I just purchased a Lyle acoustic guitar in excellent condition. It's Serial # 204 and Model # 712. The top of the guitar says Lyle with a gold cross-like design up by the tuning keys. It looks like it was painted on the wood by the manufacture. The top tuning key head and neck are the color of milk chocolate with pearl-type fret inlays. The body of the guitar is a light tangerine color showing the natural wood grain under the clear lacquer finish. It has a dark chocolate bridge, and a black pick guard with a white pearl engraved inlay of a floral sprig or vine-type design. There is a set of three circles around the center opening (1 thin black line, a wide band of black and white lines and another thin black line. It has light tangerine and milk to dark chocolate stripped sides and back which is the natural wood grain showing through the clear lacquer finish. JAPAN is engraved on the back of the tuning key head in back.
Telecaster is the original solid body guitar. Ever since this iconic model has only grown in popularity. This Tele we look it at here is a bit different. It comes packing an H/S/S pickup configuration, which you don’t see that often on these guitars. With that said, it feels and sounds awesome. I had it setup with a vintage Marshall Plexi and the sound was just impressive. There’s definitely more tonal range than you get in a standard Telecaster.
In late 2012 I decided that I had all the modern guitars I needed. I’m not gigging much, just writing and recording. There were a couple of vintage guitars I was interested in. A Vox teardrop, especially the Mark IX, and the Fender Coronado. The Voxs turned out to be too expensive for me, especially the Mark IX, which was a 9-string beast meant to sound similar to a 12-string. Those are very rare and priced out of my range. The Coronado, I might be able to afford one day, but I’m not as interested as I was. The new reissues sell for about $700, but they’re different from the originals in several important ways.
Many musicians find it helpful to be able to plug in and amplify their acoustic guitar. So, how does an acoustic-electric guitar work? These guitars boast the addition of a pickup system inside the body that turns the vibrations of the soundboard into electronic signals. These signals can be weak, so most acoustic-electric guitars use a preamp to make them stronger.

Think "guitar god," and a particular image of Jimi Hendrix springs to mind: Hendrix kneeling, shamanlike, before his Fender Stratocaster, his hands seeming to coax flames from the instrument. Captured by photographer Jim Marshall at the 1967 Monterey Pop Festival, this image is burned into the collective consciousness of American rock culture in the same way that Hendrix's signature sound still echoes through the years. His defiant rendition of the "Star Spangled Banner" isn't quite a technical masterpiece -- one could almost play the melody with a single finger. What elevates the song is its sound. To get that dissonant wailing, Hendrix uses two effects: an Arbiter Fuzz Face and the Vox Wah-Wah [source: Trynka].


You can divide these further into cabinets and combos. A cabinet is simply an amplifier without a head. The head is all the knobs and so on that can be tweaked to produce variations in tone and volume. Combos include the head, so they're often preferred as they're easier to port around. However, if you want a multi-speaker setup, you'll want to opt for cabinets with separate heads.
It is a popular technique in which the player's thumb or index finger on the picking hand slightly catches the string after it is picked, canceling the fundamental of the string, and letting one of the overtones dominate. It is used by popular guitarists such as Eddie Van Halen, Steve Vai and Joe Satriani who utilize the tremolo arm and high gain amps together with the pinch harmonic to produce horse-like wails from the instrument. - winner333
Thanks for posting the cool video. I have a Decca like that one. Its pickups migrated to my #1 guitar, which is a relative from roughly the same era (early 1970’s), a Daimaru (sunburst, jazzmaster / jaguar copy surf guitar body, tremolo, etc.). The Decca now has one Daimaru pickup (I wrecked the other one when I was a teenager — thinking I was going to ‘improve’ it), but otherwise, my Decca looks basically identical to yours — except for it has the original tuners, and I angled the bridge in the 1990’s. The neat sound you can get from one of these particular Deccas is the placement of the bridge pickup, it’s a bit further from the bridge than a lot of other electrics, which gives it a neat, plunky sound to it — as is apparent from your video.
In late 1960, the amp was redesigned with three, rather than two, channels, each with two inputs, and offered with an optional Top Boost, or Brilliance, circuit, which introduced an extra gain stage and separate bass and treble controls. The Top Boost feature proved popular enough that it became standard on the AC30/6 (so named for its six inputs). Its chimey high end was a signature of the Beatles’ early recordings and was later favored by guitarists like Brian May, Tom Petty, Peter Buck and The Edge, whose 1964 AC30/6 has been featured on every U2 album.
THE VOTERS: Trey Anastasio, Dan Auerbach (The Black Keys), Brian Bell (Weezer), Ritchie Blackmore (Deep Purple), Carl Broemel (My Morning Jacket), James Burton, Jerry Cantrell (Alice in Chains), Gary Clark Jr., Billy Corgan, Steve Cropper, Dave Davies (The Kinks), Anthony DeCurtis (Contributing editor, Rolling Stone), Tom DeLonge (Blink-182), Rick Derringer, Luther Dickinson (North Mississippi Allstars), Elliot Easton (The Cars), Melissa Etheridge, Don Felder (The Eagles), David Fricke (Senior writer, Rolling Stone), Peter Guralnick (Author), Kirk Hammett (Metallica), Albert Hammond Jr. (The Strokes), Warren Haynes (The Allman Brothers Band), Brian Hiatt (Senior writer, Rolling Stone), David Hidalgo (Los Lobos), Jim James (My Morning Jacket), Lenny Kravitz, Robby Krieger (The Doors), Jon Landau (Manager), Alex Lifeson (Rush), Nils Lofgren (The E Street Band), Mick Mars (Mötley Crüe), Doug Martsch (Built to Spill), J Mascis (Dinosaur Jr.), Brian May, Mike McCready (Pearl Jam), Roger McGuinn (The Byrds), Scotty Moore, Thurston Moore (Sonic Youth), Tom Morello, Dave Mustaine (Megadeth), Brendan O’Brien (Producer), Joe Perry, Vernon Reid (Living Colour), Robbie Robertson, Rich Robinson (The Black Crowes), Carlos Santana, Kenny Wayne Shepherd, Marnie Stern, Stephen Stills, Andy Summers, Mick Taylor, Susan Tedeschi, Vieux Farka Touré, Derek Trucks, Eddie Van Halen, Joe Walsh, Nancy Wilson (Heart)

I see a bunch of people all over social network sites and youtube videos responding with things like "who needs it, just give me a guitar and a tube amp" whenever news about a pedal of some kind comes up. What's so wrong with pedals? For some reason there's a stigma against them that "bad players use pedals to mask how bad they are" when most people use them to get sounds out of their guitar that you normally can't without them. I don't understand why so many people opt for the "guitar right into an amp" sound when there's so much more available.


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There's no reason not to try an effect if you want to. Sure, some kind of effect might mask some bad habits (reverb and delay might sort off mess your timing), but distortion for example is almost like playing another instrument, and if you're into punk/rock, the sooner you try it the better. You will have to figure out ways to mute the strings and reduce string noises, which is part of the technique.
Ibanez is a Japanese guitar manufacturer which was founded in the year 1957. Ibanez was the first Japanese company to gain a foothold in exporting guitars to United States and Europe. They were the pioneer to produce the seven- strings guitars. Ibanez has produced several guitar models including the Electric Guitar Models, the Signature Models, Bass Guitar Models, and Acoustic Guitar Models etc. The Ibanez guitars are one of the best in the world.
It is also important to consider the maximum number of effects that can run simultaneously, which are usually based on effect group types or "blocks". This means that you usually can only have one modulation, one reverb, one drive etc in a preset. Advanced processors allow for more freedom which include combining same type pedals, series/parallel routing, pre-post amplifier routing and many more. While they allow for more ways to craft your tones, these processors also require more tweaking time and are usually more expensive.
The only reason why anyone likes Ibanez is because it's cheap. When you're ready to buy a real axe, get a Jackson. Ibanez is not a "shredder" brand, it is a budget brand, just like Carvin. Jackson has it all: great sound, great feel, great looks, great for shredding! I'll admit because Rich makes some interesting looking guitars, but Jacksons are still cooler (if you've ever seen a Kelly, I'm sure you'll agree). Jackson For the Win!
A looper allows you to record a musical passage or phrase then play that passage back repeatedly. You can then record more loops and layer them, one on top of the other. Most recording and playback functions are foot controlled, and once you’ve created suitable backing tracks, you can can then play over the repeated passages in real time, creating exciting one-man-band sounds never possible before. Many of the more advanced models include built-in rhythms, custom effects, inputs for vocal mics and other instruments, plus MIDI and USB capabilities so that you can use the looper as part of your digital song-creation and recording processes.
Quality replacement pot from Bourns with DPDT pull switch for coil tap or other switched application.   Knurled 1/4" shaft fits most knobs.  Low torque, carbon resistive element, great replacement in many applications using passive humbucker or single-coil pickups.   Note that length of threaded part of shaft is 3/8" - measure to make sure that this is long enough for your application, especially if the pot mounts through the wooden guitar body.   (This pot will not work on Les Pauls, for example).  1 Meg Ohm, Special A2 taper preferred by guitar and bass players.  Nut and washer included.   Note: threaded bushing diameter is 3/8", like most 24mm "quarter-sized" pots.   Both pot and switch terminals are solder lugs.   Not designed for PC board insertion.

Fender is well known for producing excellent quality musical instruments. Not just today, instead it always has topped the list of best guitar brands as an icon in the music history of America. It produces a brighter tone, accompanying single coil pickups rather than the humbuckers. The single coil pickups are specially designed in a way scratching through the mix with the glorious sound to produce the characteristic tone. The unique part of Fender guitars may cause issues with humming.
I’m not a Fender amp guy at all. I know, a lot of people swear by them, and they do sound great, and are a standard in the indie world. They tend to have less options and features that a beginner might want to play around with, and to get those options you end up spending more money than you might be comfortable with. You also don’t get much horsepower for the cash compared to some of the other lower priced options. To me, a cheap Fender sounds like…a cheap Fender. Blues guys sure do love those Mustangs though.
Thanks. It sounds good without tone shaping ability but I wanted to hear the original sounds. It now has 2 capacitors tied together from the volume pot to 1 tone leg. I am guessing the original tone switch was wired with one cap. for the low & one cap. for middle and the 3rd tone leg was straight wired for treble high. I also wonder how the ground sweep worked on the tone selector?? I just need to know. I’m a DIY guy.
Designed in collaboration with the legendary Guns N' Roses guitarist, this limited-edition Slash Firebird won't last long. After all, as Slash himself says, "Who doesn't want a Firebird?" Limited to a production run of just 900, worldwide, this version of the iconic guitar combines tradition, like the reissue Kluson banjo-style tuners, with some of Slash's signature touches like the Seymour Duncan Slash signature Alnico II pickups and flame maple top. Great for rock and blues, don't miss your chance to snap one of these up. Case sold separately.
And it took a long time because inevitably the tremolo would go out of time with the track because the tremolo doesn't stay in regular clock time. Also we would go out with each other's amps, so we had to keep looking up at each other after every fifteen second bursts and kind of fess up, "Oh yeah, mine kind of went out of time." It took long time, but I'm glad we did it that way because if we had cut and pasted two seconds of audio, it wouldn't have had the same dynamic quality throughout the six minutes of the song, or however long it is.
While it might seem unnecessary, an EQ pedal is a very handy effect to have. Many amps have very specific voicing that can only be adjusted so far with their tone stack. Also, many small amps have limited on board tone-shaping options. For example, the popular Fender Champ 600 or the Blackstar HT-1, which only have one knob for tone shaping. With an EQ in your chain, you can fine-tune the amp to your liking, or you can perfectly dial in a distortion or fuzz that normally won't cooperate.

This guitar is awesome. If you are on the fence, get off and buy it. It's beautiful and sounds awesome. I'd give it 10 stars if I could. The tone is so much better than my old acoustic. All mahogany I love it. Looking forward to years of getting better with this beauty. I have zero negative to say. Had it a few months have played everyday. I hate to leave it to go to work. Wish I had all day to play it.
Leo Fender's work is timeless. This is easily deduced by simply looking at the popularity of both Stratocasters and Telecasters. With that said, Strats are arguably the favorite between the two. A top of the line American-made Stratocaster still costs a bit more than what our budget here is, however, there is an alternative. Fender's plant in Mexico builds great Stratocasters that aren't really behind their American counterparts. You essentially get a near identical performance at a more affordable price due to the stigma. The Fender Classic Series '70s Stratocaster is one such guitar.
Floor model Bugera 1960 infinium 150 watt all tube head. This amp never left the store until the closing sale when it was purchased by me. I have the shipping box, and all original packaging. Store owner had this in December of 2017, and used only as a store model. I gave it a thorough look, and checked everything out, and its all good. Do the research on these. They are very loud, and have had great reviews! Tube setup is auto bias ( so you dont have to send it to a certified tech to change out your tubes) three way switch to accommodate your speaker cabs in ohms. Really nice bang for the buck right here. I will accept any reasonable offer. Any questions please message me. Continental Us sales only.
We took another detailed look at all acoustic-electric guitars priced under $500 available from major American online retailers, and for this update, we shortlisted 78 of them for closer analysis. We then collated over 7700 ratings and reviews from forums, videos, retailers, blogs and major music gear publications and processed those data with the Gearank Algorithm to produce a Gearank score of out 100 for each guitar. Finally we selected the highest rated guitars in two of the most popular price brackets, sub $300 and sub $500. For more information about this process see How Gearank Works.

Dimebag Darrell first discovered this guitar master while he was working in a club in Colleen, Texas. King was 17 and Darrell was 15. "They played and blew me away," King says. So he asked if the aspiring guitar legend needed help breaking down his guitar. It was the beginning of a working friendship that lasted until Dime's untimely death in 2004. Learning from another guitar master, Walt Treichler of Rotting Corpse, is what put this guy at the top of the extended family's list for repair answers. He also studied with Floyd Rose at a guitar show, learning everything there is to know about the Floyd Rose tremolo. "There's nothing better than the original thing Floyd came up with," he says. King is the kind of guitar doctor who makes house calls; but he's not accepting any new clients unless you're part of his extended family of musicians. "If I know 'em, and they need work on their guitar, I'll help 'em out."

000-28EC[10] and 000-28ECB: Two of the five “Eric Clapton” models. Same body size as the 000-15, but with the Martin short scale (24.9″). This artist signature model is constructed with higher-quality woods (especially the more expensive 000-28ECB constructed from Brazilian Rosewood, hence the “B”), a different shape to the neck, and more ornamentation around the edge of the body.
For solidbodies there is usually a one- or two-letter prefix indicating the body style or general model. This is followed by a dash and a number which usually indicates the number of pickups (e.g., J-1), although on occasion the number indicates the year of introduction (e.g., TG-54). Guitars bearing a vibrato usually appended an “L” after the pickup number (e.g., MJ-2L).

Another reason that some bassists prefer the "bass stack" approach is that it is much easier to customize a separate preamp/amp/speaker cabinet setup with a bass stack than it is to customize a combo amp. With a bass stack setup, a professional bassist can handpick the brands of preamplifier, graphic equalizer, power amplifier and speaker cabinet(s) they wish to use. It is also much easier to replace defective components with a bass stack than with a combo amp. If the power amp on a combo amp fails, only an electronics technician can repair or replace the power amp. With a bass stack, in which the power amp may be a separate component in a rackmount road case, the defective power amp can be removed with only a screwdriver and a new power amp can be mounted in the rack and connected to the other components. This facilitates replacement of components while on tour. Touring bassists may travel with one or more backup amplifier heads, to use in case the main amplifier head develops a technical problem.


Open tunings improve the intonation of major chords by reducing the error of third intervals in equal temperaments. For example, in the open-G overtones tuning G-G-D-G-B-D, the (G,B) interval is a major third, and of course each successive pair of notes on the G- and B-strings is also a major third; similarly, the open-string minor-third (B,D) induces minor thirds among all the frets of the B-D strings. The thirds of equal temperament have audible deviations from the thirds of just intonation: Equal temperaments is used in modern music because it facilitates music in all keys, while (on a piano and other instruments) just intonation provided better-sounding major-third intervals for only a subset of keys.[65] "Sonny Landreth, Keith Richards and other open-G masters often lower the second string slightly so the major third is in tune with the overtone series. This adjustment dials out the dissonance, and makes those big one-finger major-chords come alive."[66]

The Marshall JMP Super Bass is a 100 watt amp. Lemmy, bassist/lead singer of Motörhead, used numerous of these amps to drive cabinets with four 12" speakers and others with four 15" speakers. His amps were labelled named “Killer,” “No Remorse,” and “Murder One".[5] The Peavey Mark IV is a large, solid-state amp providing 300 watts at 2 ohms; the Mark IV was known for its affordable price and its reliability.[6]
Although there have been several copies of Gibson guitars in Epiphone, yet their quality, tone, and artisanship suffice to attract and retain more customers. During the past few years, Gibson has adapted some modifications in their lineup. This includes restoring their classic Les Paul Studio design as Studio T, and the Les Paul Studio Faded, which is an affordable variant.
It obviously wasn’t ideal for guitarists to permanently damage their amplifiers for the benefit of experimental tone. Nor was it practical for them to drag immovably large objects on tours. Luckily, increasing experimentation in guitar sound modification collided with the widespread manufacture of electronic transistors in the early 1960s, which replaced vacuum tubes and integrated synthetic distortion in amplifiers. As the transistor revolutionized computing, it also dramatically simplified the production of guitar effects and amplifiers, allowing compact design and portability with little overheating.
Several years later, Gibson issued its third Jimmy Page Signature guitar, this one based closely on Jimmy Page’s #2. Issued in a production run of 325 guitars, the guitar more accurately reproduced Page’s heavily modified No. 2 than the original Signature model of the 1990s, and featured the 4 push-pull pots, the two mini-switches under the pick guard, accurate tuners and sound-accurate pickups (the same pickups that were used in the 2005 Jimmy Page No. 1 Signature), as well as an accurate neck profile. As in the original Signature model of the 1990s, pulling up the neck or bridge volume pots switched the respective pickups’ coils from series to parallel, and pulling up the tone pots switched the respective pickups from humbucking to single coil. The two push-button DPDT switches mounted beneath the pickguard provide universal switching functions, regardless of the positions of the push-pull pots. With the switch mounted toward the bridge-end of the pickguard in the out position, the bridge pickup’s phase is reversed. With the switch mounted toward the neck-end of the pickguard in the out position, both pickups are wired in series and out of phase. With both switches out, both pickups are in series and in phase. The Jimmy Page “Number Two” Les Paul is finished with a sunburst finish to replicate the appearance of the original guitar. 325 of these guitars were made, with the initial 25 being autographed by Jimmy Page and priced at US$25,000 when new.
When guitarists who play jazz and other more complex styles improvise, they use scales, modes, and arpeggios associated with the chord progression. The must learn how to use scales (whole tone scale, chromatic scale, etc.) to solo over chord progressions. Soloists try to imbue melodic phrasing with the sense of natural breathing and legato phrasing used by players of other instruments. Jazz guitarists are influenced by trumpet, saxophone, and other horn players. Celtic fingerstyle players are influenced pipes and fiddles.
Acoustic guitarists can sometimes get left out in the cold when it comes to multi-effects pedals. Fortunately, the team at Boss have been listening to your requests for an innovative multi-effects pedal for acoustic guitar, and ended up creating a complete live performance option for players of all levels. In fact, they’ve crafted the best multi effects pedal for acoustic guitar that you could find in the Boss AD-10 Acoustic Guitar Effects Processor.
Death By Audio Reverberation Machine Spring type Reverb/synthetic atmosphere creator with Altitude control that allows the reverb to distort. Also has a light/dark switch to control color of the reverb. Pedal was used in a smoke free studio, never gigged and has no velco on bottom. Pedal has small speckled blemishes in paint next to volume knob. This has no effect on function. Pedal is in perfect working order. This is a great pedal for people who want to add more texture to their sound. Ive used it on synths, drum machines and samples- handles any source without discretion. The only reason for letting it go is that i have too many spring type reverbs. Thanks for looking .
Launch price: $1,949 / £1,639 | Body: Alder | Neck: Maple | Scale: 25.5" | Fingerboard: Rosewood | Frets: 21 | Pickups: 3x Pure Vintage '65 Gray-Bottom Single-Coil Strat | Controls: Volume, neck tone, bridge/middle tone | Hardware: Pure Vintage 6-saddle Synchronized vibrato, Pure Vintage Single Line 'Fender Deluxe' tuners | Left-handed: Yes | Finish: Olympic White, 3-Color Sunburst, Candy Apple Red
I participated in what I think was perhaps Gibson's best SG...a prototype made for Robbie Krieger. It had my then-patented carbon fiber "T" cross section fingerboard which absolutely took care of the #1 problem with SGs...the rubber neck syndrome. It also had a beautiful flame maple top on the mahogany body and it got a cherry sunburst. Fabulous guitar. Robbie must still have it.
I've been to Steve about a dozen times with my guitars, families and friends instruments and have sent several people there and have nothing but great things to say.  He is reasonably priced and likely one of the most talented and experienced Luthier's in Boston.  It's rare to see any establishment get 5 stars from so many people and Steve deserves it!  Only thing is, if you're in a rush to get your instrument back, go somewhere else where they do it quickly and without much thought/TLC.  Steve takes his time to do it right and has a lot of customers because he's the guy to go to in the greater Boston area. Highly recommend!
The MESA Bigblock 750 has a built-in overdrive channel. The Mesa M2000 has a high gain switch which can be engaged with a footswitch. The Marshall MB450 head and combo bass amplifiers have a tube pre-amp on the "Classic" channel which can be overdriven. The Ashdown ABM 500 EVO III 575W Bass amp head has a built-in overdrive effect. Overdrive is also available on many Crate bass amplifiers. The Yamaha BBT500H has three types of built-in drive effects: overdrive, distortion and fuzz. The Ampeg B5R Bass Amplifier has two channels: clean and overdrive, with the ability to combine the two. Verellen, a boutique amp company, produces a bass amplifier with a built in overdrive channel.
I've been a guitar player for decades but only recently became serious about working on my instruments. In my research, I’ve found hundreds of articles about instrument repair, and while many are fantastic and chock full of information that’s invaluable to musicians, a lot is impractical or requires more space or specialized tools than most of us have. Plus, some repairs, such as fretwork, nut replacement, under-saddle pickup installation and finish repairs are best left to professionals.
What if you could get a wide variety of sounds from your acoustic guitar, including complex effects and virtual (MIDI) instruments, without having to use an external amp? That would certainly be a game-changer, as it could essentially turn your guitar into an all new instrument, and by adding to your available 'soundscapes' without needing to be tethered to a plug, it could also convert acoustic performances into rockin' ones.
The F Series Martin electrics were before my awareness of the diversity of the guitar universe, but I recall the appearance of the GTs, which got to stores in Wisconsin in the summer of ’67. I recall admiring the cool shapes and burgundy finish, although I’ve never been a fan of DeArmond pickups and, rightly or wrongly, always considered them a weakness. As already indicated, the GT Series was hardly a winner and fell victim to the general guitar malaise that swept the world guitar markets in around 1968. The same guitar bust that did in Valco/Kay and a host of Japanese guitarmakers did in Martin’s archtop electrics.
Pedals allow instant variables, with built in effects you have to dial it in every song, I can turn on a chorus on the verse add fuzz on the hook and manage combinations in real time, much more flexible. Also boutique pedals like earthquaker devices and Devi Evers create much more complex sounds within each pedal, it really helps when u are trying to cultivate your own sound.

Some combo amp and speaker cab manufacturers sell fitted amp or cab covers, to protect the equipment from dust and inclement weather. Professional touring bassists may place their amp heads, combo amps and speaker cabinets into foam-lined road cases to protect them during transportation. Rackmounted road cases typically have recessed handles on the sides for carrying the case. Touring professional bassists may have roadies who carry their amps and cabinet on and off stage.
The FR6UC's matt black flat finish and lack of bling lends the instrument a mean, no-nonsense aesthetic that would be a perfect fit for the modern metalcore player. There's an ebony fingerboard and its neck is a five-piece affair, with two thin strips of 0.5mm walnut between three sections of maple. The FR6UC's suitably rock-looking distressed pickup covers house a pair of Bare Knuckle Aftermath humbuckers with "accelerated bass response for exceptionally fast tracking of high-speed staccato riffing with crushing midrange and precise high-end articulation". The 14.7k-ohm bridge unit comprises a trio of ceramic magnets, while the neck is Alnico V with a DC resistance of 11.5k ohms. This instrument is built cleanly with excellent fretwork, as you would expect from a Japanese guitar at this price point, although it has to be noted that - considering its relatively compact proportions - it's a little on the weighty side, weighing in at 3.8kg (8.4lbs). The FR6UC's Bare Knuckle Aftermaths in full humbucking mode are perfect for a gamut of king-size-yet- articulate heavy rock tones, from Foo Fighters and Queens Of The Stone Age right through to Deftones and Slipknot. That said, the Aftermaths are by no means all about metallic high gain; back off the volume and switch to position two or four to get one of the inner coils in isolation and you'll enjoy pleasantly springy Strat-style tones. It may be none-more-black in appearance, but there's a broad range of hues on the FR6UC's sonic palette.
Slightly out-of-tune strings on a bass may not jump out as much as on guitar (especially in chords), but when that bass line is sitting under other parts in the mix, even slightly off-pitch notes will make their presence known, and sometimes be harder to track down (why does this song sound a little “off”?). I’d use a tuner (h/w or s/w), but I’d also always verify by ear, before hitting record, and I’d check tuning periodically as the session progresses—just as with drums, hard players can easily put the instrument out after a few energetic takes.
While there's nothing necessarily wrong with plonking your mic right at the centre of the speaker cone if it gets what you're after, a lot of producers take the time to experiment with different positionings off axis, where the sound is typically warmer. Mike Hedges: "Depending on where you have [the mic] — outer speaker or inner speaker — you get the difference in tone from the edge of the speaker and the centre of the cone." In fact, Mike Clink also tries small changes in position even when working with basically on-axis sounds. "I'll point [the SM57] exactly dead on, though I might move it an inch or two to get the right sound."

i think i have the exact same guitar as you do daniel. it's the same red into black faded with one pickup and no serial number tho. i'm looking everywhere for the exact model info etc. but i can't seem to find it either. i got it free froma guy i know and i had to replace the tuning heads, the strings and some of the ground wiring but now it's doing great. i love it. it has a really good sound for being so old!
I HAVE A P38-12E I BELIEVE MINE WAS MADE IN SPAIN ALSO. LATER THEY WERE MADE IN MIAMI AND LATER IN CHINA KEEP IT IN GOOD SHAPE I HAVE MANY GUITARS ACOUSTIC AND ELECTRICS. EXCELLENT ACTION AND SOUNDING GUITARS FOR THE PRICE I HAVE GIBSON,EPIPHONE,IBENEZ, THE BEST SOUNDING 12 STRING I EVER OWNED WAS A TAKIMINE. WHICH WAS STOLEN IN LAS VEGAS. EVEN HAVE A 12 STRING ACOUSTIC I MADE. I ADDED A FISHMAN AND MADE IT ELECTRIC I ALSO PUT A TUNEMATIC BRIDGE ON IT. THEY ALL HAD DIFFERENT SOUNDS BUT THE ACTION ON THE PALMER IS THE BEST. I EVEN HAD A VICTORIA VIOLIN BASS WAY BEYOND A HOFNER. JUST BECAUSE YOU DIDN'T PAY BIG BUCKS DOESN'T MEAN ITS NOT BETTER THAN A MARTIN. I PLAYED MY UNCLES MARTIN HE MADE AT THE FACTORY WHEN HE WORKED THERE. AND IT CAME NOWHERE CLOSE TO MY PALMER OR TAKAMINE. PALMER CAME CLOSE TO MY 1960s GIBSON DOVE. DOVE HAD A BETTER SOUND PALMER HAD BETTER ACTION. HOLLYWOOD PHIL. GUITARIST AND SINGER FOR THE GWB BAND. I'M ALSO HEAD SOUND AND LIGHTING TECH FOR THE METAL BAND BLACKFATE.
Many guitar and bass bodies are made from Mahogany. There are 49 types of Mahogany, but many are practically extinct because of the wood’s popularity for furniture and musical instruments, and the types used today are not the same as the Mahogany used in guitars in the 1940s or 1950s. Mahogany gives a warm timbre with a lot of bottom end. Les Paul type guitars often combine a mahogany body with a maple top for a total that is balanced overall.

The body and neck are also slimmer than other Spanish guitar models, as well, so if you’re used to a steel-string, but gearing up to try a classical guitar, the Kremona Sofia is one to put on your list to try. The strings are Royal Classic Sonata strings, made in Spain, so add this to the guitar body’s manufacturing origins, and you will have a sound that is worthy of a professional, but affordable for just about everyone.


Aaron Staniulis is not only a freelance live sound and recording engineer, but also an accomplished musician, singer, and songwriter. He has spent equal time on both sides of the microphone working for and playing alongside everyone from local bar cover bands to major label recording artists, in venues stretching from tens to tens of thousands of people. Having seen both sides at all levels gives him the perfect perspective for shedding light on the "Angry Sound Guy." You can find out more about what he’s up to at aaronstaniulis.com.


Leo Fender’s simple and modular design was geared to mass production, and made servicing broken guitars easier. Guitars were not constructed individually, as in traditional luthiery. Rather, components were produced quickly and inexpensively in quantity and assembled into a guitar on an assembly line. The bodies were bandsawn and routed from slabs, rather than hand-carved individually, as with other guitars made at the time, such as Gibsons. Fender did not use the traditional glued-in neck, but rather a bolt-on. This not only made production easier, but allowed the neck to be quickly removed and serviced, or replaced entirely. In addition, the classic Telecaster neck was fashioned from a single piece of maple without a separate fingerboard, and the frets were slid directly into the side of the maple surface—a highly unorthodox approach in its day (guitars traditionally featured rosewood or ebonyfingerboards glued onto mahogany necks). The electronics were easily accessed for repair or replacement through a removable control plate, a great advantage over typical construction, in which the electronics could only be accessed through the soundholes in the case of hollow-body instruments, or by taking off the pickguard after removing the strings (in a design popularized by Fender’s own later guitar model, the Stratocaster).
Where there is more than one pickup, a switch selects between the outputs of individual pickups or some combination; two-pickup guitars have three-way switches, and three-pickup guitars have five-way switches. Further circuitry sometimes combines pickups in different ways. For instance, phase switching places one pickup out of phase with the other(s), leading to a "honky", "nasal", or "funky" sound[citation needed]. Individual pickups can also have their timbre altered by switches, typically coil tap switches that effectively short-circuit some of a dual-coil pickup's windings[vague] to produce a tone similar to a single-coil pickup (usually done with push-pull volume knobs).
The BOSS ME-80 gives you all of the effects needed to create that elusive signature tone. The multi-effects unit is a great way to learn how different effects interact with each other to provide you with crystal-clear tones to fuzzy, thick walls-of-noise. If you have an ME-80, download BOSS Tone Studio for an easy way to experiment and learn these effects, have fun and use your ears to build your best guitar sound.

There is a historical parallel between musical styles (baroque, classical, romantic, flamenco, jazz) and the style of "sound aesthetic" of the musical instruments used, for example: Robert de Visée played a baroque guitar with a very different sound aesthetic from the guitars used by Mauro Giuliani and Luigi Legnani – they used 19th century guitars. These guitars in turn sound different from the Torres models used by Segovia that are suited for interpretations of romantic-modern works such as Moreno Torroba.
Fender’s legendary tone is enough to win just about anyone over, and they cater to a wide range of customers by offering the more cost friendly Squier series. While their classic electric guitars are favored by plenty of players, their acoustic selection and Jazzmaster offerings have their fair share of supporters as well. No matter what you’re looking for in a guitar or what price range you’re shopping in, you’re likely to find a good fit with Fender.
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While the Line 6 PODHD500X is no longer the flagship guitar processor, it is still very much in demand in the market, as evidenced by the overwhelmingly positive response that it continues to get from users and expert alike. It follows after its predecessor, albeit with a more powerful CPU and improved interface via colorful LED rings around the footswitches.
The RG (Roadstar) is one of the most famous Superstrat guitars on the market and remains a hugely popular model in all price categories. However, they also produce other collections such as the streamlined S Series (standing for ‘Saber’) and the relaxed Talman collection. Also look out for the Iceman – an edgy original Ibanez design, famously used by Paul Stanley from Kiss.
When guitarists who play jazz and other more complex styles improvise, they use scales, modes, and arpeggios associated with the chord progression. The must learn how to use scales (whole tone scale, chromatic scale, etc.) to solo over chord progressions. Soloists try to imbue melodic phrasing with the sense of natural breathing and legato phrasing used by players of other instruments. Jazz guitarists are influenced by trumpet, saxophone, and other horn players. Celtic fingerstyle players are influenced pipes and fiddles.
That "bad players use pedals to mask how bad they are" stigma comes from people who can't use effects. I mean, you can't just auto-set your delay to syncopate with your playing and make you sound like the Edge with every not you hit. You have to figure out the delay's rate, and what notes you can "delay" together so it doesn't sound like a jumble of notes.
I first met Ralph Novak in 1980, when he was working at Subway Guitars in Berkeley, California. I'd assembled a kit Strat and it needed a refret. My monstrosity was painted Shell Pink in tribute to Strats from Fender's surf era. Little did I know what was to come of Ralph's distant future. He was the fret guru in Berkeley, and his work was astounding - the best I'd ever seen! Ironically, Vintage Guitar columnist Stephen White was also working at Subway at the time. So began our journey into luthiery madness! Fast forward to 1989.

Gibson also tops the list of best electric guitar brands that retain a consistent design. Among the popular models, the Les Paul is a favorite guitar that has been ruling the music world for several decades. It is a high-end, USA-made instrument that comes in a variety of variations. Other famous Gibson guitars include the SG, Explorer, Flying V, ES-335, and Firebird.

I found myself un-obligated, bored and holding a fist full of cash one Friday afternoon, so I wandered into my local guitar shop. With a new found love of single coil pickups I had been eyeballing the Gretsch and Guild hollow bodies unfortunately too poor to actually buy one. On this afternoon, however, I played the Godin 5th Avenue Kingpin. It was love at first strum. Mine is called Cognac Burst. The satin finish on these instruments is beautiful, and give it a vintage, played look. This guitar has a really nice feel in terms of the neck and the thickness of the body. I have fairly long fingers and the neck is comfortable to play. It feels to me, a bit like the thicker necks on the Les Pauls of the late 50s. When I got the guitar, the shop said they'd dial it in for me for free, but frankly, I have no complaints as it is. With the classic style floating bridge you can drop the action impossibly low before you start to get fret buzz. After I brought mine home, I did just that and it plays like a dream. The frets are finished well and there is a bevel on the edge of the fret board and frets that keep them out of the way if you're in the habit of sliding your hand up and down the neck quickly. The Kingpin has a warm mellow tone when unplugged that is perfect for playing jazz and blues. I also enjoy the lower volume of the guitar since it has f holes when I play later in the evening. Plugged in, the P90 kills and sounds good clean and driven. It also retains that warm, mellow tone when played without distortion. I haven't had any trouble with feedback as I tend to keep the volume a bit lower for small spaces. My one complaint is the hideously ugly case, that costs 80 bucks. It's like its made of extra tough styrofoam. I understand they were going for lightness, but it's just ugly. All in all though, this guitar is a great choice and plays as well as my Gibson Les Paul and my buddies Gretsch 51... whatever.

There are a lot of choices out there for the prospective buyer of a fine guitar. It's no secret; a handmade instrument can cost a lot. For that matter, any of the better guitars purchased from a quality manufacturer is going to command what most people would consider to be a lot of money. Are there compelling reasons to spend your money on a handmade guitar from a custom builder rather than from a brand name factory or custom shop? There certainly are! … [Read More...]


Ampeg was swallowed up by Japanese electrical giant Magnavox in 1971, when they wanted to get in on the electric guitar copy craze of the 1970s. Magnavox produced electric and bass guitars under the Stud badge as well as the successful Ampeg brand. It's been suggested that Magnavox was also responsible for producing Selmer acoustic guitar badges during this time, but that has not been verified. Selmer was sold to Magnavox around the same time they bought Ampeg, so it certainly seems plausible they could have made Selmer acoustic badged guitars as an offering for that market. Stud badged guitars were made until '75, with Ampeg guitar production continuing until 1980. Opus was another badge made by the company. Magnavox lost their interest in Ampeg shortly thereafter and the brand languished until it was resurrected over a decade later by another American company.
If you’ve read our full reviewof the 50s Stratocaster, you’ll know that this Classic Vibe Stratocaster is an excellent prospect for any beginner who loves the good old days of rock n’ roll! Made by Squier, this 50s-inspired electric has huge vintage appeal, with a modern feel thanks to a trio of Alnico III single-coil pickups and a smooth, modern C-shaped maple neck (with 21 medium jumbo frets).
However, amplifiers can also be quite loud. Maybe you’ve got a fancy one, big enough to make everyone in a bar cover their ears. Or maybe you don’t have one at all, and have been playing on acoustic guitar. Either way, you may not have known that you can simulate the trademark sounds of famous amplifiers using something you probably already have: a computer. Using your computer as an amp isn’t too complicated, and it opens up a world of possibilities that the analog audio world can’t deliver on a budget. Some newer practice amplifiers have headphone jacks so you can play without making a racket, but those are only starting to become widespread and the majority of hobbyist electric guitar players would rather spend big money on a good stage-ready amplifier than a mediocre one to accompany their practice amp. If you’re an electric guitar player looking for a way to practice quietly or with headphones, this is the tutorial for you. You will need: An electric guitar A computer running Windows XP or better (Windows 7 or newer preferred) An instrument cable (both sides quarter-inch and mono, same cable used to plug guitars into amps) A ¼-inch to ⅛-inch mono adapter

A batch of 20 to 30 guitars featuring Ripley’s electronics was assembled using Japanese bodies and necks. The one in our possession is a GS2-R (#28949) with a standard (no German carve) Strat-style body, bolt-on multilaminate neck made up of red-dyed 1/16″ maple strips glued end-to-end, pointy-droopy carved bi-level six-in-line headstock, Gotoh tuners, black hardware, 24-fret ebanol fingerboard, faux-pearl pennant inlays and locking Ovation Floyd-Rose-licensed vibrato system. Two plastic-covered humbucking pickups (no exposed poles) featured individual output controls for each string, with six individual three-way mini-toggles for selecting pickups combined with six fader pots directing string/pickup output to a stereo jack.
Measure the height of the strings at the twelfth fret. For most playing styles, the height between the bottom of the low "E" string and the top of the twelfth fret should be a hair over 2/32". The High "E" string should be set at 2/32". The other strings should gradually flow between these measurements. This is where I would start, but the player's style (particularly their right-hand attack), as well as string gauge, scale length and individual neck nuances may necessitate deviation from these numbers.
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Hmm… you still want to buy an electric guitar first up? Okay, but again spend extra money on a guitar that plays well, will keep its value and feels perfect in your hands. In other words, don’t focus too much on paying for extras like custom pick-ups, locking nuts and electronics you don’t need just yet. At the moment it’s all about fingers and hands, not foot-pedals.

Hollow Body Guitars: Guitars with hollow body construction were the first mass-produced round-neck models built, in the 1930s. Jazzman Charlie Christian was the most-fiery champion of the early hollow body electric, using a Gibson ES-150 — a model first released in 1936 — to record vastly influential sides with Benny Goodman, Lester Young. Buck Clayton and as a leader in his own right. He also used the ES-150 to help invent the art of single-note lead guitar.

When starting with the electric guitar, it’s not uncommon to look at experienced player’s pedal board and think “Wow, so many pedals, with different names – wonder what should I get”. And while everyone knows that the core of your sound comes from the sensibility of your touch, your guitar and your amplifier, it is also true that certain pedals can transform and shape your tone to make it more unique and personal. Before shelling out all your beloved savings on unnecessary pedals, take a look at this guide to understand the 10 basic pedals, the so-called “must-haves”. 
Wah-Wah: For swishy, rounded sounds that sort of sound like the guitar is wailing, a wah-wah pedal employs a sweeping filter controlled by a spring-loaded treadle, creating quirky frequency boosts as you work the pedal up and down. A famous version of this pedal is marketed by one manufacturer as the “Crybaby,” in an attempt to describe its tone in one word. The late Jimi Hendrix used one of these pedals to great advantage.
The Epiphone LP Special II has a mahogany body and neck. The fretboard features dotted inlays and is made of traditional, unfinished rosewood – a standard choice that yields a sound consistent with the aesthetic standards of a Les Paul. If you want a Les Paul but you don't want to pay a fortune for it, this mahogany beauty is worth your consideration.
Strings produce sound in the guitar. In electric guitars, because there are no holes, the vibration is passed to a pickup which senses the vibration of the strings passes the signal on to the guitar amplifier. There are two types of strings for electric guitars, light and heavy gauge. Lighter ones are easier to play and allow easy bending of notes, but they are more likely to break and produce less volume. On the other side, heavier ones produce high volume but are hard to play and require more finger pressure to bend notes.
The simplicity and ergonomic design of the Pacifica PA012 body mirrors that of the PAC112. It is also available in exciting colors to match it perfectly to the player preference. Tonewood for PA012 as specified on the Yamaha catalog can either be in alder, nato or agathis, while the PAC112 is only made in alder wood. Neck for both guitars are made in maple with a satin finish then it is overlaid by a 22 medium frets rosewood fingerboard marked by inlay dots.
For years, Schecter has provided a nice counterpoint to the various Les Paul and Strat look-a-likes on the market (many of which are very good) at an affordable pricepoint. As my local guitar shop owner once said, for the money, they might make the best all around guitar south of $1,000. You can spend more than that, but the point is, they don’t skimp downrange.
In 1967 Lipsky introduced a line proto-copies carrying the Domino brand name. Most were inspired by European models such as the EKO Violin guitar. Among the offerings were two models sporting a California cache, the #502 Californian, an asymmetrical copy of a Vox Phantom, and the #CE82 Californian Rebel (wouldn’t California Rebel have made more sense?) shown here.

Hertz Guitar is a well known brand, which manufactures high quality guitars. The company was originated from Shanghai,China and North Korea. Their musical instruments were introduced on September 2009. They offer world class quality instruments from world class branded production houses. They maintain international standard. It mainly focuses on musical instruments as well as accessories. They manufacture a wide range of guitar. Available at below Rs. 12,040/- (approx).

C.F. Martin was born in 1796 in Markneukirchen, Germany and came from a long line of cabinet makers and woodworkers. His father, Johann Georg Martin, also built guitars. By the age of 15, C.F. Martin was apprenticed to Johan Stauffer, a well-known guitar maker in Vienna, Austria. Martin returned to his hometown after completing training and opened his own guitar-making shop. However, he soon became embroiled in a controversy between two guilds.
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Kansas guitars has been around since 1927. They made some very nice guitars. Some expensive and some inexpensive. But the real question is whom makes the guitar for Kansas? And that is non other then Cort. Yes Cort makes guitars for just about everybody and you dont even know. the big secret is cort guitars themselves are very well made but cheaper then most brands, but same or better quality then highline guitars. Cort bailed out fender and also built Fenders for many years. So in short Kansas is a well made guitar and there set neck models are awesome and run about $400 to $600. You cant get a set neck today for under $800. And if you want to see how many guitar brands have cort making there guitars do some research on Cort and you will be surprized. They have been around for ever and are the elite company in the business.

Epiphone is regarded as one of American’s oldest and most revered musical instrument manufacture, which was founded in 1873 by Anastasios Stathopoulos. Their headquarters located in  Nashville, Tennessee, United States. Their produce amplifiers, mandolins, banjos, effect units etc. The company is owned by Gibson Guitar Corporation. Their guitars are the best selling one in Indian market. Available at Rs. 13,000/- onwards (approx). For more details, visit Epiphone.com.


Where can you find one? My guess is that FIDELITY was a housebrand (like Holiday or Silvertone), and these might be Valcos or some other maker. But I have since seen 2 or 3 of them on Ebay, not going for too much money. Also, there are several other brands (and no-brands) that look much like these, so keep your eyes peeled, don’t pay too much, and score a little gem that will have other guitar players saying “what the hell is that” and have your significant other shaking his or her head when the UPS/Fedex people come knocking.
I'm not sure if it's been made clear or not yet, but the imported firewood that had a Kay brand name on it in the seventies bears no relation to the products of the the Kay Co. of Chicago USA. It's not all plywood either; they had a range of total crap to not-so-crappy models. I never much liked their p.u.s or their necks. This is a good body (late 40's K-44) with a better (Harmony!) neck.
Some guitarists consider the notion of modifying an electric guitar from its stock configuration distasteful, while others consider it mandatory. As a custom builder with a decidedly vintage background, I fall somewhere in between. Generally, I’m most in favor of maximizing an instrument’s usability without jeopardizing the ability to return it to original condition.

Fender is considered as an American manufacturer of amplifiers and stringed instruments, which was founded by Clarence Leonidas Fender in the year 1946. They provide a wide range of guitar. It has comfortable necks and  smooth fingerboard. Their headquarters located in Scottsdale, Arizona, United States. The guitar will available at Rs. 12,199/- onwards (approx). For further information, visit fender.com.


Electric basses tend to use a medium jumbo fret as most Fenders have thru the years.  There are some folks who like the medium or even the very narrow/small mandolin fretwire for basses – this is more of a vintage feel, like the earliest Fender basses (Fender created the Precision Bass in 1951).  Since string height for bass strings is higher due to gauge and tuning, they are easy to grip and many bassists do not seem as concerned about fret height as guitarists.
Although the G&L Legacy electric guitar was released one year after the passing of Leo Fender, it is designed to the specifications of the original Stratocaster but with a few modern features specific to G&L instruments. The Legacy included, for instance, G&L's Dual Fulcrum vibrato and Schaller tuners and was available in a combination of different tonewoods. Even if the G&L guitars from before Leo Fender's death are more collectable, the Legacy electric guitar is still considered a high-quality instrument.
The Marine Band 365 Steve Baker Special (365/28 SBS) possesses the same construction as the original 365, but with low pitched tuning to their natural major keys, available in C, D, G, A, and F. It is named for, and was developed in part by noted harmonicist Steve Baker, who resides in Germany and has contributed to the design of several other Hohner harmonica models, including the Marine Bands Deluxe and Crossover.[18]
In the 1950s, Gibson also produced the Tune-o-matic bridge system and its version of the humbucking pickup, the PAF ("Patent Applied For"), first released in 1957 and still sought after for its sound.[citation needed] In 1958, Gibson produced two new designs: the eccentrically shaped Explorer and Flying V. These "modernistic" guitars did not sell initially. It was only in the late 1960s and early 70s when the two guitars were reintroduced to the market that they sold well. The Firebird, in the early 60s, was a reprise of the modernistic idea, though less extreme.
EQ placement is similar. Some players prefer to mold and shape their guitar’s primary tonal character before it is processed by other effects, but others prefer to adjust the EQ of the finished sound (again, placement in front of delay and reverb is preferable). Or maybe your distortion pedal’s EQ controls just don’t have enough bass or treble and you need to tweak its tone a touch more. If you own an EQ pedal, have fun and try placing it in different locations to see what works best for you.
Get ready to rock! This kid's electric guitar set has everything little rockstars need to jam out in style and foster a growing passion for music. Whether a child is just learning the basics or has mastered every chord, this guitar is the perfect practice tool to lift them to the next level. Hook it up to the included 5-watt amplifier and let your kid experience music like never before!
I listen to a lot of internet radio, from soul to death metal. I think it's good to listen to a wide variety of music, even if you're not particularly into certain genres. Each genre has its own qualities when it comes to guitar, so spend time just... listening. Listen to how rhythms, chords and solos are used. You may not know how they're doing it just from listening, but you might like the sound of something which you'll then be inspired to go and investigate independently.
Strumming Patterns: Tremolo is a tough fit here for the same reason as delay. Timing and repeating issues both tend to cause problems.Chords: This can work if used sparingly, especially when strumming patterns are simple and chords are allowed to ring.Short Arpeggios: Particularly if played during a verse, short arpeggios are easily benefited and improved by a light tremolo effect.Quick Solos: Any unique, lead guitar part that needs something extra can be a good spot for the tremolo effect. Usually this will occur during the bridge of a song.

Finally, there was a mysterious lap – clearly Valco – which had no real National or Supro equivalents. This had tapered shoulders that swept down, wing-like, to the bottom, which had a little concave cutout. It was covered in ivory plastic on top, with black-lacquered sides. It had a rosewood ‘board with dot inlays. The pickup was the new exposed-pole single-coil with a bolt-on handrest, in front of narrow rectangular plate that held the saddle and attaching holes. Volume and tone knobs sat on little mini-plates on either of the strings. Another atypical downscale version of the National New Yorker was offered at the same time by Montgomery Ward.
Back when they were starting, Jackson guitars were only available to the elite few, mostly heavy metal artists. After being acquired by Fender, Jackson has since expanded into the entry level realm with mass produced versions of their popular guitar designs, including the Dinky shape. The JS11 Dinky does just that, making the Jackson Dinky a beginner and student friendly instrument that more players can enjoy.
The Gruhn Guitars repair shop has been world renowned for decades for its unrivaled expertise, skill, and respectful repair practices. Though our full-time staff of luthiers primarily focuses on repairing and restoring the instruments we make available for sale, beginning in 2016 we are also pleased to offer our repair services to loyal customers as an extended benefit of buying an instrument from Gruhn Guitars. Instruments purchased from Gruhn Guitars will be moved to the front of our repair queue and will be repaired at a discounted labor rate. As a sign of our appreciation for your business, Gruhn Guitars is here to help you for years to come to keep your instrument in the same prime working order as when it was listed for sale at the shop.

Prior to being acquired by Gibson back in 1957, Epiphone once competed with the most popular guitar brands in the market - including Gibson. These days, Epiphone is known for being the affordable sub-brand of Gibson, producing cost-effective alternatives to many of their premium guitars. Many experienced players today credit this brand for manufacturing their first ever instrument, and their popularity in the entry level market continue to soar high.

Harmony's market share of entry and intermediate-level instruments was it's downfall in the mid-1970s, as it found itself unable to compete with the competition from overseas (particularly Japanese) manufacturers. The higher-end American companies like Guild, Gibson and Fender struggled to some extent too, but the imports were generally aimed at student guitarists rather than professionals.
These are world class guitars and have got probably the best feel any guitar can give apart from that u can play everything on these guitars from classic rock to jazz and blues followed by metal. the main thing that these guitars are known for is their finish and there unique necks which are really fast and not too thin which keeps your tone and feel in place. I would say that these guitars definitely deserve a place in the top 3 and definitely do watch out for the petrucci signature models
The written history of the classical guitar can be traced back to the early 16th century with the development of the vihuela in Spain. While the lute was then becoming popular in other parts of Europe, the Spaniards did not take to it well because of its association with the Moors.[citation needed] Instead, the lute-like vihuela appeared with two more strings that gave it more range and complexity. In its most developed form, the vihuela was a guitar-like instrument with six double strings made of gut, tuned like a modern classical guitar with the exception of the third string, which was tuned half a step lower. It has a high sound and is rather large to hold. Few have survived and most of what is known today comes from diagrams and paintings.
Beyond shaping and body design, there are a number of characteristics that distinguish the Gibson Les Paul line from other electric guitars. For example, in a fashion similar to Gibson’s hollow-body instruments, the strings of Les Paul guitars are always mounted on the top of the guitar body, rather than through the guitar body, as seen in competitor Fender’s designs. The Gibson also features a variety of colors, such as Wine Red, Ebony, Classic White, Fire Burst, and Alpine White. In addition, the Les Paul models offered a variety of finishes and decorative levels, a diversity of hardware options, and an innovative array of electric pick-up options, some of which significantly impacted the sound of electric music. For instance, in 1957, Gibson introduced the humbucker (PAF), which revolutionized the sound of the electric guitar, and eliminated the mains hum, which had previously plagued guitars with single coilmagnetic pickups.

The Triple Crown TC-50 is a three-channel amp, with independent preamps covering clean, low-gain and high-gain ranges. The front panel packs three identical sets of controls including gain, master volume, bass, mid, treble and presence, together with a two-way toggle switch that changes the channel gain and voice. There’s a small toggle switch for manual channel changing, and a pair of master output level controls, one of which is footswitchable. The feature-rich rear panel includes Mesa’s exceptional CabClone speaker-emulated output, with a balanced XLR, headphones socket and line out. The TC-50 also benefits from a footswitchable effects loop, separate reverb level controls for each channel, and MIDI switching for all the major functions. The Triple Crown’s clean channel is highly versatile, going from butter-sweet clarity through to edgy blues soloing, with a lot of control over that ‘just on the edge’ sweet spot. The Lo Gain channel is where the TC-50’s crunch and classic rock tones live, with a multi-layered overdrive and harmonic overtones that shift with varying degrees of pick attack. Flipping the toggle switch into Drive mode adds a subtle midrange bump, invoking JCM800-approved snarl and a dose of extra gain. The Hi Gain channel adds more of the same - lots more, so much so that in the upper reaches we think this is probably the most gain ever from a Mesa amp. No doubt about it, the Triple Crown has three channels packed full of world-class tone that only a handful of amps can compete with.
Most of the better machine heads on the market these days use a standard .375" headstock hole, so swapping tuners isn’t that hard to do. The problem comes with the mounting at the rear of the peghead. Luckily, if you use the type that screw down from the front side with a nut and washer, you can swap and test before you drill additional mounting-screw holes.
In late 1929, Martin built a prototype batch of six OM guitars. The very first of these had pyramid bridges and no pickguard. Martin soon realized that with the vigorous strumming required in a band setting, a pickguard would be required. Hence all OMs after the prototype batch had a small teardrop-shaped pickguard. The new OMs were not highly sucessful. They sold, but not as well as Martin had hoped. In 1933 the OM designation was dropped and was now called the "000" model. But infact the 1933 "000" models were the same as the 1933 "OM" models, retaining the OM body style and 14 fret neck. Then in 1934 the standard 000 models were modified to the shorter 24.9" scale (for unknown reasons, as the 12 fret 000 body had a 25.6" scale length its inception in 1902 to its demise in 1931). Yet the OM's longer scale was a major factor in the OM's tone. The strings on an OM must be tuned to a higher tension to get concert pitch. This extra tension translates into more drive on the top, hence providing more volume and tone. The OM's scalloped braces and a small maple bridgeplate give the OM a great sound. Although these features were common to other Martin models of the time, the OM's top brace under the fingerboard was missing. This design is unique to OMs making the top very lightly braced. This does lead to some problems with cracks in the upper bout along the side of the fingerboard, but it also contributes to the great sound of the OM models.

This is because you won’t have to go through all the hassle of doing research on pickups, then finding a way to mount them without damaging your guitar. While magnetic pickups are surely quite easy to install, contact pickups or blended systems with microphones and preamps might require removing the top, drilling, using all sorts of screws and plates, etc.

This multi-effects pedal lets you setup your virtual rig with up to five effects that include various modulation, distortion, compressor, delay, reverb and other effects. They can also run alongside the Zoom G1Xon's built-in amp modeling, which lets you choose between 22 different amps. Those are a lot of features in a small unit, thankfully Zoom implemented an interface that makes tweaking and configuring easier. As expected although you are still limited by two footswitches, it comes with an expression pedal, which adds even more to its value and usability.
According to Michael Wright of Vintage Guitar magazine, Univox itself has a rather convoluted history. Though it was a part of the “lawsuit era” of the ‘70s, Univox wasn’t just another copy manufacturer out of Japan. It’s a bit more complicated than that. The firm was created from a joining of multiple companies that had a few other name brand guitars – Hagstrom, for one – under their corporate umbrellas.
Modulating Offset: The output of solid-state amplifiers is directly connected to 2 DC power supplies through the output transistors. The instantaneous non-symmetry within the music waveform (particularly from the bass notes) is averaged as a modulating DC offset. This modulating offset is small, but it varies the efficiency of the speaker, introducing inter-modulation distortion, amplitude modulating the music. This problem is mostly eliminated by the trend to use an active sub-bass. In valve amplifiers the output transformer isolates the speaker from the amplifier electronics. No modulating offset can be produced.
Much like how a wah-wah pedal is a foot rocker attached to a tone pot, the volume pedal is the same deal, but with a volume pot instead.  As you sweep from heel to toe, you’ll go from “0 to 10”.  Aside from adjusting the overall volume, a guitarist can produce other worldly sounds by swelling into notes, or rocking the pedal rhythmically.  When these sounds hit your delay and reverb, the sky is the limit.
While a noise suppressor/gate is not a modulation effect, it usually works and sounds best when it’s placed either directly after or in front of modulation effects. I prefer the noise suppressor after modulation effects as this placement will mute an unwanted constant “whoosh” that often can be heard when a flanger or phaser shifter is engaged even though the guitar is silent.
Firstly, they are cheaper than their tube counterparts, which is why most beginners will end up starting on a solid-state amp. They are also much more efficient, easier to maintain (no need to change tubes), lighter to carry, and less fragile. While the tone of modern-day solid-state amps can be incredible, they don’t tend to be as fluid or responsive as tube amps. For more on solid-state amps, check out our dedicated solid-state amp page.
Now, in the days of solid state signal processing, outboard units are available to produce a facsimile of the old tube-type distortion. Some units actually incorporate a vacuum tube and do it the old way. Other electronics packages simulate the effect. The "tube-type" distortion is preferrable to many over the kind of distortion produced by solid-state amplifiers because the tubes just gradually rounded over the peaks as they went into distortion, whereas the solid state devices just chop off the tops of the peaks cleanly at the supply voltage point, producing a harsh distortion. One type of distortion device, employed as a distortion pedal, was called a "fuzz box".
Clarence White helped shape two genres: His acoustic flatpicking, first displayed as a teenager when he and his brother formed the Kentucky Colonels band, was key in making the guitar a lead instrument in bluegrass. Later, he set the stage for country rock and transferred that dynamic precision and melodic symmetry to the electric guitar. A top session man in the Sixties, he played on the Byrds' 1968 landmark, Sweetheart of the Rodeo. After he joined the band later that year, White brought a full-bodied rock elation to his California-inflected Nashville chops. "He never played anything that sounded vaguely weak," said the Byrds' leader, Roger McGuinn. "He was always driving… into the music." White had returned to bluegrass with the acclaimed Muleskinner album when he was killed by a drunk driver in 1973. He was 29. "Clarence was immersed in hard country and bluegrass," said Dan Auerbach of the Black Keys. "He incorporated those elements into rock & roll, and it totally blew people's minds."
Bass effects that condition the sound, rather than changing its character are called "sound conditioners." Gain booster effects pedals and bass preamplifier pedals increase the gain (or volume) of the bass guitar signal. Bass preamplifiers for double basses are designed to match the impedance of piezoelectric pickups with the input impedance of bass amplifiers. Some double bass preamplifiers may also provide phantom power for powering condenser microphones and anti-feedback features such as a notch filter (see "Filter-based effects" section below).
When playing the electric guitar, you’ll have to simultaneously use both hands. One hand will be responsible for fretting and the other hand will be responsible for strumming or plucking. Depending on which is your more comfortable side and whether the electric guitar is designed more for one side than the other, it will impact your play style and music quality.
A Vibe or Univibe pedal reproduces the sound of a rotating speaker by synchronizing volume oscillation, frequency-specific volume oscillation, vibrato (pitch wavering), phase shifting, and chorusing in relation to a non-rotating speaker. The modulation speed can be ramped up or down, with separate speeds for the bass and treble frequencies, to simulate the sound of a rotating bass speaker and a rotating horn. This effect is simultaneously a volume-oriented effect, an equalization-oriented effect, and a time-based effect. Furthermore, this effect is typically related to chorus. Some vibe pedals also include an overdrive effect, which allows the performer to add "tube"-style distortion. This effect is the most closely related to a rotary speaker. Some Vibe-only pedals include:
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• For the fifth insert (leave the fourth empty), go to Distortion/AmpSimulator and click on the plug‑in's edit button. For the Amplifier Model, select Crunch, and try the following parameter values: Drive at 8.7, Bass, Middle, and Treble all at 5.0, Presence at 6.2, and Volume set to 5.0. For the Cabinet, select Cabinet 2, with Lo Damping at 38 and Hi Damping at 35.
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