Classical guitars have nylon strings, which are softer than steel strings, and easier to press down. However, the neck is much wider on a classical guitar, which can be a struggle for beginners. The action is likely to be higher, as well. In general, they are softer-toned and don't project as well as a steel string acoustic, which makes for quieter practising, which could be a consideration.
One of more commonly known effects for musicians is distortion. It falls into the family of effects sometimes referred to as "dirt" boxes: Distortion, Overdrive, and Fuzz. In simple terms, it is cutting the top and bottom of the sound wave off using a technique known as "hard" clipping to create a more square shaped wave instead of the more natural sine wave formation. A solid explanation on the techniques and methods of creating different types of distortion can be found on Wikipedia.
WARTUNG Herzlichen Glückwunsch und vielen Dank dafür, dass Sie sich für ein Produkt von Ibanez entschieden haben. Ibanez legt bei seinen Produkten die höchsten Standards an. Alle Ibanez- Instrumente werden vor der Auslieferung unserer strengen Qualitätskontrolle unterzogen. In dieser Anleitung wollen wir beschreiben, wie Sie das Äußere Ihres Instruments pflegen und Ihre Gitarre in dem Zustand halten, wie sie bei Auslieferung ab Werk war.

In other words, it will slather the tone with raw dirt without affecting the core of the signal. A lot of people mistake fuzz pedals for distortions due to their more aggressive nature, but these beasts of old are definitely unique. One of the best examples of what a fuzz box sounds like is the Electro-Harmonix Big Muff Pi – a fuzz pedal whose circuitry gave birth to countless other models.
The ultimate rock/metal electric guitar instrument is here! Shreddage II covers the entire range of lead AND rhythm playing – every fret, every string, and tons of articulations. A powerful interface allows for easy playing and deep customization. With the included Kontakt Player and ReValver HPse, you’ll have everything you need to SHRED. Now includes Shreddage 2X update!
To silence your guitar, go into the full-mute position discussed in Part I: let at least two of your fingers rest gently on the guitar strings, and don’t push down on any fret. Alternatively, bring the palm of your strumming hand down on the strings as if you were going to start palm muting. Practice playing power chords and quickly muting them either way.

Before diving in, it’s also worth mentioning the “crap in, crap out” rule, which dictates that any recorded track is only going to sound as good as the guitar and amp that it captures, however good your mic or skilled your engineering. You can’t expect elevated studio technique to convert junk tone or a mediocre performance to stellar sounds in the mix; the best you can hope for is to accurately capture the sound being made by your amp, and to do so with optimum depth, dynamics, and fidelity. Of course, it’s possible that the crappy, low-grade junk tone you capture from a scuzzball rig is exactly what the recording demanded (Jack White or Dan Auerbach, anyone?), but it will usually benefit the tune to capture it as powerfully as you can!

1. Examples. There are a handful of examples in this book and that's about it. I expected much more in the way of alternate wiring examples but they were only mentioned in passing it seems. Additionally if you're looking for good step by step instructions you wont find it here. The instructions are average at best and never really go deeper than "put this wire here and that wire there" . It's step by step,but just barely. Don't expect any deep explanations on the theory behind why certain wirings do what they do or why they sound the way they do. It's cursory at best.


Except for the Epiphone Les Paul Express’s total domination of the mini guitar category, there was no clear leader among the guitars, and our picks are the guitars that got the best average ratings. Our testers found lots to like in many of the guitars we tried, and you may find an axe you like better in our competition section below, where we include comments on all the guitars we tested.
The Yamaha Pacifica has long proved a benchmark for quality and specification, and the 112V remains one of the best guitars for beginners. The 112 is far from fancy and simply concentrates on the bare necessities. Yet the construction is of excellent quality. Trust us, if looked after this will be a guitar for life. By design it's an altogether more modern, brighter and lighter take on a hot-rod Strat. But when we say brighter that doesn't mean overly shrill. In fact the bridge humbucker will surprise some, it's beefy without being too mid-range heavy and although the coil-split proves a little bland played clean, with a distortion boost it's a pretty useful gnarly and wiry rhythm voice. It's good to have the choice too when mixed with the middle pickup - switching between the full and split coil here is subtle but, especially with cleaner 'class A' amp voicings, there's enough character difference to be useable. The solo single-coils impress - plenty of percussion and with a little mid-range beef added from the amp these get you to the correct Texas toneland. Neck and middle combined produces a fine modern Strat-like mix - the added brightness will cut through a multi-FX patch nicely.
And therein is the VST guitar's edge, as it continues to improve in quality, not matching that of performances by the late Jimmy or the long-standing Carlos or whomever one adopts as their personal guitar deity, but bringing in new qualities of its own. In computer science terms, improved controllers are providing ever more interesting views of ever more detailed models to listeners attuned to the particular environment augmented by the virtual model. The guitar VST is not your daddy, but it might be the little sibling with your daddy's eyes. In the long run.. well... forget that. We love you pops. My little sisters, brothers and I hope you live forever, or at least as long was we do.

Clapton is good… not gonna argue that he is an amazing guitarist… but no where near the best guitarist of all time…. Satriani can play ANY clapton riff, solo, song, chord progression, whatever.. Clapton can’t come close to playing any of Joe’s stuff. And most of Claptons best songs are JJ Cale tunes. Cocaine, Layla, After Midnight, etc,…. etc…. Oh and Clapton put out a whole album dedicated to Robert Johnson and admitted that most of the songs are redone and reworked because “the man” Clapton couldn’t play em anywhere near as well as Mr. Johnson.
Maple is a very hard type of wood with good tonal qualities and good sustain. Guitar necks are traditionally made from maple, in part because of its strength, and in part because the material can highlight and amplify the wood in the body. Maple is also often used as a top for the guitar body, partly because it is beautiful (think flame, or quilted maple tops), and partly because it can brighten a sound that would otherwise be murky.
Some Korean Ibanez serial numbers are purely numeric with no alphabetic characters. According to Jim Donahue these guitars were manufactured in the Cort factory, in which he had the supervision. Because they had no date stamps available when they started, the serials numbers of Artstar models in this factory were written by hand. These handwritten serial numbers are hard to decipher. The production of these Artstar models at the Cort factory was discontinued in 2003.
The Yamaha's top is constructed of Sitka spruce, a “strong yet elastic” wood that helps the player articulate tone and dynamics. The neck is made of Nato wood, and the back and fretboard are both made of rosewood. One of the best things about the Yamaha's neck and body is the way the two are joined together: via a hand-fitted, dovetail neck joint that uses no metal hardware. This neck-to-body cohesion is ideal for tone as well as the overall stability and durability of the physical instrument.
The Squier Affinity series is a great beginner instrument. All of the bodies & necks have been CNC manufactured, so they are consistent and solidly built. In recent years, Fender has completely re-hauled the Squier series of instruments to make them decent introductory level instruments, at a great introductory cost to the beginner player. You can choose from Strats, Teles and even Jazzmaster style guitars!
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This years new Guitar World Magazine Holiday Buyers Guide issue is full of great gear for the upcoming holiday season. The amazing new FU-Tone Design Your Own & the Titanium Bridges are featured and well worth checking out. Make sure you pickup a copy of the new Buyers Guide on news stands today and all of the beautiful women photographed don't hurt either!
I use an EBTECH HUM X. I plug my Fender ’62 Re-Issue Deluxe Reverb into the HUM X and then I plug the HUM X into the wall socket. It works great for me. For my pedals, I use a Visual Sound One Spot to power my large board with no issues and I have a Boss BCB-3 pedal board/case with OD-3, CH-1, DD-3, and a TU-2 next to the OD-3 on the floor since my BCB-3 is really old it came with a 4 pin daisy chain. I power that with a Boss PSA-120S AC Adapter also with no issues. I read about keeping your signal as clean as possible and cable lengths no longer than is necessary. I would try everything mentioned above and make sure you have good quality and proper length cables. BTW, if you research cables, you may find that more expensive doesn’t always mean better. Check out Pro-Co. They are also made in the USA. Good luck!
Unlike the guitars we have mentioned so far, the Taylor BT2 Baby Taylor is a travel guitar. In other words, it's a 3/4 scale size of a standard dreadnought, making it easier to play for a lot of us. The top wood is a solid mahogany piece while the back and sides are made of layered Sapele. The use of laminate wood is one of those friction points which many purists like to point out to. However, the way Taylor builds these guitars, you really won't hear a difference. In this case it's only a visual difference, and a fairly attractive one at that.
I found myself un-obligated, bored and holding a fist full of cash one Friday afternoon, so I wandered into my local guitar shop. With a new found love of single coil pickups I had been eyeballing the Gretsch and Guild hollow bodies unfortunately too poor to actually buy one. On this afternoon, however, I played the Godin 5th Avenue Kingpin. It was love at first strum. Mine is called Cognac Burst. The satin finish on these instruments is beautiful, and give it a vintage, played look. This guitar has a really nice feel in terms of the neck and the thickness of the body. I have fairly long fingers and the neck is comfortable to play. It feels to me, a bit like the thicker necks on the Les Pauls of the late 50s. When I got the guitar, the shop said they'd dial it in for me for free, but frankly, I have no complaints as it is. With the classic style floating bridge you can drop the action impossibly low before you start to get fret buzz. After I brought mine home, I did just that and it plays like a dream. The frets are finished well and there is a bevel on the edge of the fret board and frets that keep them out of the way if you're in the habit of sliding your hand up and down the neck quickly. The Kingpin has a warm mellow tone when unplugged that is perfect for playing jazz and blues. I also enjoy the lower volume of the guitar since it has f holes when I play later in the evening. Plugged in, the P90 kills and sounds good clean and driven. It also retains that warm, mellow tone when played without distortion. I haven't had any trouble with feedback as I tend to keep the volume a bit lower for small spaces. My one complaint is the hideously ugly case, that costs 80 bucks. It's like its made of extra tough styrofoam. I understand they were going for lightness, but it's just ugly. All in all though, this guitar is a great choice and plays as well as my Gibson Les Paul and my buddies Gretsch 51... whatever.
Very difficult guitar to put down. I was browsing local guitar shops, looking for a deal on a used MIM Stratocaster, just to have, I'm an SG man. This guitar caught my eye and the store owner was kind enough to allow me a little play time with this visually stunning guitar. I think I was expecting another copy of Fender's Stratocaster, given the shape and three single coil pickups. From the first strum I knew this was something different, tonally like a cross between a Strat and a "Rick". That's a very big deal. Finish was excellent and setup close to ideal for me, so I wound up with a new guitar for roughly what I expected to pay for a used model. Getting home I immediately ran through my amps, trying to find something to complain about. I'm lucky to have a few tube amps known for excellent clean channels. This is my preference, and this guitar does not disappoint. Think 60s Ventures, dripping with reverb. Yeah! Overall this guitar gives a great range of tone, is comfortable though just this side of heavy and seems to be very well made. Moderate use of Leo Fender's brilliant trem doesn't seem to effect tune. The guitar came strung with 9s, though I've since moved to 10s, my personal preference. And it fits a Strat hardcase perfectly. To be crystal clear, this guitar doesn't replace any of the legends, such as my beloved SG's or Strats. Instead, it provides a beautiful and unique enhancement for guitarists that favor those instruments.
Meaning of electronic: (of a device) having or operating with the aid of many small components, especially microchips and transistors, that control and direct an electric current. or (of a device) having or operating with the aid of many small components, especially microchips and transistors, that control and direct an electric current. Example is “electronic calculator”.
Except if, like George Gruhn, you know better. The 71-year-old Nashville dealer has sold guitars to Eric Clapton, Neil Young, Paul McCartney and Taylor Swift. Walking through NAMM with Gruhn is like shadowing Bill Belichick at the NFL Scouting Combine. There is great love for the product and great skepticism. What others might see as a boom — the seemingly endless line of manufacturers showcasing instruments — Gruhn sees as two trains on a collision course.
Pitch Bend/Shifting: From a simple octave above the note you’re playing or at intervals in between, a pitch shifter effects pedal will change the pitch of your note or chord. More sophisticated pitch shifters create two or more harmony notes so you can accompany your root note for a fuller sound. Some simulate a chorus effect by providing minute shifts in pitch.
Next we look at the features and hardware of the guitar. What brand are the pickups? Is the bridge fixed or is there a tremolo system? Is there a locking nut or anything else to help with tuning stability? Does it come with a case? We also take this opportunity to look at any special features that define the guitar – perhaps a bridge that never goes out of tune, or a control switch that makes the guitar do crazy things.
While there is absolutely no reason to go with "standard" if that's not what you prefer for a given instrument, I think it's safe to say that 10s (usually 10-46) are standard, since nearly every string manufacturer that uses such descriptors for their electric sets refers to their 10s as "regular." Ernie Ball Regular SLinky? 10-46. Fender Regular Whatevers? 10-46. D'addario Regular Light (note that there is no other, more REGULAR sounding name)? 10-46. Dean Markley Regular Blue Steels? 10-46...
First, Steel String sounds heavenly, and I always love it when my mouth drops the first time I hear a hyper-realistic sounding VST. Steel String has done this completely, in fact, the only time I was ever pulled out from its hyper-realism was on the fret noise that recreates the articulation of finger sliding across the strings when changing positions.
So last week I wrote about if it made sense to replace the speaker in an amp, or if it would be better to just get a different amp, I'll bet some of ya saw this weeks topic coming, right?  Once again I must begin by stating that even though we design, build and sell pickups here, we will NOT offer biased information (I promise); remember, we are real-world guitar players too.  Yep, we also need to carefully watch how we spend our money lest we find ourselves without a roof over our head!  And I mean really, I could take being homeless ... but I'd NEVER do that to a good GUITAR! Shall we dive in?
We are very proud to present to you a pleasant surprise I must say from way back when folks this is prime Time beginning of that Golden Era of some of the GREATEST QUALITY Acoustic guitar that FENDER ever had the smarts to Import… that’s right these are Japanese crafted beauty’s . Built back in the day when Japan had the economy riding high while US guitar builders were getting bought out by business folks not guitar builders and US economy was in the tanker just a little brief history reminder… Fender & Gibson were under the gun to cut costs and re-structure if they wanted to stay alive and that they did…. CBS , Norlin…. And others cut back on the high quality woods they once enjoyed and relied upon the reputation the US had for making great guitars basically reputation from the late 50’s – early 60’s To about 68-69 or so…. Then quality went down no doubt…. Right then it was prime time for Japan Luthiers to strike and they did…they stepped up the quality from the funny toy grade guitars we saw here in the states back when I was a kid you could get a decent cute player electric guitar at the Pawn shop in about 1965 for about $69.00 in fact my dad bought my 1st electric guitar there for $69.00 … I loved it—it was a “ KENT” and it sounded very good threw my Silvertone amp….. ..Kent is a offspring of Greco which is a factory behind making many brands buildby Fujigen Gekki…. Ok what this Fender beauty traces back to the great FujiGen Gakki in 1974 according to its serial number… making this beautifully preserved SOLID TOP Vintage Japanese guitars 40 years old a true vintage guitar in its own right. It was during the time when this guitar was built that the Japanese Luthiers set out to make some of the most righteous guitars period… fit – finish - workmanship & materials used are the good stuff folks….. This full size Dreadnought Acoustic guitar is a replica of the Martin designed D-28 known to be one of the finest most prolific designs the US Martin & co ever produced. This Fender F310 is of a High Quality example, The top is Solid Spruce straight grained with some nice figure and wow it has 40 years of patina to its color and finish and overall vintage appeal is Very strong… I was drawn to this example it sounds deep and rich and complex with an excellent volume And its highs ring threw when cording and finger picking , This guitars Back & sides are true to the masterful D-28 desigh …. High quality ROSEWOOD just beautifully grained see the pics for more detail Its absolutely beautiful back – sides are all east Indian Rosewood the fingerboard may be Brazilian Rosewood by its looksa very high grade non theless, the bridge appears to be Ebony wood….. the Bridge is nice and flat to its top which is also nice and straight, action is very good medium low and adjustable. The top has a couple of minor doinks see the pics not bad at all and certainly nothing remotely enough to detour from its vintage Gorgeous looks , no cracks anywhere found , bindings are very food, overall this guitar is an EXTREMLY CLEAN example aside from the afore mentioned . This guitar is in top Vintage used condition and is easily a 9//10 Fit and finish I suggest this was built but a high level Journeyman and can compete or compare with A nice vintage Yairi or Morris or Gibson or Martin for that matter…. .
The Alvarez AG75CE is on the upper range of $500 acoustic guitars. This particular model is a cedar top with rosewood back and sides. It also features scalloped and forward shifted bracing which makes for a bigger sound. Owners of this guitar are posting rave reviews citing it’s quality of build and great tone. The cutaway is a nice feature for those that want to reach the upper register of the guitar, and it looks cool too! It is a grand auditorium body, which does not quite have the bass of a dreadnought but offers a more balanced sound. Great for singing along. This guitar is a great choice for intermediate players looking to not break the bank.Check it out here.

The early Silvertone electric guitars were made by Harmony and Danelectro, with a few exceptions. Danelectro had been making amplifiers since the 1940's for Sears, Epiphone and it's own brand. Their manufacturing facility was in Neptune New Jersey. The Dano's started mainly with the infamous "U" series which had the Lipstick pickups and "Coke-bottle" headstocks. Jimmy Page, Jimi Hendrix and many other rock stars got started and continue to play the Dano's. Aside from the very first Danelectros for Sears they all had the Lipstick pickups. That's how you can tell a Dano from the other manufacturers. Danelectro also manufactured the infamous "amp-in-case" models of which I have two examples: a 1964 and a 1968. If you want more info on Dano's go here.

There are a lot of different kinds of guitars (acoustic, semi-acoustic, electric, steel etc.) but some companies make a wide variety. Here's a list. . Fender (Mine) . Ibanez (Mine too) . Epiphone (Also Gibson plus the kids version is Maestro) . Dean . Some good acoustic companies are . Alvarez (Also mine) . Crescent . You can visit the websites for these companies. Hope I could help!
Half a step down from standard tuning. Used by bands/artists such as: Jimi Hendrix, Coheed and Cambria, Black Sabbath, Motörhead, Cannibal Corpse (Chris Barnes era), Nirvana, AFI, Rise Against, Failure, Weezer, Green Day, Kiss, The Hellacopters, Backyard Babies, Guns N' Roses, Neil Young, Van Halen, Brand New, Blind Guardian, Metallica (on the "Load", "Reload" and "Garage Inc." albums, "The God That Failed" and in live performances of standard tuned songs since 1995), AC/DC (some songs and in live performances of standard tuned songs since 2008), Slayer, Alcest, Rage Against The Machine, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Yngwie Malmsteen, Alice in Chains, The Smashing Pumpkins, The Killers, Relient K, Suede, RED on "Not Alone", Beach House, Third Day (on "I Can Feel It"), Die Ärzte (since "Geräusch") Skillet (on "A Little More"), and Vertical Horizon, Tyler Bryant & the Shakedown.

Like effects pedals, multi-effects processors are used to modify and alter the clean signal of your guitar to produce a large variety of effects (reverb, wah-wah, overdrive, distortion, chorus, etc). Unlike a simple pedal that gives you one or two options for modifying tone, a multi-effects processor has a full load of effects and sounds that allow you to play music with a rainbow-colored tonal palette. There are processors for modifying guitar, bass, and even units for vocalists with pitch-correction tools and harmonizer effects.


There are times when a single-coil just doesn’t have enough twang. I’ve encountered Strat neck pickups that are just too wooly to provide me with that saucy, SRV/Hendrix-style rhythm juice. Or, sometimes an anemic bridge pickup just needs an extra dose of snap to push it into Tele-like territory. If so, this simple mod could be just what you’re looking for.
The hollow body electric guitar rose to prominence when Gibson introduced the ES-150 back in 1936. Fully hollow body electric guitars (sometimes referred to as “Jazz Box” guitars) tend to have arched tops and large, deep bodies that allow the sound to fully resonate to produce an incredible full-bodied voice with amazing projection and depth. Jazz players and blues players really love the sound fully hollow guitars deliver. While the classic, larger-bodied fully hollow electric guitars definitely still exist, there are also a substantial amount of thinline fully hollow body electric guitars that guitar players may find to be more comfortable. Guitar brands such as Gibson, Gretsch, Ibanez, D’Angelico, Guild, and Epiphone provide guitar players with a fantastic array of fully hollow body electric guitars.
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