compared to guitars produced today. In their historic designs, Blueridge attempts to capture some of that magic.
So you've decided to purchase a new axe? Well you've definitely come to the right place. Todays line of intermediate electric guitars are so superbly crafted right down to the smallest component, you don't have to worry about sacrificing quality for a reasonably priced instrument. In fact, this catalog is exploding with intermediate electric guitars for every taste and style. Like any expert guitarist will tell you, the learning process speeds up considerably when you have a guitar that's an ideal balance of comfort, playability and tone. Thankfully, popular guitar companies like Ibanez, Epiphone, Jackson and countless others are passionate about giving everyone the opportunity to play an electric guitar that's meticulously constructed. You'll even find intermediate electric guitars that are endorsed by professional artists, including Dave Mustaine, Brian May and John Petrucci. Since its earliest beginnings, the classic sound and feel of a Strat has found its way in the hands of icons, and the Fender Deluxe Player's Stratocaster will be sure to continue that legacy. Consisting of a noiseless pickups, gold hardware and loaded with advanced electronics, this Strat plays effortless, and the push-button pickup switch provides you with seven pickup combinations for a wide range of tones. This section also features plenty of intermediate hollow-body guitar choices, such as the Gretsch Guitars G5420T Electromatic. This eye-catching single-cutaway contains a Bigsby tremolo and Filter'Tron pickups to give you a lethal combination of vintage twang and vigorous punch. Searching for a brand new electric guitar is an exhilarating experience, and with so many stunning options to choose from on today's market, there has never been a better time than now to get your hands on an instrument that perfectly represents your own personality. Whether you're a '60s garage turkey or a technically-skilled metal shredder, you can bet that you'll find what you're looking for.

The first part of this book shows why Guthrie is such a great player, and dives into his mindset when it comes to teaching and playing. I really believe you should go buy this book, so I don't want to give too much away, but he covers great topics like how to avoid guitar injuries, setting goals for yourself, thoughts on technique, tone and gear, and general tips on how to practice.
• Vibrato: There are several types of vibrato — a/k/a tremolo or whammy bar — tailpieces. They debuted in the 1930s via inventor Doc Kaufman, who developed a vibrato unit that was mounted on a guitar’s body and had an arm that moved side to side. Today’s vibrato arms move up and down and are dominated by the top-mounted Bigsby style vibrato and various types of through-body vibrato tailpieces, ranging from the spring-tensioned arms found on many classic thin solid bodied guitar models to the dive-bombing units like the Kahler and Floyd Rose types favored by metal shredders. These also have fine-tuners for each string, to compensate for any detuning the use of the vibrato arm might produce. Gibson also offers a top-mounted Vibrola unit of its own design.
i think i have the exact same guitar as you do daniel. it's the same red into black faded with one pickup and no serial number tho. i'm looking everywhere for the exact model info etc. but i can't seem to find it either. i got it free froma guy i know and i had to replace the tuning heads, the strings and some of the ground wiring but now it's doing great. i love it. it has a really good sound for being so old!
Jacob - it really depends on several factors: how much money you have to spend, type of music you like to play, electric or acoustic. You can get started with a $100 acoustic of various branding with decent quality or a basic Squier Strat for $100-150 if you want electric for many styles. Epiphone makes Les Paul and SG models for $100 and up for a little more rock and roll edge - its all a choice of your style.
I have owned a lot of amps over the years. I am also a dealer in music accessories. Please note that we do not sell these amps, so I am not endorsing and using something my shop sells. I recently have bought a couple of amps in a series (I bought one first and then bought another) and have been really impressed. The Vox AV series. http://www.voxamps.com/AVSeries

During the 1960s, many musicians[who?] preferred Martin guitars built beforeWorld War II to more recent guitars of the same model. The pre-War guitars were believed[citation needed] to have internal bracing carved more skillfully than later instruments, producing better resonance, and tops made from Adirondack red spruce rather than Sitka spruce. Additionally, 1970s Martin dreadnoughts suffered from poor intonation in the higher registers[citation needed]. Some luthiers and repairmen[who?] attribute this to a gradual trend of misplacing the bridge on these guitars: the same jigs for bridge placement were used throughout the history of each model’s production. As the amount of production increased from the Martin factory, the jigs eroded, resulting in inaccurate bridge placement[citation needed]. This was eventually identified and corrected.
At GuitarBassPro.com. ("GuitarBassPro"), we are committed to protecting the privacy of our customers and users of our web site located at www.GuitarBassPro.com (the "Site") . This privacy policy ("Privacy Policy") gives you details of our privacy practices, including (a) what information we collect about you when you use the Site; (b) how the information will be used or disclosed; and (c) your rights with respect to our collection and use of your data. We may modify these policies from time to time and will provide notice of any major changes by posting such notice on the Site.
This cutoff is based on the average used price on Reverb over the past year, and while the $1000 cutoff is relatively arbitrary, it is as good a point as any to divide between entry-level gear and more heavy artillery. Here again, we are not combining wattage and cabinet size variations on the same models, which inherently decreases the ranking of any amp series with a multitude of different configurations.
A very good option in the budget pedal market. Comes with a great number of effects to combine for solid sounds. Virtually all the factory pre-sets are worthless and are sort of demonstrations of what the pedal can do. But you have plenty of user saves and setting up good tones is straight forward and simple. The tuner in this and my handheld one never agree. Someone is lying!
If you’ve read our full reviewof the 50s Stratocaster, you’ll know that this Classic Vibe Stratocaster is an excellent prospect for any beginner who loves the good old days of rock n’ roll! Made by Squier, this 50s-inspired electric has huge vintage appeal, with a modern feel thanks to a trio of Alnico III single-coil pickups and a smooth, modern C-shaped maple neck (with 21 medium jumbo frets).
On 2007’s self-titled effort and the new Nightmare, Avenged Sevenfold have continued to expand their sonic template, leaving Vengeance and Gates plenty of space to explore a range of different styles. At the end of the day, however, metal is metal, and at its essence that means killer riffs and shredding solos, which the duo unleash in abundance. A7X staples like “Bat Country,” “Almost Easy” and the latest single, “Nightmare,” are chock full of blistering rhythms and finger-twisting, speed-of-light leads, while they tread that sweet spot between catchy melodicism and all-out aggression.

Starting to learn on an electric guitar can be much easier as compared to an acoustic guitar. Electric guitars chords are easier to hold down as the width of the neck is shorter. The strings on the electric guitars are softer than those of acoustic guitars, which is easier on your fingertips if you're just starting out. They can be slightly more expensive than acoustic guitars, especially because other gear is needed to support your playing (i.e. amps, cables, and so on). It's all a matter of personal preference, but here are some of our top choices.


Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Maple - Quilted - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 22 - Inlay: Mother Of Pearl - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Custom - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Diecast, Gold, 2x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Black, Red

The Supro Spanish Guitar was a non-cutaway archtop built by Regal with electronic components supplied by National Dobro. Except for the fairly modern block-style Supro logo, this was pretty much a typical downscale pressed-top Regal archtop guitar, with a mildly rounded headstock, neck joining the body at the 14th fret, 20-fret rosewood fingerboard, five single-dot inlays, wooden adjustable compensated bridge and a simple trapeze tailpiece. The most distinctive feature was that the guitar had no f-holes. You’ll recall that the ’35 Dobro Electric Spanish was a “conventional” archtop, most likely with f-holes (a comparable National archtop also had f-holes in the beginning, but switched to the non-f-hole design in late ’36 or ’37, following the Supro pattern). The pickguard was typical Regal made of black Ebonoid plastic. In catalog illustrations this appears to have white trim around the edge, but this was apparently company “retouching” to make the pickguard stand out better in the pictures; real examples have plain black ‘guards. The oval, covered pickup sat on a wider oval surround which also held the single volume control. This pickup was nestled down near the bridge. The tuners were Harmony Tune-Rites, with polygonal pot metal buttons. The necks on National Dobro guitars which were entirely made by other manufacturers were glued in. Slightly later, when they began making their own necks and applying them to other bodies, National Dobro Spanish guitars had bolt-on necks.


{"eVar4":"shop: guitars","eVar5":"shop: guitars: electric guitars","pageName":"[gc] shop: guitars: electric guitars","reportSuiteIds":"guitarcenterprod","eVar3":"shop","prop2":"[gc] shop: guitars: electric guitars","prop1":"[gc] shop: guitars","evar51":"default: united states","prop10":"category","prop11":"electric guitars","prop5":"[gc] shop: guitars: electric guitars","prop6":"[gc] shop: guitars: electric guitars","prop3":"[gc] shop: guitars: electric guitars","prop4":"[gc] shop: guitars: electric guitars","channel":"[gc] shop","linkInternalFilters":"javascript:,guitarcenter.com","prop7":"[gc] sub category"}
We make our Tone Bars / Ferrule Blocks (tone slugs) out of 360 brass and use them on most all of our string through custom guitars. You will notice an enhancement in sustain and beauty.  The ones sold here are not polished. Go to shawwoodshop.com to purchase slugs that are polished. Please ask any questions you might have about the Slug. I offer quantity discounts.

Description: Body: Nato - Body Construction: Solid - Neck Attachment: Neck-through - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 3 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25" (64cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Chrome, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, Kluson Tuners - Pickups: Harmony - String Instrument Finish: Bronze, Black
{"eVar4":"vintage: guitars","pageName":"[gc] vintage: guitars: harmony","reportSuiteIds":"guitarcenterprod","eVar3":"vintage","prop18":"skucondition|0||creationdate|1","prop2":"[gc] vintage: guitars","prop1":"[gc] vintage: guitars","prop17":"sort by","evar51":"default: united states","prop10":"category","prop11":"guitars","prop5":"[gc] vintage: guitars","prop6":"[gc] vintage: guitars","prop3":"[gc] vintage: guitars","prop4":"[gc] vintage: guitars","channel":"[gc] vintage","linkInternalFilters":"javascript:,guitarcenter.com","prop7":"[gc] vintage"}
Jump up ^ The little finger whose use is not completely standardized in classical guitar technique can also be found designated by e or x. There are several words in Spanish for the little finger: dedo meñique, dedo auricular, dedo pequeño, but their initials conflict with the initials of the other fingers; c is said to be the initial of the dedo chiquito which is not the most common name for the little finger; e and x are not initials but letters that were picked, either with its own rationale, by people who didn't know what else to pick
As the author of the article, I don’t use an Axe-Fx, but a $250 Fly Rig. But if I want to talk to an expert on modeling, I wanted to ask the company that knows it best. Sure, you have to take in to consideration a PA, but you have to do that if you own an amp too, since proper sound sends keeps the volume lower on stage to send everything through the PA.
(48 Contiguous U.S. States) Free Free Shipping With Backstage Pass 92118 2-Day Standard Ground {savingIsUpTo=false, MSRP=248.0, listPriceRange=false, isFreeShipping=true, download=false, isPriceDrop=false, salePriceRange=false, YourSaving=0.0, productId=site1prodJ40301, MSRPRange=false, enablePDPColorOption=true, showBrandNameWithProduct=true, usedAmount=131.12, restockStartAmount=null, listPrice=149.0, priceVisibility=1, usedCount=1, salePrice=149.0, isOnSale=false, showMSRP=true, restockCount=0}

Launch price: $2,419 / £1,943 | Body: Alder | Neck: Maple | Scale: 24" | Fingerboard: Rosewood | Frets: 22 | Pickups: 2x Bare Knuckle Johnny Marr single coils | Controls: Volume, tone, 4-way pickup selector switch, 2x 'bright' slide switches | Hardware: Jaguar bridge with Mustang saddles and vintage-style floating vibrato | Left-handed: No | Finish: Olympic White, Metallic KO


Jazz guitarists use their knowledge of harmony and jazz theory to create jazz chord "voicings," which emphasize the 3rd and 7th notes of the chord. Some more sophisticated chord voicings also include the 9th, 11th, and 13th notes of the chord. In some modern jazz styles, dominant 7th chords in a tune may contain altered 9ths (either flattened by a semitone, which is called a "flat 9th", or sharpened by a semitone, which is called a "sharp 9th"); 11ths (sharpened by a semitone, which is called a "sharp 11th"); 13ths (typically flattened by a semitone, which is called a "flat 13th").
We certainly can’t have a best cheap electric guitars list without the awesome Epiphone G-400 Electric Guitar, Worn Cherry. In fact, this guitar will make most peoples’ “best guitars” lists thanks to the fact they’re built to such high standards and they sound absolutely fantastic. The budget friendly price tag makes it an affordable option for beginner guitarists, but you’ll often see these Epiphone SG models on the professional stages of the world thanks to the sheer playability and build quality.
Through the late 1960s, Westheimer offered a wide range of Kingston instruments including electric basses and hollowbodies (and even amplifiers). By the mid-1970s, it was becoming increasingly expensive to build guitars in Japan, so Westheimer shifted production to Korea by building a factory there, which became Cort. Kingston guitars existed in one form or another through the 1970s and even in the early 1980s, but Westheimer was finding great success building budget and entry-level guitars in his Cort factory for big U.S. guitar companies such as Kramer, B.C. Rich, and Epiphone.

The best guitars?  Look at what the best players use.  Certainly Gibson and Fender are in the mix, but these are typically priceless, early production or highly customized one-off units.  If you want something more or less off the shelf that is in the same range of build, tone and feel quality look at the following (BTW, you can't get these at Guitar Center, which is probably why they haven't been mentioned yet):
Launch price: $1,499 / £1,211 | Type: Amp modeller/multi-effects pedal | Effects: 70 | Amp models: 41 guitar, 7 bass | Connections: Standard guitar input, standard aux input, XLR mic input, standard main outputs (L/mono, R), XLR main outputs (L/mono, R), standard stereo phones output, 4x standard send, 4x standard return, s/pdif digital in, s/pdif digital out, AES/EBU and L6 Link out, Variax, MIDI in, MIDI out/thru, USB, 2x expression pedal, Ext amp, CV | Power requirements: Mains power (IEC lead)

For better or worse, by 1982 the taste for natural-finished, neck-through guitars with lots of switches and active electronics had begun to move on. On the horizon were the brief affair with weird-shaped “heavy metal” guitars and the impending first Strat-mania and the rise of Superstrats which would pretty much define the remainder of the decade. 1982, and the 18 and 28 Series, marked the end of Martin’s direct manufacture of electric solidbody guitars.
I personally don't like the shape of the Valkyrie...it just looks odd to me. Try a few Epi's...some are pretty nice. Stay away from the G310s...I suspect they may be made of balsa wood..and the Specials. But the G400s, the customs and the Tony Iommis, all of which I have played, have been pretty decent in terms of fit, finish and sound. I'd really love to play a Prophecy at some point...they look pretty rad.
I have one of these and what I like about this guitar are the little touches. The arch top and binding helps set it apart from other guitars around this pricepoint, as does the black chrome hardware. Schecters are enormously comfortable guitars to play and their finish work is excellent. This is a lot of guitar for the money, but you can upgrade twice within $500 with the Omen Extreme-6 and the Omen Extreme-6 FR, depending on your needs. After owning mine for a few years, I tossed a couple of Seymour Duncan Antiquity pickups in it to give it a serious upgrade and more longevity.
Power amp clipping is not the same thing as preamp/preamp tube clipping. Sending a power amp signal that is getting power amp clipping to a speaker can blow the speaker. Sending a preamp/preamp tube clipped signal through a speaker is not harmful. In practice, part of the "breaking up" amp sound, of a "cranked" amplifier, which is widely appreciated by hard rock, metal, punk and blues musicians, is a mix of preamp and power amp clipping. One of the benefits of using a separate components head system, in which a separate preamp and power amp are mounted in a rack, is that the bassist or bass tech can watch for the clipping warning LED on the power amp and lower the power amp volume, if necessary.
I didn’t use any guitar effects. I just used a straight into the amp, and I put the amp up pretty hot, though. The tweeds go up to 12 usually, and this one I had on 10 on the bridge pickup on the Strat. I was using a glass slide. Here’s the slide I was using. It’s like an old medicine bottle. I put some felt in there to make it a little bit of a tighter grip on my finger, but it’s the same slide that Dwayne Allman used.
I'll second the neck comment, conditionally. My first guitar was a hand-me-down Monterey archtop acoustic that had been my uncle's, and it have a sharp V neck. Out of nostalgia I bought another Monterey on eBay and its cross section feels like a tomato can lying in my hand. After a refret it plays smoother and easier than anything that fat has a right to. The original frets..., not quite.

Boss’ CE-1 Chorus Ensemble was the first of these types commercially available, and is the best remembered of the company’s now-archaic looking early range of die-cast metal pedals. The unit was an instant success when it hit the market in 1976, and was quickly snatched up by a range of major players. Andy Summers used the CE-1 with the Police in the late 1970s and early 1980s, and it’s probably most famously heard on the band’s big 1979 hit “Message In A Bottle,” though others made creative use of it too. Shortly after the Boss, Electro-Harmonix offered both its Memory Man Stereo Echo/Chorus—which featured a very good, spacious chorus setting that a lot of player’s loved—and smaller, stand-alone Small Clone chorus. Like the Small Stone phaser before it, the Small Clone had a softer, subtler sound than many of the chorus pedals that would soon flood the market, and it too was a huge hit. Kurt Cobain’s use of the pedal on “Smells Like Teen Spirit” and Chris Novoselic’s bass part on “Come As You Are” from Nirvana’s Nevermind album shows off how it can add a rich, moving, liquid texture to both clean and distorted parts. MXR, DOD and Ibanez all offered popular early IC-based analog chorus pedals, and today every major mass-manufacturer has a unit on the market.
I am not completely sure this tuner info is completely accurate. Sorry about that... Remember as a general rule Grovers were used on style 21 and above, and Klusons were used on style 18 and lower. There are some exceptions (like during 1940 to 1945, and pre-1930s). On pre-war Grover tuners, there are basically two types used on Martins: G-93 (round button 'butterbean') and G-98 (scalloped buttons, aka "Sta-Tite"). Both came in 6:1 and 12:1 tuning ratios, with 12:1 coming about in 1938 (and replacing the 6:1 ratio). The post-1938 12:1 ratio Grovers can be always be identified since they combine the thin seamed tuner buttons with the long pointed baseplate, and the tuner gear is screw mounted. The 1938 and prior Grover G98 tuners have a thin seamed button combined with the a square tipped baseplate, and always had the 6:1 ratio. They also had the riveted tuner gear. Ater WW2 the G98 was reintroduced with pointy baseplates and a screw mounted gear, and this was copied by Waverly, Grover, Schaller, etc after the war. Also Martin used original Waverly tuners (open back, rounded base tips, butterbean buttons) after WW2 on 00 and 000 and some D guitars style 18 (and some 28) in the late 1940s and 1950s.

Crafted with quality body woods, it features a solid cedar top with a wild cherry back and produces a dynamic sound with a good mid-range that projects wonderfully. Sitting at the top is a distinctive, tapered headstock, which allows for greater tuning stability, while the hand-finished silver leaf maple neck – with rosewood fretboard – is slightly fatter than other acoustics, and is great for fingerstyle guitarists.
The model designations of the archtops are unknown. Later these guitars would have either a PE or EP model designation, so presumably the ones in the photo did, too. One appears to be a full-sized, thick-bodied archtop with a rounded cutaway. Not much is visible in the photo, but it apparently had a single, white-covered pickup at the neck, block inlays and a white pickguard. The other guitar had a single pointed Florentine cutaway and was slightly smaller than, say, a Gibson ES-335. It’s impossible to tell the depth from the photo, but it looks as though it’s a thinline. This, too, had a single white pickup at the neck, moveable adjustable bridge, trapeze tail, large white pickguard (not modelled on a typical Gibson shape, by the way), a little plastic plate on the lower bout with volume and tone, with white knobs. The fingerboard has large white dots, with double small dots at the octave. The f-holes are three-part; the headstock Teisco three-and-three.
Look for additional symbols in the tab. As you can see in the example above, many tabs aren't just collections of lines and notes. Tabs use a wide variety of special symbols to tell you how to play the notes in the tab. Most symbols refer to specific playing techniques - to make a song sound as much like the recording as possible, pay attention to these special markings.
{ "thumbImageID": "Rocketeer-Electric-Guitar-Pack-Red-Burst/430930000003000", "defaultDisplayName": "Rogue Rocketeer Electric Guitar Pack", "styleThumbWidth": "60", "styleThumbHeight": "60", "styleOptions": [ { "name": "Red Burst", "sku": "sku:site51343059402611", "price": "109.99", "regularPrice": "149.99", "msrpPrice": "299.99", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Rogue/Rocketeer-Electric-Guitar-Pack-Red-Burst-1343059402611.gc", "skuImageId": "Rocketeer-Electric-Guitar-Pack-Red-Burst/430930000003000", "brandName": "Rogue", "onSale": "true", "stickerDisplayText": "On Sale", "stickerClass": "stickerOnSale", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Rocketeer-Electric-Guitar-Pack-Red-Burst/430930000003000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Blue", "sku": "sku:site51275425410280", "price": "109.99", "regularPrice": "149.99", "msrpPrice": "299.99", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Rogue/Rocketeer-Electric-Guitar-Pack-Blue-1275425410280.gc", "skuImageId": "Rocketeer-Electric-Guitar-Pack-Blue/430930000004000", "brandName": "Rogue", "onSale": "true", "stickerDisplayText": "On Sale", "stickerClass": "stickerOnSale", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Rocketeer-Electric-Guitar-Pack-Blue/430930000004000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Wine Burst", "sku": "sku:site51343059402609", "price": "109.99", "regularPrice": "149.99", "msrpPrice": "299.99", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Rogue/Rocketeer-Electric-Guitar-Pack-Wine-Burst-1343059402609.gc", "skuImageId": "Rocketeer-Electric-Guitar-Pack-Wine-Burst/430930000002000", "brandName": "Rogue", "onSale": "true", "stickerDisplayText": "On Sale", "stickerClass": "stickerOnSale", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Rocketeer-Electric-Guitar-Pack-Wine-Burst/430930000002000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Black", "sku": "sku:site51275425410277", "price": "149.99", "regularPrice": "149.99", "msrpPrice": "299.99", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Rogue/Rocketeer-Electric-Guitar-Pack-Black-1275425410277.gc", "skuImageId": "Rocketeer-Electric-Guitar-Pack-Black/430930000001000", "brandName": "Rogue", "stickerDisplayText": "Clearance", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "Clearance", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Rocketeer-Electric-Guitar-Pack-Black/430930000001000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } ] }

Now, you may be wondering if there are things to love about Guitarist and there certainly are. The GUI is incredible and simply one of my favorites around. And if you need funk or jazz rhythms fast, then this is your guy — the auto-wah feature saves this plugin. The more you put realism out of your head and strive for interesting tones, the more you’ll like Guitarist.


Bracing affects the way the guitar sounds because it changes the pitch or tune that the guitar produces out of the sound hole. Personally I think X bracing is the b est because it produces a more even and better more balance for mids and high notes and just enough bass on the E and A strings that gives a brighter more even tone. Blinded or pessed bracing gives a much deeper sound than x bracing which =less versatility but if you bought a pressed dread knot or anything else you'll still be okay just remember strings make a huge difference and running your guitar to the right amount of tone for any song will work it's just that Taylor produces the best over all guitar itself by better quality woods and they go through ver strict and rigorous testing and inspections before they are sold to retailers and customers. Higher grade parts attention to detail and style of music versatility is why one guitar can cost 3 times as much. Most companies like Taylor is know give warranties or $ back

As suggested by the numerical designation, Martin’s 28 Series was essentially an upgrade or refinement of the earlier 18 Series. Martin typically indicates fancier materials and appointments with a higher number (a D-28 is fancier dreadnought than a D-18, etc.). These consisted of one guitar, the E-28, and one bass, the EB-28. The first prototypes appeared in June of 1980; production began in January of 1981.

A note on acoustic guitar pickups (piezo, in particular): Making crazy 10 dB cuts? Contemplating making some absurd boost? You're probably not wrong – the acoustic pickup world can be the Wild West when it comes to tone. Some are great, and some are downright questionable. There are too many variables to even begin suggesting frequencies, so use your ears to guide you home on this one.
There are two types of acoustic guitar namely the steel-string acoustic guitar and the classical guitar. Steel-string acoustic guitars produce a metallic sound that is a distinctive component of a wide range of popular genres. Steel-string acoustic guitars are sometimes referred to as flat tops. The word top refers to the face or front of the guitar which is called the table. Classical guitars have a wider neck than steel-string guitars and are strung with nylon strings. They are primarily associated with the playing of the solo classical guitar repertoire. Classical guitars are sometimes referred to as Spanish guitars in recognition of their country of origin.
The earliest sound effects were strictly studio productions. In the mid to late 1940s, recording engineers and experimental musicians such as Les Paul began manipulating reel-to-reel recording tape to create echo effects and unusual, futuristic sounds. Microphone placement ("miking") techniques were used in spaces with specially designed acoustic properties to simulate echo chambers.[22][23][24] In 1948 DeArmond released the Trem-Trol, the first commercially available stand-alone effects unit. This device produced a tremolo by passing an instrument's electrical signal through a water-based electrolytic fluid.[25] Most stand-alone effects of the 1950s and early 60s such as the Gibson GA-VI vibrato unit and the Fender reverb box, were expensive and impractical, requiring bulky transformers and high voltages. The original stand-alone units were not especially in-demand as many effects came built into amplifiers. The first popular stand-alone was the 1958 Watkins Copicat, a relatively portable tape echo effect made famous by the British band, The Shadows.[26][27]

{ "thumbImageID": "Affinity-Mini-Strat-Electric-Guitar-with-Rosewood-Fingerboard-Pink/J86206000003000", "defaultDisplayName": "Squier Affinity Mini Strat Electric Guitar with Rosewood Fingerboard", "styleThumbWidth": "60", "styleThumbHeight": "60", "styleOptions": [ { "name": "Pink", "sku": "sku:site51500000053100", "price": "129.99", "regularPrice": "129.99", "msrpPrice": "235.99", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Squier/Affinity-Mini-Strat-Electric-Guitar-with-Rosewood-Fingerboard-Pink-1500000053100.gc", "skuImageId": "Affinity-Mini-Strat-Electric-Guitar-with-Rosewood-Fingerboard-Pink/J86206000003000", "brandName": "Squier", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Affinity-Mini-Strat-Electric-Guitar-with-Rosewood-Fingerboard-Pink/J86206000003000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Torino Red", "sku": "sku:site51500000053099", "price": "129.99", "regularPrice": "129.99", "msrpPrice": "235.99", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Squier/Affinity-Mini-Strat-Electric-Guitar-with-Rosewood-Fingerboard-Torino-Red-1500000053099.gc", "skuImageId": "Affinity-Mini-Strat-Electric-Guitar-with-Rosewood-Fingerboard-Torino-Red/J86206000002000", "brandName": "Squier", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Affinity-Mini-Strat-Electric-Guitar-with-Rosewood-Fingerboard-Torino-Red/J86206000002000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Black", "sku": "sku:site51500000053098", "price": "129.99", "regularPrice": "129.99", "msrpPrice": "235.99", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Squier/Affinity-Mini-Strat-Electric-Guitar-with-Rosewood-Fingerboard-Black-1500000053098.gc", "skuImageId": "Affinity-Mini-Strat-Electric-Guitar-with-Rosewood-Fingerboard-Black/J86206000001000", "brandName": "Squier", "stickerDisplayText": "", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Affinity-Mini-Strat-Electric-Guitar-with-Rosewood-Fingerboard-Black/J86206000001000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } ] }
The Red Hot Chili Peppers always knew how to rock a party; it took John Frusciante to turn them into an arena-packing band with a sound they could call their own. Frusciante is a remarkably elastic stylist and a gifted sculptural arranger who pushed the Chilis to explore new worlds without getting in the way of their funk-pumped energy; he beefed up their sound with both well-placed fire (the volcanic, Hendrix-style solo on “Dani California”) and remarkable elegance (the indelible opening chords of “Under the Bridge”).
Many Rickenbackers — both guitars and basses — are equipped to be compatible with a “Rick-O-Sound” unit via an extra “stereo” output socket that allows the two pickups (or neck and middle pickup combined/bridge pickup, in the case of three pickup instruments) to be connected to different effects units or amplifiers. Another idiosyncrasy of Rickenbackers is the use of two truss rods (rather than the usual one) to correct twists, as well as curvature, in the neck.
But where do you start? What do all these different pedals do? In this guide we will give you a brief overview of what each different type of effect does so you can make sure you are looking for the right gear. If you're new to the pedal world, you might wanna check out our selection of best guitar pedals for beginners while you're here. And if you already have some pedals but want advice on which pedalboard to get, click here!
The National STEM Guitar Project, in partnership with NSF Advanced Technological Education (ATE) Centers with funding provided through a grant from The National Science Foundation (#1700531, #1304405, & #0903336), hosts innovative Guitar Building Institutes throughout the US. Five-day institutes, combined with additional instructional activities comprising 80 hours, provide middle, high school, and postsecondary faculty training on science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) applications as they relate to the guitar. The institutes present and teach participants hands-on, applied learning techniques to help engage students and spark excitement for learning STEM subject matter.

Fun !...so fun...I like the game it was worth waiting a couple years for it and I like the fact that even though I preordered it when I first got my xbox one to Best Buy they still gave me all the points for my xbox and the game so I recommend it to a friend and I'm glad that I finally got the Xbox one and the game came out to play it...IF YOU ARE A DIE HARD FAN OF HALO YOU WILL GIVE IT A 5, IF YOU ARE REALISTIC YOU WILL GO WITH A 4, NOT TOO MUCH HAS CHANGED A FEW NEW SUITS AND COLORS FOR YOUR SOLDIER, STORY IS GREAT LIKE ALWAYS, AND LIKE ALWAYS ALOT OF GRINDING ON EVERY LEVEL, IT DOES NOT BRING ANYTHING NEW ON THE 1 PLAYER SIDE,MULTIPLAYER HAS PLENTY NEW FEATURES,AS A FAN OF HALO, I MUST HAVE IT IN MY COLLECTION AND YOU MUST TOO!
Taylor, Martin, Gibson all great production brands... Which is better comes done to what you like sonically, visually and of course the feel in your hands. It is also difficult to compare one brand versus another unless you are comparing similar designs using the same tone woods and in the same price range. Anyone espousing one is better than the other without doing this is not being honest with themselves. I own a Martin and two Taylors, all are great and have different voices and feels... Even the 2 Taylors are very different in sound and looks. In the end I vote for Taylor because I like the neck carve and feel that the looks and build quality are a bit better in the $3K - $4 price range. If your looking for something in a lower $500 - $1, 000range you probably should be considering Yamaha or Takamine. Though in the end you get what you pay for.
While we have touched on the characteristics of single coil and humbucking pickups, to truly cover guitar electronics check out -‘Guitar Electronics for Musicians’ by Donald Brosnac which details the history of guitar pickups and goes into great detail about the mechanics of guitar pickups). It’s fairly heavy going for anyone new to the topic but also very interesting at the same time.
The pitch shifter is one of the most versatile effects in the pitch category.  Often used with a rocker pedal like a wah-wah or volume pedal, the pitch can be swept up or down by a specified amount in a smooth glissando-like bend.  It’s typical to hear a player use a range of one or two octaves for the sweep, so the shifted pitch lands back on its original note, but in a higher or lower octave.
The core of this guitar is its twin horn double cutaway mahogany body, which follows after the original SG. But as expected in this entry-level price range, they exchanged what's supposed to be a mahogany neck for maple with 12" radius rosewood fingerboard. Specifications remain faithful to the original, with a scale length of 24.75" and 1.68" nut width. The generic pickups installed sound surprisingly good for the price, but like many have done, the pickups can be easily swapped out for more hard hitting humbuckers to get more out of the guitar.
From the jazz-tempered Artcore series to the metal-shredding Iron Labels and all of their rocking classic models, Ibanez electric guitars are definitely not confined to any one genre. You can play whatever music you like with the right Ibanez axe, whether you go for one of their off-the-shelf designs or the signature style designated by your favorite guitar hero.
Note: Youpi Choupi's answer calls my answer below into question by pointing out that classical and flamenco guitars are acoustic guitars. He is correct in this of course, they are all types of acoustic guitar. However, most of the time when someone says they play "acoustic guitar," they mean the commonly used steel-stringed acoustic that most rock, folk, country and other artists play, and I believe this was the intent of the OP when they asked the question. Hence, an answer simply pointing out that Spanish guitar and acoustic guitar are both acoustic guitars would not have been a helpful answer.
MXR’s Distortion+ preceded the Tube Screamer and is an even simpler design, and, despite its name, is more an overdrive than a distortion. That said, its sound is considered by many to be a little more opaque, or colored, than the Tube Screamer’s. The box uses a 741-type IC and a pair of germanium diodes to achieve its soft-clipping sound. These are different components than the famed germanium transistors, but are made of the same material. Germanium is generally attributed a “softness” of tone, and the same applies to the diodes used in the Distortion+ (and other units); change them for silicon diodes and you’ve got a hard-clipping distortion pedal.
OK, our math isn't so great, so we've gone ahead and included an 11th amp in this list of 10. Although it's way too soon to be declared "iconic," PRS Guitars' brand-new Sonzera series of amps have been hot topics in gear land since they were introduced at the 2017 Winter NAMM Show. Let's just call them "instant classics." Featuring a rugged steel chassis, custom transformers and road-ready construction, each Sonzera model delivers serious tone with maximum reliability.
Most guitar especially for those which have more than 1 pickup have selector switch. Attached on the body and normally below the 1st E string on the body of a stratocaster guitar. And on the top shoulder for Les Paul. Its a basic things to understand the switches on which pickups its toggling. First, you need to understand what is the switch for???
You can use similar two-mic techniques, minus the effects, on a single amp to capture a variety of larger-than-life guitar sounds. One trick that I stumbled upon involves miking a twin-speaker amp with two mics that are close in response, but not matched (see Fig. 1). The first time I tried this, on a session with guitarist Paris Slim, I used an Electro-Voice RE20 and a Sennheiser 441.
In October 2017, Gibson announced plans to relocate its Memphis operations to a smaller location and plans to sell the Memphis property. Gibson opened its Memphis facility 18 years before, which occupies just a portion of a massive 127,620 square foot complex. According to the Memphis Daily News, Gibson plans to search for a new facility for its Memphis operations and will stay in the current spot for the next 18 to 24 months. The facility, which sits across from the FedExForum along South B.B. King Boulevard, is expected to list for $17 million.
Description: Body: Nato - Body Construction: Solid - Neck Attachment: Neck-through - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 3 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25" (64cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Chrome, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, Kluson Tuners - Pickups: Harmony - String Instrument Finish: Green
The filters and shifters group also shapes the waveform but in a different fashion than the dynamics group. First and foremost, now that you've gotten rid of noise and extreme volume variances, you want to use an equalizer to tweak your tone. You may roll off extra bass frequencies and increase some high frequencies while dipping the mids. You want this done before you apply the more obvious effects in the next groupings.

If the microphonic problem is not due to the cover, or is with a singlecoil pickup you have two options. First is to wax pot the pickup. The second is to pot the pickup in something else. Laquer was once commonly used, but it can cause a problem with some types of insulation (disolving it) and prevents future repair (other than full rewind). I have found a great alternative to both. It is vinyl sanding sealer. (I'm using Sherwin williams wood classics interior sanding sealer) This stuff penetrates deeply, dries solidly, and allows for repairs same as wax does. It requires no special equipment or care. Just submerge the pickup wait till bubbles stop appearing, pull it out and set it on a paper towel to dry. Once the excess has run off (a minute or so) wipe off the top and bottom of the pickup with a rag and allow it to finish drying. In it's intended use it dries fully in an hour. I leave them overnight.


At least one other Teisco guitar was available from around this time in the ’50s, probably slightly later on � another mini Les Paul that was the ’50s piece de resistance, the J-5. The J-5 was a single-cutaway solidbody that went beyond the other more derivative LPs. This had a slightly elongated body shape, with less pronounced waist than a traditional Les Paul. The upper bass bout headed toward the neck with a more angular, almost pointed corner rather than the typical rounded shoulder. The cutaway horn was also more angular, heading out at almost a right angle to the neck. It’s impossible to tell from the photograph, but this looks to be a glued-in neck. The fingerboard was bound, and featured the typical large white dots with two small dots at the octave. The headstock was a white-faced asymmetrical affair, with a curved peak extending on the bass side, with a concave dip across the top. Tuners had white rectangular buttons. These would be interesting enough, but the body had a bound flamed maple top � flat, not carved. The pickguard followed the body profile, with an extension down the lower side for the volume and tone controls. On the black pickguard were two black-covered pickups, looking sort of like P-90s. Pickup selection was with a chicken-beak rotary three-way switch. Knobs were white knurled with silver top rings. The bridge was a typical adjustable wooden type. Again, a large tailpiece assembly allowed the strings to pass through the body. This is a very beautiful guitar.
Next was Eunice's ‘electric guitar’. It was beautiful and hardly used. However a common problem with guitars of this era were the horrible pickguards made from celluloid that would off-gas while in storage and then wreak havoc over the guitar’s other parts. Upon closer inspection the guitar was actually dripping wet from the many years of storage in the hard case.
Wah-wah: A wah-wah pedal creates vowel-like sounds by altering the frequency spectrum produced by an instrument—i.e., how loud it is at each separate frequency—in what is known as a spectral glide or "sweep".[68] The device is operated by a foot treadle that opens and closes a potentiometer. Wah-wah pedals are often used by funk and rock guitarists.[69]


Based on the MaxxFly body style, this guitar features a 22-fret rosewood fingerboard, a maple neck, and to top it all off, has a mahogany body. Possibly the best part of this guitar is that it comes equipped with Graphtech Ghost piezo pickups. These pickups turn your guitar into a full-blown midi instrument. You can learn more about the Graphtech Ghost pickups and other awesome guitar innovations at GraphTech’s site. Expect to pay slightly under $500 for this guitar. 

It all added up to a cartoonish minimalism that struck a vital cultural nerve when the Ramones burst out of Manhattan’s Lower East Side CBGB scene in the mid Seventies. They were the perfect antidote to the bloated self-indulgence of Seventies arena rock and the tendency—a hangover from the hippie era—for rock and rock musicians to take themselves way too seriously. The Ramones were passionate about rock, without ever being pompous.
I have a Vox Shadow that's sunburst, white pick guard that surrounds 3 solid chrome face pickups and the middle pick up has "VOX" engraved in it. 3 seperate volume controls and a master volume control. Tuning keys are all chrome, and the green decal on the face of the headstock reads Shadow, JMI Dartford, Kent. Neck is attached withthe help of a chrome plate, on the back side of the 'plank' body is an access plate for the jack that states made in England. Guitar also has the original roller/tremelo tail piece with palm lever. The numbers of 64728 are stamped on the back side of the headstock just below the tuning keys. Finish is beginning to crack a bit but it's all original, right down to the volume pots that have to be cleaned from time to time. It must be a rather unknown line that Vox had as I can't find out much on it either. Had this guitar for many years. Was handed to me in pieces in an old 'cardboard' case, (that has since gone away) put it back together and added it to my "music room".

Some bass amps have two inputs. One some amps, one is a high gain input and the other is a low gain input. On other amps, the two inputs may be intended so that two basses can be plugged in at the same time. On these amps, there may be a separate volume control for each input; this is done to enable a bass player to switch between two instruments on different songs (e.g., a fretted and fretless bass) without having to unplug and plug in jacks. For example, the vintage Traynor Bass Master tube head has two inputs, each with its own volume control. Some bass amps have an auxiliary in jack, for plugging in a drum machine, keyboard bass or synthesizer. Some bass amps also have an external speaker out jack. While this jack is also 1/4", a speaker cable must be used with this jack, rather than a patch cord, because it sends a powered signal out to an external speaker cabinet. Higher-powered and more expensive amps may have Speakon output jacks.
The only reason why anyone likes Ibanez is because it's cheap. When you're ready to buy a real axe, get a Jackson. Ibanez is not a "shredder" brand, it is a budget brand, just like Carvin. Jackson has it all: great sound, great feel, great looks, great for shredding! I'll admit because Rich makes some interesting looking guitars, but Jacksons are still cooler (if you've ever seen a Kelly, I'm sure you'll agree). Jackson For the Win!
• Why fret ends get sharp: Sometimes the end of the fret wire can become sharp or, more accurately, protrusive at the sides of a guitar’s neck. Besides being rough on the hands, this is an indicator of a trickier problem: that the fingerboard has become dry and shrunk. This means that the guitar has been kept in an environment that lacks the proper humidity. More careful storage is the ultimate answer, but using lemon oil on the fretboard also helps prevent this from happening by moisturizing the wood.
Which tonewood works the best for you will depend on your personal preference as well as the genre of music you're playing. Electric guitar bodies come in a whole range of styles. You have classics such as the Stratocaster and the Les Paul shape, but there's much more out there to explore. Granted, a vast majority of these were heavily inspired by the aforementioned models and you probably don't want to go too far off into the realm of the strange.
Another great thing about this guitar is the Min-ETune system that offers 16 tuning presets. This not only makes it super quick to tune your guitar for everyday use, it’s also great if you need to tune your guitar up or down. It saves you a lot of work and time! It’s also a feature that makes these electric guitars for beginners who don’t know how to tune their guitar, and even if they of course can use a tuner this is still a faster option.
Much like any other job or hobby, building guitar pedals requires specific tools in order to get the job done. Furthermore, before you start putting together your first build, it is vital that you have a significant understanding of how to solder circuit board electronics – otherwise you may find yourself at a loss due to faulty soldering (believe me, this is not a fun issue to troubleshoot).  If you need to practice soldering, here is a helpful video.

The original  Owner purchased this guitar new at Ideal Music in Atlanta and loved her for the last 50 years. Vintage 1967 Gretsch 6120 Chet Atkins Nashville model,factory bigsby replaced "kill switch" tip (the white one) I have an original tip now, to lazy to take new pictures...and reproduction armature inside body for string mute / Muffler system...SEE MORE HERE...

The second issue of the Les Paul guitar was introduced to the public in 1954. Called the Gibson Les Paul Custom, this entirely black guitar was dubbed the Black Beauty. The Les Paul Custom featured a mahogany top to differentiate the instrument from its Goldtop predecessor’s maple top. It also featured the new Tune-o-Matic bridge design and a pickup with an alnico-5 magnet, P-480, in the neck position. In addition, since 1957, the Custom was fitted with Gibson’s new humbucker pickups, PAF,[16] and later became available with three pickups instead of the more usual two. The three pickup model retained the standard Gibson 3-way switch so not all pickup combinations were possible. The neck and bridge-only settings were retained, but the middle switch position was set to enable the middle and bridge pickups. A common modification was to restore the standard neck/both/bridge switching combination and add a switch to enable the middle pickup on its own.[citation needed] The guitar is wired as a “normal”2 pick up Les Paul except there is a master volume , master tone, (for front and back pu) while the middle pick up has its own volume / tone. this allows the middle pu to turned out of the circuit or mixed with the other two. allowing many different tones.
So many new guitarists, and even not so new guitarists, play with the volume and tone knobs turned all the way up all the time and then shell out lots of money for pedals when they are not satisfied with their tone before taking advantage of what the guitar can do (and it's a lot). Then of course, your amp's tone controls can refine things even more.
Just wanted to get back with a thank you note. I received the kit last week and installed it in my Stratocaster with Texas Special p'ups. It's absolutely brilliant. Not only is the Blend control a superb new addition to the tonal options, but the pots also feel so sturdy and smooth. Feels like I have some custom build now. Just amazing, thank you! In addition, the treble bleed mod is the icing on the cake. I’m no longer afraid to roll down the volume knob." - Andrei Custom Blender Mod for Strat®  
It’s important to remember that these setups are not set rules that must be followed.  You can get a variety of unique sounds by placing your effects in unorthodox locations.  It’s common to run into that special sound that came about as a ‘happy accident’ when setting up your effects.  Using these suggestions, you can build up your own pedalboard to suit your individual taste.
{"eVar4":"shop: guitars","eVar5":"shop: guitars: electric guitars","pageName":"[mf] shop: guitars: electric guitars: semihollow and hollow body electric guitars: kay vintage reissue guitars","reportSuiteIds":"musiciansfriendprod","eVar3":"shop","prop2":"[mf] shop: guitars: electric guitars","prop1":"[mf] shop: guitars","evar51":"default: united states","prop10":"brands","prop11":"kay vintage reissue guitars","prop5":"[mf] shop: guitars: electric guitars: semihollow and hollow body electric guitars","prop6":"[mf] shop: guitars: electric guitars: semihollow and hollow body electric guitars","prop3":"[mf] shop: guitars: electric guitars: semihollow and hollow body electric guitars","prop4":"[mf] shop: guitars: electric guitars: semihollow and hollow body electric guitars","channel":"[mf] shop","linkInternalFilters":"javascript:,musiciansfriend.com","prop7":"[mf] sub category2"}
Some types of wood that were commonly used in the 1950s are close to extinct today, and can no longer be used for mass production. For instance, import and usage are restricted for certain types of Mahogany, Rosewood, and Ebony, and large guitar manufacturers in the US have been raided by the justice department on suspicion of using illegal materials.
If you are trying to find the best electric guitar for beginners but you lack the time to do the necessary research in order to find a quality product, this short introduction should help you out. After reading plenty of electric guitar reviews and after comparing top-notch products, we have reached the conclusion that Epiphone Les Paul STANDARD is the model that you should have in mind. This device has a beautiful mahogany body and a maple top that is said to deliver an easy to distinguish classic tone. As a plus, the model comes outfitted with Alnico Classic humbucker pickups that secure a subtle and warm tone. If the Epiphone Les Paul STANDARD is out of stock, we recommend that you check out the Epiphone Les Paul STANDARD Electric as it is a reliable alternative that you might equally enjoy.
Shimming a neck: The best shims are one piece and the full size of the neck pocket. For this veneer from the hardware store works well. However, it is very hard to get an even taper on these. The next best option is to use masking tape. Masking tape is paper which is wood fiber so it's almost as good as a solid shim, and much better than the smaller shims which leave large gaps which impedes the transfer of vibration, and could cause problems later on. To make a tape shim, lay strips of tape side by side perpendicular to neck, and add layers to provide the taper. i.e. stripe 1- 1 layer, stripe 2- 2 layers, stripe 3- 3 layers. Place the neck in the pocket, mark outline of pocket, and trim just inside outline.
By moving up or down one level, in terms of magnetic strength, you can usually add or subtract a little edge from a pickup. If your guitar is too tangy, moving down one pickup level (e.g., from alnico 4 to alnico 2) may smooth it out. If you want to add bite, go with a slightly stronger magnet—like, alnico 5 to a ceramic magnet. The good part is that magnets are both easy to find and inexpensive in comparison to buying a whole new pickup.
This guitar follows traditional Martin specs with a 25.4" scale length and a 1.75" nut width, and they also gave the neck and ebony fretboard a worn-in feel that makes the guitar play extremely well right out of the case that it comes with. On top of its true to form vintage sound, playability and looks, the OM-28 E Retro is equipped with the extremely versatile Fishman F1 Aura Plus, which offers three acoustic voicings modeled from actual Martin Museum guitars. If you play various musical styles and you're looking for a be-all and end-all acoustic guitar, you will be blown away by the OM-28 E Retro.

I always recommend the Cordoba C5 for beginners who are looking for their first classical or nylon string guitar. It’s comes at a very wallet-friendly price, but it sounds and plays exceptionally well for a guitar in its price range. More experienced players can look to other C-Series Cordoba guitars like the C12, which is built for advanced guitarists.


Starting in the early '90s, music gear manufacturers began developing digital effects models that aimed to re-create the sounds generated by classic effects, instruments, and vintage amplifiers. This technology quickly expanded to include models of revered amplifier heads, speaker cabinets, microphones, and even specific microphone placements. Many amps and multi-effects units today incorporate a wide range of models, often grouped into categories such as stompboxes, amps, and mics. Over the last decade, Line 6, one of the leaders in this field, has even created guitars and basses that contain modeled sounds of famous vintage instruments. As the technology has grown more sophisticated, models have become more realistic, often very closely resembling the gear on which they’re based.
Slicer – A dynamic effect that sounds like your guitar tone is chopping in and out. This percussive effect is akin to sequencer-type effects used by synthesizers. The effect turns the volume of the signal on and off, and sounds like the signal is being “chopped up” or “sliced” in a specified pattern. The BOSS SL-20 Slicer features 50 patterns to turn your guitar into a groove machine!
Speaker simulators are switchable filter sets designed to reproduce the EQ curves of a variety of speaker cabinet configurations (with varying degrees of success). The subsequent coloration is meant to replicate typical speaker sound and behavior, softening the harsh upper-midrange edges associated with amplifier distortion. Speaker simulator boxes are designed with direct  guitar-amp recording in mind, and are intended to remove the speaker cabinet and microphone link from the signal chain.

Semi-acoustic guitars have a hollow body (similar in depth to a solid-body guitar) and electronic pickups mounted on the body. They work in a similar way to solid-body electric guitars except that, because the hollow body also vibrates, the pickups convert a combination of string and body vibration into an electrical signal. Whereas chambered guitars are made, like solid-body guitars, from a single block of wood, semi-acoustic and full-hollowbody guitars bodies are made from thin sheets of wood. They do not provide enough acoustic volume for live performance, but they can be used unplugged for quiet practice. Semi-acoustics are noted for being able to provide a sweet, plaintive, or funky tone. They are used in many genres, including blues, funk, sixties pop, and indie rock. They generally have cello-style F-shaped sound holes. These can be blocked off to prevent feedback, as in B. B. King's famous Lucille. Feedback can also be reduced by making them with a solid block in the middle of the soundbox.
×