In terms of the Teisco brand, the moving force was Jack Westheimer and his W.M.I. company in Chicago. According to published accounts, Westheimer began importing Teisco-made Kingstons in around 1961, although these were not promoted in the trade press until the beginning of ’64. It was this connection that would make Teisco the dominant powerhouse it was to become.
The Orange Crush PiX CR12L is another fairly standard style beginner amp. It has the same standard features as most beginner amps. The Crush PiX CR12L is a little more expensive than some similar featured amps, like the Velocity V10, but it makes up for the extra cost with a better build quality, better tone, and a well designed control layout. The Crush PiX CR12L gives a lot of control over the tone, but manages to do so in a clear, easily understood control panel.
The Effect: Expression pedals are nowhere near as popular as some other guitar effects. However, they have the power to make or break your guitar tone, depending on how far you are willing to go. At their very core, expression pedals are nothing more than a potentiometer in a pedal form. They can be as simple as that, which is represented beautifully by the Mission Engineering Inc EP­1, but there definitely are more advanced designs available. The purpose of an expression unit in your signal chain is to give you more control over equipment which supports this kind of accessory. We’re talking rack mounted effects, digital processors, guitar effects pedals and more. In some cases they are downright necessary, but in most they offer a whole new level of control over the effect in question. Despite their inherent simplicity, finding a good one still take some effort, lots of research and planning.
Lyle guitars are among the rarest brands of electric and acoustic guitars in the world. Produced during an indefinite timeline in the 1960s and 1970s in Japan, the history of the Lyle instrument brand remains somewhat of a mystery. Total distribution of Lyle instruments in the U.S. was very limited. The same company that produced many of them, Matsumoku, also produced the more popular Aria brand.
The Fender Stratocaster features cutaway horns that give musicians access to higher frets. The back of the body is designed for comfort for longer performances. These guitars have three single coil pickups which transfer the string vibrations to the amplifier. They can all be turned on at once to produce a wide range of sounds. It also features a tremolo bar which allows you to lower or raise the pitch, much like tremolo pedals themselves, by pulling up or down on the bar to produce different effects. Stratocasters are the best option if you like to dabble in different playing styles and music genres.
Welcome to the gallery of Silvertone guitars from the VintageSilvertones.com collection! The instruments are listed in chronological order from left (oldest) to right (more recent). The gallery will continue to grow as we get more Silvertones. The purpose of this gallery is to help identify all the Vintage Silvertone guitars from the 1950's through the early 1970's. We're major fan of Silvertones and have discovered that there's a lot of misinformation out there.
Determining the phase of pickups: attach pickup leads to an ohm meter, and then tap on the pickup with something metal, note direction the meter reading moves. Also note which wire is attached to the red test lead. Attach the nect pickup to the ohm meter, and tap on it. If ohm meter reading moves opposite of the direction it did for the first pickup, reverse the leads. When the meter reading moves the same direction, not which wire is attached to the red lead. it is the same as it was for the first regardless of it's color (i.e."hot" or "ground")
When it comes to amplifiers that won’t break the bank, but sound loud enough to break your windows, Orange Amplification know exactly what they’re doing and they do it well! The Orange Crush 12 Solid State 12W 1X6 Combo is one of the best cheap amps in the music scene and one that can easily be used on stage and in the studio due to its legendary tone and reliability. This Orange Crush 12 Solid State 12 watt amplifier features a 6” Voice Of The World speaker custom designed by the team at Orange amplification to deliver punchy and articulate sound.
Power attenuation[when defined as?] can be used with either low-power or high-power amplifiers, resulting in variable-power amplifiers. A high-power amplifier with power attenuation can produce power-tube distortion through a range of listening volumes, but with a decrease in high power distortion. Other technologies, such as dual rectifiers and the sag circuit[jargon]—which should not be confused with attenuation—allow high power amplifiers to produce low power volume while preserving high power distortion.[27]
I’ve tried some guitars for beginner, being beginner myself! And let me tell you… around 500 USD and under 1000Usd they are plenty BUT. Avoid Epiphone. I got one and let me tell you, the material is weak. I’m mean the construction material. Some time after buying my Epiphone standard pro (lespaul) I tried a PRS SE245, it is a single cut too but… man, the playability and the quality of construction are absolutely not comparable. For the price I think it is the best single cut you could find! And to say the truth, now I started to play correctly. I’ll sell my first one and I’m going to buy a PRS McCarty 594. PRS is really high quality material. From bottom line to high end models!
1960's Teisco Del Rey, Model ET-44? Electric Guitar. 4 single coil Pickups. Great, original Black / Green burst finish. '57 Chevy style aluminum pick guard. "Shark-Fin" headstock. Rosewood fingerboard. Original 4+2 tuners with cast cover. 4-bolt neck joint with an adjustable truss rod. Bridge adjustable for height, intonation and string spacing. 4-Square pole pickups, 4 pots, 4 pickup selectors and a 3 position rotary wafer switch. Some of the pots do things and some don't either by modification or design. The rotary switch simply acts as an On / Off switch. Guitar works great the way it is, or could be configured other ways as well. We have not modified it since we acquired it 8 years ago. It's spent most of it's time in the box, until I decided to get around to listing it. Missing whammy bar as are most every Teisco we have ever owned. The bridge pickup has had one of it's mounting screws changed. The finish is in exceptional shape for a 40 year old guitar (while the photos make the guitar look black the finish is actually a dark green to black burst). Plays and sounds great. Not many finish chips. Very shiny. Frets in near new shape with virtually no wear. We have completely done a "Pro" set up on the guitar, including cleaning all the electronics, oiling the fingerboard, nut checked for correct height, neck angle checked, pickup heights checked and adjusted, adjusting the neck and action for great playability (clearance at the 9th fret = .008 when fretted at the first and the body (super low)) adjusting / checking the intonation (adjusted perfectly!) and cleaning and polishing entire instrument. This is our old shops standard $75 tune-up. Plays and sounds great. We also installed a new set of .009 strings. No case included.
I personally don't like the shape of the Valkyrie...it just looks odd to me. Try a few Epi's...some are pretty nice. Stay away from the G310s...I suspect they may be made of balsa wood..and the Specials. But the G400s, the customs and the Tony Iommis, all of which I have played, have been pretty decent in terms of fit, finish and sound. I'd really love to play a Prophecy at some point...they look pretty rad.
The Line 6 Spider IV is a good option for beginners not entirely sure what they are looking for. The amp models and effects allow it to achieve a wide variety of tones that are appropriate for almost any style of music. The Killer Ant and Hot Rod Pro Junior III do have better tones, but both are more expensive and less versatile. The Line 6 Spider IV is good for guitarists that want to be able to try a bunch of different sounds until they find something they like. It’s a very solid choice for any style of guitarist.
What’s the point in having these lists anyway? There’s always going to be anger over people who were left out/included on the list when they didn’t deserve to be… And to say that any of the musicians mentioned so far aren’t talented is ridiculous, there’s no limit in the world on how much talent there is, so why does this list have to be limited to 10? Just saying…
That's a bit if an exaggeration but you're allowed. I would venture to claim that the snobs are those who proselytize Fender and Gibson as being the best (especially Gibson). It's been demonstrated a million times over that they are not. Which does not mean they don't make guitars many people want and like. Especially Fender (I have a GREAT Highway One Strat) who have managed to reach a wider audience with the pricing structure of the Fender brand than Gibson has with the Gibson name. The reason we see so many of them in the hands of pros (and their sheepish followers) is that these companies can afford to buy "stage presence". I would put PRS in that group too; however PRS makes better production guitars than both the above. And I'm not being a snob since I can't afford a PRS.
The x99 is as Soldano as an amp can get; its purple! The X99 (a step above the 3-channel X88) is a unique MIDI-controlled preamp, featuring Tim Caswell’s innovative system of real-time-controllable motorized knobs. Modeled after the SLO, the X99 has got the Soldano character that everyone’s grown to love. If you find one, let us know! Like most discontinued Soldano’s, the X99 is virtually impossible to track down.
Harmony was founded in 1892 in Chicago by Wilhelm J.F. Schultz. Sears acquired them in 1916. Harmony made guitars for others under many names, some of which they acquired from other companies due to bankruptcies. These include Oscar Schmidt, Stella and the Sears brand Silvertone. Harmony went out of business in 1985. A new company is currently selling guitars under the Harmony name – many of these are classic Harmony designs such as the Harmony Rocket electric guitar.

You don’t have a single Guild in your list, but you have Washburns that totally lack any sort of bass response. In fact, I’ve never understood how Washburn could take perfectly good materials like sitka spruce and mahogany, and produce such inferior guitars. You list the Fender fa-100 and stratacoustic, both firewood as far as I’m concerned, but don’t list the outstanding Alvarez AD60 and AD70, two amazing sounding guitars for the money. The Hohner and Oscar Schmidt OG2 are beginner guitars, but I know a lot of people with Yamaha FG800 and FG830 guitars who would be very offended by you saying one of their favorite guitars is for beginners. They are serious instruments, even if they only carry a sub-$300 price tag. They are certainly better sounding than that Taylor Big Baby thing, which I was shocked to hear at GC. Talk about over-rated. But you did get many things right. You gave the Blueridge d160 high marks, though I think the D140 should have been up there, too. Good to see that you gave the FG800 such high marks, but I actually like the FS800 a little better. It’s easier to play and better for fingerpicking. The Ami, Jim Dandy, and Recording King are all over-rated and over-priced. You need to take the Washburns down and put up the Guild M-120, D-120, and D-150. The D-150 may be the best guitar you can buy for under a grand.
Peavey - Hartley Peavey started Peavey electronics in 1965, it went on to one of the largest musical instrument and audio equipment manufacturer in the world. They offer a multitude of guitars, amps and related gear, and the price point they use are comparatively very reasonable. One of their latest guitars, the Peavey AT-200, has the guitar world talking about its innovative auto-tune feature.
Great condition. With the exception of the gold foil missing from the back pad, allowing the pink to show thru, the guitar is entirely original. Has a couple of small spots of edge wear, and a chip on the front, the size of this 'o'. Plays and sound fine. Has correct amount of neck relief (.010") at the 7th fret, when fretted at the first fret and the body fret. Includes original chipboard case.
There was a time when Yamaha were thought of as just a guitar maker for students and beginners - but those days are long gone and Yamaha now produce quality acoustics that compete favorably with the best in this category. The LL16 is a great example, with it's all-solid wood body and built in pickups with preamp, this is a true workhorse instrument. Having premium level specs at mid-tier pricing is like a dream come true, the main reason why we consider the LL16 as the best value for money acoustic in this section.
Launch price: $499 / £445 | Body: Chambered basswood body with arched-maple top | Neck: Maple | Scale: 24.6" | Fingerboard: Rosewood | Frets: 22 | Pickups: 2x Black Top humbuckers | Controls: Neck volume, bridge volume, tone, master volume, 3-way pickup selector | Hardware: Anchored Adjusto-Matic bridge | Left-handed: No | Finish: Gold, Silver Sparkle, Black
Tablature, or Tab, is a very important tool that allows guitar players to easily learn how to play chords, melodies, and songs. Learning how to read guitar Tab can be a mystery for some newer guitar players. In this guitar lesson, we are going to learn how to read guitar Tabs and go over some of the more common elements you will see when you pull up a Tab for a song you want to learn. Try this lesson if you want to learn how to read guitar sheet music.
The electric guitar was essentially born in 1929—long before the advent of rock and roll music. The first commercially advertised electric guitar was offered that year by the Stromberg-Voisinet company of Chicago, though it was not a smash hit. The first commercially successful electric, Rickenbacker’s “Frying Pan” guitar, didn’t kick off rock ’n’ roll yet either, but it did inspire competitors to jump into the electric guitar market. Invented in 1931, the Frying Pan had an electromagnetic pickup made out of a pair of horseshoe magnets placed end-to-end to create an oval around the guitar’s strings, with a coil placed underneath the strings. The pickup, a device that converts the strings’ vibrations into electrical signals that can be amplified, was bulky and unattractive, but it worked. The commercial version of the Frying Pan was a hollow cast-aluminum lap-steel guitar, and wasn’t an immediate hit beyond some Hawaiian, country, and blues musicians. It differs from the traditional Spanish-style guitar in that it is played horizontally, on a stand or in the player’s lap, and has a sliding steel bar that can be moved along the frets for a gliding effect.
This axe is no slave to the past, however, starting with Leo’s PTB™ (Passive Treble and Bass) system which functions on all three pickups for dramatically more variety than the vintage setup. What’s more, the Legacy features a Leo Fender-designed Dual-Fulcrum vibrato, a work of engineering art which allows bending up or down with unsurpassed stability, while offering a silky feel through its beefy aluminum vibrato arm. The Legacy’s hard-rock maple neck features an easy-playing satin finish, while its 12” radius lets you bend notes deeply and its Plek-dressed medium-jumbo nickel frets deliver silky playability. The moment you open the luxurious deluxe Tolex hardshell case, you’ll be greeted with a stunning instrument and delicious aroma that’ll have your pulse racing.
The Tone knobs on electric guitars are really just potentiometers. It’s important to know that they do not ADD treble or bass to your sound, they only remove higher frequencies as you turn them down and restore those frequencies to the sound as you turn them up. When they are set at 10, you are getting all the frequencies that your guitar and pickups can produce. In some cases, this may sound too shrill or harsh so if you turn the tone knob down, you are removing some of the higher frequencies or “rolling off “ the treble. Turning the knob back up towards 10 restores those frequencies, but isn’t actively “adding” treble frequencies to what your pickups are capable of producing.
Berry snapped one up immediately in 1958 and has played the ES-335 or its slightly fancier relatives the ES-345 and ES-355 since then. A few years later the model was embraced by Freddie King. Alvin Lee made history with an ES-345 at Woodstock, speeding through “I’m Going Home,” and Larry Carlton’s incredibly lyrical ES-335 can be heard on great Steely Dan albums including The Royal Scam and near-countless other sessions. Whether equipped with humbuckers or P-90s, semi-hollow body guitars sound sweetly beautiful, but can also grind. Ultimately, however, they remain a middle ground between the electric solid body and the hollow body models.
The search never stops for the best acoustic guitar to play during jamming sessions, recording sessions and live gigs. Every year, guitar brands keep on coming up with awesome acoustic guitars to take your playing to the next level. So what’s the latest? We have scoured through various models released in recent years all the way through 2018 and picked out 7 of the very best, chosen for their impressive build, unique tonal character, incredible value and overall winning quality. If you’re looking for the best acoustic guitar for your needs, consider this your short list.
For the guitarist who's frequently on the road or often plays out, the pedalboard is an indispensable aid. Many pedalboards include custom-fitted travel cases or gig bags. With your effects already mounted on the pedalboard, performance setups are fast: just unpack the already-configured board, plug in your guitar and amplifier, and you're ready to play.
Nitrocellulose lacquer is prized as a coating by some guitarists as it is thinner than some other coatings, which some claim leads to a better sound (though we’re not going to wade into that argument here). It’s also easy to blend with paints, and easier to repair. It does have its downsides, however. The solvents used in the lacquer can be potentially damaging to the respiratory systems of workers applying the coating during the guitar’s manufacture, and for this reason other options were sought.
Many Rickenbackers — both guitars and basses — are equipped to be compatible with a “Rick-O-Sound” unit via an extra “stereo” output socket that allows the two pickups (or neck and middle pickup combined/bridge pickup, in the case of three pickup instruments) to be connected to different effects units or amplifiers. Another idiosyncrasy of Rickenbackers is the use of two truss rods (rather than the usual one) to correct twists, as well as curvature, in the neck.
By the way, if you like older Japanese guitars, you must obtain a copy of Mr. Noguchi’s book, ’60s Bizarre Guitars (Guitar Magazine Mooks, Rittor Music). It is lusciously printed in color and, while the text is in Japanese, model names and dates are in English, so it is an invaluable reference tool, as well as a fun coffee table book. Some of the following information on specific guitars comes from this source, as well as catalogs and other research materials kindly provided by dedicated guitar fans in both the U.S. and Japan. It’s virtually impossible to reconstruct a comprehensive chronology, but we will attempt to document some broad-brush details and periods of what guitars we can, and with luck you’ll be able to search out and identify your favorite Teiscos with much greater authority. Your corrections and additions are most welcome!
Ovation backed off from its more exotic design directions and in ’77 introduced two more conservative models, the Preacher and the Viper, and its first solidbody basses, the Magnum I and II. The Preacher featured two equal cutaways, whereas the Viper sported more of a Les-Paul-style single cutaway, though neither would never be confused with a Gibson equivalent. Their shape was, in fact, essentially a downsized version of the Ovation acoustic outline. The Magnum shape was derived from the earlier Breadwinner and Deacon, with more contouring.
One criticism that some have against these books are they are for people who want to gain technical competence in guitar. From the start, these books expect you to learn notation and strumming patterns. If you are simply hoping to learn some of your favorite songs and become a casual player who memorizes a few melodies, this is not the focus of this book. For that, look elsewhere or purchase a book of tabs of your favorite band or artist. This book series is targeted toward beginner and intermediate players who want to really learn guitar, and it really is a great place for you to start the journey toward being a better player.

Absolutely love this guitar!! One great instrument for a great price. Ordering was easy and delivered before projected date. I am no professional by any means, but as I've progressed, I wanted a guitar I could grow with and play for years to come. This is it!! I've played a lot of acoustics ranging from Gibson to Taylor but absolutely love this Martin. The action is like butter and coming from the Martin collection, the sound and tone is at a minimum of FANTASTIC!! If you are looking for an outstanding piece of musical magic to add to your collection, or something to purchase to have for a lifetime without spending your life savings to obtain it, this is the one you are looking for.
The output of the rails is a crunchy, high sustain rock tone that turns your Strat into a much heavier and hard-hitting instrument. The pickguard, pots and five-way volume selector are all included with the wiring taken care of. It’s also really easy to change pickups using a solderless method that allows you to remove and add pickups by simply using screws.
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The Wire. You'll see a lot of vintage spec wordings bounced around here and that pretty much boils down to the aesthetics. Those early Fenders and Gibsons we all know were wired at the original factories with a cloth covered 'push back' wire, whereas as some modern factories, far east predominantly use standard plastic coated wire today. But the important detail is the 'AWG', or American Wire Gauge. Widely used in the guitar world for optimal results, is 22AWG wire. I would go into detail on this, but THIS site has some superb facts about AWG, which if you'd like to find out more I'd recommend a read of! So back to the cloth/plastic thing. Personally, the 'push back' cloth wire is much easier and tidier to work with and I fully hold my hands up to saying it looks much better too. I always use this for any guitar wiring, the results are always great and it's a pleasure to wire up with. I personally use 22AWG copper, solid core wire, great to work with and consistent. 
While electric guitar manufacturers like this are often more expensive, they do provide a level of customization that isn’t available with several mainline models. Most companies of this size can have a casual email or phone conversation with you, take a few notes about how you want your guitar setup (probably jotting it all down with pen and paper) and then making a guitar to your exact specifications.
Maton earned international renown for their superb acoustic and electric guitars and basses, which have been played by scores of famous performers from The Easybeats to The Wiggles.[1] George Harrison owned one of their MS500 models, which were introduced in 1957 and famed British session guitarist Big Jim Sullivan owned and used a Maton ‘Cello’ guitar for many years during the peak of his career, playing it on recordings with Sarah Vaughan, Sammy Davis, Jr., Johnny Keating and his Big Band and Neil Finn from Crowded House.

In some ways, the Champion 20 isn’t quite as versatile as the other digital amps. For example, the Line 6 Spider Classic 15 has two effects selector knobs, allowing a guitarist to mix modulated effects such as phaser, flanger, and chorus with different types of reverb and echo. However, our panelists generally felt the Champion 20’s ease of use outweighed this disadvantage, and the Champion 20 does offer 12 different amp models as opposed to 4 on the Spider Classic 15. The Champion 20 also doesn’t play as loud as the Stage Right 611800, but all of our panelists thought it played plenty loud enough for beginners.

The Mahogany body and neck with rosewood fretboard makes it a highly resonant and great sounding guitar whilst the dual Alnico Classic pickups with push pull coil tapping provide a world of tonality. A SlimTaper D Shape neck profile makes it comfortable for beginners to learn on, whilst pro players will enjoy the ergonomic design 2 hours into their set or rehearsal! Available in more finishes here.
Non Locking Tremolo FAT/SAT TREMOLO TREMOLO ARM INSTALLATION The tremolo arm can be inserted and removed very easily. Insert the arm into the armhole on the tremolo base plate. Pull up on the arm to remove it. TREMOLO ARM ADJUSTMENT (SAT PRO) To adjust the height of the arm, remove the tremolo spring cover from the back of the guitar, and use a 3 mm Allen wrench to turn the height adjustment screw attached to the bottom of the tremolo block.
To capture two speakers in a multi-speaker cab or record a bigger sound that delivers the response of two different microphones in similar positions on one speaker, you can try using two mics in a close or semi-close placement. If you’re using two different mics on a single speaker, place the capsules of each as close together as possible, without touching, in order to minimize phase cancellation. This technique might seem redundant, but can often yield outstanding results, allowing you to blend the characteristics of two different microphones to capture one amp sound – a bright, detailed condenser and a punchy, midrange-heavy dynamic, for example. On guitar cabs carrying two or more speakers, try miking each speaker separately, placing each of two mics – same type or different – at the same distance. Some amp makers use different types of speakers in cabs to enhance sonic complexity, and this miking technique will make the most of those. Even two speakers of exactly the same type, however, will often sound slightly different, and blending them might yield great results.

Engineers invented the first loud, powerful amplifier and speaker systems for public address systems and movie theaters. These large PA systems and movie theatre sound systems were very large and very expensive, and so they could not be used by most touring and gigging musicians. After 1927, smaller, portable AC mains-powered PA systems that could be plugged into a regular wall socket "quickly became popular with musicians"; indeed, "...Leon McAuliffe (with Bob Wills) still used a carbon mic and a portable PA as late as 1935." During the late 1920s to mid-1930s, small portable PA systems and guitar combo amplifiers were fairly similar. These early amps had a "single volume control and one or two input jacks, field coil speakers" and thin wooden cabinets; remarkably, these early amps did not have tone controls or even an on-off switch.[1] While we do know that these late 1920s portable PA systems were used by guitarists and singers, it is not known whether upright bass players used these PA systems.
The book discusses both tabs and notation which makes it easier to transition if you’ve been using the former. It covers a wide range of topics including scales and arpeggios. The approach the author takes is logically and accessible with plenty of examples and exercises to make it stick. The only downside is that there are no songs included in it.
This D-15M dreadnought features a solid 'genuine' (South American) mahogany top over A-Frame X bracing; the same material is used for the back, sides and neck. The neck profile is a 'modified low oval', and it's hard to imagine anyone having a problem with it. Bone nut and saddle: check. Vintage-style, open-gear tuners check. Super-thin matt nitrocellulose finish all over: check. Tonally, there is a rich and projecting core sound that's complemented by the unmistakable, Martin D-resonance. It's vibrant and ebullient, yet not brash; warm and full without being thick or indistinct. It puts every single cent of its build budget into making the best sounding and playing instrument, with very little concession to cosmetics, electronics or anything else. Solid woods, improved neck joint, bone nut and saddle, no frills whatsoever, save for the 'burst – it's unreservedly recommended.
Kramer served a prison sentence on drug-related charges after the MC5 split up. When he got out, he teamed up with Johnny Thunders to form Gang War and later re-emerged as a solo artist on L.A. punk label Epitaph. Smith went on to lead the punishingly loud Sonic Rendezvous Band and married New York punk rock poet, artist, singer and originator Patti Smith. He passed away in 1994. But from the Clash to Fugazi, Crass and Green Day, the politicized wing of punk rock continues to fly the banner first raised by the Motor City 5.
Located in Kobe, Japan, this manufacturer made the famous Maya brand guitar. Maya guitars were in production from 1970-1980. It's been suggested that Maya may have been responsible for the Aztec badge. You'll notice that Maya has been attributed to a company known as Tahara. At this point I do not know if Maya assisted in production or if Tahara produced some Maya guitars as a subcontractor. Maya and El Maya badges have also been attributed to Chushin Gakki. More research is needed to clarify this point.
A. Electric guitars either have bolt-on, set neck, or neck-through neck construction. Bolt on necks are simply bolted onto the body, set necks are set into the body and glued, and neck-through construction is where the neck extends all the way through the body. The latter is generally considered the best and most durable, but won't be found on cheaper guitars.
A bass stack may use a single speaker cabinet (e.g., the huge 8x10" cabinets widely used by hard rock and metal bassists). The 8x10" cabinet is often provided as "backline" equipment at music festivals; this way, all the bassists from the different bands can use the same amplifier and speaker cabinet. This reduces the transition time between bands, because the roadies do not have to remove the previous band's bass stack and bring in the subsequent band's stack. Using one 8x10" as backline gear for an entire music festival also makes the transition easier for the audio engineer, because she can have an XLR cable plugged into the amp head's DI unit output (to get the bass amp's signal so that it can be mixed into the sound reinforcement system mix) and have a mic set up in front of the cabinet, to capture the amp and speaker cabinet's distinctive tone. The 8x10" cabinet is widely used by heavy metal music, hardcore punk and psychobilly bassists, as these genres use a loud onstage volume. Some metal bassists, such the bass player for death metal band Cannibal Corpse, use two 8x10" cabinets for large concerts in stadiums or outdoor festivals.
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Now you should have all you need to assemble your first effects pedal. Make sure you have a clean, well-ventilated area to work. Wash your hands before you start. If you like, wear some conductive nitrile gloves. Avoid handling components any more than necessary. Contaminants on the components and PCB will make them harder to solder and can cause reliability problems. Certain IC’s can be damaged by static electricity from handling. Solder is hot and creates dangerous fumes so be careful. Follow the instructions carefully, in particular making sure you insert components in the correct places and the correct way around. Many components look alike and some are polarity sensitive, so take your time to get it right. Solder one pin of a component and then double-check it before soldering the rest. It’s much easier to move or remove a component with only one lead soldered to the board.
In March when the Cut interviewed Fabi Reyna, the editor-in-chief and founder of She Shreds, a magazine for female-identifying guitar players, she commented on men insisting she listen to the guitar heroes we’re all allegedly mourning. “I was talking to a dude at a big company recently and he asked me if I’d heard of this band, which was, of course, a band of all dudes,” she said. “I was like, ‘Sorry, I don’t know much about male guitar history, and I don’t really care to. Don’t tell me or ask me about these bands because I just don’t know them.’”

It has always amused me that one of the great tempests in the teapot of guitardom has been the legendary “lawsuit” of the 1970s. You know, when Norlin (aka Gibson) sued Elger (aka Hoshino, aka Ibanez) in 1977 over trademark infringement based upon “copying” Gibson’s headstock design. There are tons of ironies in this story, but one of the most amusing aspects is that companies such as Gibson have been one of the most egregious copyists of its own guitars over the years. Witness the Korean-made Epiphone Firebird 500 seen here.
There’s also the line of self-tuning “robot” guitars that Gibson spent more than a decade and millions of dollars developing. In 2015, Juszkiewicz made the feature standard on most new guitars. Sales dropped so dramatically, as players and collectors questioned the added cost and value, that Gibson told dealers to slash prices. The company then abandoned making self-tuners a standard feature. You can still buy them — they call them “G Force” — but they’re now simply an add-on option.

Now that we covered the basic features, let’s talk about what really counts: the built-in effects, amp models, and usability. For better or for worse, people tend to compare multi-effects units with the experience and sound you get from owning a pedalboard full of individual pedals. Well, great news: the consensus is that the Zoom G3X feels a lot like using individual stompboxes; more so than any other multi-effects unit on the market. Zoom really nailed it when it comes to making an intuitive interface. If you look at the layout, you’ll notice 3 “stompbox-style” sections side by side, each with a little display and on/off footswitch. These are meant to feel like 3 guitar pedals next to each other. They’re technically 3 slots which can each hold an effect or an amp model. The Zoom has 6 slots total (you can scroll left and right to access them), and all 6 can be used at once. You’ve got LOTS of choices to shape your tone: 94 effects and 22 amp and cabinet models. Any type of effect you can dream up, the Zoom G3X has you covered. Tremolo, vibrato, compressors, filters, overdrives are all available, and many of the effects simulate popular pedals like the Tube Screamer, EHX Big Muff, Pro Co RAT, Boss DS-1, and the list goes on and on. Same goes for the amp modeling - you can emulate a Marshall, Fender, Orange, Vox, etc. and pair up different amp models with various cabinet models. You can make your effect chain in whatever order you want, which is great for the beginner who is figuring out pedal order for the first time, and the veteran who wants to experiment with unique pedal combos. From a user review:
Here’s my intuitive explanation to why we are hearing what we are hearing: What makes a guitar sound like a guitar, as opposed to for example a piano or a harp, is the spectrum of overtones that are generated when the strings are plucked. This also makes two guitars sound different from each other, despite having the same make/model of pickups. Any component that is involved in how the vibrations in the string is created (this is kind of what the myth debunking video refers to as “timbre”, but then goes on to equate to amplitude and frequency, as if the tonewood would alter the notes, as opposed to the tone) affects the sound. For example:
Tube amps use the height of the 1940s electronic technology to give out what is widely considered the best sound quality to date. Since some people tend to be confused by this, it’s important to note that only their sound rendering circuitry is based on vacuum tubes (or lamps) while the equalizers and assorted bits employ transistors like any other piece of modern electronics, with no bearing whatsoever on how the sound will come out.

The main difference between analog and digital delays is delay time and note clarity. Digital delays can produce multi second delay times whereas the Deluxe Memory Man offered a delay time of 550ms. Digital delay units also introduced the tap tempo function which is extremely useful when using delay as a rhythmic tool. There are many excellent companies producing excellent delay units, certainly a ground breaker was the Line 6 DL4 which is still popular today. Although I love the sound of a true analog delay, the latest offerings from companies like TC Electronics and Strymon offer so many options and analog emulation options it makes it a tough sell to stick with analog delays.
Every skilled worker needs to look after their tools and musicians are no exception. Sure, wear and tear is normal—especially when you play your instrument often—but a little T.L.C. will ensure your musical gear continues to look, play and sound amazing for years. At Guitar Center Repairs, you'll find a dedicated team of certified musicians who take pride in helping you reach your highest level of playing potential. Make no mistake, your music maker is in the best of hands at GC Repairs. When it comes to looking after your musical equipment, certain things should be left to professionals—pickup installation, wiring customization and structural repair, to name a few. Mind you, there are tasks that every guitarist can take care of at home, including regular polishing and restringing. Of course, not everyone has the time to continually look after their instrument and bringing it to Guitar Center is a great way to save yourself time and ensure that the job gets done right. With that being said, GC's services go well beyond cleaning and string changing. For those of you who own a stringed instrument and find the action is higher than it once was, a truss rod adjustment is definitely in order. Or, maybe you want to personalize the look and sound of your guitar—in which case, an expert will be more than happy to swipe out your pickups for a new set, replace the pickguard or perform any other task to give you an axe that’s entirely your own. Honestly, your best bet is to browse this entire section and see what else is offered in the way of repairs, maintenance and modifications. Who knows, maybe your local GC is having a free guitar setup day, so feel free to have a look around this page or take a swing by the store in your area. Our friendly and knowledgeable staff is always happy to speak with other local musicians and setting up a quick appointment for your instrument will do wonders for your musical enjoyment. From nut and bridge replacements to even amp electronic upgrades, Guitar Center Repairs has you covered.
Ah yes, the 808. It's often used and referred to as a kick, but it tends to act more as a very low tom, as it has a pitch. This thing is the Loch Ness Monster – there tends to be more under the water. The best way to deal with a true, clean 808 sample is to work around it. It's usually best to let the 808 do its thing and to get the bottom end around it the hell out of the way. If it's a fuzzy sample or has been driven and squashed, you may need to play with things above 250 Hz, but usually live and let live is the best approach.
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A list that's bound to be disagreed with, and I do. Although I love Hendrix, Clapton, etc. I'm still most impressed with Mississippi Fred McDowell. Bass line, rhythm, lead slide, and singing simultaneously and effortlessly. Several video performance on DVD are available, in case you listen to just an audio recording and wondered "who are the other guitarists playing, they're really good together?" nope, just Fred.

Anything for which they are wired and/or programmed.  One great example is my first real guitar, a Carvin V220.  It had two humbuckers in a sorta heavy angular gibson explorer body.  Each pickup had volume and tone with a 3 way selector for either or both pickups to be on.  In addition, you could toggle switches to split coils on the humbucker to do a good approximation of a single coil pickup.  Further, you could toggle in/out of phase to get a Peter Green tone or other effects.   Tom anderson guitars have great configurations.  I have gone to lighter strats in recent years and usually replace the pickups with handwounds and customize my 5way switch depending on the guitar.   I love true single coils except that I prefer a humbucker in the bridge. 
Growing up in the late '80s as a young teenage musician, my friends and I played on many a Japanese guitar. Sure, we thought Japanese guitars were cool and weird looking, but cost was the true deciding factor. You could pick up a Japanese guitar at any pawn shop in our town for under forty bucks. Harmony, Kay, Teisco, Univox, Silvertone, Lotus, and other names I can't recall were always popping up at practices and jam sessions. Nowadays, Japanese guitars from the 1960's and 1970's are increasingly hard to come across, but we are always on the hunt, and we have found some cool and interesting vintage Japanese guitars, amplifiers, and other stringed instruments from the Far East...
DISCLAIMER: Hoshino owns the copyright to all of the catalogs scanned in here. This website has NO RELATIONSHIP with the Hoshino Gakki Group and makes no claims to ownership of the linked scans. These catalog scans are provided solely for personal academic/research purposes, so that collectors and others who own one or more of these fantastic guitars can properly identify the model and year of manufacture.
Adolph Rickenbacher was born in Switzerland in 1886 and emigrated to the United States with relatives after the death of his parents. Sometime after moving to Los Angeles in 1918, he changed his surname to “Rickenbacker”. This was done probably in order to avoid German connotations in light of the recently concluded First World War as well as to capitalize on Adolph’s distant relation to World War I flying ace Eddie Rickenbacker. In 1925, Adolph Rickenbacker and two partners formed the Rickenbacker Manufacturing Company and incorporated it in 1927. By the time he met George Beauchamp and began manufacturing metal bodies for the “Nationals” being produced by the National String Instruments Corporation, Rickenbacker was a highly skilled production engineer and machinist. Adolph soon became a shareholder in National and, with the assistance of his Rickenbacker Manufacturing Company, National was able to boost production to as many as fifty guitars a day.[4]
Up for sale is an Ibanez RGA32 guitar equipped with Metal Works Brushed EMG 57/66 pickups and Sperzel locking tuners. This guitar is in great condition, has never been gigged and has been kept in my smoke free music studio. Guitar Specs: Mahogany body with quilted maple top 3-Piece maple Wizard II neck Bound rosewood fretboard with 24 jumbo frets Gibraltar Standard bridge Pearl dot inlay
A reverb pedal basically gives an echo effect and gives your guitar more weight. Think of the sound you hear when you walk into a church or cave – a big expansive sound that reverberates off the walls. In addition, if you want to completely oversaturate your sound with reverb to sound like you’re in a massive cave, you can turn the reverb up all the way and engage it when the song calls for it.
With a typical Strat single coil pickup and assuming an instrument cable capacitance of 500pF, 250K tone pot, 0.022uF cap, guitar plugged in to a 1Meg input, the range of the tone control is roughly from 6.0kHz -3dB (tone fully clockwise – with a resonant peak of +7.4dB at 3.9kHz) to 950Hz (tone fully anti-clockwise – with a resonant peak of +4.5dB at 594Hz). These figures vary from pickup to pickup and depending on the instrument cable capacitance.
Epiphone is to Gibson what Squier is to Fender. Meanwhile, the Les Paul is Gibson’s Stratocaster. Probably one of the most famous guitars on the planet, the Les Paul has been played by the likes of Slash, Jimmy Page, and Bob Marley. Epiphone, luckily, has made it available to the world with a price that won’t break the bank. And it’s an excellent guitar for those starting to play rock music.
Featuring a scalloped X, a Fishman Isys III System, a Rosewood bridge with compensated saddle and chrome die cast tuning keys, a body with laminated Mahogany back and sides and laminated Maple top, a cutaway design with dreadnought body shape with a wide choice of color and design, and to top it all off, a Fender FTE-3TN Preamp with Tuner, this guitar surely has it all and it’s not even that expensive!
New to the music scene, and never one to stand on formality, I had a chance (multiple chances) to visit Grumpy's Guitars and Stuff, and was never anything but treated with respect, courtesy, and professionalism. My purpose for the visits were neither to buy, nor to have repaired, an instrument. It was to have the proprietor take a look at the bass that I had build. To give me his opinion and estimation on how I did. He walked through the process I'd used, for defretting, paint stripping, and then staining and poly sealing. Demonstrated how to adjust the truss rod, and complimented me on the work I'd done. All while setting aside his own work (A gorgeous early era hollow body electric Gibson.) I was charged a grand total of a great conversation for the tutoring and advice... Above and beyond! The selection of instruments was impressive -- and Grumpy's is the ONLY music/stringed instrument store I've entered in Albuquerque with not one, but 3 double basses, including an electric, and 2 classic uprights. Thanks for the great service, and awesome selection! I'll be by to have my '62 Fender Re-Issue pickups ordered through you, and to see about switching to a new brand of flatwound, when I break my next GHS.
The steel-string and electric guitars characteristic to the rise of rock and roll in the post-WWII era became more widely played in North America and the English speaking world. Barrios composed many works and brought into the mainstream the characteristics of Latin American music, as did the Brazilian composer Heitor Villa-Lobos. Andrés Segovia commissioned works from Spanish composers such as Federico Moreno Torroba and Joaquín Rodrigo, Italians such as Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco and Latin American composers such as Manuel Ponce of Mexico. Other prominent Latin American composers are Leo Brouwer of Cuba, Antonio Lauro of Venezuela and Enrique Solares of Guatemala. Julian Bream of Britain managed to get nearly every British composer from William Walton to Benjamin Britten to Peter Maxwell Davies to write significant works for guitar. Bream's collaborations with tenor Peter Pears also resulted in song cycles by Britten, Lennox Berkeley and others. There are significant works by composers such as Hans Werner Henze of Germany, Gilbert Biberian of England and Roland Chadwick of Australia.
Also in 1952, Kay introduced the matching K-162 "Electronic" Bass, which was the first commercially available thinline-hollowbody electric bass guitar, and the second production electric bass guitar after the Fender Precision Bass debuted in 1951. Due to the use of K-162 by a bassist of Howlin' Wolf, Andrew "Blueblood" McMahon, it is commonly known as the "Howlin Wolf" bass. These instruments[clarification needed] are believed to be the first semi-hollow electrics[citation needed] (i.e., thinline-hollowbody electric with solid center-block), predating the Gibson ES-335 by six years. Their unique design[clarification needed] featured a flat top with no f-holes, a free-floating arched back, and two braces running along the top. The result was a semi-acoustic instrument that was feedback-resistant while retaining natural acoustic resonances. In 1954, Kay added the K-160 bass to its catalog with baritone tuning, according to the catalog,[citation needed] "tuned like the first four guitar strings but one octave lower." Structurally this bass was basically same as K-162 bass, except for the higher pitched tuning and the addition of a white pickguard.
In 1967 Lipsky introduced a line proto-copies carrying the Domino brand name. Most were inspired by European models such as the EKO Violin guitar. Among the offerings were two models sporting a California cache, the #502 Californian, an asymmetrical copy of a Vox Phantom, and the #CE82 Californian Rebel (wouldn’t California Rebel have made more sense?) shown here.
The downside of going electric is that now you have to think about a soundboard, or at least an amp. And no self-respecting guitarist can live without a few pedals to tweak the sound. I mean you only need a volume pedal to control the level, a tuner might be nice, chorus is always appreciate, a nice delay pedal wouldn’t be bad, and you might need a clean boost for those solos. Then again, you might just want to plug straight into the soundboard and just enjoy that amplified acoustic sound.
Possessing great look and feel, the LyxPro, the amp is small and would work best for headphone, something that is normal with beginner instrument. It also features a digital clip-on tuner that is so perfect for tuning the 6 strings that are designed on the rosewood fretboard. The Canadian maple neck also compliments the rosewood fingerboard and the overall solid wood body finishes for greater sound quality.
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Since we have already covered amp modeling software, this time we will focus on software that provides quality guitar effects. These popular software effects applications will get you as close as technologically possible to your favorite stomp box and rack mount effects - minus the bulk, weight and the hassle. Note that certain packages excel in specific effect types, so do check out your favorite effect types via the demos before you decide on which is your top pick. We have included both paid and free guitar effects software for you to sink your teeth, and mouse, into.
Best Answer:  First, make sure you have new or clean strings that aren't dead. You should hear a metallic harmonic overtone to picked notes particularly on the low E, A, and D wound strings. If your low E sounds in tune but makes a flat dull boww boww boww instead of dang dang dang when you pick change them. Set your amp up for a fairly bright sound clean, playing off the bridge pickup. Make sure the guitar volume knob(s) are rolled all the way on and tones are all the way up, no roll off. If you can't get a nice clear clean sound that doesn't sound distant and muted then you have some issue with the guitar electrics or amp. If you're playing off the neck pickup that's a big muddier right there. The neck pickup is good for clean rhythm playing, jazz, and for a hollow warm tubey sound on single notes but tends to muddy overdriven power chords. Once you have the amp set for a bright clean sound that's not too brassy (if it has a master volume in addition to a gain or channel volume set the gain or volume low for a clean sound and use master for output level, let the RP90 do the effects work, not the amp preamp for now.) bring in the RP90. I'm not familiar with it but try it on a few overdrive and distortion settings. If you've only been an acoustic player high overdrive or distortion "power steering" takes a different play style.
"Our expertise is to customize guitars according to the specifications of our clients. Owning the latest state of the art equipment, craftsmanship and skilled technicians. We take great pride in the quality and designs of our electric guitars and basses. From traditional to unique styles a U.S. Masters instrument rates with the finest in detail, woods, finish, feel, components and consistency. Our designs incorporate some advanced high performance features, some patented, to improve on aspects of sonic response and feel, upper fret access, the ease of playing, comfort and all designed to provide you with one of the finest responding instruments available. Our 100% satisfaction guarantee allows you to buy with confidence!"
Description: Body: Mahogany - Top Wood: Mahogany - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Neck Construction: D-Shape - Fingerboard: Ebony - Frets: 24 - Inlay: Pearl - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Headstock: 6 In-Line - Bridge: Tune-O-Matic - Bridge Construction: Ebony - Hardware: Black, Grover Tuners - Pickups: Seymour Duncan Live Wire - Pickup Configuration: Dual - String Instrument Finish: Charcoal Burst, Vintage Burst

If you want to combine the dynamics of a well-recorded drum kit with the pumping excitement you get from heavy compression, send either the overheads only or the entire kit to a buss and insert a nice-sounding compressor there. Set the compressor to a high ratio and low threshold and mix in some of this with the song. You may need to adjust the attack and release controls to get the effect you're after, but you don't need to blend in much of the compressed sound to really add punch and weight to a drum track. Nicholas Rowland


As the title suggests, solid body electric guitars don't have a chamber or hole the way that an acoustic guitar does; instead, they're made of solid wood. These are the most common type of guitars that you’ll find in shops or online stores. They're perfect for a wide range of musical situations. These guitars rely on the wood quality and their components to output sound. Below we’ll highlight four famous types of solid body guitars.

Looking at the front (or top rather) panel of the Boss ME-80 is where it gets interesting. Don’t let the sheer number of knobs intimidate you. Shaping your tone with the ME-80 is a very tactile experience, just like you would if you had a pedalboard full of pedals. The ME-80 is made for the guitarist that doesn’t necessarily want to lug around (or spend money on) a large pedal collection, but still loves the feeling of turning knobs and instantly hearing results. The interface is actually pretty easy to understand. Every major section is surrounded by a white border, and to design a sound (a.k.a. patch) you just move through the sections and set the effects to your heart’s content. We should mention that the Boss ME-80 has 59 different effects and nine guitar preamps which you can use. The first section labeled PREAMP is where you set your amplifier model, and should feel familiar if you’ve ever messed with a guitar amp. Next you have an EQ section, REVERB, COMP, OD/DS, MOD, and DELAY. You can look at the front panel for yourself in a closeup photo to see the various effects available within each of these groupings. The 8 black footswitches along the bottom are what you use to switch effects on and off, as well as move through banks and presets. They’re not your traditional stompbox footswitch, but they feel pretty nice. As is the norm with the larger multi-effects floor units, the ME-80 incorporates an expression pedal, which is assignable to different effects via the knob next to it. Very easy to use, very intuitive.
In the ideal scenario, once set, your saddles should neither be flush down on the bridge assembly of the guitar, nor extended so high they could go no further. This saddle height relative to the bridge assembly is a reflection of the neck angle. If the saddles sit flush, the neck angle is not set back very far and vice-versa. This is where you should decide if your neck angle is in need of adjustment ( if you have a bolt-on neck). Check the measurement at the 12th fret then progress up the neck, measuring every couple of frets. The string height should continue to gradually rise, if it doesn't the neck is set back too far and has to be tilted up just a little. This is a very sensitive adjustment and the thickness of a couple sheets of paper can make a big difference. Some Fenders have a neck tilt adjustment screw that is accessed with an Allen wrench through a hole in the neck screw plate. The strings must be loosened, then the neck screws, then the tilt adjustment screw is tightened or loosened. Never do this when the neck screws are tight! If you don't have a tilt adjustment, thin shims of wood veneer are fitted in the neck pocket to adjust neck angle. Uneven frets are also a possibility. If , after having followed all the above steps, you are still getting fret buzz, you must establish that the frets are all even. But this leads us to fret dressing, which is another story altogether.
Of course, the big news was the introduction of the Spectrum 5. This had a slim, highly contoured body with a pointed upper horn pointing up and a hooked lower horn. The body featured a German carve relief along the edge. The head was the new hooked kind from ’64-65, while inlays were triangular “picks,” sort of like Kays of the time. Pickguards were two-part plastic covering the entire area under the strings, with volume and tone controls and stereo and mono jacks. The “vegematic” push-buttons came in five groovy colors.
I had a Soundgear 5 string bass when they first came out and it was one of the worst basses I have ever owned. Crappy electronics, uncomfortable neck and the list goes on. I used it as a back up when I was touring 100+ shows per year and luckily my Tobias Killer B5 never had issues other than the occasional broken string. The best thing I can say about it is I lent it to a "colleague" and he ended up stealing it. Good riddance!
As already stated, the perfect-fifths (P5) interval is the most harmonious, after the unison and octave intervals. An explanation of human perception of harmony relates the mechanics of a vibrating string to the musical acoustics of sound waves using the harmonic analysis of Fourier series. When a string is struck with a finger or pick (plectrum), it vibrates according to its harmonic series. When an open-note C-string is struck, its harmonic series begins with the terms (C,C,G,C,E,G,B♭,C). The root note is associated with a sequence of intervals, beginning with the unison interval (C,C), the octave interval (C,C), the perfect fifth (C,G), the perfect fourth (G,C), and the major third (C,E). In particular, this sequence of intervals contains the thirds of the C-major chord {(C,E),(E,G)}.[4]
Our site has a wealth of information about what goes into making a Taylor guitar and how to make this very important decision. We have guides for how to find the right fit for you. Learn about the subtle differences in shapes and styles. Delve into different types of woods and construction, which are vital to the flavor and tone of an acoustic. Explore the Taylor line by series to find the look and style you want for your instrument.
Any vibration we can hear as "sound" is composed of some distribution of overtones above the fundamental frequency. Overtones exist in a set fashion based on the physics of vibrating waves and the ratios between them. The only difference in tone between any instrument is caused by a different prominence and distribution of these overtones. When a string is plucked on an electric guitar the vibrations move into the body of the guitar as well. The resonant properties of the wood will cause some of these overtones to be "summed" and exaggerated while others will "cancel" to some degree. The vibrating string will be influenced, however slightly, by the vibration of the guitar, in turn changing the distribution of overtones on the vibrating string - essentially creating a feedback loop.

For solidbodies there is usually a one- or two-letter prefix indicating the body style or general model. This is followed by a dash and a number which usually indicates the number of pickups (e.g., J-1), although on occasion the number indicates the year of introduction (e.g., TG-54). Guitars bearing a vibrato usually appended an “L” after the pickup number (e.g., MJ-2L).


It also includes a -6dB/oct low-pass filter that’s built into the plugin’s tube/valve modeling equation, and can imitate a lower-quality tube triode.  There’s a switchable output saturation stage, which can be used to overdrive the output signal and all the standard Voxengo plugin features, such as full multi-channel operation, channel routing and built-in oversampling. It’s great for guitars and for dirtying up sounds such as vocals, drums or synths.
When most people think about electric guitars, chances are they’re thinking rock ‘n’ roll. However, stringed instrumentalists had been attempting to amplify violins and banjos since the 1910s using internally mounted telephone transducers — and indeed, the first electrically amplified guitar was designed in 1931 by George Beauchamp of the National Guitar Corporation. Charlie Christian’s 1936 Gibson ES-150 was heard on landmark recordings with Benny Goodman and Lester Young, influencing other jazz guitarists to follow suit. Clearly, the electric guitar is not a product of rock ‘n’ roll; rather, it was driven by the need for guitarists to be heard over the drums and horn sections of big bands.
“Back in the fifties and sixties, you could tell what studio they had been recording in just by listening to the song,” Dr. Susan Horning Schmidt says. She is a professor at St. John’s University who has researched and written extensively about sounds and the recording process. During the period Dr. Horning Schmidt is referring to, the recording facilities were also physically bigger and bands often played together in a more live-type setting. Horning Schmidt states that “there’s a lot more space in the recording, a lot more acoustical space and dynamics.” Unfortunately, we’re losing that space with contemporary recording and production techniques.
The guitar sports an AAA flame maple top on a three-piece mahogany body, whose Translucent Black finish was picked by the man in the top hat himself. The iconic Firebird pickguard sits prominently on the axe, but this one features Slash’s “Skull & Top Hat” logo. The mahogany neck comes in a custom profile, too, which is rounded but slim enough for searing fretwork. A pau ferro fingerboard with trapezoid pearl inlays completes the cosmetic concerns on the axe.

Both pickups were controlled by a separate volume control, with one master tone control. Another toggle served as a coil tap. The Ripley project went nowhere, however, the body styling would reappear on the upcoming Korean Celebrity series. It is very possible, since this shared the Ultra Hard Body model designation and was made in Japan, that the mystery Japanese guitars were essentially the same.
As mentioned earlier, technically, magnetic pickups are small magnets with fine wire coils. These small magnets produce a magnetic field around them. When the metal strings of the guitar are strung by the user, a vibrating motion is generated inside this magnetic field which changes the magnetic flux of the field. According to the law of electromagnetism, this change in the magnetic flux produces an electric charge in the wire coil around the magnet.
The free GUITAR RIG 5 PLAYER is ready to rock right from the start: It offers a supreme selection of modular, high-class components, effects and routing tools, bundled as the free FACTORY SELECTION. For classic power and gain the Tube Compressor and Skreamer really come into their own, while a range of high-end effects such as the Studio Reverb and Delay Man can add that special touch. Choose from many Amp and Envelope modifiers as well as Routing Tools to further shape your sound to perfection.
First, let’s start with the switch. Like the Gibson-style switch, the Stratocaster’s is used to select between different pickups and combinations thereof. In this picture of Jimi Hendrix and his Stratocaster, the switch is just above the knobs. It’s a little hard to see because of the white pickguard, but if you have this type of guitar, you’ll have no trouble finding it on your own instrument.

MAKE YOUR OWN BODY BLANK Another neat trick to create your own body blank for $10 is to get a 3/4" thick peice of Birch Plywood that comes cut into a 4' by 2' board. Simply cut out two rectangular sections of the board that will accomodate your desing and wood glue them together. Be generous with the glue to make sure there aren't any spaces between the boards when you press the two together, clamp and stack weights on top of it so the two peices are joined firmly and let dry overnight. This gives you a a 1 1/2" thick body blank that is rigid and works great for electric guitars. You will have to go with a solid color paint when you finish it but you won't be able to tell the difference between it and the solid wood blank. Plus you'll save a good chunk of change that you can use towards good pickups and hardware. If you want to make the body a little thicker, you can get a 1/4" peice of birch and glue it between the two thicker peices. It's also a good idea to prerout any wire cavities in that 1/4" peice before you glue them together. That way you don't have to worry about drilling them later and ruining the top of your guitar body with the drill.

Large speaker cabinets such as 8x10" enclosures may have wheels and a "towel bar" and dolly wheels to facilitate transportation. Speaker cabinets with 1/4 input jacks typically have two parallel jacks, so that the amp head may be plugged into one cabinet, and then a second cabinet can be "daisy chained" by connecting it to the first cabinet. Cabinets with horn-loaded tweeters often have an attenuator knob for controlling the tweeter. Some 2000s-era speaker cabinets may have Speakon jacks; these jacks are often used with high-wattage amps, because they are safer, as the cable connections are hidden inside the connector and thus it is impossible for the user to touch the metal contacts when plugging in the amp cable.
Electric Guitars- Vintage, new & used / Second-hand electric guitars by Kay, Teisco Del Rey Ray ET J-1, Univox & Silvertone. Cheesy Japanese, Surf Guitars. Also guitars by Ibanez, Gibson, Fender, Peavey, Martin, Zon, Gretsch, Rickenbacker, Diasonic & More. Les Pauls recording, lap steels / slide guitars, Barney Kessel style, Fender Stratocasters, Telecasters, Squire Bullet series, Peavey Falcon neck Martin Acoustics, bass guitars, Zon Legacy Elite 5 string Bass, Diasonic double single cutaway, Rickenbacker, archtop, Gretsch TW-100T Traveling Wliburys guitar, Hamer Mirage 1, Yamaha sg-2000, Fender Jag-Stang, Gibson Howard Roberts, Ibanez Artist AR-100 to name a few.
It also has an overwhelming amount of sheet music in it. These music sheets allow you to practice what is being taught in the given chapter, which is nice, but going through the books, I felt there was a lot left unexplained. This was probably a result of them trying to simplify things as much as possible, but this actually leaves holes in the padawan guitarist's knowledge.
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One cool thing about liking oddball old guitars is they always contain hope…and a challenge. By which I mean, no matter how obscure or exotic, you always live with hope that you’ll someday figure out what the heck they are and thrive on the challenge of trying to do so. At least that’s been my repeated experience over the last quarter century or so of playing guitar detective. That being said, this 1967 Apollo Deluxe was kind of the exception that proved the rule, in that it followed a reverse pattern, sort of backing into discovery.
Wow, didn't expect a budget-priced instrument to perform this beautifully! I had planned to use this as an introduction into nylon-string (from electric), then upgrade to a better (i.e. more expensive??) model. That won't be necessary! The NTX700C is absolutely perfect for me and will remain the nylon-string guitar in my stable. I am a professional solo jazz guitarist and ventured into a nylon-string for my Brazilian jazz set. Being an electric player, the transition with this model has been much easier than a traditional classical. The onboard electronics are great with my Bose L1 system. I have the cedar top, and the tone is very mellow, and already opening up with only three weeks of playing.
Gotta say a tele has to be the hardest but most rewarding to play. If you make a mistake, you will definitely hear it, but it just helps you're playing get more clean. Les pauls are a lot easier with the shorter scale length and forgiving pickups. Haven't played any metal guitars but I figure it has a lot to do with their setup that makes it sound so easy. You can do just about anything with the tremolo arm into a van halen kind of setup and it'll sound cool. Or you can whack one off with your guitar like steve vai
Bobby Jo is number one on this list. Every artist has unknowingly been influenced by him. Starting in the Mississippi Delta, Johnson’s life is rife with myths, and allegory. His deal with the devil and death are full of folklore and mysticism, and it only adds to his haunting voice and groundbreaking guitar playing. His songs are just a pure expression of emotion with no bars held. He led the groundwork for early blues to be filled in and worked upon by all the artists on this list. He also worked on breaking down social barriers. A black man in the early 20th century was not exactly the best place to be. But his music was to add interest by white musicians and help the civil movements of the sixties. Politically or musically, Robert Johnson is deserving of number one on this list.
I have been a bass player and still am however I started on guitar at 12 and went back to it about 12 years ago. There really isn’t too much difference of perfecting your craft on either instrument. The most important thing to realize is when to play and when not to. I spent years learning how not to be a busy bass player and now that I have such a passion for playing guitar, I’m learning how to sound busy without really being busy.

This full-size electric guitar from Davidson is all that you need to start playing master the very art of strumming. The quality, durability, comfort, and accessories that are required to get you started is included in this solid guitar package from Davidson. This is a full size (39 inches) and complete scale solid electric guitar made of maple wood. It is an electric guitar featuring a maple neck and gloss finish.
Floor model Bugera 1960 infinium 150 watt all tube head. This amp never left the store until the closing sale when it was purchased by me. I have the shipping box, and all original packaging. Store owner had this in December of 2017, and used only as a store model. I gave it a thorough look, and checked everything out, and its all good. Do the research on these. They are very loud, and have had great reviews! Tube setup is auto bias ( so you dont have to send it to a certified tech to change out your tubes) three way switch to accommodate your speaker cabs in ohms. Really nice bang for the buck right here. I will accept any reasonable offer. Any questions please message me. Continental Us sales only.
I think Washburn is one of the best out there, From their A series, to HM to x series they all rock. I've had a a-10 since 1980 and it plays great! I have also got the reissues still great quality over the years. The only issue I've seen is Washburn's commitment to catch/keep some artist. Either they can't keep um or they don't want to. Can't see it being the later. Its very difficult to try one of their pieces out as their are very few stores that even stock them. In the 80's early 90s they were everywhere, now?
First, you have 11 different modes, including the TonePrint option, just like the Flashback delay. Then you have a true bypass circuit with an analog dry-through signal, which perfectly preserves the natural tone and EQ of your acoustic guitar (again, similar to the Flashback's setup). When you're using the effect, we would advise tinkering with the mix to get about 35-50 percent of your dry signal coming through.
I love this guitar! I am so happy with this axe and haven't put it down since it arrived. I don't think that you will find a better value in the Martin lineup, especially for an all solid wood guitar and a free HSC. People complain because this wasn't made in the USA, but I don't think that anyone would complain after playing this beauty. The action right out of the box was perfect, just like any high end Martin should be (plays like my HD28 and D18). This thing plays like butter and is silky smooth. Some people complain about the stratabond neck, but I love the feel of it and it is rock solid and should last forever! The finish and style of the guitar is very minimalistic, which is something that I love. It may be too plain for some people, but I love it. Something just
Unfortunately, no reference materials were available for this early period, so we’ll make some educated guesses. Based on the evidence of the logo on the 1968 amplifier, we suspect Univox guitars with the plastic logo debuted at about the same time. By 1970, Univox was employing decal logos on some models, further corroborating this conclusion. If this assumption is correct, it would suggest that among the first Univox guitar was the Mosrite copy known later as the Hi Flyer, debuting in around 1968. This would be consistent with the evolution of “copies” in Japan. As the ’60s progressed, the Japanese were getting closer and closer to the idea of copying, producing guitars similar to their competitors, such as Italian EKOs and Burns Bisons, etc., finally imitating American Mosrite guitars in around ’68. The Japanese affection for Mosrites was no surprise, since the band most associated with Semi Moseley’s guitars was the Ventures, who were enormously popular in Japan.

I'll second the neck comment, conditionally. My first guitar was a hand-me-down Monterey archtop acoustic that had been my uncle's, and it have a sharp V neck. Out of nostalgia I bought another Monterey on eBay and its cross section feels like a tomato can lying in my hand. After a refret it plays smoother and easier than anything that fat has a right to. The original frets..., not quite.
Once CNC (computer numeric control) equipment was introduced into guitar factories starting in the late 1980s and continuing on into the 1990s, it became far less of an issue where a guitar was made. Many of the CNC machines were made in Japan. In some cases the difference between an American-made guitar versus a Japanese-made guitar versus a Korean-made guitar was little more than where the machine was located. To make a guitar in the USA involved putting a Japanese-made CNC machine on a boat and sending it to the US whereupon it could be programmed in the USA and then American or other wood could be fed into the machine, which would spit out components made to tolerances within a few thousandths of an inch of the programming. By contrast a Japanese-made guitar would be produced by leaving the CNC machine in Japan, programming it with a disc done in the USA, and then importing wood to be put into the machine which would spit out components to the same specifications as those which would be made by a similar machine in the USA. A Korean-made guitar could be remarkably similar since the Japanese-made CNC machine could be sent to Korea whereupon the same process could be done there. By 1990 the quantity of guitars made in Japan was nowhere near what it had been earlier, but Korean production was in high gear. While some Japanese instruments have come to be viewed as quite desirable and collectible, I have seen little evidence of such activity with respect to Korean instruments, but the fact remains that the better-quality Korean guitars are remarkably good and most certainly are suitable for use on stage or in the studio.
The Boss Katana KTN-HEAD Amp Head has become one of the most talked about amplifiers as it features the coveted Waza technology found in the beautiful BOSS Waza Craft Pedals. The same care and attention that goes into these pedals has gone into the BOSS Katana head to produce a versatile and highly  aerticulate amplifier. Packed with Five unique amp characters: Clean, Crunch, Lead, Brown (derived from the Waza amp), and Acoustic (for acoustic-electric guitars), the Katana head ensures you have enough sonic diversity for all genres. You can choose from 55 BOSS effects and load 15 on to the amp via BOSS Tone Studio editor software and you can actually use it without a cab thanks to the monitor speaker - making it a great practice amp that you can use to get your sound and hook up to a cab later on at your gigs.
Pete Cornish (Pete Cornish Ltd.): “Compressors should be first in line from the guitar. Do not use a volume pedal first, as this will defeat any compression, and leave the system with maximum noise if the volume pedal is reduced to zero. I tend to connect any distortion devices and high-gain pedals first in line, and the lower-gain pedals later. I have found that the higher-gain devices control sustain, and the lower-gain devices control the tone if they are connected in this order. Modulation devices can come next.
Another great option if your budget for an acoustic is $500 or less is the BG 40 from Blueridge. It has a sitka spruce top with mahogany back and side. It features scalloped bracing for a clean and crisp tone. Owners describe it’s tone as loud and bassy, and compared the neck width to that of an electric. This could be a plus for those with smaller hands. This guitar also features a bone and nut saddle and East Indian rosewood fingerboard for smooth playability. Based on customer feedback, this is a great budget choice that won’t let you down.
In 2007, Gibson announced the idea to create a computerized Les Paul, dubbed the “Robot Guitar” which was released on December 7, 2007. The guitar has a computer integrated into the body with a “master control” knob next to the volume knobs, which can be pulled out, turned, or pressed to issue different commands to the guitar. One of the more notable features is the ability to tune the guitar to standard tuning simply by pulling out on the master control knob and strumming the guitar, while the tuning pegs adjust themselves to standard tuning. Another use of the master control knob is to be able to tune the guitar to alternative tunings, such as drop D, by pressing on the control knob to fit the setting. The new Les Paul has a new custom silverburst blue finish.[30] While the product was advertised in the American popular press as a “world’s first”, similar systems, some external, have been in use for decades.
You will come across many people who'll give you different opinions regarding different brands, and also, there are several other reviews on the Internet too. Keep your research simple, experiment, and keep frequenting guitar shops and secondhand musical instrument stores to check out the different kinds of brands. Play as many guitars of different brands as you can, and one day, you will find your 'guitar-soulmate' (sic.), the sight and sound of which will make you go 'wow!' So, if you're new to the guitar world or have recently developed an interest in it, this Melodyful article will surely sort out your doubts. Here is a brief comparison of different guitar brands along with detailed descriptions of the tone and sound. Take a look!
Need a portable pedalboard for fly dates? Tech 21 has the answer in the form of the Fly Rig 5: a small but perfectly functional pedalboard, powered by an auto-switching adaptor, so it can be used anywhere in the world. What you get is the equivalent of five stompboxes. The SansAmp is at the heart of the Fly Rig. Stomp on its footswitch and its six mini control knobs light up blue. You get level and drive knobs, three-band EQ and a spring reverb emulation based on the Boost RVB pedal. In front of the SansAmp, you get the Plexi section, based on Tech 21's Hot-Rod Plexi pedal. One footswitch emulates the natural overdrive and distortion of a late-60s Marshall, with sound dialled in with level, tone and drive controls. A second 'Hot' footswitch brings in up to 21dB of boost and can be used independently of the Plexi distortion. Last in the signal chain is the DLA, a delay with tap tempo. The Fly Rig 5 is an extremely functional unit that contains arguably the most essential effects - you can plug it into a guitar amp or straight into a PA or mixing desk. It's also a life-saver should your equipment go down at the last minute, as well as being the answer to the prayers of guitarists who need to travel light.
Mahogany is a durable wood, often described as dense and that is used in the construction of guitars. The main advantage of purchasing an instrument made from this material is the fact that it highlights the unit’s bass and midrange. Therefore, if you are into mellower tones, this is the material that you should pay attention to. The resulting guitars made from this material are usually brown.
Because overdrive and distortion add a lot of high frequency harmonics to the signal they will quickly muddy up the sound if a large number of notes are struck simultaneously. i.e. full open chords and full barres don't work with overdrive, they muddy up. What you play are simple forms, generally no more than three notes simultaneously. For example an "A" power chord is (high E to low E)
When you start to look for that great beginner's electric guitar, focus on an instrument with good-quality wood and reasonable workmanship. That's the most commonly accepted method of choosing a low-cost electric guitar for a beginner. Guitar manufacturers tend to cut corners with cheaper guitars by using, for instance, cheaper pickups and hardware. But for the guitarist who gets more serious about playing, these are all upgradeable parts that can be swapped out for higher-quality parts. So begin with a good-quality wooden frame and upgrade as time and money allow.
EQ pedals do exactly what you would think.  They allow you to set the tone of your sound through equalization.  Just like on your radio, they can adjust the bass, mid, and treble frequencies of your tone.  Depending on the type of EQ stompbox you have, you may have different ways of tailoring your tone.  There are two main types: graphic and parametric.
I would have never finished my project without this, 20 feet sounds like alot, but it can go very fast. I used this to rewire up an Epiphone hollow body,and I needed the length to reach from toggle to jack. The gauge is a perfect feel and doesnt have me worried about accidentally breaking it from movement. Also the cloth is great as it takes much more heat than the standard rubber coverings.
Many amplifiers have effects built in, but even those that do are no substitute for a well-equipped pedalboard. There are literally thousands of effects to choose from, some of which (like the Boss TU-3 Chromatic Pedal Tuner) are more like accessories that don't directly impact your sound. Others will transform it completely. For example, two of the most popular effects are the Fulltone OCD Obsessive Compulsive Overdrive Guitar Effects Pedal and the Ibanez TS9 Tube Screamer Effects Pedal - these are both overdrive pedals, and together with a good amp, they'll take an electric guitar's sound from its default, vintage-like tone all the way to the high-powered distortion of a modern rock anthem.

The Headload may be the ultimate tool for gigging electric guitarists. It has the same features as the JDX 48, but allows the player to adjust the phase of their signal to be matched with a microphone and comes with equalization controls to further sculpt the sound of their direct signal. Most importantly, the Headload is a “load-box”, meaning that it can absorb the energy of the amp’s head and produce a lower volume through the amp’s speakers. This is crucial, since most guitarists only like the sound of their amp when it is driven hard at high volumes. Unfortunately, amps being pushed to their full volume is not as enjoyable for the audience. The Headload also allows guitarists to play through their favorite sounding amp heads without even needing guitar cabs!


Ibanez RG20061, also known as the RGT220A CAH, is an RG series Prestige limited edition guitar model specially created for the 2006 Winter NAMM Show. It based on the RGT220A, but stained brown, although claimed to be barbecued to a chocolaty brown color. Features include a neck through body construction, ash body wings, Dimarzio IBZ pickups and the Edge Pro tremolo. Only 153 Made 8/10 Condition
Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Maple - Flamed - Neck Wood: Maple & Walnut - Neck Construction: 5 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 24, Jumbo - Inlay: Pearl - Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Headstock: 6 In-Line - Bridge: Edge III - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Black - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Devil's Shadow
Now if this house is rocking, don’t bother knockin. Famous words by Stevie. Many people perhaps know him for Hendrix covers, but where Jimi left off Stevie continued, and continued he did. The elements of Hendrix were alive and plain to see in SRV, but with it, he also mixed in his own influences such as Albert King and his own soul to make it his sound a trademark spot on his songs. I vaguely remember a car commercial where I spotted Stevie’s playing (Pride and Joy) in a Nissan ad. That was much before I really got into Vaughan’s work. SRV was an artist who could play while absolutely stoned face. And when he did sober up, he actually played better. His newfound health and love for life and music are showcased on In Step his last album before his death a year later. Stevie’s footprints will always be in the air and in our hearts.
If you plan to be the more lead-orientated guitarist, good for you. You’ll get more chicks and a higher place in the band pecking order. You shouldn’t however, neglect your chordal playing. A song can exist without lead lines, but not without rhythm. Don’t be fooled, every one of your guitar heroes is invariably a demon on rhythm guitar too. It’s a prerequisite: you have to understand the chords, rhythm, and harmony of a song before you can play any meaningful melody on top of it.

Ibanez are a Japanese guitar brand founded in Nagoya, Japan in 1957. They began by building copies of Fender and Gibson models, but – a couple of lawsuits later – they started creating their own models, which are now icons in their own right. Their line currently includes their famous Roadstar (RG), the thin-bodied S series, and several artist signature models, including guitars for Steve Vai, Joe Satriani, and Mick Thomson.
The numbers below the chord tell you which fingers you should be using to form the chord. Finger one is the finger closest to your thumb and then it goes across until finger four is your pinky. The image below shows this labelled for you. If you're playing a left handed guitar you'll have to use the mirror image of these pictures. The thumb doesn't get a number because it is very, very rarely used when forming chords.
Learning just a song won't get you far, there will be a point where you just won't be able to learn a song because of its difficulty. First of all you need to learn some chords, scales and study a bit of music theory. Here's one example: Lets compare a song to a poem. You can learn a poem and keep saying it, but if someone asks you the meaning of the poem, you won't be able to say anything. If you just learn how to play a song without knowing any chords, it won't be any good for you. (Btw sorry for bad English) Also if you know the essentials, learning a song will get easier and easier.
This guitar is awesome. If you are on the fence, get off and buy it. It's beautiful and sounds awesome. I'd give it 10 stars if I could. The tone is so much better than my old acoustic. All mahogany I love it. Looking forward to years of getting better with this beauty. I have zero negative to say. Had it a few months have played everyday. I hate to leave it to go to work. Wish I had all day to play it.
Among other things, they’re extremely reliable, sound great and built like tanks, so you can stomp on them for years and they’ll never let you down. However, collecting them all will cost an absolute fortune. Fortunately, the team at Boss have put together a couple of options for those who want a world of Boss effects pedals at their feet. One option is the Boss ME-80 Multi Effects Processor Pedal.
So much has changed since our last refresh – where do we begin! First we answered some common questions that you might have. Then we reviewed our top ten chart and individual categories, and removed several older models including the Gibson Les Paul Faded T 2017, Epiphone’s G-310 SG, and the ESP MH-50. We added many others including one of the greatest guitars ever made, the Ernie Ball Music Man John Petrucci Majesty Monarchy, the premium Fender Eric Clapton Stratocaster, the Yamaha RevStar RS420 and Mark Holcomb’s signature PRS MHHB2 SE.

Seven-string electric guitars were popularized among rock players in the 1980s by Steve Vai. Along with the Japanese guitar company Ibanez, Vai created the Universe series seven-string guitars in the 1980s, with a double locking tremolo system for a seven-string guitar. These models were based on Vai's six-string signature series, the Ibanez Jem. Seven-string guitars experienced a resurgence in popularity in the 2000s, championed by Deftones, Limp Bizkit, Slayer, KoRn, Fear Factory, Strapping Young Lad, Nevermore, Muse and other hard rock and metal bands. Metal musicians often prefer the seven-string guitar for its extended lower range. The seven-string guitar has also played an essential role in progressive metal rock and is commonly used in bands such as Dream Theater and Pain of Salvation and by experimental guitarists such as Ben Levin.
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