A great debate has raged hot and heavy throughout the guitar playing world since George Beauchamp and Rickenbacker invented the electric guitar. It's a debate that's ignited feuds, torn apart families and has surely broken some hearts and continues to this day. What debate drawn from the innocent depths of guitardom could illicit such a foul and unexpected response?
The Taylor Guitars factory tour takes guests through the steps of acoustic guitar construction. From wood selection to final assembly, guests will experience each process as a guitar evolves from raw wood into a finished instrument. You will also have an opportunity to visit the TaylorWare store. Here you will find everything for the Taylor fan, from apparel to gift items to replacement guitar parts. The tour lasts approximately one hour and 15 minutes and departs from the main building at 1980 Gillespie Way in El Cajon, California.
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Guitarists have their own special system of music notation called guitar tablature, or "guitar tabs" for short. Using guitar tabs, a guitarist can play a wide variety of music without ever having to learn how to read standard sheet music. Though guitar tabs aren't a perfect way of describing music, they've allowed newer generations of guitarists to quickly and easily share information about how to play songs across the globe via the internet. Every guitarist should have at least a basic understanding of how to read tablature - it's the de facto shorthand for much of the guitar music you'll find written out online.

Neck Construction – The neck part of the guitar includes the fretboard and headstock. The tuners are mounted on this part of the guitar. The width and profile of the neck affects the playability of the guitar. Most necks are either “C” or “U” shaped. In most cases, the fretboard is made from a thin layer of rosewood or ebony, but some guitars have maple necks. Fretboard have position dots and other inlaid markers that assist the player. There are generally 3 types of necks – bolt on, set neck and neck through.
It's important that an acoustic guitar feels comfortable for a beginner guitarist. How a guitar feels may vary from player to player. Is the fretboard easy to play? Is the body of the guitar the right size (hopefully not too big)? An acoustic guitar with too big of a back-end may cause irritation to the inner side of the strumming arm. Also, make sure the fretboard is flat and there is no buzzing. Are the tuning heads easy to turn? And make sure the strings are not too high off of the fretboard.
Despite what the Peate copy says, these instruments are not Dobros, but rather Supros. The guitars and mandolin shown in the Peate catalog are identified as being “The New Dobro Electric Guitars,” part of National Dobro electric guitars. However, the No. 1 Hawaiian shown is clearly the Supro frying pan (recall that the Hawaiian in ’35 was the fancier Dobro), and the No. 2 Spanish Guitar and No. 3 Mandolin are clearly labeled “Supro.”
Interestingly, it’s the back of this guitar that’s the most visually attractive, with a drop dead gorgeous rosewood fretboard and quilt maple three-piece design. You’ll stare at it for some time before you can bring yourself to flip it over and start playing. That’s not to say the front doesn’t look good - the whole thing feels more upscale than the price.
If you’re using temporal effects such as delay and reverb, these generally work best at the end of the chain. Putting a delay at the end allows the effect to give a more natural echo to everything that comes before it; the echo itself will not be altered by other effects. The same applies for reverb. Most guitarists leave reverb as the very last effect, occasionally using the amp’s in-built reverb over a pedal. Amps that have onboard reverb usually use a spring unit which produces a shimmery twang that works well for many types of music. However, if you’re looking for a roomier type of reverb that emulates a giant concert hall, a pedal based reverb is probably what you’re looking for. Either way, putting reverb at the end of the chain provides a spacious, natural tone that simulates a cavernous echo.
• Sound Judgment: Consider the sonic characteristics of the various materials used in making electric strings. Stainless steel strings are the least glamorous, but offer plenty of bright bite and sustain. Pure nickel has a warm old-school sound, for vintage tones. And nickel-plated steel is a bit brighter than classic nickel and responds more adroitly to picking attack. Chrome guitar strings are typically the province of jazz players or blues artists who are looking for the kind of warm retro tones chiseled into history by the likes of Charlie Christian or swinging Gibson ES-250, ES-5 and ES-335 bluesman Aaron “T-Bone” Walker. And then there are coated strings – the most expensive and theoretically the longest lasting. They are, however, not really the best, sonically speaking. Coated strings tend to have less sustain. Also, their Teflon exterior surfaces are slippery, which might take some getting used to for particularly aggressive electric guitar players. And when the coatings wear off, they rust like any other string.
Specs for combos were as follows: Checkmate 10 (6 watts, 6″ speaker, two inputs, striped grillcloth); Checkmate 12 (9 watts, 8″ speaker, three inputs); Checkmate 14 (14 watts, 8″ speaker, three inputs, tremolo); Checkmate 17 (20 watts, 10″ speaker, tremolo, reverb); Checkmate 16 bass amp (20 watts, 10″ speaker, volume, tone); Checkmate 17 (20 watts, 10″ speaker, reverb, tremolo); Checkmate 18 (30 watts, two 10″ speakers, reverb, tremolo); and Checkmate 20 (40 watts, 12″ speaker, reverb, tremolo). Piggyback amps included the Checkmate 25 (50 watts, 15″ speaker, reverb, tremolo); Checkmate 50 (two-channels, 100 watts, two 15″ speakers, reverb, tremolo, “E tuner”); Checkmate 100C (two channels, voice input, 200 watts, two 15″ speakers, reverb, tremolo); and the big hugger-mugger Checkmate Infinite (200 watts, two 15″ speakers, stereo/mono preamp section, reverb, tremolo and a bunch of other switches). The one shown in the catalog actually has a block Teisco logo and carried the Japanese-marketed name – King – in the lower corner.
With the Seagull S6 Classic, you get an acoustic-electric guitar that comes with a solid design and an impressive sound that will delight, regardless if you’re playing it unplugged or through an amplifier or PA. This model features a cedar top that has been tested for pressure resistance, so you know you have a tough guitar on your hands to use for many years.
At Sam Ash, we maintain close relationships with the most prominent electric guitar brands to make sure that we always have the very best, latest selection of electric guitars in our inventory. We carry acclaimed electric guitar brands including Fender, Gibson, Paul Reed Smith, Ibanez, ESP, Gretsch, Dean, Epiphone, Yamaha, Schecter, and so much more! If you’re a discerning player or guitar aficionado looking to add a new guitar to your collection, be sure to check out all the fine, premium electric guitars featured in our exclusive Electric Guitars of Distinction collection.
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