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Better known simply as an acoustic guitar, the “steel” strings (they come in all kinds of construction, not just steel) are louder and brighter, and a much more versatile instrument to play. Folk, rock, jazz — acoustic guitars have it all covered. Those steel strings also chew the ends off your fingers until eventually you develop hard calluses on the tips — very handy for plucking boiled eggs out of the saucepan.
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Charles Kaman put a team of employees to work on inventing a new guitar in 1964.[2][7] For the project, Charlie chose a small team of aerospace engineers and technicians, several of whom were woodworking hobbyists as well. One of these was Charles McDonough, who created the Ovation Adamas model.[8]Kaman founded Ovation Instruments, and in 1965 its engineers and luthiers(guitar makers) worked to improve acoustic guitars by changing their conventional materials. The R&D team spent months building and testing prototype instruments. Their first prototype had a conventional“dreadnought” body, with parallel front and back perpendicular to the sides. The innovation was the use of a thinner, synthetic back, because of its foreseen acoustic properties. Unfortunately, the seam joining the sides to the thin back was prone to breakage. To avoid the problem of a structurally unstable seam, the engineers proposed a synthetic back with a parabolic shape. By mid-1966, they realized that the parabolic shape produced a desirable tone with greater volume than the conventional dreadnought.[9]
The way that cabinet manufacturers state the power handling capabilities of a speaker cabinet (or an individual speaker) can also be confusing. An important figure for a speaker cabinet's power handling capabilities is its rated wattage-handling capabilities as "RMS". For example, a bass speaker cabinet's back panel may state that it has a power handling capacity of 500 watts RMS. This means that the speaker can handle an average power, from a power amplifier, of 500 watts. The speaker can also handle occasional peaks or "transient" bursts of higher wattages, so long as these are brief. Where is becomes confusing is that some manufacturers also list "peak power", also called "maximum power", "max power" or "burst power". Peak power is the power-handling ability of the speaker for very short bursts of high-wattage signal. The RMS figure is much more important than the "peak power" or "max power" figure. To add to the confusion, some manufacturers state the "program power" capabilities of their speaker cabinet, which can be a vague and less defined term. Reputable, major manufacturers state the RMS output and/or power-handling capabilities of their gear.
Other Ovation innovations include composite tops and multiple offset sound holes on guitar tops, pioneered in the Adamas model in 1977. Kaman Music has also sold budget guitars—and even mandolins and ukuleles—based on similar design principles to the Ovation such as the Korean-built Celebrity series and the Korean or Chinese-built Applause brand.[citation needed]
I keep coming back to this point because it’s absolutely essential: learn how to solo over chords. I don’t mean simple chord arpeggiating, even though that has its place, too. If you can follow the chord changes with smooth, soulful playing, you will never be fenced in. You can drop into any style, any band, and any situation. Most of us get stuck playing a given scale pattern for years before something shakes us up. Make this the foundation of your learning with this book.
Guitar chords and signatures. Find and save list of chords. Basic guitar chords A sheet of the most used rock chords. Suitable for beginners. Empty chord sheet An empty sheet of chords templates to print out and use. Basic guitar chords Em, C, G, D, Am, E, and A Free lesson on the basic guitar chords Em, C, G, D, Am, E, and A. The following chords are 7 of the most basic open position chords. An open position chord is one that contains at least o

Guitar combo amplifiers were at first used with bass guitars and electric pianos, but these instruments produce a wider frequency range and need a full-range speaker system. Much more amplifier power is required to reproduce low-frequency sound, especially at high volume. Reproducing low frequencies also requires a suitable woofer or subwoofer speaker and enclosure, with bass cabinets often being larger in size than a cabinet for mid-range or high-range sounds. As well, the open-back cabinets used on many electric guitar amps, while effective for electric guitar, do not have good bass reproduction.
Should space restrictions or volume levels make these methods impractical, try adding an air-guitar part as an overdub to a conventionally miked guitar track. The principle is similar to vocal doubling, for which the same part is performed twice; you may not be able to do this for an improvised solo, but for rhythm parts or composed lines, it's a snap. In addition, double tracking with a bright acoustic guitar or a smooth-sounding hollow body will add extra richness and some slick, big-budget zing to your mixes.
Compared to building something from scratch, the kits listed here are relatively easy to work with. Still, there are some that require more patience and experience, like those with set-necks and hollow bodies. On the flipside, there are kits that make life easier for you with their no-soldering required electronics and bolt-on necks. It is recommended that beginners go for easier builds, but with so much information available in the internet age, it should not hinder you from getting what you really want - just make sure to be patient and do your homework.
Even though the Orange Amps were still neither of the Top of of all lists because the Fender and the Marshall are amongst well known amplifiers for its individual claims in both patent and innovated in each technologies, (Fender corporation claims its first solid body elecric guitar to been market in mass productions and patents, whilst the other one Marshall claims either in terms truest guitar amplifications that also in mass production, so on Marshall claims a patent innovation itself and both of them were been a major direct suppliers on every famous music artists in every decades of music revolutions, on the other hands, the top spots of their hardship innovations were be at their hands, until to theIR last steps of their innovations, let the famous artists decide their demand at their hands whilst on the other side, Orange produces amps with considering a reasonable market on its considerably fine quality products because, the top spots were be still at working, and it means, ...more

Claimed to have been invented by guitarist Victor Griffin of Pentagram (who tunes it 1/2 step down).[37] Also used in the song "March of the Fire Ants" by Mastodon, "Rusty Cage" "Holy Water", and "Searching With My Good Eye Closed" by Soundgarden on their Badmotorfinger album, "Cowboy Hat" and some of "Silver Side Up" by Nickelback, "Gasoline", "Shadow on the Sun", "Bring Em Back Alive" and "The Worm" by Audioslave and "Prison Sex" by Tool. Today is the Day have used it on every album since Temple of the Morning Star, Shining use it on most of their album Blackjazz, and Black Label Society used this on much of their early material, often to emulate a 7-string guitar. Used also by Silverchair in the songs "One Way Mule" and "The Lever" from their album "Diorama".
The GrandMeister Deluxe refines the German firm's best-selling compact head, with four flexible channels and a host of built-in effects. Just about everything is MIDI-powered, so you can edit and store presets to your heart's content. The rear panel includes the latest Red Box recording output, and there's also a new improved iPad app that you can use to edit and store presets, either at the end of a lead or using a wireless MIDI adaptor. The GrandMeister Deluxe 40's four channels sound quite different from those of its predecessor: they're more balanced, with slightly less treble emphasis and a smoother but no less powerful bass response. There's plenty of headroom on the clean channel, which dovetails seamlessly with the higher-gain crunch channel. Both clean and crunch are very tweed-influenced, dominated by a warm midrange that's equally flattering to humbuckers and single coils, especially when boosted and laced with a little of the GrandMeister's digital reverb, which can be combined to taste with delay, chorus, flanger, phaser or tremolo. The two American-voiced lead channels have all the gain you could possibly need for almost any musical genre, from classic rock to modern drop-tuned metal, with a nicely sculpted top-end that squeals and snarls on demand. As a do-it-all tool the GrandMeister 40 takes some beating. All of its many features work efficiently and it's hard to point the finger at shortcomings, because there really aren't any.

Updated! Now has complete information on how to set up a guitar with a tremolo bar including the Floyd Rose Tremolo System. A complete step-by-step guide to maintenance and setup of your electric guitar. This guide, packed with images, will show every aspect of essential electric guitar care such as changing the strings, adjusting the neck, and setting the action to match your playing style. It will also show you how to fix common electric guitar problems such as buzzing strings, scratchy pots and much more. Electric Guitar Repair and Maintenance is a great resource for any guitar owner. Now at a lower price!
Stimson’s basic pickup design was used on most of National Dobro’s subsequent electrics, however, by around 1935 or so, when Supro arrived on the scene, the pickup had been modified to have a single coil wrapped around the two bar poles. Nevertheless, virtually all of National Dobro/Valco pickups were evolutionary descendents of this Stimson pickup.
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A few months ago, I decided that enough was enough, so I began to trawl systematically through Sound On Sound's interview archive, collating and comparing different producers' views on a variety of recording and mixing topics. Being a glutton for punishment, I also waded through the 35-odd interviews in Howard Massey's excellent book, Behind The Glass.
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National Reso-Phonic Guitars - World renowned for their resonator instruments. Unlike acoustic guitars, where the vibration of the wooden body creates the sound, in a resonator instrument the body acts as a speaker cabinet. When the strings are plucked, the vibration is transmitted through the saddle to the resonator. The resonator, or speaker cone, then amplifies that vibration.
Being the go-to instrument of popular guitarists like Hank Williams Sr. Neil Young and Jimmy Page (just to name a few), the current production model D-28 continues the Martin Legacy in terms of build and sound quality. Finally, all these features are provided without the inherent maintenance issues and crazy price tags of actual vintage models. If you're looking for a true traditional acoustic then your best bet is to go for the Martin D-28. The MSRP is $3299 but you can get it online for around $2,629.
This model stands out from the rest due to its modified Explorer body shape. It’s one of the more affordable guitars with such an exotic design. However, it not only looks good but it also sounds good as well. There’s enough juice in those pups to make any amp scream. Explorers aren’t really my thing, but I can’t say that Jackson JS32T Kelly was bad when I played it. On the contrary, it’s actually quite good.

PAINT INFO Remember to stick with the medium that you have chosen to finish the guitar with. Never mix lacquer with water base. This will lead to a cracked finish or lifting up off the clear coat. For my guitar I used a lacquer based paint that I got from an auto shop for one project and just plain white lacquer paint that i got from Home Depot. The waterbased paints and clear coats tend to be more expensive so that's why I chose lacquer. Make sure the surface has been cleaned and is dust free before you begin to paint. Try to find cans that have a fan nozzel because it makes it easier to get an even coat.
4. Vox VT40X 40-watt 1x10 Combo Amp ($249.99): The Vox is another modeling combo that utilizes a Valvetronix tube preamp to give you the sound qualities of a tube amp. With 13 onboard effects, you can channel quality effects without having a pedalboard at your disposal. Vox’s Virtual Elements Technology has allowed them to carefully recreate up to 20 realistic models of very sought-after amp tones, all within an attractive looking package.
Some guitarists consider the notion of modifying an electric guitar from its stock configuration distasteful, while others consider it mandatory. As a custom builder with a decidedly vintage background, I fall somewhere in between. Generally, I’m most in favor of maximizing an instrument’s usability without jeopardizing the ability to return it to original condition.
For solidbodies there is usually a one- or two-letter prefix indicating the body style or general model. This is followed by a dash and a number which usually indicates the number of pickups (e.g., J-1), although on occasion the number indicates the year of introduction (e.g., TG-54). Guitars bearing a vibrato usually appended an “L” after the pickup number (e.g., MJ-2L).
I bought a Palmer acoustic-electric about 10 years ago, for 185.00, used, it's white, with black trim, and still plays very well. I also can't find out where it's made, the neck is still straight, and the tone is good. It says hand crafted inside, and model p-38-12 and a letter I don't recognise, or is a misprint. the pick-ups are near the last frets, small screws, almost hidden. The neck is kinda wide, but you get used to it. Thats all for now, I'll bet all their guitars are pretty good.
You are bidding on a previously owned and in good playing condition Breedlove Atlas Series AD25/SM acoustic electric guitar. This auction is for the guitar and case you see pictured. No battery is included. Nothing else is included. It comes as pictured. Please take a moment to look at the pictures and get a better idea of what you are bidding on. There is a nick on the face of the guitar (see picture 3 for a better look). This guitar has scuffs and scratches from use. It could use a good cleaning. The electronics have been tested and are in good working condition. The neck is straight and the frets have plenty of life in them. The guitar is in good playing condition. Please take a moment to check out my other great items! Thanks ccloan.
4. Vox VT40X 40-watt 1x10 Combo Amp ($249.99): The Vox is another modeling combo that utilizes a Valvetronix tube preamp to give you the sound qualities of a tube amp. With 13 onboard effects, you can channel quality effects without having a pedalboard at your disposal. Vox’s Virtual Elements Technology has allowed them to carefully recreate up to 20 realistic models of very sought-after amp tones, all within an attractive looking package.
Keyboard players who use subwoofers for on-stage monitoring include electric organ players who use bass pedal keyboards (which go down to a low "C" which is about 33 Hz) and synth bass players who play rumbling sub-bass parts that go as low as 18 Hz. Of all of the keyboard instruments that are amplified onstage, synthesizers produce some of the lowest pitches because, unlike a traditional electric piano or electric organ which have as their lowest notes a low "A" and a low "C", respectively, a synth does not have a fixed lowest octave. A synth player can add lower octaves to a patch by pressing an "octave down" button, which can produce pitches that are at the limits of human hearing.
In that same year, the Los Angeles-based Volu-Tone company also sold a pickup/amplifier set. Volu-Tone used "high voltage current" to sense the string vibration, a potentially dangerous approach that did not become popular. In 1934 Dobro released a guitar amp with a vacuum tube rectifier and two power tubes. By 1935, Dobro and National began selling combo amps for Hawaiian guitar. In 1934, Gibson had developed prototype combo amps, but never them. By 1935, Electro/Rickenbacher had sold more amps and electric guitars than all the amps and electrified or electric guitars that had been made from 1928 through the end of 1934.[1]
got my dad's guitar after he passed away. its electric solid wood has a tone knob and volume knob next to the cord plug in and two little black slider buttons. I don't know anything about guitars but it only has one marker on the back its on the silver plate and it just says Japan in all caps. there is no brand name on the headstock or anywhere else on the guitar that I can find and I've looked at over many times.
Here we have another great Yamaha Its Sound is truly WELL beyond its price point someone will be very pleased. aprox..1972-74 YAMAHA FG160 WOW! . ...This is a Gorgeous MARTIN style REPLICA and for the money compares very well to the original in quality materials used..sweet vintage SPRUCE TOP now wonderfully ambered in color from age just too cool, The Back - Sides & Neck are all made from choice AAA Mahogany just what you would expect from an expensive Martin or Gibson...only you would expect to pay much more for one of those , but this is a rare early non "Nippon Gakki" model with the Red Label from Korea.. These early issue Red Label Guitars from Korea utilize the very same materials that were made in Japan. These components were used under strict quality control and 100% assembled in Korea from the very same vintage wood - components & parts as the Japan made Yamaha's. We have had many of these Red Labeled Yamaha's in the 180's & 160's currently and over the years I see up close and in person the very high grade AA mahogany neck s sides & back & the same nice nickel tuners & hardware the very same one piece solid neck no scarf joint at the back of the headstock area like the later Korean & Chinese examples ... This era exhibits just the same just as nice woods as those Japanese big dollar players but " SOME" not all are hidden treasures and are still a real bargain today when compared to the Japanese Red Label versions or a Martin or even Japan made models of this quality...fit & finish & the materials on this guitar are very nice! This guitar does not take the back seat to the Red Label Nippon Gakki version at all. The action is very EZ to play and the TONE is simply wonderful..The Condition is very good++ to excellent vintage it is not mint,and it is not beat..it has natural minor play wear and dings associated with a well loved and played quality guitar it has all the rich patina now of a true vintage acoustic and is quite beautiful in its own right. This guitar has a good history of care its a California guitar where the climate is stable and quite favorable to guitars and was adult owned & loved. This guitar has the preferable a nice MEATY U Shaped Premium Mahogany one piece solid NECK, the frets are still good, The Rosewood is gorgeous too it looks to be Premium grade as well..You will not be disappointed with this guitar at this price the sound is rich like a an expensive $1,000+ guitar, big tone ...no repairs, structural damage..It comes with a new set of Martin strings installed ready to play out of the box. TRULY STUNNING, SEE MORE ... This baby is nice and sweet in person...very nice, , with a classic MARTIN LIKE feel & Sweet-Tone that simply is very hard to beat. The neck is STRAIGHT and the frets are fine w/plenty of life left,this baby plays real nice she stays in tune very well.. .nice workmanship & choice select materials used....You will not be disappointed with this FINE YAMAHA FG160 guitar with NICE TONE & SOUND...its a real Great Player ....This guitars condition is rated at a 8+ Very good+ or better and is very good to excellent condition only a few very minor dings can be seen. this is a real Vintage guitar" and as you can see its in Gorgeous shape!. no known problems cracks-breaks-repairs with no other known issues at all. This one is is 100% READY TO GO!!! its in very good to excellent condition a solid 8+ OR BETTER. This .
Next up we have the specialty electric guitars. This category consists of several different types of electric guitars, but we’ll start out with 12-string electric guitars. The fact that the low E, A, D, and G strings all feature higher octave strings while the B and high e strings both have additional strings that are tuned the same, electric guitar 12-string models have a distinctive shimmer and richness to them that guitar players love. Guitar players who favor heavier genres like death metal or hard rock may want to add a 7-string, an 8-string, or even a 9-string electric guitar to their rig for when they need some extra low-end growl and power. Other specialty guitars include baritone guitars, double neck electric guitars, and pedal steel guitars & lap steel guitars.
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