They are the most common effect group and are used by almost every guitar player from Stevie Ray Vaughan to Yngwie Malmsteen. Most amplifiers have channels for overdrive or distortion, but having these effects as pedals allows you greater variation in tone and allows you to “push” the cleaner channels of your amp harder, giving a different sound to the overdrive channel.
Here we have another excellent FG160 for your serious consideration the Yamaha FG 160 Acoustic Guitar Made in Japan in the early - mid 70's from Nippon Gakki factory. This example is an early 70's a more RARE version Yamaha FG 160 again this example is the Made In Japan Nippon Gakki and not to be mistaken for the similar Korean version of the FG-160 which is also nice but not the same as these apples/oranges. This example is MADE IN JAPAN and was built well over 35 years ago and was built to very high detailed standards as well as some of the best Exotic grained Honduran Mahogany woods available ( see pics please for that detail ) in that time period to compete with the great Martin and now this Yamaha is quite well aged with beautiful patina of a true vintage instrument and is a true vintage guitar in its own right. This one has the Amber/Tan label and not the Red Label but the golden lable. The frets are very good - original. The guitar has it's natural age and patina with a few expected minor nicks,dings from a well loved and adult respected instrument. This fine example is here and in stock... We upon receiving have remove the strings cleaned and detailed the guitar oil rosewood and polish finish, and this guitar to plays very well and optionally available upgrade if wanted please ask us...may include new bone nut/saddle/ we have several of these old Yamaha's and they are truly amazing instruments very well compared to Martin, Taylor, Gibson for there fine construction and playability with amazing tone for this kind of money... Here s a link to Harmony Central if you care to rehttp://reviews.harmony-central.com/reviews/Guitar/product/Yamaha/FG-160+/10/1 All New pics ... Interested ? ask Thanks . .
The Epiphone Les Paul-100 Electric Guitar is another renowned guitar by the Epiphone Company. This guitar comes with 700T Humbucker pickups and the fretboard of the guitar is made out of rosewood. It has separate tone and volume controls to make it more user-friendly. The body of the Epiphone Les Paul-100 Electric Guitar is made from mahogany but has a maple top. It's thanks to the mahogany body that this guitar produces such a great sound. For a beginner, this instrument is a must-have.

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The Tele is often called a workingman’s instrument for its simplicity.  It also happens to offer tons of tone variants, just like the Strat.  The neck pickup, with its distinctive “lipstick” look, can go from perfect blues tones to jazz, just by rolling back the tone knob.  Danny Gatton was known to take full advantage of the many sounds the Tele could produce, even in one song, by rolling the tone knob to produce the “wah wah” effect that most players achieve through a foot pedal.

While it is well loved for its HD amp models, it also packs quite a lot of effects (over 100!), applying the same HD modeling technology on actual stompboxes to get them to sound as close to the real thing as possible. The amp modeling and effects section together allow for a wide variety of tones, while the deep controls that you have over each amp and effect parameter allows for even more in-between tones, so you can craft your very own sound. The LED rings add to the unit's overall eye candy and improve the already intuitive interface of the unit. It also houses extensive input and output options, including having its very own mic preamp, so you can use it for a variety of instruments and even vocals. Other features include built-in 48-second looping, tuning and compatibility with Line 6' modeling instrument (Variax) and amps.
Artwork: Improved Fender pickups from 1944. 1) A general view of a guitar with the pickup shown in blue and the strings colored orange. 2) An end-on view (looking down from the head toward the bridge) shows one version with a single pickup coil (green) spanning all six strings. 3) Looking from the side, you can see how the strings thread through the pickup coil. 4) In an alternative design, there are six separate pickup coils, one for each string. From US Patent 2,455,575: Pickup Design for Instruments by Clarence Leo Fender and Clayton Orr Kauffman (filed September 26, 1944, issued December 7, 1948). Artwork courtesy of US Patent and Trademark Office.
From top to bottom, this Hummingbird creates a buzz. Whatever your preference in size, colour, tone and playing style, it’s difficult to avoid picking this Cherry Sunburst up. It’s such a simple guitar to play that it’s rare to ever feel like you’re incapable of striking the right chord - especially on a neck that’s just 12” in radius. While the traditionally ornate decoration and blushing finish have been lovingly retained, this modern Montana incarnation offers a discrete LR Baggs Element VTC system for plug-in power. It is unlike many we have seen and produces one of the best sounds we’ve heard from an electric acoustic. Throw in the pleasure of playing such a superb guitar and it’s tough to say anything bad about the Gibson Montana Hummingbird Cherry Sunburst.  
The Marine Band 365 Steve Baker Special (365/28 SBS) possesses the same construction as the original 365, but with low pitched tuning to their natural major keys, available in C, D, G, A, and F. It is named for, and was developed in part by noted harmonicist Steve Baker, who resides in Germany and has contributed to the design of several other Hohner harmonica models, including the Marine Bands Deluxe and Crossover.[18]
Hi Chris. That doesn’t ring any bells I’m afraid. If your customer wants a new scheme I wouldn’t be afraid to replace the stock switch with a standard 5-way and then you know where you are. There’s always a chance that the Vigier switch is doing something funky and it started with slightly different pickup selections so the sound might change with a new standard switch. Obviously make sure you’ve got notes and photos so you can revert back to the stock wiring! Have you tried to buzz out the Vigier switch with a multimeter to see how it works? Alternatively, have you tried touching the pickup magnets with a screwdriver to see which pickups/coils are on in each switch position, that might give you some clues?
Oh but this guitar is beautiful. The PRS SE A50E Angelus is something you would really want to play in front of an audience because of its stunningly good looks and the quality sound it produces. This guitar has a solid Sitka spruce top, figured maple back and sides, mahogany neck, bone nut and saddle as well as ebony fretboard and bridge. It has a distinct and highly playable Angelus Cutaway body shape. The PRS abalone bird inlays on the fretboard are a really nice touch. Yes, it’s a gorgeous, well-built guitar, but that’s not all.
Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Ash - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 5 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Inlay: Pearl - Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Headstock: 6 In-Line - Bridge: Tremolo - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Black - Pickups: Ibanez - String Instrument Finish: Natural Blue
To make it simple, we chose a four-chord song: The Ramones' "Blitzkrieg Bop." At first run-through, the game asked Andrew to play only one note every few seconds. As he successfully hit those, it added more and more until he was playing almost every note. On the next run through, the AI suddenly threw in two-note power chords. Once he mastered those, the game leveled up again, asking him to play every chord of the real guitar track that Johnny Ramone would have played. Finally, we unlocked Master Mode, which challenged us to play the song from memory. Only the measures appeared on the screen—no notes.
• Wound Up: String windings directly affect tone and playability. Round wound strings have more “zing” – sustain, responsiveness and bite. Flat wound strings have a smoother and more consistent tone regardless of attack, which makes them a favorite of jazz players, like the great Gibson ES-350 legend Barney Kessel. Blues guitar kingpin Jimmie Vaughan also uses flat wounds for his vintage tone. And they offer less resistance than round wound strings, so they can be beneficial for rapid, even toned performance and squeak less.

The most basic, original pickup design is a single-coil pickup. It’s composed of a single magnet with fine wire wrapped around it, creating a magnetic field that captures the strings’ vibrations converting them into an electronic signal. Single-coil pickups tend to be bright and crisp sounding. The tone they produce cuts through dense band sounds well, but they are also prone to generating hum and are subject to magnetic interference. Many great artists play guitars equipped with single-coil pickups. Eric Clapton, Stevie Ray Vaughan, John Mayer, Merle Travis and many others are famous for their use of single-coil tone.
For a slightly more distant, but fuller sound, bring up the fader on the mid- distance mic. Slowly add that signal to the close sound described in the previous paragraph. You'll have the detail of the close mic, but with the fullness that comes with adding some "room" sound to it (just like sitting in the tenth row). This is a pretty standard approach that will give you a pretty standard rock guitar sound.
CF Martin & Company was established by Christian Fredrick Martin in 1833, is an American guitar manufacturer. It is highly regarded for its guitars with steel strings. Martin Company is a leading manufacturer of flat top guitars that produce top quality sound. They fabricate classic and retro styles of guitars with varied body type and sizes available in 12, 14, and 15-string styled guitars. Top quality tonewood is used after testing the sounds and vibrations produced within a pattern of a time frame. Choose the strings based on the genre of music and style you will play this guitar. The starting price of an acoustic Martin guitar is 23,000 INR approximately.
The rotary speaker effect is based on an actual rotating speaker system invented by Donald Leslie called the Leslie speaker. It was often paired with a Hammond organ, but in the 60’s guitar players also began using it for the unique tone and effect it gave the guitar. The original Leslie speaker cabinet used a two speaker system with a rotating horn and bass woofer drum. This created a cool, swirling effect where the music seemed to move around the room. Obviously, guitar pedals can only simulate this rotatary effect, which can be enhanced with a stereo amp setup. Of course you could use an actual Leslie speaker (or one of the newer competitors), but costs are high and it requires lugging around an extra speaker cabinet.
What is the best acoustic guitar brand? That's subjective, and often based on a consumer's past experiences with a specific brand. This list includes a vast majority of the most recognizable good acoustic guitar brand names that are currently on the market. This list includes those acoustic guitar brands that consumers might wish to learn more about.
I bought my 10 year old son a digitech RP355 multi effects pedal to use. It's cheap and simple to edit patches for different sounds and you can download patches to get the sound used in some popular songs but the thing I like best about it is the amplifier emulation. After using it for a while my son found he liked the sound of Vox amps so we bought a AC4 and it sounds great. I liked the fender deluxe and bassman amps so I had a deluxe amp circuit built by a local amp guy. Later on you will find that you want to move on to real pedals as they sound better so a multieffects pedal is a good way to sample a lot of different effects in one package. Most multi effect pedals have a sampling function so you can record a short song segment and then the unit will replay it while you solo along. Some also have the ability to record from an outside source and then play it back at slower speed so you can learn tricky licks. Lastly, most units have drum tracks which is a great way to play along and stay on time.
The sound quality is pretty excellent. Relative to the Zoom, Line 6, and Boss multi-effect pedals, the distortion on the DigiTech is surprisingly nice. The reverbs are absolutely gorgeous, which is no surprise given they are Lexicon algorithms. Chorus and delay also sounds great, and the effects’ parameters are easy to set up and adjust using the row of knobs below the display. We also find the noise gate works extremely well at taming any unruly noise issues caused by dirt effects. Overall, we’re impressed at how the RP500 replicates a lot of the “classics.” A quick note on the presets - they are less than stellar, so don’t judge this pedal by them. You’ll have to play with them a little bit to arrive at better, more usable sounds.
Simulators: Simulators enable electric guitars to mimic the sound of other instruments such as acoustic guitar, electric bass and sitar. Pick up simulators used on guitars with single-coil pick ups replicate the sound of guitars with humbucker pick ups, or vice versa. A de-fretter is a bass guitar effect that simulates the sound of a fretless bass. The effect uses an envelope-controlled filter and voltage-controlled amplifier to "soften" a note's attack both in volume and timbre.[97]

It’s yet another Hal Leonard book (that guy really wanted you to learn to play), with the same audio perks as the guide above. This guide is perhaps a little over the head of most beginners, but if you grapple with it early, the rewards could be considerable. Fourteen scales across 96 pages means this isn’t an enormous volume of information to digest, so give it a whirl.
Designed by Todd Langner (who also engineered the ADA MP-1), the Langner DCP-1 possesses somewhat of an infamous reputation. Very few know about it, but everyone who does, swears by it’s greatness. Built with much of the same blueprint as the Bogner Fish, the Langner features two independent channels with fully adjustable boost functions. Using five 12ax7a tubes, it’ll produce the glassiest cleans to the highest of high gain tones. Presets can be front panel selected or footswitched. If you’re into rare gear, this is the amp for you. Good luck finding one!
I think that there is a lot more that goes into getting a rich sound than just the pickup layout. AYK different pickups also have very different sounds, so if you line up an HH next to an HSH, there are going to be so many different factors that it's impossible to just point to the pickup configuration as the difference, unless they are the same make and model. From my personal experience of wanting a nice HSH many years ago, it's not worthwhile to limit yourself to that configuration because there are so few models. IMHO. Also, I don't think you mention what style of music you play at all. – JFA Jun 25 '14 at 1:59
The 10.5mm string spacing allows for easy picking across strings, such as string skipping and hybrid picking. The snap and hold tremolo arm socket can makes it easy to load a tremolo arm, and the arm torque adjuster enables fine torque adjustment without any tools. The stud lock screws lock the stud bolts in place, for better tuning stability and resonance. The 2-point floating tremolo system allows for super smooth tremolo motion when either raising or lowering the pitch.
The transmogrification of bulky, fiddly tape echo units into transistorized analog echo pedals in the late 1970s is arguably one of the greatest economies the delay-loving guitarists has ever experienced (physically more than financially). Players addicted to anything from slapback to the hypnotic sonic cloning of their Echoplexes, Copicats, and Space Echoes breathed collective sighs of relief when Electro-Harmonix and MXR introduced relatively affordable analog delay pedals. By the early 1980s there was barely a rocker going who stepped on stage without a delay pedal, and every major effects maker offered a model or two. Many players gradually decided that their old tape echoes actually sounded better than the transistorized alternatives, but for convenience sake a majority of these still stuck with their stompboxes for live work. Opinions on the tonal superiority of tape echo—and especially tube-powered versions—have become even more vehement in recent years, spawning high prices in the used market and even the recent offering of a Tube Tape Echo from boutique pedal maker Fulltone, but many still find tape impractical.
For most applications, all you really need is a guitar input, and an output that you can plug to an amplifier or PA system. Still, it doesn't hurt to have extra input/output options, like a mic XLR input (for vocalists who play guitar), an aux input (for practicing with your favorite tracks), headphones out (for quiet practice and tweaking), stereo output, and many more.

One last note concerning the use of compression: Be careful. Compression occurs naturally in overdriven tube amplifiers, and overly-compressed clean settings or direct guitar tracks can sound harsh, with an exaggerated picking sound. We hope that having read this article, you'll approach the process of recording the electric guitar with a new insight and fresh ears, and wish you the best in your quest for the ultimate tone.

• Library content : Choose from 154 patterns covering a wide range of realistic riffs, arpeggios, alternating intervals and chords. The patterns are conveniently grouped into 31 well-coordinated set of presets, suitable for everything from modern pop music to electronics. Autochord mode and convenient presets allow you to execute or program convincing batches of electric guitar, regardless of background music.
Aside from the stereo effect of doubling up the same part and panning it to opposite ends of the stereo spectrum, some guitarists use stereo rigs in conjunction with stereo effects. Traditionally, this involves using two amp cabinets, although single cabs that operate in stereo are available. To achieve a good, even stereo image, it’s best to mic each cab identically, ideally with the same type of mic. Invert the polarity of one of the channels to avoid any out-of-phase issues, and pan them hard left and right. Stereo effects such as reverb, delay and room ambience, can be added to mono guitar signals at the mixing stage.
After making your observations about the curve in the neck, make your adjustments of the truss rod, if necessary, until you have the amount of forward curve you are looking for. In the best case scenario this will mean that you end up with a slight forward profile, when fretting the 1st and 12th frets, usually no more than 1/32", focused in the 6th-7th fret area and tapering towards flat in either direction.
Why We Liked It - Even if this isn’t the cheapest guitar on our list, we think the Schecter Hellraiser is the best bargain! To get this much guitar for so little money is almost incomprehensible and we feel like a million bucks when we play it! It not only looks good, it sounds fantastic, and you can be sure to impress everyone who hears you play with this wonderful instrument!
225 Parsons St, Kalamazoo, MI, 49007 1917–1984 Also located next to railroad tracks, this facility had major expansions in 1945, 1950, and 1960.[83] Various brands were produced there, including Gibson, Epiphone, (1957–1970)[84][85] and Kalamazoo. During the depression of the 1930s, children's toys were produced there, and during WW2 it produced materials to support the war effort in addition to producing guitars.[86] Between 1974 and 1984 Gibson moved its manufacturing out of this facility to Tennessee. Most of this move happened in 1974, leaving only acoustic and some semi-acoustic production for this plant.[87] In 1985, Heritage Guitars began production, renting part of this facility.[88]
Was skeptical at first since I own a couple of vintage Martins. Aside from the LX1E being a sustainable responsibly built guitar that has HPL back/sides, hybrid neck/fingerboard, and whose soundhole smells like a Lincoln Log toy set this is an amazing find. Yup- it’s perfect for the overhead bin on airplanes, comes with a good gig bag, and sounds great plugged in. Experimented with .11 gauge string set, but this guitar is really made for either .12 gauge or a true .13 (medium gauge) strings set. This guitar is designed for the combination of heavier strings and assertive strumming or picking to create a sound that belies its small size. It welcomes being pushed, muted, and/or percussively played. Found the same to be true of Martin’s DX regular size guitars which sound amazing for what they are. While the E Sheeran LX model has his logos on it, this
The ‘boomer’ kids wanted their own voice and opinions to be heard, they wanted to be taken seriously – and like the quote from the 1966 film ‘The Wild Angels’ which exaggerated this rebellious angst to the extreme “…We wanna to be free to do what we wanna do…”  There was a sense of needing to rebel against ‘The Man’ – basically anyone who told them what to do or how to conform to society respectfully.
Just In: another great from Japan at Yamaha Nippon Gakki and wow this model was a good surprise by the big sound it projects I know why Martin made this shape guitar now they weigh nothing and put out a big sound I hardly believed it when I first heard one of these well that was years ago and I have had quite a few of these but non sounded any better than this baby. its in very good - excellent vintage condition no structural issues or cracks or even finish checking its neck alignment is excellent and its top is flat and bridge is tight its action is within Martin specs medium low and it plays excellently all throughout the fingerboard no weird buzzes its fun to play and sound is recording worthy, well taken care of over 40 years old and well maintained has resulted in a better than average survivor. Big sound and a pleasure to play with Martin like tone for a fraction. Questions or to buy contact Joe at: jvguitars@gmail.com .
Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 22 - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: ABR-1 - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Nickel, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - Guitar Features: Pickguard - String Instrument Finish: Various
The Ace Frehley (KISS) signature model, released in 1997 and re-released in 2012, has three humbucking DiMarzio pick-ups, a cherry sunburst finish (AAAA), a color image of Frehley’s face in his Kiss make-up on the headstock, and mother-of-pearl lightning bolt inlays, and Ace’s simulated signature on the 12th fret. There was a limited edition, Gibson Custom Shop run of only 300 guitars that were built with DiMarzio PAF, Super Distortion, and Dual Sound pickups. The production run model was only built with DiMarzio Super Distortion pickups. This was one of Gibson’s best selling artist runs. These guitars are now valued at between $US4,000–12,000.[citation needed]The more recent 2012 “Budokan” model features mother-of-pearl block inlays (no signature at the 12th fret), a Richlite fingerboard, Grover machine heads with pearloid banjo buttons, and a grade A maple top.[44]
In August ’68, Ovation added three more models – the Hurricane 12-string and the Typhoon I and II basses, all with chrome hardware. The K-1120 Hurricane was a Tornado with the extra strings, advertised as offering a “harpsichordian” effect. This lasted only a year and was gone by ’69. The initial Typhoon basses had slightly smaller bodies than the guitars, with stubbier, more flared horns. These lasted only a year until ’69, when the body styling changed to that of the Gibson-style guitars. The K-1140 Typhoon I bass had one Schaller pickup and a covered bridge/tailpiece assembly. The K-1240 Typhoon II was a two-pickup model with a three-way select. This was also called the Williwaw (“mountain wind”) in some Ovation literature, but it was never really called that. The Typhoon I was only available in the stubby body and was discontinued in ’69. The Typhoon II changed model number in March ’70, becoming the K-1222. This model made it until June ’72.
Music Theory for Guitarists by Tom Kolb is one of the most comprehensive ways to learn music theory from a book that we can recommend. This book, and the combination of online audio that accompanies it, has helped many aspiring guitarists learn theory after being frustrated with trying to learn how to play the guitar. One reason that might be is because Tom uses very plain language to explain theoretical concepts that are often confusing and can come off as complex. Further, the book includes diagrams frequently, which really helps visual learners.

So what are acousticelectric guitars? Quite simply, it’s an acoustic guitar with slight modifications that means it can be plugged into a power amp. This means that the sound from the guitar can be made much louder for use live or with a band. It also means that, as the signal becomes electric, it can be altered with effects pedals and other equipment. Sometimes, because of this, electric acoustics are used when recording in a studio, though a microphone is often used too.
To ensure 100% customer satisfaction Bajaao offers 10 day return policy and we also pay for the return shipping to help you be free of the online shopping anxiety. Our content rich page is your one stop to get all the required information about the products be it the product description or the user generated hands on reviews. A friendly and knowledgeable staff is there to help you out with your queries should there be anything else you wish to know about the product, process, payment or after sale service. Our dedicated team will help you to select from the best of the products within your range. Call our experts to find out the best product to suit your style and need and buy Electric Guitars at the lowest prices in India.
One of the most over looked and shockingly good guitars I have ever played in my 23 years of chopping wood. In their rich history there have been little misses, but over all Aria guitars are supreme to their competitor especially at the price point. My 1977 Aria les paul copy has at leased twice the balls as my buddy's 6 year old Gibson and tons more playability. Forget about comparing to epiphone, seriously. eBay yourself a Aria electric and you WILL be pleasantly surprised. Aria acoustics; If your reaching for a nylon, Aria makes some of the best classical guitars with a history of employing some of the most well noted artisans of the craft, such as Ryoji Matsuoka. Fine craftsmanship all around, built with quality woods and have a tendency to get better with age, laminated or not. As for steal strings, I've only played one to be honest, but this Martin 'lawsuit' was a work of art. Thank you.
The Les Paul Traditional 2019 is one of the latest iterations of this iconic guitar, bringing over the same pleasing aesthetics and rock friendly tone using modern production methods for improved reliability, consistency and expanded tone options. The body features a classic mahogany body with no weight relief, and a AA grade figured maple arched top. The 24.75" scale length mahogany neck is topped by a 22-fret fingerboard that has a nut width of 1.695". Giving this guitar its classic voice are Burstbucker 1 & Burstbucker 2 humbuckers, with Orange Drop capacitors that replicate the ones found inside vintage Les Pauls.
Aimee, by Pure Prairie League, Love,Me by Collin Ray, Where have you been, Kathy Matea, Landslide, Fleetwood Mac, The Reach, Dan Fogelburg, The Seven Bridges Road, The Eagles, Longer, Dan Fogelburg, Fire and Rain, James Taylor, Your The Lucky One, Allison Krause & Union Station, Time in a bottle, Jim Croce, Whenever You Come Around, Vince Gill, Man of Constant Sorrow, (as performed by Union Station),
Lou Reed has been blowing traditional guitar styles to bits since his Velvet Underground days. A fan of Ike Turner's R&B and Ornette Coleman's free jazz, he created epic bad-trip psychedelia on songs like "Sister Ray." "He was rightfully quite proud of his own soloing," wrote fellow New York guitar luminary Robert Quine, "but resigned to the fact that most people weren't ready for it." As a solo artist, Reed kept on ripping up the rulebook: See 1975's Metal Machine Music, a noise opus that took feedback further than Hendrix could have imagined.
Rock ’n’ roll is an industry that’s continually pushing musical, social, and cultural boundaries, and the electric guitar is its iconic instrument. The acoustic version has been around since at least the 16th century. So when I first started working with co-curator Gary Sturm on an exhibition about the invention of the electric guitar at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History, our driving question was: Why electrify this centuries-old instrument? The simplest answer: Guitarists wanted more volume.
An overdubbing session is ideal for air-guitar miking because there is no leakage from other instruments. I usually prefer to maintain total isolation between the two sources, placing the guitarist and amp in separate rooms. But for some production styles, the acoustic air mic can also do double duty as a distant room mic for the amp, with the ratio of pick sound to ambience determined by mic placement and amp volume. I've recorded some very hefty-sounding rock 'n' roll power chording this way, as well as a variety of vintage-style solos and rhythm parts. At the board, a low shelving or low-midrange EQ cut, combined with a subtle high-end boost around 4 to 6 kHz, will usually help these tracks jump out of the mix.

This is a solid body bass guitar that has a full deep sound. There is not much middle to it which makes it less defined than a lot of basses but it does suit some music very well. There is a choice of sample sets to choose from in this soundfont. Direct or through my j-station (which makes it sound more like its through an amp), or a mix of the two. The j-station samples are the same direct samples routed out and through the j-station and back in again, which is why it is possible to have a mix of the two. The J-Station samples make a distorted beefy bass sound which can be useful for some music i.e. 3 piece bands where tha bass fills out instead of a rhythm guitar or just for a more lo-fi bass sound. The direct samples are not so distorted and can be used in alot more styles of music. There is a preset that includes slaps and slides etc to help add some realism.


I'm not sure if it's been made clear or not yet, but the imported firewood that had a Kay brand name on it in the seventies bears no relation to the products of the the Kay Co. of Chicago USA. It's not all plywood either; they had a range of total crap to not-so-crappy models. I never much liked their p.u.s or their necks. This is a good body (late 40's K-44) with a better (Harmony!) neck.

A: If it looks like a ??? it almost certainly is a ??? Because the factory used to change the hardware at a whim there will be slight variations. This has, in most cases, nothing to do with a particular year but more to do with what happened to be to hand at the time. Some exceptions are pickups, pickguards, logos and headstocks. All I know is here on the website if you look hard enough. Also bear in mind that your guitar may have been modified at some stage in its life.
In more recent years, a diverse cross-section of artists have started to favour Rickenbacker guitars. In 1979, Tom Petty and Mike Campbell of Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers would adopt the Rickenbacker 12-string “toaster” jangle into their records and still use the vintage 1960s models. The post-1960s “Hi-gain” pickup-equipped guitars are associated with The Jam and REM. The “Hi-gain” pickups are well suited to harder spiky pop/rock sounds as well as the classic clean chime.
WOW! This thing is incredible. One of the nicest instruments we have ever played and we've had, played and sold a few hundred over the past 20 years! Can't say enough about this bass. It's a pre-owned Zon Legacy Elite series 5-string model featuring a beautiful book-matched solid Bubinga wood top over a solid Mahogany wood body. A solid graphite neck / fingerboard utilizing a sculpted body neck joint finishes off the basic construction of the instrument. Huge tone is delivered via 2 active Bartolini pickups that feature controls for volume, bass, midrange, treble and balance. This bass has had the electronics modified by Zon to move the midrange control from the access hole in the back cover to a matching pot located in the control section on the front of the bass. While at Zon to get the custom electronics installed,  the original owner had new frets and a new finish coat added. Figured as long as it was there "what the heck". Tuning is accomplished via the 5 German made Schaller tuning machines in the same gold plate finish as the solid cast bridge. The solid graphite neck features a full 2 octave neck with 24 frets and a 34" long scale. This bass is a dream to play! Just about as good as it gets. There's not a mark on it anywhere. It looks brand new! Rock solid and stays in tune. Set up perfectly! Includes original Zon Soft exterior hard shell case on black Cordura.
Consideration of this takes us back again to Kink Dave Davies: “The blues players were the first to crank it up, and the music had that spirit, that anguish. We used to listen to all those guys. Like John Lee Hooker—he had that buzz, that drive. I used to listen to him and think, ‘What’s he doing there? That’s amazing—how do you get that sound?’ I think all those elements led to me messing around with amplifiers, because all the amplifiers were clean, soulless.”
The ’38 Supro line contained two lap steel models, still made of wood, but substantially different from the model seen in the ’38 Sorkin/’39 Grossman catalogs. The Supro Avalon Hawaiian Guitar had a rectangular body with rounded corners and two concave “cutaway” shoulders. The head had a slight curve to it. The fingerboard was made of polished aluminum, and the guitar was finished in gloss black. An enameled handrest covered the single pickup and strings passed into a slotted rectangular metal tailpiece. On either side of the fingerboard, just above the handrest, were two square plates embossed with the Supro logo and containing one control knob each, for volume and tone. Without case this cost $40. Note that this was the first appearance of tone controls on Supro brand guitars.
To make frequency selective networks, we must use capacitors and/or inductors. Unlike resistors, both caps and inductors discriminate against some frequencies in favor of others. Capacitors preferentially pass higher frequencies; inductors pass lower frequencies more easily. Resistors help us set how much gets through, while caps and inductors select which frequencies get through. Inductors are big, heavy and expensive, so almost all tone controls use only caps and resistors.
While anything with decent gain could be used for metal, a dedicated metal amp is the only thing a dedicated metalhead would want to use. These amps are actually very similar to other styles of amp, with one big difference – they are loaded with massive gain, which is essential for metal. A perfect example of what makes a great metal amp is the EVH 5150III. Designed with Eddie Van Halen, this all-tube amp head is an absolute beast in term of power and gain, with face-melting distortion and 50 watts of power.
In the face of this mounting conservatism, Ovation entered the solidbody marketplace with an in-your-face design consistent with the radicalism of its Lyracord bowl-backed acoustics. In ’71 it unveiled the battleaxe-shaped Breadwinner, followed by its upmarket brother, the Deacon, in January ’72. As you might expect, despite the unusual shape (rounded upper edge, deep single cutaway at the double octave, s-curved lower edge, and asymmetrically scooped out lower bout) these also featured some innovations. Both had two-octave bolt-on Ovation fingerboards, the former unbound with dots, the latter bound with diamonds. Both had mahogany bodies, the Breadwinner with a kind of spackle finish (white, black, tan or blue), the Deacon a sunburst finish. The Breadwinner had a molded plastic bridge/tailpiece assembly with adjustable plastic saddles and chrome hardware; the Deacon had a similar unit with metal saddles with gold hardware. Early Breadwinners had the jack on the back of the body, but this quickly migrated to the pickguard; some transitional examples have both jacks on the back and pickguard. These Ovation guitars were remarkably ergonomic, well-balanced when standing and cradling comfortably on the knee if you preferred to sit.
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There are two main types of pickup you’ll find on a guitar suitable for beginners: a single-coil pickup and a humbucker pickup. Without bogging you down in the details of how they work, the single-coil is the classic original pickup, which typically offers a bright and sparkly sound. As they cut through the mix, single-coils are excellent pickups for lead players. Then comes the faithful humbucker, which – as the name suggests – ‘bucks’ the hum, meaning less background noise. Humbuckers produce full, meaty sounds found across the world of rock and metal, and are great for lead and rhythm guitar. However you can still play fast punk rock powerchords with a single-coil, just like you can play an upbeat country number with a humbucker! You’ll usually find two or three pickups on a guitar, although some models will offer just one. Guitars with two or more pickups will come fitted with a pickup selector switch to quickly change between them.
The Applause line is relevant because the technology used to make the aluminum and foam necks was subsequently applied to Ovation’s final American-made solidbodies, the Ultra Kaman or UK II, which was introduced in 1979. The UK II featured an aluminum frame with a urethane foam (Urelite) body, featuring the usual Ovation shape but with a little Tele-style curve on the upper shoulder and a sharp single cutaway. The top featured a contour like a carved top, although it was molded, of course. The neck was typically Ovation, with a bound 24-fret ebony fingerboard. Pickups had changed to twin-blade humbuckers, still in the smaller Ovation size. Electronics were fairly conventional, with a three-way select, two volume and two tone controls. No reference materials are available to me, but it appears that the earliest UK IIs had a little Les-Paul-style elevated pickguard and hollow bow-tie inlays. Also, the early UK IIs seem to have the plastic and metal bridge assemblies seen on earlier Preachers and Vipers. Later versions have the notched abalone block inlays, no pickguard and all-metal bridge assemblies. This is what makes me think the switch to metal bridges occurred in around 1980. As far as I know, the model name never appeared on the pickguard!
Though comfortable playing many styles, Atkins was most often associated with country music and the acoustic guitar. By using a combination of his fingers and a thumb pick, he created his signature “fingerpicking” sound—a style somewhat inspired by fellow guitarist Merle Travis. Atkins even recorded a duo album with Travis, as well as with other respected guitarist like Doc Watson, Les Paul, Jerry Reed and Mark Knopfler.
There's a sick little used Chinese Peavey going for $90 at my local guitar shop. It plays great, but nobody seems to want it. I'm already picking up a MIM strat from there, but after I save up a bit more change I think I'll grab it as well. You always have to dig for the good players, and sometimes you just happen to be lucky enough to find a cheap one on a fluke, doesn't matter where it's from.
But having hot tubes is only half the recipe for getting great tone. Room sound is the other ingredient necessary for obtaining a full-bodied guitar track. It didn't take me long to figure out that the guitarists on my formative blues sessions were slyly contributing to my "education" by nudging the mics away from their amps as soon as I left the room. Thanks to their clandestine efforts, my ears opened up to an entire new world of electric-guitar sounds.
In one position, lug A and lug B are not connected (that is, the circuit is open). In the other, both lugs are connected (the circuit is closed). To use our seven-sound mod as an example: In one switching position, both lugs are not connected, so the neck pickup connected to the switch is not engaged. In the other position, both lugs are connected and the neck pickup is engaged.
Description: Body: Mahogany - Top Wood: Mahogany - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Neck Construction: D-Shape - Fingerboard: Ebony - Frets: 24 - Inlay: Pearl - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Headstock: 6 In-Line - Bridge: Tune-O-Matic - Bridge Construction: Ebony - Hardware: Black, Grover Tuners - Pickups: Seymour Duncan Live Wire - Pickup Configuration: Dual - String Instrument Finish: Charcoal Burst, Vintage Burst
I bought this kit for myself. I wanted the satisfaction of building and playing my own guitar. The price was well within my budget. I did upgrade the electronics, put on a Bigsby tailpiece, a new roller tune-o-matic bridge, and planet waves self trimming tuners. The items in the kit were fine to use, but i wanted a one off guitar, that would have the sound and the look I wanted.

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Okay first of all yes, John Mayer deserves to be on this list. I would've probably put him even higher. I understand if you don't agree but go listen to his Where The Light is album and get back to me on that. I think Eric Clapton should've made the list though. And, although I'm not a big fan of metal I can say as a guitarist anybody can go up and down scales and embelish notes and sound like a metal genius. The artists above put real soul into their music. I think you have an amazing list though. Many people probably would've have thought of some of the people on here… but what about Derek Trucks?
No way can this list be accurate simply for the fact that there are so many styles out there with such important players, having a list of greatest guitar players with BB King and Tom Morello on it is ridiculous. Both are great in their own right but it’s like comparing apples and oranges. There should probably be separate lists for separate genres. Having said that, I think a good start for a top 10 ROCK list, in no particular order, would be: Joe Satriani, Yngwie Malmsteen, Kirk Hammett, Dimebag Darrell, Steve Vai, Eric Johnson, Slash, Jerry Cantrell, Joe Perry, and Angus Young.
Note: Youpi Choupi's answer calls my answer below into question by pointing out that classical and flamenco guitars are acoustic guitars. He is correct in this of course, they are all types of acoustic guitar. However, most of the time when someone says they play "acoustic guitar," they mean the commonly used steel-stringed acoustic that most rock, folk, country and other artists play, and I believe this was the intent of the OP when they asked the question. Hence, an answer simply pointing out that Spanish guitar and acoustic guitar are both acoustic guitars would not have been a helpful answer.

Keyboard players who use subwoofers for on-stage monitoring include electric organ players who use bass pedal keyboards (which go down to a low "C" which is about 33 Hz) and synth bass players who play rumbling sub-bass parts that go as low as 18 Hz. Of all of the keyboard instruments that are amplified onstage, synthesizers produce some of the lowest pitches because, unlike a traditional electric piano or electric organ which have as their lowest notes a low "A" and a low "C", respectively, a synth does not have a fixed lowest octave. A synth player can add lower octaves to a patch by pressing an "octave down" button, which can produce pitches that are at the limits of human hearing.


I own one of these that I found in the trash on the side of the road - I have to say it has a good bit of wear and looks like it might fall apart any second in blue with black and chrome hardware - you couldn't pay me to get rid of this thing. I love the way it sounds and plays - its the benchmark for me for all my other acoustics - I dig the sound of this beast. Been a total metal monster for an acoustic \m/>.<\m/
Check the action and clearance of the guitar strings by playing it before you begin setup. There should be 3/64-inch between the fret and the string on the treble side, and 5/64-inch on the bass side. Check that there is no buzzing when you play high up on the neck, and that the strings are not too difficult to push. If you hear buzzing, the neck must be corrected for underbow; if the strings are too far from the frets, the neck must be corrected for overbow.
Whether you have your sights set on a dreadnought acoustic or a classic Squire Strat, the guitar value packages found here consist of everything a player needs to make their guitar learning experience an exciting and enjoyable one. From Fender, Dean and Alfred to Jasmine, Ibanez and Martin, all the big names are here. You'll have no problem finding the perfect guitar value package that pertains to your specific music tastes. 

The Epiphone Dove Pro is such a good guitar that it’s going to be a contender for a top pick in pretty much any list, but in this one we’ve given it the title of best value electric acoustic. You can spend a lot more money and not get much more guitar, and you can even spend more money and not get a guitar as good. The Dove Pro is that accomplished.
After the retirement of Kuhrmeyer in 1955, the company was taken over by Sidney M. Katz. The product line of Kay was shifted toward electric musical instruments on demands, and in 1964, the company moved to a new factory in Elk Grove Village, Illinois. In 1965 Katz sold Kay to Seeburg Corporation, and he became the head of Seeburg's musical instrument division. In 1967, Kay was resold and merged with Valco, but dissolved in 1968 due to financial problems.[9]
Quality replacement pot from Bourns with DPDT pull switch for coil tap or other switched application.   Knurled 1/4" shaft fits most knobs.  Low torque, carbon resistive element, great replacement in many applications using passive humbucker or single-coil pickups.   Note that length of threaded part of shaft is 3/8" - measure to make sure that this is long enough for your application, especially if the pot mounts through the wooden guitar body.   (This pot will not work on Les Pauls, for example).  250K, Special A2 taper preferred by guitar and bass players.  Nut and washer included.   Note: threaded bushing diameter is 3/8", like most 24mm "quarter-sized" pots.   Both pot and switch terminals are solder lugs.   Not designed for PC board insertion.
In Vietnam, electric guitars are often used as an instrument in cải lương music (traditional southern Vietnamese folk opera), sometimes as a substitute for certain traditional stringed instruments like the Đàn nguyệt (two-stringed lute) when they are not available. Electric guitars used in cải lương are played in finger vibrato (string bending), with no amplifiers or sound effects.
Fender’s arm when it comes to affordable quality guitars is the Squier. The Affinity Stratocaster is no push over. It has an ergonomically design contoured double cutaway body made of alder and has the C-shape all maple or with rosewood fingerboard neck patterned over an original Fender which contributes greatly to the guitars comfort and playabilty.

These 8 free guitar lessons are from Chris Buono’s 60 Electric Guitar Techniques You MUST Know where he’ll describe and demonstrate 65 of the most popular electric guitar techniques found in blues, rock, jazz, metal and other contemporary genres of music. He also shows you how they’re notated in standard notation and tablature to help you get the most out of reading or writing sheet music, tabs, and charts.
Most lo-fi amplifiers in the 40s and 50s produced unexpected distortion or overdrive tones at higher volumes. Guitarists quickly discovered that the Fender Tweed Champ (originally marketed to beginners as the Champion 800 in 1948) produced a distorted sound at high-volume levels thanks to the Champ’s low power output and simple circuitry. Many of the classic guitar solos in the 1950s were recorded through a Champ, which resembled a wide-panel TV cabinet covered in tweed cloth. Leo Fender even went so far as to manufacture the first 100-watt amplifiers for surf guitar pioneer Dick Dale, who had blown hundreds of Fender amps and speakers from regularly turning up the volume.
Yes, but not by a guitar center tech who realistically knows fuck all about anything he is adjusting. Find a luthier out independent repair person in your area. Even if it's an hour drive, the difference in the setup will be well worth it. You will also have established a relationship with someone who will know the right way to fix it if and when something breaks.
Some modeling processors fit the palm of your hand and you can place them on a tabletop and punch their buttons to select sounds and effects; some are almost two feet long, weigh as much as 10.5 pounds, sit comfortably on the floor and are operated by foot switches or rows of foot switches called pedalboards. Depending upon how sophisticated, complex and pricey your modeling processor is, you can have a huge sonic palette at your fingertips (or underfoot). Many of these units are MIDI compatible as well, allowing you to stream MIDI data to your computer or other recording device, or trigger other MIDI instruments. Just remember that for performance, you will probably be better off with a processor that is operated by foot switches; this allows your hands to remain free for playing your guitar or guitar synth.
The Epiphone brand scores another spot in this list with the Hummingbird Pro, a stylized take on the popular dreadnought shape. This guitar is the affordable version of the original Gibson Hummingbird, as seen in the hands of big name artists like Keith Richards, Noel Gallagher, Sheryl Crow and many more. It is a modern and more cost effective take on the guitar that Keith used on many of The Rolling Stones' popular tracks, including "Play with Fire" and "Satisfaction".

Vox is a musical equipment manufacturer founded in 1947 by Thomas Walter Jennings in Dartford, Kent, England. The company is most famous for making the Vox AC30 guitar amplifier, used by The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, The Kinks, The Yardbirds, Queen, Dire Straits, U2 and Radiohead, the Vox Continental electric organ, and a series of innovative electric guitars and bass guitars. Since 1992, Vox has been owned by the Japanese electronics firm Korg.
The first successful guitar pickup was developed in the early 1930s by Rickenbacker® to help amplify Hawaiian lap steel guitars which were popular at the time. The first pickups were single-coils and while they do a good job of picking up the guitar signal they are also susceptible to picking up interference from nearby electrical devices. The Gibson® humbucker (US Patent 2896491) was developed in the 1950s to eliminate the "hum noises" resulting from electromagnetic interference. The humbucker uses two coils and a pair of pole pieces (having opposite magnetic polarities of each other) for each string. The coils are wound and connected to each other in such a way that the current produced by the moving guitar string in the two coils adds up (in-phase), while the current produced by electromagnetic interference in the two coils cancels (out-of-phase). Not only does the humbucker drastically reduce noise from interference, but it also has a different characteristic sound. The single-coil pick up is commonly considered to have a thin, clear and bright (more treble) sound, while the humbucker is known to have a full, but dark (less treble) sound with more overall signal output.

He’s sauntered down through the decades unfazed by stints in jail and hospital, heroin addiction, assorted femmes fatales, copious boozing, rampaging Hells Angels and assaults from fellow icons like Chuck Berry and Peter Tosh. Unconstrained by the grinding gradations of clock, calendar, public morality or legal prohibition, he has defined life on his own terms.
Of course, the effect is not as good as using a professional studio but most users report that reproduction is very good for a simple computer application. The interface of Guitar Rig is extremely well laid out and even for those new to amps and guitar effects, it doesn't take long to navigate your way around. If you intend to use Guitar Rig for live performances, a convenient Live View displays the most essential readouts and level monitors to keep your eye on.
Call of Duty: Black Ops III is the ultimate 3-games-in-1 experience. In Campaign mode, you must navigate the hot spots of a new Cold War to find your missing brothers. Players can play the campaign cooperatively or solo and are now always connected to the intelligence grid and their fellow operatives during battle. Multiplayer features a new momentum-based chained movement system, allowing players to fluidly move through the environment with finesse, using controlled thrust jumps, slides, and mantling. Black Ops III multiplayer also introduces the new Specialist character system, which allows players to master 9 characters' battle-hardened weapons and abilities through a challenge-based unlock progression system. No Treyarch title would be complete without its signature Zombies offering. "Shadows of Evil" has its own distinct storyline right out of the box, set in the fictional 1940s Morg City, where four particularly troubled individuals — the femme fatale, the magician, the detective, and the boxer — star in this film-noir inspired horror story.
The Line 6 POD Farm program is famous for its amp simulation, however many users have realized that the quality of its modeled effects are equally superb. Some even use the POD Farm strictly for its effects! It has a huge collection of FX - up to 94 - and it modeled some of the most popular stompboxes including the MXR Phase 90, ProCo Rat, Uni-Vibe, Arbiter Fuzz Face and Big Muff Pi. It also includes modeled versions of old analog devices like the EP-1 Echoplex. Setting up is a breeze with its simple carousel-style interface, which lets you visualize your signal chain. Current Retail Price $49.00
Taylors are okay as guitars go, but... I've owned three, sold them all in mint condition and lost considerable coin in doing so. I think they belong on this list because they charge hand made prices for MASS PRODUCED guitars. Don't believe me? Take the Taylor that you own and do a search for it on eBay. That's right, at this very moment there are hundreds of guitars just like yours for sale on eBay. And that's only checking this one sales venue! These guitars are worth half of what you paid because the market is saturated with them. Taylor cranks out hundreds of them per day and 100's of thousands per year. If you're shopping and seriously considering a Taylor, you can get comparable quality and far better value elsewhere. Choose carefully and you'll see your investment go up in value. Aside from some special, collectable models of Taylor, you will loose money on this brand.
Gotoh’s Telecaster bridge has the vintage look and mounting layout with a few modern additions: The In-Tune saddles give you the vintage look with unique grooves cast into the saddle to move the contact point of each string for more accurate intonation. Each saddle is reversible and can be used in any position. This gives you a huge advantage over traditional barrel style saddles that were never designed with precision intonation in mind. The brass saddles will give you that bright Tele twang! The stamped steel base plate’s cut down sides give you the unrestricted string access that many modern players prefer.
Although electric guitar sounds vary dramatically, they are all essentially midrange instruments with little or no extreme high- and low-end information. With the tone controls on the amp and the guitar itself, recorded electric guitar sounds often need little in the way of EQ if the desired tone was produced at the recording stage. However, if the sound needs a bit more bite, try boosting the upper mids somewhere between 2.5 and 5kHz. For added warmth, a little boost around the 250Hz range should thicken the sound, while muddiness is often dealt with by cutting a few dBs at around the 200Hz mark.
The E minor chord is one of the simplest to play because you only use two fingers Take extra care not to allow either of them to touch any of the open strings, or the chord won't ring properly. Strum all six strings. In certain situations, it may make sense to reverse your finger position so that your second finger is on the fifth string, and your third finger is on the fourth string.
To quote the super-helpful legendarytones.com, "The Hiwatt DR103 is notably louder and can also run much cleaner than 100-watt Marshalls when needed, and they also have tremendous headroom available. Playing a Hiwatt at a loud volume is, well, an experience." The site adds, "The Hiwatt DR103 design is based around the use of four EL-34 power tubes and four 12AX7 preamp tubes. The transformers are set up so that the amp can be used with various line voltages around the world and speaker impedance can also be set to 4, 8, or 16 ohms with two speaker outputs wired in parallel."
Quality replacement pot from Bourns with DPDT pull switch for coil tap or other switched application.   Knurled 1/4" shaft fits most knobs.  Low torque, carbon resistive element, great replacement in many applications using passive humbucker or single-coil pickups.   Note that length of threaded part of shaft is 3/8" - measure to make sure that this is long enough for your application, especially if the pot mounts through the wooden guitar body.   (This pot will not work on Les Pauls, for example).  250K, Special A2 taper preferred by guitar and bass players.  Nut and washer included.   Note: threaded bushing diameter is 3/8", like most 24mm "quarter-sized" pots.   Both pot and switch terminals are solder lugs.   Not designed for PC board insertion.

Take a guitar playing friend with you, decide on a price range and try out all the guitars you can afford. Then go to another shop and do the same. Include used instruments too, and don't worry too much about the appearance. The important thing is how it sounds and how well it plays. A guitar with a nice low action which sounds reasonably good will help a great deal toward helping you stick with it. A guitar with a high action that sounds horrible will make you give up before your fingertips have time to harden!
: This vintage YAMAHA is one of the greats folks and here for your serious consideration today at Joe's Vintage Guitars.... This is the Classic Vintage Yamaha FG-200 - Nippon Gakki body seems the same specs as the famous FG180...hummm? interesting She's been lovingly played for nearly 40 years,its beautifully aged now with a great feel & patina only found on real vintage guitars of this age and caliber. This guitar really has nicely opened up over the past 40 years and you just don't get booming bassy tone like this one with a new guitar thats for sure. This example is not mint but is beautiful in its own right, it does have a few nicks, dings and wear but nothing really bad at all really she just looks the part of the 40 year old Martin D28 vintage guitsr. A lot of guitar for not a lot of cash... Vintage aint goin down..get her at a great price today! Let me know...thanks for your interest, Joe email me: gr8bids@comcast.net This is an early one from the Nippon Gakki plant and has a surprising boom even for or a 200 same as our great old red lable FG180 for that matter with no real decernable diference. I cannot find a serial number but is believed to be late 60's - early 70's This old girl has Excellent low end sound!!! and tone on this guitar is wonderful - it really booms! Condition: Average vintage wear wich includes minor pick wear, scratches dents & dings for an old vintageguitar. but no cracks to be found, straight neck, trussrod is functioning properly, very good frets still playing well all the way up & down the fingerboard with no funny buzzes or dead spots... Frets 1 - 5 ( cowboy cord area )have medium play wear but still plenty of life remaining no problemo. action is very good at 3/32 1st E string @ 12th fret. Tuners are the original and in excellent working order. Bridge plate is securely fastened to top. We have just as a precationary installed A PlateMate brass plate has now been installed to any prevent further wear to bridge plate which is common among these vintage guitars. This brass plate has also contributed to its big booming tone now is even a more rich sounding competitor to a vintage Martin D-28... FRESH SET UP...with Martin Bone & Saddle... this guitar is a wonderfull fun guitar to play lots of bang for the buck factor here.. This guitar is overall a very solid well built guitar that is standing the test of time it also is a great sounding vintage guitar that plays very nicely. Ya can't go wrong with this wonderful vintage Yamaha FG Nippon Gakki guitar Has a new bone saddle and Martin Silk Steel strings. No case included but will protect and properly package for shipping. PlateMate product works very well and is easily removed if desired. To my ear it enhanced this boom-box's sound quality and is described by the manufacturer as follows: If you want to protect and enhance the sound and tones and balance out string volume of your acoustic guitar, Mitchels Plate Mate is the way to go. Mitchels Plate Mate is a small piece of brass that is applied without using or altering of tools, and is installed as fast as you can change a set of strings. This was invented and patend mainly to prevent damage caused by ball-end strings on the acoustic guitars bridge plate, it is also proven to enhance volume, tones, and balances out string volume by one of the best acoustic guitar makers in the world. Mitchels Plate Mate will protect your guitar from ball-end strings pulling up threw the bridge plate and possibly cracking the bridge or pulling the bridge off the top of your guitar which would be a very expensive repair bill. It also protects your bridge pins, and saddle by making the string windings stay down in the string holes where they belong. I have used Mitchels Plate Mate in guitars priced from $100 to $50,000 it doesnt matter the price just protect your prized posetion or investment. .
Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Maple - Flamed - Neck Wood: Maple & Walnut - Neck Construction: 5 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 24, Jumbo - Inlay: Pearl - Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Headstock: 6 In-Line - Bridge: Edge III - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Black - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Devil's Shadow

While all acoustic guitars share the same basic construction and design elements, there are important differences that affect their sound and playability. Each guitar shares those basic characteristics above, but now that you know how an acoustic guitar is designed and built, you will want to consider some of the variables that change how each guitar feels and plays. These variables include:
We guitarists can be slow to come around to new ways of doing things, heck we still prize the 1904 technology of the vacuum tube in guitar amplifiers, so it's a huge testament to Ovation's success that they've managed to be so successful while breaking the most sacred rules of guitar material and construction. Great examples of this are their Celebrity Elite CE44 and their entry-level Applause Balladeer AB24.
So, which are the best budget electrics guitars available today? We've gathered a selection of the electric guitars that we reckon offer the best bang for the buck in the sub-$/£500 market. You may recognise some of the perennial budget classics (hello - again - to the trusty Yamaha Pacifica), but there's a raft of high-scoring options out there for the more adventurous.

While all of the brands featured in this guide produce wonderful instruments, the clear all around winner is Fender. Fender somehow manages to feature the best of both worlds in nearly every category. Guitar players have been turning to Fender for over seventy years, and for good reason. The company is renowned for its high quality craftsmanship and their beautifully constructed instruments have been inspiring guitarists for decades.
Three CraViolas were offered. These had a strange asymmetrical shape with a pear shape, no waist on the bass side and sharp waist (and almost cutaway taper) on the treble. Soundholes were D-shaped with fancy rosettes, with a pointed tortoise guard on the steel-stringed versions. These had slotheads with a Woody Woodpecker-like peak pointed bassward. The bridges were similar to the mustache version on the Country Western. The CRA6N Classic ($150) had a yellow spruce top and full-grained Brazilian rosewood body, no inlays or pickguard. The CRA6S Steel String ($160) was a similar steel-string with pin bridge and diamond inlays. The CRA12S 12 String ($175) was the 12-string version.
Great guitar at this price point. Want to make it better? For so little money you can add lighter strings, a bone saddle, bone nut and pins. It's not necessary but they may help some. A bunch of small improvements put together make a big difference. What really does make a difference is having the action set up properly. Lowering it made it much easier to play for me. The finish and craftsmanship on this guitar is excellent.

“I like it because it’s light and simple,” Alana said, reflecting on its 5.1-pound weight. “It’s easier to get my hand around the neck on this one,” Charles noted. Both found the Les Paul Express’s rounded top shoulder to be more comfortable than the horn-shaped cutaways on most of the other short-scale models, and they felt the smooth finish on the back of the neck made it easier to play. The adults agreed. “I’m surprised—for a small guitar, it’s fun to play,” Ken Rosser said.
Looking for a super-hot, aggressive metal tone? You need a dedicated high-output humbucker that will crush any amp. Whether passive or active, it’s humbuckers that dominate the heavy rock and metal genres, offering huge power, mix-cutting melodic lead tone, and noise-cancelling abilities – just what’s need when the volume and gain increase. For gigging metal guitarists, humbuckers are pretty much essential. This genre has some great affordable options that will turn any axe into a tone monster, as well as some high-end signature pickup sets from legends such as Dimebag Darrell and Mick Thomson, while the premium James Hetfield Humbucker Set from EMG is one of the best purchases a gigging metal guitarist can buy!
While all of the aforementioned stomp boxes (pitch shifter, envelope follower, wah pedal, compressor and overdrive/distortion) should be plugged into the amp’s input, modulation effects can be connected to an amp’s effects loop instead of into its input. Again, this is a matter of taste. Some guitarists prefer the more “pristine” sound quality of modulation effects patched into an effects loop, particularly since this setup can help reduce overall noise.
Neck of the guitar is bolt-on made from maple with a scarf joint for an angled back headstock. Which in turn increases the tension behind the nut eliminating the need for string trees or string retainer bars. Also on the neck are 24 jumbo frets placed on a rosewood fingerboard garnish by sharks fin inlays for the looks and performance of the guitar.
Although the hollow bodies of these guitars create a mellow, naturally voiced tone perfect for jazz, vintage country and other styles that require warmth and clarity, they can also snarl. For proof of the latter, check out Lennon’s performances on “Revolution” and “Cold Turkey.” Too much volume or proximity to the amplifier, however, and hollow bodies can howl with feedback unintentionally. And that’s why the semi-hollow body guitar was invented.
This is basically the same as having an entire studio’s worth of gear under your feet. You have 72 amp models to play with, painstakingly recreated from reference amps such as Vox Ac30 amps, Hiwatt Custom 100, Fender amps and more. There’s 194 effects to choose from ranging from distortion to modulation to delay, compression, wah – basically any effect you can think of! There’s also 37 cabinets that you can choose from which gives each amp model and effect a unique sound as well as 16 microphones which provide unique tonal qualities to your overall sound– we challenge you to get bored of this!
Filters are also great for use on drum loops. One trick I like is to send the drums to a modulated resonant filter set up as a send effect, with a narrow band-pass EQ beforehand. This creates a rather bizarre metallic melody that accompanies your drums. It can get fatiguing if over-used, but brought in at a low level in some sections of a song, it can create plenty of interest, particularly if followed by a modulated delay. Matt Houghton
He's not talking about that kind of 'setup', it's not a type of guitar, it's an essential basic maintenance you perform on any guitar. The setup that he's talking about involves properly adjusting the neck relief (the bow of the neck), the string/saddle action (height above the fretboard), and the intonation (altering the length of the string by moving the saddles on the bridge closer or further from the nut so that the strings are in the most consistent tune up and down the neck).
That day, I learned about the array of amazing things you could do with effects pedals. Sure, guitar is about your hands, but you also have to play with your feet. You have to know when a song needs more distortion, and when a song needs a jangly chorus with reverb. Without effects pedals, you’re painting with only primary colors, you’re singing in only a major key, movie-acting with one emotion. Guitar pedals open up a world for you in music. Of course wonderful music has been made in the time before such magical machines existed, and great music will continue to be made without them as well. They’re just tools after all. But what glorious tools they can be.
Being relatively new to the ABQ area, I've been checking out the local music shops and finding myself underwhelmed - that is until I walked into Grumpy's. Kevin is probably the last honest guy in the business. His pricing is more than fair - whether you're looking for repairs, custom builds, or gear - and he's more than willing to dispense advice or talk shop (not to mention his sense of humor). To put it succinctly; he knows his shit and doesn't blow smoke up one's ass! Sure, the shop doesn't have the "selection" that a place like GC might have, but Kevin can probably get anything you need. (Besides, what's more important - knowledgeable, down-to-earth customer service at a locally owned shop, or being ignored by douchebag wankers who came of age playing along to Miley Cyrus?!) Go to Grumpy's!
Gretsch G5422G12 Electromatic Double Cutaway Electric Guitar, 12-String   New from$999.99In Stockor 12 payments of $83.34 Free Ground Shipping Reverend 2017 Airwave 12 Electric Guitar, 12-String   New from$1,199.00In Stockor 12 payments of $99.92 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING D'Angelico Premier DC Electric Guitar, 12-String (with Gig Bag)   New from$899.99Only 2 Left!or 12 payments of $75 Free Ground Shipping Ibanez Artcore AS7312 Electric Guitar, 12-String   New from$499.99In Stockor 8 payments of $62.50 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING See All Electric Guitars: 12-String
A good guitar builder can pick materials that provide a predictable result. The process of making a guitar that costs $10,000 and one that costs $1,000 is identical, or at least very similar. The big difference is likely that in the more expensive one, personal attention has been put into selecting, drying, storing, and cutting the tonewood. The cheaper, which is mass produced by less skilled labor, consists of the same species of wood, but from a pile that came out of a container, in the order it was stacked. This means that two guitars from the same batch can sound quite different. They can sound exactly like the expensive guitar, but they can also sound different.

So, I've done what any self-respecting woman with a rather obsessive personality could do and trawled YouTube for all the best videos of Swift performing stripped down versions of her songs where it's just her singing against a minimal melody. I'm sure you'll agree that as much fun as queen of the squad, awkward dancing hero era Swift is, that these videos are all the proof you need that she doesn't need dance moves or supermodel friends on stage in order to rule.


With 20 watts of rated power and an 8-inch speaker, the Champion 20’s sound output capability is a little above average for this class of amplifier. Those who like the features but need more power can check out the 40-watt version with a 12-inch speaker, the Champion 40, which costs twice as much but should be powerful enough for most jam sessions and gigs. The Champion 20 also includes a 3.5 mm line input for connecting a smartphone (good when you want to play along with recorded music or a music instruction app) and a 3.5 mm headphone output.

The specs for this stripped-back Singlecut are identical to PRS's gloss Standards; the difference is in the paint - or, rather, the lack of it. Instead of that faster S2 gloss, here we have a nitrocellulose satin finish that doesn't bother with grain filler - you can easily see the body wood's grain and feel it on the neck - for a thinner finish, which will wear and age the harder you play it. Plus, thin finishes don't choke any vibrations or resonance. Along with the dot-only fingerboard inlays, this Satin Singlecut looks very workmanlike, but the build and parts still deliver the goods. The body is one-piece mahogany, the neck three-piece. The bridge is the USA Stoptail, the locking tuners, like the pickups, made in Korea to PRS specs. The pattern regular neck is a nice mainstream handful, and setup and intonation are, as ever, top-drawer. Mahogany guitars can be dark-sounding and here, yes, there's a throaty midrange focus, but a clean-edged ring and resonance that provides clarity and punch, much like the pickups that nail an almost P-90-ish sizzle and classic-rock poke. The four-control layout means there's plenty of adjustment, and the coil-splits on the tone controls add authentic single-coil cut. Clean, low, medium or high-gain, this one's a banker: the most rock-out, resonant blue-collar PRS we've ever played, and that's why it's one of the best electric guitars, especially at this price point.
I won't lie, I was VERY skeptical ordering this. But I figured that isfits not great, I could sell it. After getting it, this package is amazing for the money. I am definitely keeping it! I own/have owned $5,000+ models and some $100 "disposable" axes and I was shocked at this beautiful guitar. First off, the flamed top is gorgeous. It doesn't have a cheap look to it. The fret board is so so but you cant expect too much here. The frets don't have sharp edges and nicely done. The sealed tuners are smooth and after a minute of the inital tuning (with the included chromatic tuner), I played it for a few hours and it kept proper tune. The overall tone of the guitar is warm and projects well. I got absolutely no rattle or vibration. Then I plugged into the included amp. I will admit, the amp isn't great but but its a free practice amp. So I plugged into my Peavey and man....it sounds awesome. It also came with a so so gig bag, few picks, a strap, a truss rod key, sorta cheap guitar cord, an extra set of strings, and batteries for both the tuner and for the preamp on the guitar. Speaking of that, its a 3 band EQ with a gain control, volume and a battery checker. I paid $140 for all of this and I will say that this is one of the best deals I have gotten in almost 37 years of me playing. If you want a good practice guitar and can even play a show, don't pass this one up. The guitar alone is worth 3x of what the whole package costed me. I think I'll check out more Glen Burton guitars.
Taylors have a "happier" sound and I like the feel of them. I am a novice but from what I have seen for a beginner with an acoustic guitar, they felt and sounded warmer and less tinny than the laminated wood ones. A good rosewood taylor isn't on the cheap side of things but it feels like you can play better than you can. And the model I looked at had strings that were nice and close to the frets so you didn't feel like you were pushing in deep like the keys of an old typerwriter. Go into a Guitar Center or somewhere you can actually feel what you are getting before you buy anything. I got a cheap Gibson online less than a month ago and got what I paid for when it came with the bridge completely missing and a brassy sound when it was played. Buy your stuff in person. I think that Gibson is probably still a good brand, but the quality control of the cheaper models they put their name on is something I might question from my first experience with them...
A multi-effects device (also called a "multi-FX" device) is a single electronics effects pedal or rackmount device that contains many different electronic effects. Multi-FX devices allow users to "preset" combinations of different effects, allowing musicians quick on-stage access to different effects combinations.[16] Multi-effects units typically have a range of distortion, chorus, flanger, phaser and reverb effects. The most expensive multi-effects units may also have looper functions. Pedal-style multieffects range from fairly inexpensive stompboxes that contain two pedals and a few knobs to control the effects to large, expensive floor units with many pedals and knobs. Rackmounted multieffects units are typically mounted in a rack. Guitarists and bassists may mount their rackmounted multieffects unit in the same rack with their preamplifier and power amplifier.
Description: Guitar Type: Acoustic/Electric - Body Size: Dreadnought - Top Wood: Spruce - Back: Mahogany - Sides: Mahogany - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Neck Attachment: Set - Nut Width: 43mm - Fingerboard: Rosewood - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 26" (66cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Rosette: Pearloid - Hardware: 1/4" Output, Chrome Tuners, XLR Output - EQ/Preamp: Ibanez AEQ200T - String Instrument Finish: High Gloss Natural

There are several aspects that make the acoustic guitar different from the electric one. The most notable difference is the fact that the acoustic types do not need a source of electricity or rather they do not have to be plugged in for them to be heard. They are relatively large and are built with a hollow chamber for the magnification of the guitar’s resonance thus giving out sound that originates from the plucked strings. It also has a bridge that is essential for the transmission of vibration of the strings to the body. They are self contained, needing minimal preparation to play. In other words, they are the guitars to be bought by all those looking for simplicity.
This page contains information, pictures, videos, user generated reviews, automatically generated review and videos about Washburn XM DLX2 but we do not warrant the quality, accuracy or completeness of any information on our web site. If you have more information about Washburn XM DLX2 please write a review. Some reviews are automatically generated generated by using verbal representation of publicly available numeric rating information musicians entered while writing review of Washburn XM DLX2. User generated reviews of Washburn XM DLX2 represent opinions of credited authors alone, and do not represent Chorder's opinion.
Artists all over the world are enjoying the classic looks and premium features of Vintage Guitars. Professional players and producers working with world renown Artists like Gregg Allman, Amy Grant, Josh Turner, and many  more, rely on the great sound and playability of Vintage Guitars. See what they’re saying about the guitars they’re rocking out on every night!
Charlie Christian and Django Reinhardt are generally held to have initiated the use of the guitar to play melodies and improvisations over other instruments, the former using an early form of amplification, the latter playing forcefully on an acoustic guitar. Over the years, jazz guitarists have been able to solo in standard jazz idioms, such as bebop, cool jazz and so on, while in also absorbing influences from rock guitarists, such as the use of electronic effects.
yeah i know the GSP has 2 EQ ( well 3 if i wanted to use up a slot in the OD section ) but i use both EQs on the GSP and i prefer a external eq, that i can adjust on the spot depending on that patch, rather then going in and changing the EQ each time on that patch. I use 3 different guitars each one is totally different in sound, so the external EQ really helps.
If the gap is perfect, congratulations – you may now move on to step 2. If the gap is too large, then you need to tighten the truss rod a little (similarly, if the gap is too small, you need to loosen the truss rod). Locate the adjustable end of the truss rod. On every Les Paul style guitar I have seen, the adjustable end of the truss rod is located under the truss rod cover, located on the peg head. To remove this, simply unscrew the two (or three) screws and lift/slide the cover off.
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More expensive amplifiers may have a patch bay for multiple inputs and outputs, such as a pre-amp out (for sending to another guitar amplifier), a second low gain input, to use with active basses, an in jack to create an effects loop (when used with the pre-amp out jack), an external speaker output (for powering an additional speaker cabinet), and stereo RCA jacks or an 1/8" jack, for connecting a CD player or MP3 player so that a player can practice along with recorded music. Some amps have a 1/4" jack for connecting a pedal to turn the amp's onboard overdrive and reverb on and off or to switch between channels. Some amps have an XLR jack for a microphone, either for the guitar amp to be used for singing (in effect as a mini-PA system), or, for acoustic guitar, to mix a mic signal with a pickup signal.
Bobby Jo is number one on this list. Every artist has unknowingly been influenced by him. Starting in the Mississippi Delta, Johnson’s life is rife with myths, and allegory. His deal with the devil and death are full of folklore and mysticism, and it only adds to his haunting voice and groundbreaking guitar playing. His songs are just a pure expression of emotion with no bars held. He led the groundwork for early blues to be filled in and worked upon by all the artists on this list. He also worked on breaking down social barriers. A black man in the early 20th century was not exactly the best place to be. But his music was to add interest by white musicians and help the civil movements of the sixties. Politically or musically, Robert Johnson is deserving of number one on this list.
Situated just under the Spectrum 5 were the Teisco K guitars. Indeed, these Ks may have been introduced slightly before the Spectrums, since they appear in a 1966 Japanese Teisco brochure that does not contain the Spectrum. A second ’66 Japanese Teisco brochure contains both Ks and Spectrums. The K guitars were very similar in profile to the Spectrum, except that the horns were not curved, and flared out more or less equally in a more tulip shape, though still pointing slightly inward. These still had the German carve relief, 22-fret rosewood fingerboards, plus the new hooked headstocks. Inlays, however, were dots, and the vibratos were the more pedestrian Japanese version of the Bigsby. Pickguards were the new striped metal affairs introduced the year before, extending from above the strings down through the lower bout control area.
I had just finished signing up for guitar.com. I am a 54-year-old disabled Miner of 22 years, so I thought I would try to take up playing the guitar once again like I did when I was a kid. I forgot a lot about it through the years as life moved on, but now all I have is time. I came across your website and thought why not give it a try. so anything you suggest I will try once twice if I like it lol
Let’s start off with a guitar’s signal. As the driving force behind the entire effects chain, a guitar’s signal (more importantly, it’s voltage) must travel through the input cables and all of your effects pedals before it can reach the amp. As you can imagine, by the time a guitar’s signal finishes making its way all the way to the amp, the signal will undoubtedly suffer from a bit of degradation, losing its tone and body in the process. It's not your guitar's fault, it's simply the nature of electricity.
In this tuning, the fourth (G) string is lowered a half-step, thus recreating the intervals between the top five strings, lowered a perfect fourth. Though chords can easily and more fully be played from this tuning, it sometimes results in awkward inversions, a relatively minor problem if the five-string is played in an ensemble with a bass guitar.
The Marine Band Thunderbird is a model of low and super-low pitched 10-hole diatonic harmonica that was introduced in 2011. It possesses a bamboo comb like the Crossover, and a conical shaped lower cover plate. Designed by noted harmonica player and customizer Joe Filisko, this plate helps reduce any rattle caused by the low frequency tone produced by the reeds. It is available in low major keys A through F, as well as low B-flat and E-flat, and double-low F.[14]
Talk box: A talk box directs the sound from an electric guitar or synthesizer into the mouth of a performer using a tube, allowing the sound to be shaped into vowels and consonants with movements of the mouth. The modified sound is then picked up by a microphone. In this way the guitarist is able create the effect that the guitar "licks" are "talking". Some famous uses of the talkbox include Bon Jovi's "Livin' on a Prayer", Stevie Wonder's "Black Man", Mötley Crüe's "Kickstart My Heart", Joe Walsh's "Rocky Mountain Way", Alice in Chains's "Man in the box" and Peter Frampton's "Show Me the Way".[66][67]
I play a Tele, but I can’t say I’m in love with it. I have this feeling that a Gibson would sound and play differently – perhaps warmer and more mellow – but I have no factual basis for thinking that. It is based more on who I have seen playing different models, and what style of music they are playing. This is what I think most of the differences guitarists imagine come down to – a lot of preconceived notions, reinforced by vague generalizations (like the ones in this article) and marketing hype. But I readily admit I could be wrong about that.

I do all my recording through my Axe FX, though there are many ways to USB record to computer. That being said, I plan to play live using my Ax and my other FRFR gear. I’m using a Matrix 1600-watt amp and a Matrix 2×12 (FRFR) cab and will run direct-out to PA when the time comes. I see no reason to lug around a half-stack or stack let alone the consistency and versatility of this setup. This is my first time using FRFR, and was tempted to go with a hi-end head and cabinet combo, but the up front investment will be worth it. I won’t ever have to buy effects pedals or change heads when I want a different sound. I did add a Mission SP-2 expression/volume pedal and also use my old Pod X3 Live for a midi controller. As for volume, I’m confident that my setup will hold its own vs. most other half-stack setups. I may add an Atomic CLR or another Matrix 2×12 (like the one I have) for a monitor later on. Another important factor is my band does cover songs and the Axe setup allows me to tailor my tone to match the bands we cover at the click of a switch. As a guitarist and computer tech/nerd, it doesn’t get any better than this for me. The configuration possibilities are endless.
The Badazz U1820 guitar and U1820B bass were essentially bolt-neck copies of the new Guild S-100 introduced in 1970, the so-called “Guild SG.” This was a solidbody with slightly offset double cutaways. It had a bolt-on neck with a Gibson-style open book head, outlined decal logo, block inlays, bound 22-fret rosewood fingerboard (rounded end), two of the 12-pole humbuckers with the narrow center black insert, finetune bridge, Hagstrom-style vibrato (as found on early Guilds), two volume and two tone controls, plus three-way. The bass was the same without the vibrato and with dots along the upper edge of the fingerboard. These were available in cherry red, orange sunburst or natural (“naked”). List price for the guitars in ’71 was $199.50 with case, while the basses cost $220. These pickups, by the way, while being somewhat microphonic (as with most early Japanese units), scream, if you like a really hot, high-output sound.
Although I left it up to our panelists to decide what they think is most important in a beginner’s amp, we all agreed on a few parameters. First, the amp should have no glaring technical flaws—it shouldn’t produce excessive amounts of noise or hum, and it shouldn’t exhibit audible signs of distress, such as buzzes or rattles. Second, it should produce enough volume that the guitarist can jam with instruments such as piano, saxophone, and a small drum kit.
The first two letters of these names indicate the number of poles, while the last two letters are the number of throws. So a SPST (aka 1PST or 1P1T) means single-pole/single-throw, a SPDT (1PDT or 1P2T) means single-pole/double-throw, and DPDT (2PDT or 2P2T) means double-pole/double-throw. There are many more configurations, including 3PDT devices used for true-bypass switching in effects, and Fender’s 4PDT S-1 switch. Found on push/pull or push/push pots, the DPDT on/on switch is by far the most common, and mini toggles are available in an endless number of variations.
Here’s an interesting (they’re all interesting to me!!!) guitar that shows the evolution of Matsumoku made guitars.  Even the earliest solid body electrics that came out of the Matsumoku plant were made of solid wood and displayed really good wood craftsmanship!  Lots of start up companies went to Matsumoku in the early days because the plant had proper wood drying facilities (if the wood wasn’t dried properly, the guitars often became seriously messed up during the import trip across the ocean).
“Photocell Tremolo is found in mid-1960s American amplifiers. Those classic circuits used a light-dependent resistor to attenuate the input signal, coupled with a miniature neon bulb that is connected to the LFO. As the LFO oscillates, the bulb gets brighter and dimmer which in turn varies the resistance of the LDR. The varying resistance works with other circuit impedances to change the signal level, which produces a characteristically ‘hard’ sounding tremolo that moves between two levels, reminiscent of a square wave.” Got that? Well it is tricky and they do sound somewhat different but essentially they produce the same effect. The pedal I am using here, the Fulltone Supa-Trem uses a photocell to produce the sounds found in the classic Fender amps and most common tremolo circuit.

The guitar itself features a resonant and solid American Alder body, maple neck and 2 x single-coil pickups with 1 x humbucker installed with a coil tap function for tonal variety. The guitar is comfortable to play and sounds great especially when you throw some distortion at it through an amplifier. The guitar is budget friendly and ideal for beginners and home recording enthusiasts thanks to its high build quality and comfortable playing experience.
I’m sorry you were disappointed in the videos. I guess your definition of lesson and mine differ. I would define lesson as something that teaches the viewer a new skill or provides them with information they didn’t already possess. I certainly learned a lot from Clapton talking about how he achieved that great tone, from Angus Young explaining his style, and from Slash explaining how he plays American Man.
In the Guitar amplifier world, ANY of the “boutique” brands (some are truly boutique, offering one-of-a-kind amps, but many are just small-scale shops that have a couple lines to choose from and a couple of customizable features) fit this classification of “top shelf,” because they offer the highest quality components, are assembled with the greatest of care (usually by hand with almost no automation), and generally offer tweaks and improvements on older designs. In effect, these amps are “custom built or even bespoke.
Many pedal builders will order their resistors, capacitors, IC, and other components in bulk online. Most of the time, this is a much cheaper method than buying single components – plus it gives you an enormous variety of components to use. It may also be wise to check out the circuit boards inside of any old electronics, or broken guitar pedals you no longer use. You’d be surprised what you may find.
You may wondering how these chord shapes has been constructed. For now, you just need to know that a chord is based on the notes of a simple scale, which has 7 notes, and you finish on the original note, one octave up, for a total of 8 notes. A basic Major chord is made up of the 1st note in the scale of whatever key you are playing in, also called the root note, the 3th note, and the 5th note. We’ll get into that later, when we talk more about scales.
Lyle guitars were some of the best COPY CAT guitars made during the LAWSUIT years - years where Lyle (made in Japan) attempted to COPY higher end American made Gibson and Fender guitars - hence 'lawsuit' guitars. There are some other companies that attempted to 'copy' American instruments but many of those were made in Korea or other countries and were not of the quality that the Japanese 'Lyle' copies of American instruments. They would have done well to make their own branded guitars - they're very well made. Another 'copy' company from that era is Ibanez - they made excellent instruments, too, and they paid quality guitarists to help them market their marque - George Benson, for example. Enjoy your guitar.
The Mustang bass debuted in 1966 as (along with the Coronado) Fender's first shortscale bass, however the Competition finishes were not seen until 1969. It was effectively the same instrument, with sports stripes, and initially a matching coloured headstock. The competition colours were Red, Orange and Blue (although blue was officially called Burgundy). Have a closer look at this 1969 Fender and check out the soundclips through various vintage amplifiers.
Let me tell you about the vintage look at why it is favored among so many musicians and aestheticians around the world. Well, I won’t be able to tell you much about the vintage look in this short text, but what I can tell you is the fact that some of the best looking items out there, and best sounding, are entirely vintage. Well the Vox MINI3G2CL Battery Powered Modeling Amp is one of the vintage looking but entirely modern technology employing amps that produce a great sound while looking positively scrumptious. This small amp avoids the problem of weak low tones that so many other amp have by incorporating a bass boost technology into its construction. As a result we get a small, portable amp with a handsome look and an incredibly well rounded sound, with expressive lows and expressive high both present. And the price point relative to some of the other options on this list makes it a required purchase, unless something else catches your eye that is.
So don't hesitate; your next multi effects pedals, rack-mounted units and accessories are probably waiting just a few clicks away. The only thing better than a board full of great pedals is one box that combines all those great pedals into a single convenient package - and once you've got that multi effects unit onstage with you, the possibilities are virtually endless for the personalized tones and unique sounds you'll be able to bring to every performance.

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Another important point I want to add here is - if you are on a budget, do take a look at models in higher price brackets. Why? The simple reason is, it will make you aware what a good guitar looks like. The expensive ones usually have better sound quality, better looks and it is more comfortable. It will help you grow along with the guitar. Always buy the higher priced guitar in the range that you can afford.
I've gone into a fair bit of detail here, which may be baffling to some, or may be old news to others, but I hope it cleared some of the common misconceptions about certain parts transforming tone that I have discovered in my time doing this! Truth is, upgrading your wiring is a really worthwhile modification to carry out. Replacing parts with quality components, of reliable build quality and accurate tolerances and ratings will simply be the best for your guitar. You may well see a tonal improvement afterwards which each customer of mine has reported back after fitting one of our harnesses, which is lovely to hear. But approach with the right facts, approach without the mystique of 'this vintage style pot will transform my tone' and you'll be pleasantly surprised I'm sure! There's no magic to a responsive, great guitar tone. 
Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Maple - Flamed - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Nut Width: 42mm - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 24, Jumbo - Scale Length: 25" (64cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Earvana - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Hardware: Chrome, Grover Tuners - Circuit Type: Active - String Instrument Finish: Brown Sunburst
4. Vox VT40X 40-watt 1x10 Combo Amp ($249.99): The Vox is another modeling combo that utilizes a Valvetronix tube preamp to give you the sound qualities of a tube amp. With 13 onboard effects, you can channel quality effects without having a pedalboard at your disposal. Vox’s Virtual Elements Technology has allowed them to carefully recreate up to 20 realistic models of very sought-after amp tones, all within an attractive looking package.
There is dust or corrosion in the potentiometer behind the knob. You need to turn the volume knob between 1 and 11 over 9000 times to wear the track clean again. . If that does not help taking the electronics tray out of the amp (don't break the wires and don't electrocute yourself) to check if the volume potentiometer has any holes. Using a can of compressed air or non-reactive solvent from an electronics store with the thin nozzle tube supplied, blow or flush out the dust. . If it really annoys you and you can't get rid of it, replacing the potentiometer(s) with new sealed ones will overcome the problem forever. or use standard ones and remember to turn the knobs every week to stop dust from settling. . PS. if it is a high powered amp there will be capacitors inside that can seriously hurt you even when the amp is unplugged.
Some guitarists use identical pickups in each position and still get contrasting sounds from each pickup. Others use different types of pickups, often to balance the tonal tendencies of a particular pickup position. For example, a guitarist might choose a moderate-output pickup in the neck position and use if for clean-toned chords, but opt for a high-output bridge pickup for a louder, more distorted, solo sound. A pickup of that type will probably sound darker than a single-coil, but a player who finds the naturally twangy bridge position a little too bright would welcome that change.

The bridge (or “tailpiece”) is the piece near the back of the guitar that anchors the strings and helps transfer their vibration to the guitar’s body. There are really only two main types: vibrato and non-vibrato. Non-vibrato bridges are exceedingly common and provide the best sound transfer. Vibrato tailpieces feature a tremolo arm or “whammy bar” that alters the string tension when pushed and pulled, resulting in a change in pitch that sounds really cool. Vibrato tailpieces don’t transfer sound as well as non-vibratos because they have reduced contact with the body of the guitar. This can result in loss of sustain. Furthermore, the constant changes in string tension can send the tuning out of whack. Don’t say you weren’t warned.
Martin’s B series basses were big flat-tops with 34″-scale mahogany necks. Designed by Dick Boak, these ABGs used the same bodies as Martin’s Jumbo guitars; measuring 16″ wide with a depth of 4 7/8″, they were large enough to produce decent acoustic volume without being ungainly like other maker’s attempts. The top was solid spruce, the fingerboard was ebony, and the body was either solid East Indian Rosewood (B40) or solid flamed maple (B-65). A Fishman bridge-pickup system was available adding an “E” in the model number. Both basses were also available with fretless fingerboards.
"Later, in the '70s, a line of low-priced Japanese-made instruments were imported and sold under the Dorado name in an effort to compete with the flood of imports inundating the market. Flattop acoustics and solidbody electrics alike were sold under the Dorado name. None hold much in common with Gretsch's own guitars." Also, that Gretsch had been sold to Baldwin prior to 70's; reacquired
Flanger effects simulate the studio trick of repeatedly putting your thumb on a tape recorder’s reel for a second and then letting the reel (and music’s pitch) catch back up while a dry (unaffected) signal plays alongside. Flangers usually have a depth setting, which controls the intensity of the effect, and a rate control that adjusts the speed of the cycles.
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The modern full size classical guitar has a scale length[46] of around 650 mm (26 in), with an overall instrument length of 965–1,016 mm (38.0–40.0 in). The scale length has remained quite consistent since it was chosen by the originator of the instrument, Antonio de Torres. This length may have been chosen because it's twice the length of a violin string. As the guitar is tuned to one octave below that of the violin, the same size gut could be used for the first strings of both instruments.
For the last tip/technique, I’m going to shift gears and talk about recording acoustic—upright—bass. This may seem more daunting, but many of the same techniques apply—I’ll mention a few quick items that would be specific to the big box. While the dynamic mics I mentioned above might work fine (especially on stage), a good large-diaphragm condenser would be appropriate in the studio, to capture the high end and air of the acoustic instrument as well as the lows. On stage, the relatively low acoustic volume of the instrument may preclude more distant mic positioning, but you can wedge a small (pencil-type) mic into the bridge, with appropriate foam padding, and this, surprisingly, can often provide excellent sound and much better isolation. 
4. Vox VT40X 40-watt 1x10 Combo Amp ($249.99): The Vox is another modeling combo that utilizes a Valvetronix tube preamp to give you the sound qualities of a tube amp. With 13 onboard effects, you can channel quality effects without having a pedalboard at your disposal. Vox’s Virtual Elements Technology has allowed them to carefully recreate up to 20 realistic models of very sought-after amp tones, all within an attractive looking package.
The body is very much the same, composed of a chambered basswood topped by an elegantly contoured laminate maple top - complete with the easily identifiable Gretsch style pickguard. The neck specifications also follow the Pro Jet Bigsby, with a shorter than usual 24.6" scale maple neck, 12" radius rosewood fingerboard, and 1.6875" nut width. It has a total of 22 medium jumbo frets with Neo Classic thumbnail inlays serving as fret markers. Because its not a Filter'tron pickup, the sound of this guitar will be subtly different, but apparently good enough for the many users that have rated this guitar highly and even recommend it.
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During the first three decades of the 20th century, with the rising popularity of Hawaiian and big band music in America, guitar makers built larger-bodied instruments, using steel instead of gut strings, and metal instead of wood for the guitar body. Around 1925, John Dopyera designed a guitar with metal resonating cones built into the top that amplified the instrument’s sound. That suited twangy Hawaiian and blues music but not other genres. Then, in the 1920s, innovations in microphones and speakers, radio broadcasting, and the infant recording industry made electronic amplification for guitars possible. The volume was suddenly able to go up: way up.
It's Mal - i posted the comment ref the muted G string on my Epi Les Paul 1960 Tribute - thanks for your response it was very good of you. I'm going to be playing (when i say playing i really mean faffing with) my guitar later so i'll have a look at the saddle, though i have rubbed my finger over it to see if there were any obvious issues which there wasn't. I have also rubbed the graphite from my clutch pencil over it when changing strings - no improvement; i'll get magnifier out and take a closer look and let you know, i may take you up on your kind offer if i'm still stumped.
Many modern guitar amps also are equipped with multi-effects sections that encourage experimentation. There are also dozens of multi-effects pedals out there that are very affordably priced and offer a complete suite of effects. Most of these amp and effects processors feature presets created by engineers and pro guitarists to sound good at the touch of a button. Many allow you to create your own unique sounds then store them for instant recall. If you're a typical player, you'll adopt and abandon dozens of different effects boxes and presets over your playing career as your style and musical tastes evolve and change.
Phasers work in a way similar to flangers, but this time the copy of the signal is filtered to bring it slightly out of phase. This creates a sweeping, futuristic sound at cranked-up settings, but dialed down will get a chewy, textured tone that’s even suitable for rhythm playing. Eddie Van Halen is one guitarist well-known for his application of the phaser. Today he employs his own signature effects pedal, but his classic MXR Phase 90 is legendary among guitar tone nerds.
Woodwinds, brass, and similar instruments can only play one note at a time. To make a chord, they have to have a minimum of 3 players playing a single note in the chord at the same time. As you can imagine, this requires excellent timing and coordination between the players to make a clean chord. This is why orchestras have to have a Conductor to direct the music. With a guitar, you are the Conductor, and can make any kind of music you want, all by yourself.
1958-1969: replaces the "U" models and now has a double cutaway body with short horns. Masonite/poplar frame bodies, 13.25" wide. Models numbers include the "Standard": 3011 (black 1 pickup), 3012 (bronze 1 pickup), 3021 (black 2 pickup), 3022 (bronze 2 pickup), 5025 (blond 2 pickup). The 3021 is considered THE Jimmy Page model. "Seal" shaped pickguard and concentric knobs on 2 or 3 pickup models. Round control knobs.
000-28EC[10] and 000-28ECB: Two of the five “Eric Clapton” models. Same body size as the 000-15, but with the Martin short scale (24.9″). This artist signature model is constructed with higher-quality woods (especially the more expensive 000-28ECB constructed from Brazilian Rosewood, hence the “B”), a different shape to the neck, and more ornamentation around the edge of the body.
"Our expertise is to customize guitars according to the specifications of our clients and we have our own factory that recreates all major guitar brands, boutique brands and collectible guitars. Owning the latest state of the art equipment, craftsmanship and skilled technicians. We take great pride in the quality and designs of our electric guitars and basses. From traditional to unique styles a U.S. Masters instrument rates with the finest in detail, woods, finish, feel, components and consistency. Our designs incorporate some advanced high performance features, some patented, to improve on aspects of sonic response and feel, upper fret access, the ease of playing, comfort and all designed to provide you with one of the finest responding instruments available. These guitars are of the finest, and yet it is only fraction of the cost that you would normally pay. You may be wondering how such an amazing product could be so cheap, It is possible because it has been manufactured in China, where labor is cheap. Cheap labor does not mean that has been compromised; all parts are of the highest and have been imported from overseas. When purchasing this guitar you can only stand to win. If you are satisfied, you have just saved yourself hundreds of dollars! So go on, treat yourself to the guitar you have always wanted. Our 100% satisfaction guarantee allows you to buy with confidence!"
11. Yamaha THR10 ($299): Another compact yet mighty combo amp, the THR10 boasts a mid-century-modern design with a variety of onboard effects and amp emulation options. This amp uses Virtual Circuitry Modeling (TCM) technology, which creates realistic and pristine tone. When plugging in your bass or acoustic guitars, you can even bypass the modeling section. One of the most convenient functions is the ability for the amp to run on a supplied AC adaptor or battery power for ultimate portability in your individual practice scenario. And it even includes Steinberg’s Cubase AI recording software so it’s plug-and-play right out the box!

For more control and fine tuning of your sound, you may want to use a parametric or graphic EQ. A parametric EQ allows you to adjust the width of the frequency band that's being altered and the shape of the curve—how abruptly the boosted or cut area changes to the unmodified area. A graphic EQ divides the frequency ranges into a number of narrow bands which can each be boosted or lowered by sliders, thus giving you a visual or "graphic" representation of how the EQ is being affected. The more bands there are, the more precise your adjustments can be.


Classical Guitar The classical guitar is a variation of the Spanish Guitar, from its construction, size, weight, wood and the sound it produces. Classical guitars have six nylon strings, rather than metal strings used in other acoustic guitars. The shape, construction, and material of classical guitars vary, but typically they have a modern classical guitar shape, or historic classical guitar shape (e.g., early romantic guitars from France and Italy). Classical guitars are also typically played with the fingers rather than a pick (as steel-string acoustic guitars are often played).
“Move up to Alnico IV and the power rating comes up and the frequency response flattens out – you get a balanced and natural- sounding response from the coils, but not so it’s boosting the treble. The mid-range stays quite constant as well. And then you go to Alnico V, which has the highest power. Then the bass and treble do get boosted and the sound starts to get more aggressive – more ‘rock ’n’ roll’, for want of a better term.

FRET LEVELING ("Filing", "Dressing"...) $150.00 and up. Worn or uneven frets can he filed level in many cases, if there will remain enough height on the fret to suit the customer. Frets must be lowered to the height of the lowest pit that can be found. Sometimes, replacing the most worn frets is appropriate. Includes "set up" adjustments.Add $25.00 for finished maple fretboards.
When Schecter was first founded in 1976, the company’s original purpose was to produce replacement parts for other guitar manufacturers. In 1979, they produced their first guitar and it all took off from there. Today, Schecter is one of the highest rated guitar brands. If you’re looking for a guitar to play metal in particular, Schecter could be the brand for you. Schecter is well-known for their brutal heavy metal sounds. They have a decent range of models, including basses. Schecter’s arguably most famous guitars are the Hellraiser series. They are usually closer to $1000, but it could be worth it for you. When played correctly, the heavy metal distortions and gains that blast out of the amp is fantastic and if you’re a bit more gentle you can even get some softer sounds out of it. The same can be said with most Schecter models, but they favour heavy metal, so if you’re not looking to play heavy metal, you might want to look elsewhere.

Richie Sambora: features an alder body, a 22-fret neck with maple fingerboard, mother of pearl “star” fingerboard inlays, Floyd Rose “Original” locking tremolo, 25dB active mid-boost circuit with active/passive switch, two Fender Texas Special single-coil pickups (neck/middle) and a DiMarzio PAF Pro humbucker in the bridge position. Updated in 1999 with American Vintage hardware, dual-coil Ceramic Noiseless pickups and a 12dB active mid-boost preamp with “no-load” tone circuit and bypass switch. Also available as a “standard” version with a poplar body, rosewood fingerboard with 21 medium-jumbo frets, DiMarzio PAF Pro humbucker with two standard alnico single-coils and a Floyd Rose II locking tremolo. Discontinued in 2002.
Electronics.  If your guitar comes with a pickup system (either from the factory or aftermarket) we will test it before it ships.  Poor sound, uneven string balance, and just plain component failure is all checked & corrected so you don't have to fool around with it. If your guitar's system requires a battery inside the guitar, we may remove it prior to shipping.
A standard Squier Stratocaster is mass-produced in factories located in Indonesia or China. For its construction, Squier usually uses woods readily available in those countries, such asagathis and basswood. They also use stamped metal hardware and multiple pieces of wood in construction to reduce waste and to lower costs. In some cases, the body is laminated, much like a plywood, rather than consisting of two or three solid pieces glued together.
The Salamander Grand (Yamaha C5) has by nature so many velocity samples that it already has a great expressive sound. I have normalised the samples and re-attenuated them to suit sf2 format and simplified it by leaving out some pedal noises and other non-critical sounds. Cut-off frequencies have been adjusted for extra expression and using Wavosaur I have removed the gaps at the front of the samples to greatly reduce latency.
An utterly odd topic would be a discussion of woods for a certain tone. Wood does no magic to the tone. It has properties which might change the resonant behavior of a guitar body. But, that it does by some very course parameters, say stiffness and specific weight. Of very same importance is the shape of the plank which is referred to as “the body”. Stiffness, weight and shape work all together.
Hybrid amps are a strange beast. As the name suggests, they combine multiple technologies to produce a unique hybrid amp experience. They may use the digital front end of a modeling amp with a tube-based power stage, or a tube preamp with a solid-state power amp. The benefits of this style of lesser-seen amp is that you can sometimes get the best of both worlds, with the awesome tone of a tube amp, but with the processing power of a solid-state amp. These amps tend to be cheaper than tube amps and generally easier to maintain.
The fact is, the qualities of different strings can have an effect on your guitar’s resonance and tone, on the quality and responsiveness of your attack as a plectrist or finger picker, and impact your speed and other important factors. And think about your budget. Some coated strings list at nearly $20, while a good basic set of electric guitar strings can be scored for $3 to $4 on sale.
Before I got this guitar, I purchased a classical "starter" package that had crazy good reviews on Amazon. I have been playing guitar on and off for a few years but I would still classify myself as a beginner. In addition, it was my first classical guitar. I was extremely disappointed with the starter package (Yamaha) guitar. Chords sounded awful, and subtle chord changes, such as cadd9 to g were lost in the deep, bass sound. I understand that classical guitars are mainly for finger picking, but I need a guitar that can do both.
Compressor: Compressors make loud sounds quieter and quiet sounds louder by decreasing or "compressing" the dynamic range of an audio signal.[60] A compressor is often used to stabilize volume and smooth a note's "attack" by dampening its onset and amplifying its sustain. A compressor can also function as a limiter with extreme settings of its controls.[61]
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Add a maple top to the mahogany body, as do a great many Les Paul models, and a blend of characteristics comes forward. The mahogany’s depth and richness remain, but the maple provides added snap, clarity, and definition. It also tightens up the lows and adds more cut to the highs. For many players this sonic evolution is highly desirable, whereas others might prefer the smoothness of the pure-mahogany design.
Although a lot of engineers prefer to mic up the single, best-sounding speaker cone of a multi-speaker cab, some blend the sounds of more than one. Steve Churchyard: "If I'm using a 4x12 cabinet, I find two of the best-sounding speakers, and I'll put an SM57 right on axis and right on the cone of both those guys. Then I'll mix them in the control room, combine the two together. It seems a little different than just using one mic. It's not twice as good, but it's just mixing the character of two different speakers."

This guitar is one of the most appreciated units on the market at the current time. This unit is prized for the fact that it comes equipped with a particularly sturdy body that has been made out of solid wood. Even more so, the body of this instrument was constructed using mahogany, hence its durability, while its top part contains maple. Consequently, this unit is glossy and has an appealing clear-cut design that you are prone to enjoy.
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