Instruments with built-in effects include Hammond organs, electronic organs, electronic pianos and digital synthesizers.[19] Built-in effects for keyboard typically include reverb, chorus and, for Hammond organ, vibrato. Many "clonewheel organs” include an overdrive effect. Occasionally, acoustic-electric and electric guitars will have built-in effects, such as a preamp or equalizer.[20][21]


Jackson is regarded as a manufacturer of electric guitars and electric bass guitars, which was founded in 1980 by Grover Jackson. Their headquarters located in Scottsdale, Arizona, USA. They manufacture trendy and stylish guitars. Most of the music players choose a Jackson’s guitar for good performance. It is very apt for sharp and clear music. The price range starts from Rs. 13,380/- onwards (approx). For further details, visit jacksonguitars.com.
I am not completely sure this tuner info is completely accurate. Sorry about that... Remember as a general rule Grovers were used on style 21 and above, and Klusons were used on style 18 and lower. There are some exceptions (like during 1940 to 1945, and pre-1930s). On pre-war Grover tuners, there are basically two types used on Martins: G-93 (round button 'butterbean') and G-98 (scalloped buttons, aka "Sta-Tite"). Both came in 6:1 and 12:1 tuning ratios, with 12:1 coming about in 1938 (and replacing the 6:1 ratio). The post-1938 12:1 ratio Grovers can be always be identified since they combine the thin seamed tuner buttons with the long pointed baseplate, and the tuner gear is screw mounted. The 1938 and prior Grover G98 tuners have a thin seamed button combined with the a square tipped baseplate, and always had the 6:1 ratio. They also had the riveted tuner gear. Ater WW2 the G98 was reintroduced with pointy baseplates and a screw mounted gear, and this was copied by Waverly, Grover, Schaller, etc after the war. Also Martin used original Waverly tuners (open back, rounded base tips, butterbean buttons) after WW2 on 00 and 000 and some D guitars style 18 (and some 28) in the late 1940s and 1950s.

In this era, as well, Gibson began experimenting with new models such as the Les Paul Recording. This model is generally unpopular with guitarists due to its complex electronics. The Recording featured low-impedance pickups, many switches and buttons, and a highly specialized cable for impedance-matching to the amplifier. Less noticeable changes included, but were not limited to, maple fingerboards (1976), pickup cavity shielding, and the crossover of the ABR1 Tune-o-matic bridge into the modern day Nashville Tune-o-matic bridge. During the 1970s, the Les Paul body shape was incorporated into other Gibson models, including the S-1, the Sonex, the L6-S, and other models that did not follow the classic Les Paul layout.

Solder is basically a low melting alloy, which in a nutshell means it’s melting point is far lower than the typical materials it will be used to join. It’s melting range is generally between 200 to 800 °F. Solder is available in either lead-based and lead-free. Most commonly you will use a 60/40 (60% tin, 40% lead) rosin core solder when working on guitar wiring.
Jazz rhythm guitar often consists of very textural, odd-meter playing that includes generous use of exotic, difficult-to-fret chords. In 4/4 timing, it is common to play 2.5 beat intervals such as on the 2 and then the half beat or "and" after 4. Jazz guitarists may play chords "ahead" of the beat, by playing the chord a swung eighth note before the actual chord change. Chords are not generally played in a repetitive rhythmic fashion, like a rock rhythm guitarist would play.
Maton established itself early on the Australian rock scene in the late Fifties, assisted by Australia’s tariff regime, which made imported guitars far more expensive than the local equivalents. Maton guitars were used by many well-known Australian pop and rock groups including Col Joye & The Joy Boys. The company also made one of the first sponsorship deals in Australian rock, supplying Melbourne band The Strangers with a full set of the distinctive ‘El Toro’ model guitars and basses (notable for their outlandish ‘horned’ body shape) while the group was working as the house band on the TV pop show The Go!! Show in the mid-Sixties.
Distortion sound or "texture" from guitar amplifiers is further shaped or processed through the frequency response and distortion factors in the microphones (their response, placement, and multi-microphone comb filtering effects), microphone preamps, mixer channel equalization, and compression. Additionally, the basic sound produced by the guitar amplifier can be changed and shaped by adding distortion and/or equalization effect pedals before the amp's input jack, in the effects loop just before the tube power amp, or after the power tubes.
The E-18 and EM-18 were basically the same guitar differing only in electronics. The E-18 featured two DiMarzio humbucking pickups, a DiMarzio PAF at the neck and a DiMarzio Super Distortion at the bridge. In addition to the regular controls, the E-18 had mini-toggle phase switch. Production of the E-18 began in April of ’79 and about 5,307 (about 1,320 a year) were made until the guitar ended in early 1982.
The company has been run by the Martin family throughout its history. The current chairman and CEO, C.F. ‘Chris’ Martin IV, is the great-great-great-grandson of the founder. The firm was the first to introduce many of the characteristic features of the modern flattop, steel-strung acoustic guitar. Influential innovations include the Dreadnought body style and scalloped bracing. Some time in the 1970s, Martin bought Levin guitars[1] and around 200 D-18’s were apparently built in Sweden; they are stamped LD-18[citation needed].
What people may not know is that they have a very affordable line of entry-level guitars.  This line continues the legacy of craftsmanship and prestige that comes with owning a Taylor. Whether you look into their line of Baby Taylors – 3/4 sized guitars that play better than many full-sized budget guitars, or you look into their entry full-sized acoustics, Taylor will not disappoint you.
Gibson produced only hollow body electrics until 1952, when the first Les Paul solid bodies hit the market. But that still left a gap. Certain players wanted a guitar with the versatility of a Les Paul, but the warmer, mellow tone of a hollow body — albeit one that could be played at high volume. A solid wood block runs through the center of the guitar’s body, allowing greater sustain and less feedback at high volumes than hollow bodies, while the winged side of these guitars’ bodies still provide for a mellow tone thanks to their acoustic resonance.

Gibson Brands, Inc. is considered as an American producer of guitars and other instruments, which is located in Nashville, Tennessee. The brand was earlier known as Gibson Guitar Corp. The company was founded by Orville Gibson in 1902. They are famous for its innovative and superior quality guitars. They sell their guitars under different brand names. These guitars are available at little higher rates. The price range starts from Rs. 49,500/- onwards (approx). For more details, visit Gibson.com.
Over 20 years, Ovation produced some very interesting guitars. Not only do the American models feature innovative technology that alone makes them worth seeking out, they really handle nicely as players, despite their rejection at the time. Some were ahead of their time. Most were out of step with it, as well. After two decades of failed attempts to market solidbody (and some hollowbody) electrics, Ovation did what other companies who failed to successfully cross over from the genres that brought them their fame. In ’88, Ovation purchased Hamer guitars. Ah, but that’s another story…
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Im sure are techs at these stores that aren't bad AT ALL, but when you don't know who they are, I wouldn't trust them with a truss rod while you're not there standing over trheir shoulder watching them. I may just be paranoid, but hey, better safe than sorry is the way I look at it. I've done my own setups. And I plan to keep doing it until the day comes when I order myself a custom bass that I worked my ass off for, then I'll be willing to spend $50 on a 'properly' done setup. I dunno
The first step is to determine what’s in your pickup already. The most common magnets for humbuckers are (roughly in order of strength): alnico 2, alnico 4, alnico 5, and then various types of ceramic magnets. In simple terms, the stronger the magnet, the greater the potential output. But you can’t just look at magnetic strength alone, because stronger magnets also affect the string’s ability to sustain.
Because most “top 10 guitar posts” throw a bunch of guitars up there, tell you they’re “the best” and give you little information about them. That’s unhelpful on its best day and dangerously misleading on its worst. Because “best” and “top” are not concrete terms in this sense, unless you’re talking about sales figures, which they almost never are.
You may wondering how these chord shapes has been constructed. For now, you just need to know that a chord is based on the notes of a simple scale, which has 7 notes, and you finish on the original note, one octave up, for a total of 8 notes. A basic Major chord is made up of the 1st note in the scale of whatever key you are playing in, also called the root note, the 3th note, and the 5th note. We’ll get into that later, when we talk more about scales.
The 50-watt version is driven by seven 12AX7 preamp tubes with two 6L6s powering the amp, which is surprisingly huge in output – capable of filling an auditorium no problem (depending on your cab, of course). Other features that make this such a popular choice among gigging guitarists include three customizable channels and a four-button footswitch.

Granular Guitars is the second exclusive VST Sound Instrument Set created by sound designer, composer and multi-instrumentalist Simon Stockhausen. Adding to the sound libraries of Padshop and Padshop Pro Granular Guitars spans nearly three gigabytes worth of studio-grade recorded samples, covering various acoustic and electric guitars as well as providing more exotic instruments like psaltery, celtic harp and oud played in traditional styles, plus experimental ways of treating the guitar. With 260 presets, Granular Guitars includes big cinematic soundscapes, beds and pads, beautiful fragile textures, plucked string sounds morphed into alien noises, heavy metal sounds and overdriven guitar screams clashed with divine New Age sounds.


Some guitarists use identical pickups in each position and still get contrasting sounds from each pickup. Others use different types of pickups, often to balance the tonal tendencies of a particular pickup position. For example, a guitarist might choose a moderate-output pickup in the neck position and use if for clean-toned chords, but opt for a high-output bridge pickup for a louder, more distorted, solo sound. A pickup of that type will probably sound darker than a single-coil, but a player who finds the naturally twangy bridge position a little too bright would welcome that change.

By the fall of 1956, Daniel started making the Silvertone and Danelectro lines using the standard Dano materials: a Poplar wood frame (that comprised the sides, neck and bridge block of the guitar), stapled together and covered with 3/8" thick masonite. The top and back was painted, but the sides were covered in a vinyl material to hide the unpainted poplar wood frame. Also the now infamous "Lipstick tube" pickups were used. These pickups had an alnico bar magnet and coil measuring 4.75k ohms wrapped in brown vinyl tape. The pickup guts were placed inside surplus, chrome plated, lipstick tubes. These pickups were actually the same as previously used and hidden beneath the pickguard. Just now they were adorned in lipstick tubes and mounted in cutouts in the masonite body. Construction methods stayed this way for most models throughout Danelectro's history.


The desire for innovative sounds has intrigued musicians in every culture since the dawn of time. Oscillating the volume of a note is an ancient technique — we’ve been able to do it with our voices as long as we’ve been capable of singing. Any musician playing a stringed instrument can create tremolo effect — they simply move the bow or finger back and forth while sustaining a note, as violinists and cellists do. But what about other sounds? How has the addition of mechanical and digital devices changed our music?
Epiphone, coolest brand ever. More songs have been written on Epiphone guitars than any other. Sure! Gibson bought & attempted to hijack the Epiphone kudos, but failed, as all that happened was Epiphone became the affordable brand of the people. Gibson & Taylor are by far…so far…the least cool brands ever. I’m telling you, more songs (filled with passion & desperation & anger) have been written on Epiphone guitars than any other, by folk who can’t afford or don’t have a mummy to buy them a Fender strat or Gibson.

Large-scale traffic in guitars between Japan and the United States began in the very late ’50s. Jack Westheimer of Chicago’s W.M.I. corporation has published his recollection of having begun to bring in Kingston guitars purchased from the Terada Trading Company in around 1958. The Japanese themselves began advertising their wares to American distributors as early as July of 1959, when Guyatone ran a small space ad touting small pointed single cutaway solidbodies more or less resembling Teisco’s mini-Les Pauls.
By contrast, tuning (or pitch) correction processors and plug-ins are normally considered processors rather than effects, but they do have creative uses. The idea behind these devices is to monitor the pitch of the incoming signal, then compare it to a user-defined scale, which can be a simple chromatic scale or any combination of notes. Pitch-shifting techniques are then used to nudge the audio to the nearest semitone in the user's scale but, because the amount of pitch-shift required is usually quite small, the result doesn't sound grainy or lumpy, as often happens when large amounts of pitch-shift are generated. Because pitch tracking is used to identify the original pitch, only monophonic signals can be treated.
6) PLEASE DO NOT POST THE FOLLOWING: Memes, jokes/skits, rage comics, sub-related rant posts, spam, advertising of your goods or services, shill advertising, links to outside retailers (links in discussions are ok), gear for sale posts (head to /r/Gear4Sale). Comment manipulation (edits made to conceal behavior) is strictly prohibited. Market research is strictly prohibited.
All I can say is 5+ STARS, holy smokes and WOW!!!! ALL that for $140 SHIPPED!!!! AMAZING DEAL!!! The guitar plays GREAT! The color is very beautiful! The sound is quite impressive for the little money spent!!! The little AMP is adorable and works perfectly. All the accessories are great and are the perfect 'icing on the cake'!!! You will need a better gig bag than the one the guitar is shipped with, the gig bag that comes with it is thin and good to keep the dust off but not much more. So, buy a nice gig bag that will fit and your guitarist will be travel ready! I highly recommend this guitar ensemble to everyone! For $140 SHIPPED, you truly won't be disappointed!
As this site was founded by one of the circuit board designers from GuitarPCB.com, you can be assured that all of the homework has been done for you in selecting the appropriate parts for each circuit. Many of the kits we sell are not available from any other US supplier. Currently, we only ship to the USA, however, we plan to expand to the rest of North America in the future.

Sometimes, the research we do - such as this hunt for the best multi effect pedal - opens up our world to a piece of gear we did not previously know about, and yet completely blows us out of the water. Such is the case with the Line 6 M5 Stompbox Modeler. This is the second item from Line 6 that made it into our top 5 list (the other one being the high-end POD HD500X). The Line 6 M5 is different than the other multi-effect pedals on our list, as it’s the only one that can only model one effect at a time, and also does not do amplifier modeling. With the other pedals on our list, you could replace your entire pedalboard by having multiple effects active at the same time. The M5 is far more simplistic, only letting you use one at a time. You might be asking yourself why we love it so much - well, it’s not for everyone, but there’s a lot of beauty in its simplicity. Read on to see if this is the right pedal for you.

The Ford Model T was revolutionary. The only horses involved were under the hood, which was a big enough deal at the time, but we now know that the assembly line process behind it would go on to revolutionize the way we manufacture tools, vehicles, and the rest of our modern appurtenances. In all honesty, the Model T had a long way to go. Consider how that horseless carriage would hold up today. When we put nostalgia and historic significance aside, it’s the last car you’d want take a long trip in or depend on for daily commutes. From a modern day performance perspective, the Ford Model T was garbage.


ANYBODY, OF EVERY ABILITY, CAN PLAY – Designed for every type of learner, ChordBuddy includes modifications that allow individuals of every ability to successfully learn a new instrument. Perfect for use in the music therapy, home, or school setting, ChordBuddy can help individuals learn to play the guitar flat or with two people at a time, making for what is an all-around therapeutic experience.
Your budget – When it comes to the best electric guitars or really any real instrument in general, you’re going to have to pay a decent amount of money if you want a quality investment. Although we did find a few budget-friendly guitars to take a look at below, a lot of these will near the half-a-thousand mark and beyond. It all depends on you, of course. Do you want a beginner and starter electric guitar to begin those shredding adventures? Or perhaps the best of the best that the most famous artists use? Perhaps you’ll end up saving more than you already have as you’re reading this — it may be worth it to wait a bit longer.
In 2000, for the anniversary of the Squier line of Stratocaster guitars, that year’s model was offered in a limited-edition green finish. The “Crafted in China” Squier Affinity Strats are different from their immediate predecessors; most have plywood bodies, larger headstock shapes, and somewhat inferior small parts. The pick guards generally now have 11 holes and screws, departing from the original ’50s style. Many people attribute the Affinity’s decline in quality to the introduction of the changes in 2000. The next major change for the Affinity line was a reduction in body thickness from 1.75″ to 1.5″, noticeable in size and weight.
The reverb driver amp consists of a phase inverting push-pull circuit made from dual sections of a 5532 high quality audio op-amp. This provides a voltage swing of approximate twice the supply voltage to the reverb impedance matching transformer, allowing higher power transfer. The 100 ohm resistor is critical for insuring a clean drive signal, without it, the op-amps can saturate when driving the transformer, producing unwanted distortion.

Sweet and tasty Smooth Jazz track. Featured electric and acoustic pianos, electric organ with synth. Rhythm electric guitar playing chords and another creamy electric guitar playing solo. Also, this track has warm and wide bass guitar with drums and percussion. This track is great for presentations, advertising, real estate background, Youtube and other videos.
The valvetronix XL-series builds on the success of the original valvetronix digital amplifier. A range of tube-powered modelling amplifiers, with hi-gain sounds designed to span the entire range of heavy rock music. The XL-series uses VOX's patented Valve Reactor technology, producing the sound and feel of an all-tube amp. Models: AD15VT-XL 15-watt 1×10" speaker, AD30VT-XL 30-watt 1×12" speaker, AD50VT-XL 50-watt 2×12" speakers, AD100VT-XL 100-watt 2×12" speakers.
We are recording between June and July our new album entitled "Brutal Agression" which should be out in October/November, also we were recently invited to Rock al Parque in Bogota, which is one of the biggest festivals in Latin America, joining Cannibal Corpse, Havok, Symphony X, Internal Suffering and many more. After that we will play at other festivals such as Mamut Fest y more to be confirmed, then we will concentrate on album release and touring, which will be accompanied by one or more videos.
To understand the difference between parallel and series wiring of two pickups, check out the two diagrams. In the first, the two pickups are wired in parallel, so both pickups’ inputs and outputs are connected together. This is one of the main reasons why a Strat usually has a very bright tone—parallel wiring allows the signal from each pickup to reach the output jack by the shortest possible route. The result is that the high frequencies reach the output jack almost unchecked, giving your Strat that sparkling sound we all love so much.
The Gibson 2017 has a truly amazing setup and it played nicer and felt better than most models in its class. The tone is deep and throaty, and ab0ve all, it’s 100% Les Paul. What actually made the big difference in this electric guitar is the upgraded electronics and wirings with very minimal feedback and sustain. There is no buzzing or excessive string vibration. All that you get is a superb, perfect fit and finish.
"We are extremely excited about this next phase of growth that we believe will benefit both our employees, and the Memphis community. I remember when our property had abandoned buildings, and Beale Street was in decline. It is with great pride that I can see the development of this area with a basketball arena, hotels, and a resurgent pride in the musical heritage of the great city of Memphis. We continue to love the Memphis community and hope to be a key contributor to its future when we move nearby to a more appropriate location for our manufacturing based business, allowing the world the benefit of our great American craftsmen."[36]
A compressor “compresses” the signal that your guitar produces by normalizing the dynamic range of the audio input signal based on a threshold value. This effect is used virtually everywhere in recording. Everything you hear in music that is produced today is compressed in some way–and it can sound anything from a subtle barely noticeable effect to a thick, dampened squish.
The tip of a soldering iron is very hot, around 700F, and can damage the board, component packages, and wire insulation in a fraction of a second, not to mention your own skin, so be careful the tip does not touch anything as you move it in and out of the soldering area. Put the pencil back in its holder when not soldering. Don’t leave a hot iron laying on a bench or table.
Slightly out-of-tune strings on a bass may not jump out as much as on guitar (especially in chords), but when that bass line is sitting under other parts in the mix, even slightly off-pitch notes will make their presence known, and sometimes be harder to track down (why does this song sound a little “off”?). I’d use a tuner (h/w or s/w), but I’d also always verify by ear, before hitting record, and I’d check tuning periodically as the session progresses—just as with drums, hard players can easily put the instrument out after a few energetic takes.

As obvious as it sounds, a tuner (or tuning pedal) is fundamental for your rig. It can also act as a mute switch for changing guitars between songs. These days there are many smartphone apps for tuning your guitar – as well as clip-on tuners – but when you need precision and a clear visual indication of the pitch of your strings, nothing beats a good old tuning pedal. The Boss TU-3 is a classic tuning pedal with lots of useful settings – alternatively, you can check out the CPT-20 by Harley Benton which features true bypass connections and a super large LCD display. Need a smaller footprint? Try the Mooer Baby Tuner!

The simplest guitar amplifiers, such as some vintage amps and modern practice amps, have only a single volume control. Most have two volume controls: a first volume control called "preamplifier" or "gain" and a master volume control. The preamp or gain control works differently on different guitar amp designs. On an amp designed for acoustic guitar, turning up the preamp knob pre-amplifies the signal—but even at its maximum setting, the preamp control is unlikely to produce much overdrive. However, with amps designed for electric guitarists playing blues, hard rock and heavy metal music, turning up the preamp or gain knob usually produces overdrive distortion. Some electric guitar amps have three controls in the volume section: pre-amplifier, distortion and master control. Turning up the preamp and distortion knobs in varying combinations can create a range of overdrive tones, from a gentle, warm growling overdrive suitable for a traditional blues show or a rockabilly band to the extreme distortion used in hardcore punk and death metal. On some electric guitar amps, the "gain" knob is equivalent to the distortion control on a distortion pedal, and similarly may have a side-effect of changing the proportion of bass and treble sent to the next stage.


Randall is a guitar amp manufacturer that specializes in high-gain sounds, and they are revered in the metal community. A Randall tube amp is a force to be reckoned with, but thanks to the late Darrell Abbott of Pantera and Damageplan their solid-state sounds are just as legendary. Dime loved the harsh, scooped sound of Randall amps, and it became his signature sound throughout his early career.

SSO Strings (Sonatina Symphonic Orchestra) is a creative commons licensed library. For violin, chamber strings and flute I have taken several of the instrument samples and layered them together to allow for expressive playing over the velocity range. Flute SSO for example contains soft, hard and overblown samples from SSO. To create chamber strings I have used bass strings, cello, expressive violin and viola over certain ranges of the keyboard.
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With a neck made of mahogany and a body of maple, the Ibanez Artcore AF75 is one of the best hollow body electric guitars included on this list. Due to its hollow body design, this guitar has the ability to play well in all genres, ranging from country to hard rock, and is known for its high-quality tone and ability to maintain tune through long periods of playing. This is possible in part due to the pickups at the neck and bridge, reducing excess humming for clarity in tone and pitch.  The knobs at the base of the body have a super-grip design, making it easy to change the volume and tone between the neck and the bridge and utilize the three pickup selector. A pearl block inlay is included on the rosewood fretboard, making this 20 fret electric guitar a strong option to conclude this list.
STEM educators will take part in an intense five-day electric guitar design/build institue. Each faculty member will build his/her own custom electric guitar and will engage in student centered learning activities that relate the guitar design to specific math, science and engineering topics. Participants leave this weeklong experience with their custom-made guitars, curriculum modules with short term assessments that can be immediately integrated into the faculty team school curriculum.
A very good option in the budget pedal market. Comes with a great number of effects to combine for solid sounds. Virtually all the factory pre-sets are worthless and are sort of demonstrations of what the pedal can do. But you have plenty of user saves and setting up good tones is straight forward and simple. The tuner in this and my handheld one never agree. Someone is lying!
A lot of amateur guitar players are tempted by the ‘cut’ of a high treble sound that gives their notes definition above the cacophony of the rest of the band. They become so accustomed to this sound that they lose sensitivity to its harshness. Treble becomes the ultimate weapon in their arsenal for the volume war, but to the listener, all they hear is a headache, aka bad tone.
First introduced as a 35th Anniversary Edition Guitar in 2009, it joined Taylor’s standard line up as a Specialty Model in 2010. The Baritone model features a Grand Symphony body and a longer 27-inch scale length which enables it to be tuned from B to B while maintaining normal string tension. It comes in either 6-string or 8-string option. The 8-string models incorporates a pair of octave strings that double the 3rd and 4th (D and A) strings. Solid wood back and sides available for the Baritone model are Tropical mahogany or Indian Rosewood with rosewood binding and an abalone rosette.
Description: Body: Maple - Top Wood: Spruce - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 3 Piece - Fingerboard: Ebony - Frets: 22 - Inlay: Pearl & Abalone Block - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge Construction: Ebony - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Gold, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control - Circuit Type: Passive - Pickups: Super 58 - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Vintage Yellow Sunburst - String Instrument Accessories: Hardshell Case
Either today or tomorrow my SSS Mexican Stratocaster will be arriving at my local Guitar Center and I'm not sure if I should pay to get it setup. The guy that worked there, Jon, suggested I get my guitar setup as soon as I go and pick it up since its 50% off for a first time setup. He said the technician would adjust the guitar strings, double check the action or height of the strings or something. It sounds like something I wouldn't really need but then again I'm just a beginner - maybe some of you more experienced guitarists can let me know if Jon was trying to do me a solid or if he was just trying to make a sale. He also said they'd help me get my guitar in tune which was pretty cool.
In 1964, The Rolling Stones‘ Keith Richards obtained a 1959 sunburst Les Paul.[19] The guitar, outfitted with a Bigsby tailpiece, was the first “star-owned” Les Paul in Britain and served as one of the guitarist’s prominent instruments through 1966. Because he switched guitars often enough in that period (using models ranging from the Epiphone semi-hollow to various other guitars made by Guild and Gibson), Richards is sometimes forgotten as an early post-1960 Les Paul player.[20][21] In 1965, Eric Clapton also recognized the rock potential of the late 1950s Les Paul guitars (particularly the 1958–1960 Standard sunburst models), and gave them wide exposure. He began using Les Pauls because of the influence of Freddie King and Hubert Sumlin, and played a 1960 Standard on his groundbreaking album Blues Breakers – John Mayall – With Eric Clapton. At the same time, Mike Bloomfield began using a 1954 Les Paul goldtop he apparently purchased in Boston while touring with the Paul Butterfield Blues Band, and recorded most of his work on the band’s East-West album with that guitar. A year later, he traded it to guitarist/luthier Dan Erlewine for the 1959 Standard with which he became most identified. Concurrently, such artists such as Peter Green, Mick Taylor, Jeff Beck andJimmy Page began using the late-1950s Les Paul Standards.

I have been playing for two years. I use to play (and still have) a fender squier. Today I bought a Lyle on impuls. I wasn't planning on buying one, i just walked in and it looked so beautiful. I have a feeling it is about 10 years old or so, but the sales man didn't know much other than it was a Lyle and it had new tunning pegs on it. I got it for 150$ and i would REALLY love to know more about it. Thanks.
The Reaction Many manufacturers reacted by making warranties void if amps were driven at full power, some threatened to cut off retailers who sold their amps to bands that played ‘music of the devil’. The parody of this historical contradiction has been rewritten, to fit mythical beliefs that brilliant designers created these amps for what ‘rock musos’ wanted.
We've had a thread here in the last couple months about Squires, with some pretty discerning forum members praising their quality and tone. You don't need to spend a lot of money these days for a good guitar. The one the OP bought was years ago. The fierce competition in the guitar market since the economy went bad, has forced manufacturers to up their game, and recent production is of a much higher standard.
Following the lead of Electro, which was having some success with their cast aluminum alloy bodies, Dobro – still a separate company – introduced its first cast aluminum Dobro Hawaiian electric lap steel guitar, probably in late 1934. Along with the aluminum lap, Dobro also debuted the Standard Guitar, and the Mandolin. Accompanying these was the Dobro Amplifier. All four listed for $67.50. These are all shown in the ’35 Tonk Brothers catalog.
The old ones were SOLD as cheap guitars. These new ones, at their price points, are probably decent instruments at the very least, and possibly even very good ones. I doubt they have much in common with the Kays from the 70s aside from how they look, which as other people have detailed, is probably just for nostalgia purposes. Lots of aging rockers with fat salaries who might've learned on those guitars a few decades ago!
You may wondering how these chord shapes has been constructed. For now, you just need to know that a chord is based on the notes of a simple scale, which has 7 notes, and you finish on the original note, one octave up, for a total of 8 notes. A basic Major chord is made up of the 1st note in the scale of whatever key you are playing in, also called the root note, the 3th note, and the 5th note. We’ll get into that later, when we talk more about scales.
i think i have the exact same guitar as you do daniel. it's the same red into black faded with one pickup and no serial number tho. i'm looking everywhere for the exact model info etc. but i can't seem to find it either. i got it free froma guy i know and i had to replace the tuning heads, the strings and some of the ground wiring but now it's doing great. i love it. it has a really good sound for being so old!
The material in the neck and fretboard also matters. Some guitars have both neck and fretboard in maple, and they will typically have a bright and open sound. Rosewood has traditionally been used for fretboards, usually combined with a maple neck, because it is a hardy and oily wood that can stand up to extensive human contact. Rosewood will give a darker tone than maple alone.
Telecaster is the original solid body guitar. Ever since this iconic model has only grown in popularity. This Tele we look it at here is a bit different. It comes packing an H/S/S pickup configuration, which you don’t see that often on these guitars. With that said, it feels and sounds awesome. I had it setup with a vintage Marshall Plexi and the sound was just impressive. There’s definitely more tonal range than you get in a standard Telecaster.
The company’s reputation and output continued to grow. Forays into mandolinmaking in the late 1890s and ukulele making in the 1920s greatly contributed to their expansion, and by 1928 they were making over 5000 instruments per year. The company remained family-owned and employed a relatively small number of highly trained craftsmen making instruments primarily by hand. By the early 1960s Martin guitars were back-ordered by as much as three years due to limited production capacity. In 1964, Martin opened a new plant that is still the primary Martin production facility.

In 2003,[73] Gibson debuted its Ethernet-based[74] audio protocol, MaGIC, which it developed in partnership with 3COM, Advanced Micro Devices, and Xilinx.[73] Replacing traditional analog hook-ups with a digital connection that would, "...satisfy the unique requirements of live audio performances," may have been the goal of this project.[74] This system may require a special pickup,[73] but cabling is provided by a standard Cat-5 ethernet cable.[73][74]

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Now that you have made it through, if you chose to build a guitar, you are probably going to want to make more. Hopefully some of the info as well as links I have provided has helped to get you started in the right direction. Guitar building is fun and chalenging at the same time, and if your like me you will always want to improve your skills and find something else to try out on your next project. I have added some pictures of some of the guitars that I have made down at the bottom so you can see my progression. So here's to having fun and building a piece of art that you don't just have to look at. Though they do look good hung on a wall!
Awesome and amazing are just two of the many favorable adjectives that are used to describe the Orange Micro Dark. Most users find its tone to be convincingly tube like, while others are very impressed with its volume, considering its portable profile. A lot of users also appreciate its ease of use, and it also helps that it looks really good. Bobby Cannon of Guitar Player magazine describes it as "more than capable of delivering all the vicious tones you can dial in, and there’s no shame in going for a super-light amp that does the job..."

Read Full Review Here is another superstrat design electric guitar on the list that is well recommended for a budding guitarist. While for veteran player’s out there who is on a hunt of buying an all around electric guitar on a minimum prescribe budget. The ESP LTD M-10 could be that affordable gem of a guitar you’ve been looking for and always wanted.

Description: Body: Basswood (Tilia, Linden, Lime) - Body Construction: Solid - Neck Attachment: Bolt - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 24 - Inlay: Pearl - Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Bridge: Double Locking - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Black, 5-Way Switch - Pickups: Alnico Humbucker - String Instrument Finish: Pearl White, Pearl Black
The components are adequate. The electronics are good, have good tolerances, but the off board components are cheap and flimsy. The hardware is quite good, especially the enclosure. The PCB is well designed and well labeled. The big problem is that the layout instructions are quite poor and mislabeled in a number of places. There is no bill of materials so the components can be quite difficult to distinguish even when they're labeled. Additionally, product only includes one color of wire and does not include digital instructions as indicated in the product description.
About a year ago (or maybe more) I was in a real Marc Bolan/T Rex phase, and I came across a Lotus Les Paul copy in my local Sam Ash used for $199. Like the idiot I am, I played it, and it played and sounded good, so I bought it. Well, that did not sit well with my folks, who made me take it back a few days later. It had a bolt-on neck and was quite heavy, but other than that, it looked sweet. I even was smart enough to take a picture of it:
It wouldn't be called a tribute if it didn't follow convention, so having a mahogany body with an arched maple top is expected. Epiphone also designed the neck to mimic the playability of old LPs, giving this guitar a 1960s SlimTaper D profile. However, what makes the Epiphone Les Paul Tribute Plus stand out is the use of two Gibson USA '57 Classic humbucking pickups, which essentially gives this Les Paul a more premium Gibson voice, at a fraction of the price.
With 20 watts of rated power and an 8-inch speaker, the Champion 20’s sound output capability is a little above average for this class of amplifier. Those who like the features but need more power can check out the 40-watt version with a 12-inch speaker, the Champion 40, which costs twice as much but should be powerful enough for most jam sessions and gigs. The Champion 20 also includes a 3.5 mm line input for connecting a smartphone (good when you want to play along with recorded music or a music instruction app) and a 3.5 mm headphone output.
Epiphone features all-metal rock solid hardware on all of its instruments. The Les Paul Special VE comes standard with the legendary Locktone Tune-o-matic bridge and Stopbar tailpiece for easy set up. Tuning is fast and reliable with Epiphone Premium Covered tuners with a 14:1 ratio.The higher the ratio, the more accurate your tuning. The tuners are mounted on an Epiphone Clipped Ear headstock with Les Paul Model in gold and the Epiphone log in silver. In addition, a "2016" Edition logo is on the back of the headstock. 

A variation on Drop E, A with the G flattened one half step to F♯; this tuning is identical to 6-string Drop A, with two E strings added: one above, and one below. Like Drop E, A; this tuning allows easy fingering on the E since it is a standard fourth interval below the A. It also provides three high strings a fourth apart instead of the usual two. The tuning is used by Infant Annihilator on their album The Elysian Grandeval Galèriarch. A 7-string variation of the tuning without the high E (E-A-E-A-D-F♯-B) was used on their previous album The Palpable Leprosy of Pollution and is used by Enterprise Earth/Delusions of Grandeur guitarist Gabe Mangold.
I like the difference in character of some of the amp distortions, then you get the tome knobs of the amp, different speaker emulations with tone controls and the graphic eq. So there is a lot you can do to get the right tone. My complaint on that is that the "mixer" mode cuts the highs (since there is no amp to do so) cuts thee highs too much. If you go flat with the graphic EQ the amp emulations are always a little too dark.
At least five sunburst hollowbodies were offered in ’61, the PE-7, PE-8, PE-13, PE-14 and PE-51. These appear to have glued-in necks, by the way, with the open-book head, circular sticker logo and rectangular metal-covered pickups. The PE-7 was a non-cutaway thinline with dots, a single neck pickup, elevated pickguard, a fancy lyre trapeze tailpiece and volume and tone controls mounted on the lower bout. ’60s Bizarre Guitars shows a ca. ’61 PE-8 with a single black-plastic-covered pickup with Teisco printed on the top, small strip inlays, wooden pickguard, a fancy harp tailpiece and volume and tone mounted on the lower bout. The following year this model would have two pickups, so whether this is typical or not is unknown. The PE-13 and PE-14 were single-rounded-cutaway archtops, the difference being in finish, the former being blonde and the latter sunburst. Both these were full-bodied jazz guitars, with the small block inlays, twin pickups, chicken beak selectors, elevated ‘guards and two volumes and two tones mounted on the lower bout. Some of these carried fancy Gibson Johnny Smith trapeze tails. The PE-51 was a twin pickup, single-rounded-cutaway thinline archtop, with a chicken beak selector, ordinary trapeze tail and one volume and tone on the lower bout.

1. striking the string creates the vibration and once it disrupts the magnetic field on the pickup that's it - how about when you don't strike the string at all, like when you tap on the body of the guitar? The vibrating wood imparts vibration on the strings, which in turn do their thing on the pickup. The body of the guitar, the nut, the bridge, every part of the guitar is now directly influencing the sound you hear out of the pickup. Remember, only the magnetic field disturbance is being amplified, and tapping the guitar has started the strings vibrating. How can that happen without the wood's tonal qualities affecting the waveform?
As an aside, people talk about “gold foil” like it’s some sort of rare mineral!  I see auctions all the time dropping words like “GOLD FOIL” pickups, and “As played by Ry Cooder!!!”  So far, I’ve identified 12 different kinds of pickups that had gold foil somewhere on them, and many of them are made differently!  What’s the point?  Don’t buy the hype!!  You have to play these guitars, or check out our videos to get an idea pertaining to sound.  Poor Ry Cooder gets attached to every darn gold foiled guitar ever made, geesh!  And I don’t even know who Ry Cooder is!
by pedalhaven Black & white board from  @alexjacob_ ! Here’s the signal chain: Boss TU-3 Chromatic Tuner EarthQuaker Devices Palisades Boss NS-2 Noise Suppressor Hotone Nano Legacy BritWind (Effects Loop) Boss NS-2 Noise Suppressor Joyo D-SEED Digital Delay TC Electronic Arena Reverb Don't forget to DM/Tag us to submit your photos! ▪️ ▪️ ▪️ ▪️ ▪️  #pedalhaven   #pedalboard   #guitarpedals   #knowyourtone   #ambienttones   #pedalboards   #pedalnerds   #pedalporn   #guitar   #gearporn   #gearnerds   #pedalboardpeople   #shoegaze   #geartalk   #guitarsdaily   #gottone   #tonefordays   #guitargear   #reverb   #gearpost   #boardshot 

The roots of the Supro story go back to the ’20s and the sometimes tempestuous relationship between Czech immigrant/instrument repairman/inventor John Dopyera and dapper Vaudeville musician George Beauchamp (pronounced “Beech-um”). Both were searching for the guitar’s holy grail of the era, more volume. Disagreement, and some animosity, has always surrounded the account of just who was responsible for what, but Dopyera ended up building an ampliphonic or self-amplifying guitar (or “resonator” to most guitar buffs) for Beauchamp. John applied for a patent on his tricone design on April 9, 1927, obtaining it on December 31, 1929.
Being one of the reputed organizations, operating in this domain, we are engaged in manufacturing and supplying a quality range of Gigmaker Electric Guitar. We only use high grade components and latest technology while designing these guitars. The offered range is widely appreciated all over the nation for its salient attributes. With our quality range, we
Reverb effects are another staple in the toolbox of guitarists across all genres. Just like how delay effects produce a sense of depth and space, reverb effects provide the same ability, but with a different approach. Frequently, especially in modern music, reverb effects are so subtle that it’s hard to even notice that they are there. It’s only when they are removed do we realize that suddenly the sound has become too “close” sounding.
The pickups on an electric guitar can only pick up the vibrations of the string and convert those vibrations into electricity, which is ultimately converted into sound waves that emanate from the speakers. Do the pickups shape the sound? Of course! Can pickups mask the characteristics and make two electric guitars with different tonewoods sound the same? Yes again. So, I guess the correct answer to the question if wood makes a difference in the sound of an electric guitar is “It depends”. A pickup that can’t pick up these subtle overtone differences, enough compression, or other kinds of dynamics-killing processing, will kill the dynamics of any guitar, regardless of tonewood. Does that make it a bad guitar? Not necessarily – it depends on what the musician is after.

Why the Ultra Hard Bodies flopped is a mystery, since they certainly fit with the superstrat rage of the times, but they hung around for only a year or so. According to Walter Carter, Ovation briefly contracted for a shipment of solidbodies made by a Japanese manufacturer. No information is available about these, but it doesn’t really matter since only one carton of 100 or so guitars ever came in. If you find an animal that doesn’t fit the descriptions here, take a picture and let us know about it.
The solid state amp isn’t really new either, but it only came into its own following William Shockley’s world-changing invention, the transistor. Its use for the audio circuitry allows the amp to be more adaptable and easier to tune, but despite innovations in recent years, the overdrive of solid state amps isn’t yet on par with what a tube can offer, and only a few manufacturers can boast of products that come close to sounding as clean as a tube amp.

You've bought most ANY new guitar that sells for less than about 700-bucks.  Seriously.  These days there are LOTS of really decent guitars out there in the $300-$500 price range.  Guitars designed well (and by that I mean ripped-off from Leo Fender), with bodies and necks that have been cut precisely by high-end CNC machines, decent hardware, and again a nice CNC-finish on the frets and good-looking automated paint jobs.  All in all, a guitar that plays well, intonates and stays in tune well, and looks great.  But ... sounds mediocre!  Yep, ALL manufacturers skimp on the pickups today, at least on any guitar less that about  $700-$1000.  Great guitar with midlin pickups?  Yea, fix that!

A selection of makers within the high-end, hand-built crowd of today do offer variations on the opamp-based template discussed above. Blackstone Appliances bases its Mosfet Overdrive on a discrete transistorized circuit centered around, yes, mosfets, and Klon’s Centaur pedal uses… well, who the hell knows? They cover the entire circuit board in epoxy goop to keep the cloners at bay, but this expensive overdrive certainly sounds different. Other popular boutique overdrives are found in the Barber Electronics LTD pedal, the Crowther Audio Hot Cake, and the Fulltone OCD.
But there are two things in which latency matter. Latency is time. Every digital thing ever adds latency. If you’re a well trained musician or studio rat, you can hear about a millisecond of latency if you’re listening closely. You won’t likely be bothered by 1ms latency, but 10ms might be a bit of an issue, and 100ms makes some things completely unworkable.
The first to go are the ultra-highs, and the lower the value of the pot, the greater the amount of signal that can escape to ground. This is why 500K pots keep your sound brighter than 250K: their higher resistance won't allow as much of the signal to bleed off. And a 1Meg-ohm pot has such high resistance that when wide open it sounds almost like having no control pot there at all.
The V40 expands the elusive low-to-medium gain range, putting a wide spectrum of subtly shifting overdrive textures under your fingers. There are rotary controls for gain, EQ and master volume. The real fun starts with a two-position voice switch, which subtly changes the V40's character. Voice 1 is centred more on the early 60s 'blackface' tone; Voice 2 is edgier and a touch more aggressive, evoking the tweed amps of the 1950s. A small toggle switch called 'mid kick' adds a touch of extra gain in the midrange, not least to give weedy single coils a lift for solos. There's also a digital reverb with a front-panel level control and on/off switch. Then there's the standby switch, which has two 'on' positions for high power (approximately 40 watts) and low power (seven watts). This switch also works in the V40's single-ended mode, offering a choice of around 1.5 watts in the high-power position and 0.5 watts in the low-power setting. The V40's sonic palette made us sit up and take notice. By reducing the gain, all the mildly overdriven and chime effects normally squeezed into a fraction of the gain knob's travel now occupy the whole range. The V40 Duchess is a unique design - many of its competitors feature high-gain lead channels, teamed with high headroom and often uninspiring clean channels. By focusing on those often-overlooked but highly effective low-to-medium overdrive sounds, the V40 has effectively carved out its own niche, and looks set to become popular for blues, roots, jazz and country players.
Description: Body: Maple - Body Construction: Semi-Hollow (Chambered) - Top Wood: Spruce - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Block - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24" (61cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Adjustable - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Chrome, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch, Kluson Tuners - Pickups: Harmony - String Instrument Finish: Natural

Otherwise, while the manufacturer is considerably shy when releasing specs regarding this product, customer reviews can give us a good idea of how well it performs under real-life circumstances. In brief, it performs well, particularly so for country music and slow rock, especially when paired with a couple more 12” speakers on top of the ones that are already integrated into its chassis.    

Pickup(s) 3 or 2 single-coils, with the latter having a hot humbucker in the bridge position,[1] with the exception of the Acoustasonic Strat and Stratacoustic models, the only acoustic Stratocasters.[1]Most Stratocasters generally came with a pickguard; on certain high-end versions, the pickguard is absent. There are also select models that come with active electronics and HSH, HHH, HH or Hpickup configurations.Humbucker-equipped Strats are often referred to as “Fat Strats”, in reference to the fact that humbucking pickups usually tend to have more bass in the output signal than single coils, thus making the sound “fatter”.
But if you never play with a tone as dark as the fully-rolled off sound, you might consider a lower-value cap. The next example is an .033μ (also know as 33n and 333), another popular choice, followed by the smaller .022μ (also know as 22n and 223), and the even smaller .01μ (also know as 10n and 103). As the cap gets smaller, the minimum tone knob settings gets less dark. As the overall range of the tone pot decreases, it may be easier to locate any desired “nooks and crannies” between the highest and lowest settings.
Which got me to thinking about the history of American guitar companies. Many famous brands of guitars which started production here in the USA now exist as a name being used by an unrelated company for importing guitars into this country. Other brands are still being made but ownership has passed to one of a few big guitar companies. It’s difficult to trace this history without a “score card”.

Similar to five-string bass guitar tuning, seven-string tuning allows for the extra string a fourth lower than the original sixth string. This allows for the note range of B standard tuning without transposing E standard guitar chords down two and a half steps down. Baritone 7-string guitars are available which features a longer scale-length allowing it to be tuned to a lower range.
Tone pots are similar to volume pots except they are wired in such a way as to only increase resistance on the high-end allowing the low-end signal to pass through unheeded. As you increase or decrease the amount of high end by adjusting your tone knob, your tone changes accordingly. Tone pots can be better thought of as filters, they filter high-end frequencies that ultimately affect your overall tone.
Reverb is one of the earliest effects for guitar players, originally built into the amp itself like the Fender Deluxe Reverb and Super Reverb. Traditional spring reverbs actually send the guitar signal into the springs causing them to vibrate and simulating reverb. With the advent of digital technology reverb units pedals made their way onto the market but mostly as rack units, but as technology improved and shrank many of those units can fit into a pedal now.
Were its fate left to the Electric Storms, Ovation may never have made it out of the ’60s. However, the breakthrough occurred when the company picked up the endorsement of pop star Glen Campbell, who began his career as a session guitarist and folk singer, at one point touring behind Ricky Nelson. In ’65 he was a member of the Beach Boys, but by the late ’60s he had broken through to be an enormously popular balladeer with country-tinged hits like “By the Time I Get to Phoenix” and “Wichita Lineman.”
Scott Baxendale has been building custom hand made guitars since 1974. Recently he settled in Athens Georgia where he is currently building custom guitars, restoring vintage guitars and teaching the art of lutherie to aspiring craftsman. Scott Baxendale’s legacy of building custom instruments began in 1974, when he arrived in Winfield, Kansas to work for […]
In general, the typical situation is that HSH gives me options of cleaner/thinner/clearer tones which aren't as achievable with HH (even with volume and tone pots in use!). These are options I use very frequently, and I'd feel pretty restricted with HH! Though of course, this isn't the case for everyone. Indeed, I'm quite fascinated at the variety of tones Ron Thal and Andy Timmons get from the overly-simple SH set up they prefer!

This is sort of a corollary to the DI+Amp suggestion. While effects on bass aren’t as common as with guitar parts, some bassists will come in with these big rigs of effect boxes, and want to record “their sound”, which often is clearly overprocessed for the song. Rather than argue the point, let the player hear the sound he’s used to during tracking, but be sure to also grab a nice clean signal, prior to all the effects, usually straight off the bass via a DI. That way, if your concerns prove all too true come mixdown, you can turn to the dry track, and recreate those favored effects to a more appropriate degree, with studio tools. Even if the effected bass sounds good to you, many pedals and MI effect boxes are noisy, and you might have to recreate the sound anyway, to avoid problematic buzz or hiss from the player’s cool-but-dirty toys.
The Effie was also joined by the Coily U1825 guitar and U1835 bass. These were essentially the same except the Coily guitar had a Bigsby-style vibrato, roller bridge with flip-up mute, and a pair of chrome-covered screw-and-staple humbuckers, typical of early-’70s Arias. The Coily bass had similar four-pole screw-and-staple pickups and a fancy trapeze tail with a diamond design on it. These were available in orange sunburst, red and jade green. The guitar cost $122.50, the bass $135.
The very first production electric guitar was the Stromberg Electro, developed by Hank Kuhrmeyer and introduced in 1928. It was pretty much a kludge. It was an acoustic guitar with a magnetic pickup fitted to the soundboard... Stromberg/Kay Instruments made a resonator version of this, too. The weight of the pickup, though, destroyed the guitar's soundboard over time.
“What’s the best multi-effects pedal?” is a question that comes up again and again in guitar and bass forums and discussions, and for good reason! There are a lot of multi-effect pedals out there, with prices and features varying drastically from model to model. With multi-effects pedals, it’s a little bit different than something like distortion pedals. With distortion, there might be 50 different manufacturers each making a single distortion pedal. With multi-effects, there are only around 5 major manufacturers (Zoom, Line 6, Boss, DigiTech, TC Electronic), but they each make 10 models of multi-effect pedals. This can make choosing the best one tough for beginners and advanced players alike. Luckily, we’re here to help, and after a ton of research and play testing, we’ll help you decide what the best multi-effects pedals on the market are, no matter your budget and needs.
Some more advanced models, like the Wampler Latitude Tremolo Deluxe, bring a much more complex set of features, which include choosing the waveform and more. Whether you are looking for a good way to spice up your tone without impacting the nature of your signal, or you are just in need of a great vintage style effect, tremolo is the one to go for.
I’ve been keeping track of completed Ebay sales since I started looking at Kents, and have come up with a few average sale prices. The way I figure an average is by first tossing out the highest and lowest sales. If I am left with fewer than three sales I don’t bother. That’s too small a sampling to be worthwhile, otherwise I take the average of the rest. The table below will only be updated when there is a sale that results in a change, so if the table looks like it might be dated, it’s probably because there haven’t been any sales that affected the numbers. Availability of Kent guitars on Ebay seems to ebb and flow.
Distortion and overdrive: In the early days of electronic music, vacuum tube amplifiers were used for processing the output electrical signals. Like any amplifier, these tube amplifiers had a maximum amplification above which they began to clip the peaks of the waveforms. While the resulting distortion may have disturbed the electrical engineers, a substantial fraction of the musicians liked the distorted sound and it became part of the musical medium.
Whether you call us Guitar Center Forth Worth or GC Cowtown, it's all the same to us! One way or the other, we'll be sure to send a smile and a big Texas "Howdy!" your way when you walk in the front door. Conveniently located on South Hulen Street, we're just a stone's throw from Hulen Mall, near the Chisholm Trail and I-20 interchange. Turn in when you see Chili's, and get ready to experience the down-home vibe that's been growing our community of regular customers since our grand opening back in 2004.First and foremost at Guitar Center Fort Worth, we strive to give you the experience that Guitar Center is known for nationwide: big-store selection and prices with small-shop expertise and personality. From sales to repairs, our staff in each department is well-trained to cater to Dallas/Fort Worth area music-lovers. Our store is open every day of the week, so there's always a right time to visit even if you're on a busy schedule.
Heres a few no one has brought up … very under rated or possibly not well enough known …. Jeff Beck , Steve Vai , BucketHead , Ry Cooder , Eric Johnson ,Gary Moore , Ritchie Blackmore , Andy Summers ,John Petrucci ,Vivian Campbell , Paul Gilbert , Uli John Roth ,Robert Fripp ,Akira Takasaki ,Steve Howe ,MICHAEL ANGELO BATIO ,CHRIS IMPELLITTERI ,ZAKK WYLDE , Vinnie Vincent , Stevie Stevens , and my choice for best overall would definetely be Randy Rhoads…

Of course you can use a pair of headphones and any number of other devices to listen to your playing - many of them will produce pleasing tones from your instrument, and even let it sound similar to what you heard playing through the amp - but without the physical interaction between the guitar and the amp, that constant feedback tone that you heard and felt will not be possible. If, instead of playing through headphones you play through a PA system, or studio monitors, or even the stereo speakers on a computer, you can regain some of that real, physical feedback, but it will be different. And every amp brings in different tones, different kinds of feedback and fuzz and distortion.

The downside is you do pay a considerable sum for the pleasure! Still, the playability, comfort and tone on offer from is exceptional – as we highlight in the complete Taylor A12e review. It sports a Grand Concert body made from solid Sitka spruce on the top, with laminate sapele back and sides, along with a mahogany armrest for optimal ergonomics.
Swank spent more than 25 years perfecting his skills at various guitar shops across the DFW area, including Charley's Guitar Shop in Dallas, before striking out on his own. He's repaired Andy Timmons' guitar, Ray Wylie Hubbard's and Eric Clapton's. But Clapton's repair made a significant impact. "It's kind of funny story," he says. "His technician wanted to go shoot guns -- they're English and don't get to shoot guns in their country -- so they dumped these two guitars off on me." It didn't take him long, and he soon found himself carrying them back to Clapton's rehearsal. "It was kind of weird seeing all of these pale English guys sitting around eating barbecue and passing around Colt .45s." But Clapton allowed him to stay and watch him rehearse. It's a blessing few guitar masters receive.
Teisco produced guitars that were sold in the U.S. as Teisco del Rey as well as Silvertone, Beltone, Duke, Decca, Heit Deluxe, Jedson, Kimberly, Kingston, Lyle, Norma, Tulio and World Teisco, as well as some of the early Kents. At various times Teisco guitars were made for and sold under the now well-known Ibanez name. They have developed somewhat of a cult following in the U.S. which has resulted in some unrealistic prices for some models.
Most commonly associated with classic rock, the Les Paul lives up to its reputation as a rock ‘n’ roll machine. However, the guitar is actually capable of a lot more. Something many don’t recognize about the Les Paul is that in the right situations it actually has a gorgeous clean tone. Les Paul, the famed inventor and namesake of the Gibson Les Paul, used the Les Paul extensively in his career. The famed jazz guitarist did go on to use a highly modified version of the Gibson Les Paul, but he did use the original variant of the instrument when it was initially released. Bob Marley also used a Les Paul to great effect.
The Tone knob is basically a filter to cut highs. And, once again, the pickup will sound best when turning it all the way up. With the ever-growing amount of effects amps have to offer and those available in pedal format, we often forget that this setting even exists. This basic control allows you to, for example, smoothen a jazzy sound or choke a way-too-shrilling fuzz, or anything else in that line that comes to your mind. Only your ears can tell if the sound is convincing or not!
About 30 years ago, a fellow co-worker began teaching me how to play electric guitar. I believe it was an Aria Pro Strat. He had been playing for 20 plus years at this time and was a very good teacher, he owned a 1958 Les Paul. I have not played since he was in a car wreck in 1990 as he could not return to work. He was however able to continue to play, its just our schedules never allowed the time to take lessons. He passed away in 2011, and since I retired last year, I’d like to take up lessons. I found your article very helpful in selecting an electric guitar. It mentions a lot of things most people do not consider when buying.

The M5 is extremely portable and pedalboard-friendly, measuring about 6 inches wide and tall. The construction is absolutely first rate with a heavy-duty all-metal chassis and footswitches. Line 6 absolutely does not skimp on build quality with this one. It’s also found on lots of pedalboards of pro players that we’ll talk about shortly, which speaks to it’s durability and quality. In terms of interface, it’s actually quite a simple pedal, as you can see in closeup photos of it. The inputs and outputs are rather simple. ¼” stereo in, ¼” stereo out, an expression pedal input, and an input for a 9V power supply (which comes included with it). On top of the unit you have 2 main footswitches (which not only turn an effect on and off, they are also used to scroll up and down), a small screen in the upper left corner, and 6 knobs to control different parameters of whatever effect you have selected. It does not have USB capability, balanced XLR outputs, or any of the other fancy I/O from larger multi-effects units. But then again, for its purpose it doesn’t really need all that. The M5 is intuitive, nice, and simple.


2. Pickup Setup: I'd like to see you add a section on this. Pickups should be lowered out of the way before any setup. If they're too high, the strings could hit them and cause buzzing. After everything all other setup steps are completed, the pickups should be raised to the proper position. One online video claiming to post Gibson specs says that the Low E should be 6/64" above the pickups, and that the High E should be 4/64".
That's right. It's neck first, then bridge height, then intonation (at least the way I do it). Nut height can be taken out of the equation by putting a capo on the first fret, so it can be sorted out later if there are any problems with it. Of course if you were to put a capo on the first fret, you'd need to compare that with the 13th fret when setting up the intonation.
A volume pedal is ideal for those guitarists out there who like to use volume swells or fade-ins, and those who don’t want to have to use the volume pot on their guitar to do so! All you do is apply pressure on the front or back of the pedal to get the desired effect and you’re good to go! They’re super simple to use and only change the signal rather than the tone of your guitar or bass.
On paper it looks fantastic for the money, but having Google'd it I found some people were less than happy with the fit & finish. But I value the opinions of my fellow MLP'ers a bit more than those found on some other forums so I'd like to hear what you all think. Aside from the electronics, which I'd replace, how is the quality of this instrument? Is it as good as the singlecut models?

The Martin D-28 is a modern recreation of the dreadnoughts that came from Martin's "golden era", which falls between 1930 to 1940. Since vintage D-28 specimens that were built in the '30s were being sold for more than 30 grand, the company decided to give today's guitarists a chance to own one at a more reasonable price point. Carrying with it the same premium all-solid build that include a solid Sitka spruce top, solid east Indian rosewood back and sides, solid mahogany neck and solid ebony fretboard - you can expect this acoustic guitar to sound as Martin-y as possible.
Swan7 offers the best quality guitars for most musicians. Based in Brooklyn, New York, Swan7 provides superior quality musical instruments for the music lovers. They are specially recognized due to their durability, reliability, and affordability. Hence, no matter if you are looking for a budget-friendly choice, or are yearning to buy an expensive model, Swan7 will satisfy your thirst for the best guitar.
Ribbon mics exhibit a figure-of-eight pickup pattern. One useful close-mike application for achieving heavy rock sounds involves a ribbon mic (or large-diaphragm condenser set to a figure-of-eight pattern) aimed toward the center of the speaker, with a cardioid dynamic mic angled next to it at roughly 90°, aimed off-center, with the capsules almost touching. Record the mics on separate tracks, and with proper balancing the sound should be powerful and frequency-rich.
Description: Body: Maple - Flamed - Body Construction: Semi-Hollow (Chambered) - Top Wood: Spruce - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Block - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25" (64cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Adjustable - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Chrome, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch, Kluson Tuners - Pickups: Harmony - String Instrument Finish: Natural, Sunburst

Normal people define cool as laid-back, excellent or highly skilled, but most guitarists define cool as Jimmy Page circa 1975 in a black velvet bellbottom suit decorated with embroidered dragons, playing a Les Paul slung down to his knees. As the musical mastermind behind Led Zeppelin, one of the greatest rock bands of all time, Page elevated the guitar riff to an art form, crafting orchestrated overdubbed parts that bludgeoned listeners like the hammer of the gods.
First, plug your guitar in and toggle all the switches and knobs. If your guitar still plays fine, the connection problem is internal. Second, for non-Stratocaster style guitars, remove the cavity covers on the back of the guitar. Strum the strings and move the wires that are soldered to the switches, pots, and output jack. You will probably find your loose connection when the guitar cuts out again. For Stratocaster style guitars, you will need to remove the pickguard and manually check each connection point to make sure the solders are solid. Third, re-solder the loose wire and screw the cavity covers or pickguard back on. For more information about how to solder wiring, see the soldering page.
Two ways. The most important is: practice. But the other way is technique. Proper fingering. Some chords have multiple ways they can be fingered, and you always want to pick the easiest. Now, some fingerings may not *seem* the easiest, just because they aren't the ones you already know, but in the long run, they are worth learning because they really do make things easier. In particular, most people play an open A chord the wrong way, but the proper fingering makes it easier.. The essense of fingering is laziness: you want to move your hand and fingers as little as possible. So in particular, if you have a finger down in one chord that's already in the right place for the next chord, you want to just *leave* it there. Don't pick it up, only to place it back down in the same place. And if you can use a fingering that *let's* you just leave it there, then that's clearly the choice!. So let's look at the open A chord. Most people play it with their 1st finger on the 4th string, 2nd finger on the 3rd string, and 3rd finger on the 2nd string, three-in-a-row. But that's a weak fingering (however popular it is). The better fingering is like this: 1st finger on the *3rd* string, 2nd finger on the 4th string, 3rd finger on the 2nd string. It may *look* a little awkward, and feel awkward until you learn it. But it really is the better fingering.. Why? Because consider the context of an A chord. What chords are you most likely to want to go to from an A? The biggest answer would probably be D. Well, notice, if you finger the A chord as I recommend, your first finger is now already in the right place for the D chord, and can just be left there! You only have to move two fingers, instead of all three, to switch between the two. This lets you do it faster and smoother. The other chord you'd be likely to want to go to from an A would be an E, and, while we don't have any fingers exactly in the right place, we at least already have the 1st finger on the 3rd string, like we want it for an E; we just have to slide it back one fret. This is still easier than entirely re-arranging all three fingers. Finally, more rarely, you might want to go between A and Amaj7. For instance, the old Beatles song "Mother Nature's Son" uses the sequence A Amaj7 A7. This is perfect for this fingering! You just slide your first finger back one fret to make the Amaj7, then take it off entirely to do the A7.. Similarly, a G chord normally be fingered using your 2nd, 3rd, and 4th fingers, instead of your 1st, 2nd, and 3rd. This makes it much easier to go to C, the most likely chord for you to be going to.. But no fingering rule is absolute, it's always contextual. If you have a song which requires you to move to something more unusual, and a different fingering would make that particular move easier, then use the different fingering. For instance, if I had something which required that I add an A note to the top of my G chord, then I might well use the common 1-2-3 fingering for the G chord, so that I'd leave my pinkie free to reach the A note.

Squier Affinity Stratocaster has all the same features of the Fender Stratocaster guitar at a highly affordable price. It has a maple neck and an alder body which gives it a snappy Strat tone. It also has three single-coil pickups that can be manipulated by a 5-way switch. A vintage style tremolo system makes it a great choice for those who like that system.

I've recently seen Mayer, the Chili Peppers, Clapton, and Neil in concert and had an amazing time at three of those shows. Mayer was just bad, I like his blues tracks but the show was not worth it. The Chili Peppers on the other hand were outstanding – but they just didn't compare to watching Clapton and Neil burn the house down. That's one of the reasons I always feel like Tom Petty gets missed out – he might not play the fastest or most intricate tunes, but damned if he hasn't written a ton of iconic songs.


Octave effects take the input signal and produce synthesized tones that are one or more octaves above or below it. They can be blended in with the input signal to harmonize with it in real time. The effect can be synthesized by monitoring the waveform of the input and multiplying or dividing the observed frequency by, for example, 2 (to go up or down an octave) or 4 (to go up or down two octaves). This takes advantage of the fact that tones that are an octave apart have a 2:1 frequency relationship; the frequency of the tone one octave higher than a root tone is always double the frequency of the root tone.
I can give my own story as why I decided to go direct at shows when the band I am in uses our own PA. In a 5 piece band, with dense guitar, a busy keyboardist/organist, a 5 string bass, 3 vocalists and a cymbal-happy drummer, things were getting loud onstage. Our singer would have the monitors close to feedback all night (and it would feedback several times in the night). Live recordings, both in the room, or miked on TV or radio were a mess of frequencies, since setup times were quick, and we hoped for the best. My amp, a Mesa/Boogie with 6v6s & EL84s sounded amazing. But everyone said they couldn’t hear the vocals. When we listened back, we heard what everyone else (didn’t hear). We were a sonic mess. We tried clearing it up with EQs and amp placement. It sounded clearer onstage, but microphone leakage and feedback were still a problem, and the band had internal ‘volume wars’ with each other. Truth is, we didn’t always have a great soundperson. We were carrying a lot of gear. The venues we played and the sizes of the stages and audiences varied wildly. After several poor sounding gigs that left my ears ringing (even with earplugs), I started investigating. The first decision was to go with IEMs. This would eliminate the bulky monitors (with 1 poorly placed handle, mind you) and stop the feedback problems. It would free up stage space. The next problem was realizing that the amps onstage easily could overpower the IEMs that were directed right in our ears. So I came to the conclusion that the only way past this problem was to get rid of all of the amps. 
If your guitar is your personality, your amp is your voice. Together, they join forces to deliver your sound. Choosing the right amp ensures the audience hears each note, chord, bend, and trill-just the way you intended. From the compact convenience of a combo amp to the iconic stack to the bone-crushing fury of a wall of cabinets, your new amp is in stock and ready to ship at AMS. Read more
Charles Kaman put a team of employees to work on inventing a new guitar in 1964.[2][7] For the project, Charlie chose a small team of aerospace engineers and technicians, several of whom were woodworking hobbyists as well. One of these was Charles McDonough, who created the Ovation Adamas model.[8]Kaman founded Ovation Instruments, and in 1965 its engineers and luthiers(guitar makers) worked to improve acoustic guitars by changing their conventional materials. The R&D team spent months building and testing prototype instruments. Their first prototype had a conventional“dreadnought” body, with parallel front and back perpendicular to the sides. The innovation was the use of a thinner, synthetic back, because of its foreseen acoustic properties. Unfortunately, the seam joining the sides to the thin back was prone to breakage. To avoid the problem of a structurally unstable seam, the engineers proposed a synthetic back with a parabolic shape. By mid-1966, they realized that the parabolic shape produced a desirable tone with greater volume than the conventional dreadnought.[9]
Packing almost the entire tonal essence of 80's arena rock n' roll into one bar-shaped unit, with a glassy and transparent, BBD-style chorus, a crushing hot rod Marshall-stack crunch distortion, a natural-sounding delay, and a spacious reverb. Turn on every module on the bar, with a little tweaking, you've got yourself THE EPIC lead tone, which is dynamic, responsive to your hands, with long sustain, and cuts through the mix like a knife through butter. A built-in cab simulator for getting a real guitar cabinet sound straight from the PA system; Max delay time: 500ms It is the ultimate tool for road touring gigs. Aluminum-alloy, metal casing, stable and strong; compact size. Grab it! Plug it! Tweak it! Rock it! LED indicator shows the working state; Power: DC 9V 5.5x2.1mm center negative,.
For a slightly more distant, but fuller sound, bring up the fader on the mid- distance mic. Slowly add that signal to the close sound described in the previous paragraph. You'll have the detail of the close mic, but with the fullness that comes with adding some "room" sound to it (just like sitting in the tenth row). This is a pretty standard approach that will give you a pretty standard rock guitar sound.
I followed with visits to six Los Angeles music stores to play as many guitars as I could (more than 60, including multiple samples of many models), so I could get an idea of what their right-out-of-the-box quality was like and which ones offered the best value. I emerged with a list of the most promising models, and I contacted the manufacturers to request samples. In a couple of cases, I allowed the manufacturers to substitute models that they felt were better suited for this article.

Overdriven speakers create one of the most desirable distortion characteristics: crunch. The best way to test for this is to dial in a clean setting and turn the volume way up. Low-wattage speakers break up at lower volumes, but they have a tendency to turn to mush at excessive volume levels; high-wattage speakers may not break up at all. Choose a speaker that sounds lively, defined and harmonically rich at volume and distortion levels you’ll normally play at.
I inherited a guitar and am looking for any information I can about it. It is a Kent model 533 Videocaster. I have no idea when they were made or what this one might be worth. It is a solid body, but I know next to nothing about guitars so I am not sure what other info might be needed. It needs to be tuned/serviced and possibly needs a little restoration, but otherwise it works and is not in horrible shape. Any info would be appreciated.

FU was non-stop work & fun at the 2014 NAMM Show in Anaheim California! It was great to be back in the southern California sun with 85 degrees while freezing snow and blizzards were happening back east! The fun started with an opening night party with Eddie Van Halen and the launch of several new EVH Guitar models. The rest is just a blur but here are some out-takes to enjoy, For more behind the scenes photos check out our Facebook page!
Electri6ity is frequently compared to Musiclab’s real electric guitar line as they came out around the same time, and while Musiclab delivers better quality in most aspects, you only have one guitar per VST - where Electri6ity has eight. However,  while Electri6ity will give you twice as many guitars for the price, Musiclab continues to update their Real line, now blowing Electri6ity out of the water.
Twelve-string electric guitars feature six pairs of strings, usually with each pair tuned to the same note. The extra E, A, D, and G strings add a note one octave above, and the extra B and E strings are in unison. The pairs of strings are played together as one, so the technique and tuning are the same as a conventional guitar, but they create a much fuller tone, with the additional strings adding a natural chorus effect. They are used almost solely to play harmony and rhythm parts, rather than for guitar solos. They are relatively common in folk rock music. Lead Belly is the folk artist most identified with the twelve-string guitar, usually acoustic with a pickup.
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