The Rolls-Royce of multi-effects pedals is the Line 6 POD HD500X. As far as the top 5 pedals in this guide, the HD500X is the most full-featured, most complex, and also the priciest. Despite carrying a higher price tag than the others, it comes very highly recommended and landed a solid second place on our list, and this is mostly due to two things:
The Neoclassical Speed Strategies for Guitar is another book we’d recommend more for the seasoned player. This one provides an excellent introduction into fingerpicking with helpful illustrations of exactly how to position yourself for the quickest and most efficient playing. It includes lots of helpful examples and exercises to make it easier to master.
Up for sale is an Ibanez RGA7QM guitar equipped with EMG 707/81-7 pickups and Sperzel locking tuners. This guitar is in great condition, has never been gigged and has been kept in my smoke free music studio. Guitar Specs: Mahogany body with quilted maple top 5-Piece maple/walnut Wizard II-7 neck Bound rosewood fretboard with 24 jumbo frets Gibraltar Standard 7 bridge Pearl dot inlay

During Michael Laskow's 20-year tenure as an engineer/producer, he worked with Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young, Eric Clapton, Cheap Trick and countless others. He continues to write articles for magazines like Recording and Electronic Musician. He's also the founder of TAXI, an independent A&R company that links record labels with unsigned artists and songwriters.

“What’s the best multi-effects pedal?” is a question that comes up again and again in guitar and bass forums and discussions, and for good reason! There are a lot of multi-effect pedals out there, with prices and features varying drastically from model to model. With multi-effects pedals, it’s a little bit different than something like distortion pedals. With distortion, there might be 50 different manufacturers each making a single distortion pedal. With multi-effects, there are only around 5 major manufacturers (Zoom, Line 6, Boss, DigiTech, TC Electronic), but they each make 10 models of multi-effect pedals. This can make choosing the best one tough for beginners and advanced players alike. Luckily, we’re here to help, and after a ton of research and play testing, we’ll help you decide what the best multi-effects pedals on the market are, no matter your budget and needs.
Hey Omer, I'm not really doing much to the nut here other than widening the slots, so I don't need to measure any heights, etc. For that reason it doesn't matter when I do it. However, if you were to do a proper nut job, then yes, you should probably do that after setting up the other stuff (if you suspect you're having any nut issues, then just put a capo on the first fret and set everything else up first). But if you have no reason to suspect a bad nut, I'd advise you to just leave it alone.

For example, bass guitar frequencies are on the relatively low end of the tonal spectrum. However, plucking a bass string can create a sudden, short burst of high and mid-frequency sounds. You need your bass amp to be loud enough to make those low-frequency sounds strong and audible in the mix, but you don’t want to flatten your band mates or blow out your speakers by sudden pops of high-frequency sounds.
The best way to use this type of book is to just take 15 minutes a day to work through a page or two at a time. You don’t have to find something that requires a lot of study or dedication on your part at this point. Your first priority should be finding a book that gets you thinking about theory as well as helping you develop coordination in both your fretting and strumming hand.
Particularly if you want to get into recording and production, this Blackstar model is ideal. With six distinct “voices” from Clean Warm to OD2, as well as 12 stereo effects, there is a huge range of tones and options to play with. Together with the patented ISF control it allows for a nuanced choice of timbres, allowing you to immerse into exactly the sound you are after in gloriously deep Super Wide Stereo.
JAZZ :Al Di Meola , John McLaughlin ,Wes Montgomery ,Pat Metheny ,John Scofield,Django Reinhardt ,Larry carlton ,Joe Pass,Herb Ellis ,Eddie Lang , and again I still have in mind at least 10 more jazz guitar players that jazz is the hardest and more complex guitar composition and it is an awesome style or kind of music to play just because not everybody play can play jazz.
Also remember pedals change in sound character with different guitars/pickups/amps so it’s worth experimenting before buying. If you’re not sure where to start try a few ‘classics’ as a reference point. Ibanez’ Tube Screamer or one of it’s imitators of which there are many, are mild overdrives that also usefully liven up cheaper amps, particularly when volumes need to be kept low.
Now I do all of my own adjustments and I have no plans to change that unless I run into something that's beyond me. Even if that scenario occurs, I still plan to try to learn as much as I can so that hopefully I will be able to take care of any future issues that are related. Mark did a great job for me but I feel that I do a better job adjusting my instruments to my needs.
I bought a Yamaha EC-10 classical at a garage sale for $5.00. It was still in the cardboard box and never played according to the seller. The guitar is full size and looks cool and has real good volume and good bass, but I'd still like to get more bass out of it. I'm thinking of making some modifications to my guitar so that I can fit it with actual bass guitar strings, nylon ones. A friend of mine said I'd wreck up my guitar if I did this. Would I wreck the guitar putting bass strings on it or could I make a bass out of it?
While it might seem unnecessary, an EQ pedal is a very handy effect to have. Many amps have very specific voicing that can only be adjusted so far with their tone stack. Also, many small amps have limited on board tone-shaping options. For example, the popular Fender Champ 600 or the Blackstar HT-1, which only have one knob for tone shaping. With an EQ in your chain, you can fine-tune the amp to your liking, or you can perfectly dial in a distortion or fuzz that normally won't cooperate.

There’s a huge range of cheap electric guitars out there that would not look out of place on the stages of the world thanks to high quality manufacturing and the brands actually caring about their products – “cheap” does not always mean poor quality and plenty of guitars out there will give you a fantastic playing experience for many years without breaking the bank.

Now I’ve heard people say they can’t tell the difference between the two when they’ve played both. From a strictly tone perspective, that may or may not be true. And maybe for me it’s just the placebo effect (I know its a Gibson - or not - therefore I feel an ethereal change in quality), yet it seems awfully subjective to base a $2600 difference on a report that lacks concrete research.
There was a time when Yamaha were thought of as just a guitar maker for students and beginners - but those days are long gone and Yamaha now produce quality acoustics that compete favorably with the best in this category. The LL16 is a great example, with it's all-solid wood body and built in pickups with preamp, this is a true workhorse instrument. Having premium level specs at mid-tier pricing is like a dream come true, the main reason why we consider the LL16 as the best value for money acoustic in this section.

Repairing pickups. You do not have the option of repairing and salvaging the pickup beyond re soldering the coil wire. If you do this be aware you are not repairing but instead customizing. However, to repair or restore pickups start by re-magnetize the coil magnets using strong earth magnets. If you need to re-solder the coil wire, unwind the pickup tape and properly re-solder in the wire appropriately.
Continuing to look at the well-known Fender brand, the Stratocaster American Standard is a higher-priced option with necessary features for the seasoned guitarist. This is another one of the most popular electric guitars ever. In terms of build, the body is a mix of ash and alder, creating a balanced tone for both the sharpness of the upper range chords and the dense resonance of the lower range progressions. The modern bridge has an upgrade of utilizing a block infused with copper and steel saddles for strong intonation and an ease in adjusting pitch. The tuners are placed at varying degrees and heights, with this staggered design creating a decreased in reverberation and excess hum so as to focus in on the clarity of the sound. This electric guitar also has a custom designed single-coil strat known as the “Fat ‘50s”, which is intended to create a fuller sound compared to other guitars. With a comfortable ‘C’ shaped design and durable finish, this 22 fret guitar offers desirable features for the guitar enthusiast. If you’re unsure whether to grab this or our previous Fender pick, read this Telecaster vs. Stratocaster sound article for some more info.

The Hi-Flier guitar, which was possibly built in the Matsumoku factory, underwent multiple phases during the course of its production. Each of the Hi-Flier’s four manufacturing phases came with a variety of feature changes, ranging from simply switching the color of the pickguard to actually fitting the guitar for humbuckers rather than the P90-style pickups it originally came with.

All mass-market brands offer at least one distortion pedal—and often many. Boss, for one, tries to cater to all possible tastes. Its DS-1 (not to be confused with the SD-1 overdrive mentioned above) is one of the workhorses of the breed, with some big-name players happy to stomp on its rectangular switch, including both Steve Vai and Joe Satriani. The DS-2 takes things a step further, while the MT-2 Metal Zone and MD-2 Mega Distortion get successively more evil. And Boss isn’t the only one, with DOD, Ibanez, Marshall and many, many others playing the game too, along with a few of the boutique makers. The proliferation is most distinctive in many “metal” pedals that go beyond even the standard distortion sounds. These generally offer the archetypal scooped-mid sound with thudding lows and crispy highs. Many are adjustable for anything from classic rock to metal sounds, with a tone control that acts more to reduce or accentuate mids rather than the usual high boost/cut, and often a “resonance” control or similar to adjust the fullness of the bass.
I like it especially as a studio companion for lead guitar players who have session clients that need melodies to come out perfectly on recorded tracks. Having a neck that's so thin makes it easier to play and get right the first time which will reduce the number of takes. Though the live performer will benefit as well, considering that improve playability has universal benefits.

Featuring a scalloped X, a Fishman Isys III System, a Rosewood bridge with compensated saddle and chrome die cast tuning keys, a body with laminated Mahogany back and sides and laminated Maple top, a cutaway design with dreadnought body shape with a wide choice of color and design, and to top it all off, a Fender FTE-3TN Preamp with Tuner, this guitar surely has it all and it’s not even that expensive!

This book teaches you how to visualize the notes, which will lead quickly to remembering them. Once you know where the notes are, forming chords becomes easier, which leads to fluid playing in any position. At the very least, if you can identify your root notes, you can bail yourself out of trouble at any time. That skill for resolution serves you in improvisation and the random jams that will provide much of your growth.
Scott Baxendale has been building custom hand made guitars since 1974. Recently he settled in Athens Georgia where he is currently building custom guitars, restoring vintage guitars and teaching the art of lutherie to aspiring craftsman. Scott Baxendale’s legacy of building custom instruments began in 1974, when he arrived in Winfield, Kansas to work for […]
Guitar chords and signatures. Find and save list of chords. Basic guitar chords A sheet of the most used rock chords. Suitable for beginners. Empty chord sheet An empty sheet of chords templates to print out and use. Basic guitar chords Em, C, G, D, Am, E, and A Free lesson on the basic guitar chords Em, C, G, D, Am, E, and A. The following chords are 7 of the most basic open position chords. An open position chord is one that contains at least o
Guitar pickups are quite heavily affected by the impedance of whatever they're plugged into. If it's a low impedance input, you'll end up with a muddier, flatter sound going into your amp sims. Ideally you want a high impedance input, and if the 6i6 isn't doing it a cheap-ish D.I. box will be the thing to go for. Behringer's got some that get the job done.

In standard Boss fashion, you get a set of four no-nonsense controls and a footswitch that is as durable as the case it’s installed in. However, none of this means anything if the reverb effect isn’t up to the expected level. Fortunately for us, Boss didn’t disappoint with this one. You get a reverb effect that is in that sweet spot when it comes to versatility and quality.


According to Mr. Noguchi, Teisco instruments debuted in 1946 and were made by a company founded principally by the late Mr. Atswo Kaneko, a renowned Hawaiian and Spanish guitarist, and Mr. Doryu Matsuda, an electrical engineer. Mr. Doryu Matsuda was born in 1921 and was still alive at the time of this writing. As mentioned, Mr. Kaneko gave the guitars the Teisco brand name, however, the original name of the company was Aoi Onpa Kenkyujo (roughly translated: Hollyhock Soundwave or Electricity Laboratories). This was a small workshop formed in war-ravaged Tokyo.
The Uni-Vibe was released in 1968 and became an immediate favorite of Jimi Hendrix, David Gilmour, and Robin Trower. It is actually a phase shifting effect, but what makes it groundbreaking is its use of an LFO (low frequency oscillator) to create the sweeping effect. It also uses a photocell to control the speed of the sweeping effect. That is basically a little light bulb inside the unit that will pulse at whatever speed the rate knob is set to. Also the brighter the pulse of the bulb the more dramatic the effect.
We also decided to test a separate group of smaller guitars with scale lengths (the distance from the string nut at the top of the neck to the bridge that supports the strings on the body) in the range of 22 inches, as compared with 24.75 to 25.5 inches for most full-size electric guitars. These models may be more comfortable for kids because their smaller hands won’t have to stretch as far, and many adults also like them because their compact size makes them easier to travel with.
Most of the better machine heads on the market these days use a standard .375" headstock hole, so swapping tuners isn’t that hard to do. The problem comes with the mounting at the rear of the peghead. Luckily, if you use the type that screw down from the front side with a nut and washer, you can swap and test before you drill additional mounting-screw holes.
The microphone set up I described earlier will give you a similar effect. The close mic gives you great detail (in audio terms, top-end, treble) and warmth. The mid-distance mic will give you the perspective that the amp is in a room, but without too much loss of detail. The far mic will tell you in no uncertain terms that you are definitely in a room, and with any luck, the listener's brain will process that information and tell the listener what size the room is (I'm not talking exact measurements here--just rough approximations). There will be a fairly significant loss of detail though. The combination of any of the mics will give you varying degrees of perspective and detail.
This is a nice improvement on the ME-70, which I owned previously, except for one thing: plastic expression pedal. That's why it got 4 stars from me. The ME-70 had a metal pedal, and it was substantially larger. This plastic pedal does not have the same feel. Feels chintzy. I was expecting similar quality but in that one regard the quality is inferior to the previous version.
The only reason the Yamaha Pacifica would have low action is if the string height was set low. Just making a broad statement like “if you want a low action guitar buy a Yamaha Pacifica” I know that is not your words but that is what you seem to be implying. Some beginning guitar player could buy a Yamaha Pacifica that has high action. All guitars can have low action if they are set-up to have low action. Some good info here regardless. Ben.
Hendrix, Van Halen and, uh, Mozart are the musicians to thank for most heavily influencing death-metal shredder Azagthoth, not that they really come through in the jagged riffs and cheetah-fast solos of Morbid Angel classics like “World of S—t” and “Where the Slime Live.” But that’s because he has blazed a tension-filled style all his own (when he solos, he enters a mystical mind state he calls the “Temple of Ostx”) that is finally getting more praise than early antics like cutting himself with a razor before hitting the stage and extolling Satanism.

This is a subsidiary guitar brand owned by Gibson. Epiphone makes the same models as Gibson - SGs, Les Pauls and what have you. The only real difference is the electrics, the circuitry, the wood and the finish, which to the normal eye/intermediate guitar player won't be able to tell apart from a Gibson. In fact, most of the musicians started out with an Epiphone because Gibsons are too expensive. John Lennon famously continued using Epiphone even after being able to buy Gibsons because he loved the imperfection of his Epiphone Casino.
If you already have an electric guitar and you're looking for replacement strings, carry cases, guitar stands, or other accessories, you've come to the right place. Amazon.com offers a selection of tools and accessories designed for players of every age and skill level, from beginners to pros. Look for amplifiers, cables, and microphones too—you can enjoy great selection right here online, with no need to make a special trip to the guitar shop.
Every generation there's one guitar master whose touch can make a guitar purr; whose grasp of his skill is so complete that just by looking at the guitar, he knows her problem; and whose ears can pinpoint what your tone is lacking. They are legends. And the mystique that surrounds these guys is hard to penetrate. Swank is one of those guitar masters. "I think part of my mystique now is that I'm just flaky and don't return phone calls," he says. "It's not that I'm some kind of badass." Swank was first introduced to the business of guitar repairing when he saw another master's work. "I just thought it was a pretty noble pursuit."
Distortion, overdrive, and fuzz can be produced by effects pedals, rackmounts, pre-amplifiers, power amplifiers (a potentially speaker-blowing approach), speakers and (since the 2000s) by digital amplifier modeling devices and audio software.[1][2] These effects are used with electric guitars, electric basses (fuzz bass), electronic keyboards, and more rarely as a special effect with vocals. While distortion is often created intentionally as a musical effect, musicians and sound engineers sometimes take steps to avoid distortion, particularly when using PA systems to amplify vocals or when playing back prerecorded music.

Pick-Ups – The pickup is preset underneath the strings, on the body of the electric guitar and it works as a magnetic field. When the metal strings are plucked they vibrate and generate a current that is transmitted by the pickup to the guitar cable and to the amplifier. These may is just a single pickup in a guitar or 3 to 4 pickups depending on the guitar.
The Hawaiians are likewise hard to identify. One looks to be similar to the later Teisco EG-7L, with a Gibson sort of shape and a pair of offset rocket shapes on either side of the pickup which house roller wheels for volume and tone. A second appears to have a rounded body similar to a Rickenbacker frying pan, looking perhaps like the later Teisco EG-K. This had the same slotted pickup as the J-1, and a single volume control. Finally, there’s an unidentified eight-string lap with an elongated sort of rectangular body and an elevated fingerboard. This had a volume and tone with white knobs, and the tuners were behind the head, rather than sticking straight up, as on later eight-strings.

Now check both the open and the 12th fret notes again. You’ll have to tune the open string again because by moving the saddle, the tension of the string will have changed and so will need to be retuned. Once you have correctly moved the saddle so that both the open string and the 12th fret are in tune, you can move on to the A string. Repeat until all of the strings have been done. Note that on this particular guitar, the (thick) E, A and D saddles could not be moved far enough forward to intonate correctly, so I had to swap their orientation to give a bit more distance.
First, Steel String sounds heavenly, and I always love it when my mouth drops the first time I hear a hyper-realistic sounding VST. Steel String has done this completely, in fact, the only time I was ever pulled out from its hyper-realism was on the fret noise that recreates the articulation of finger sliding across the strings when changing positions.
The EB-18 was supplied with a quality hard flight case. The EB-18 body fits into the shaped recess and the case takes account of the oddly shaped ‘lizard-looking head and large tuning lugs. There is a pair of compartments inside forcables and other items. The inside is lined with a soft, burnt orange color, fur-like material. The case is closed with four toggle latches and has a centrally placed carrying handle.

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The Ibanez RG series is basically synonymous with shreddable metal music. Inspired by the classic JEM series of the glammy 80s rock years, this GRGR120EX guitar is perfect for the guitar player who aspires to be a real metalhead. The body is made of solid alder and it comes with a slick black binding. There are two super-high-output, extra-snarly Infinity R pickups that will respond well to overdrive and distortion pedals. Moreover, a rosewood fingerboard with classic Ibanez sharktooth inlays and sharp black hardware make this guitar look like the real deal.

Two brands are synonymous with this type of instrument: Gibson and Fender.  Not only were they the earliest to bring the electric guitar to the masses, but the designs they created are still employed today, preferred by budding beginners and working professional musicians alike.  Other companies have made their mark in the market by creating variants on Gibson’s and Fender’s original designs, but they are still identified through the names that the originals were given.

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The instruments have been set up at the factory. However, time, temperature, and transportation are a few of the many things that can cause a guitar to go out of "intonation". We recommend that you get your new guitar set up by a qualified luthier upon delivery. We recommend taking it to a qualified guitar tech for a set up. They will adjust the neck and bridge to take out the buzzing. We ensure that before shipment there is no evident of fret buzz before shipment and the guitar plays beautifully since our professional guitar technicians inspect each instrument by hand, then perform a full, and precision setup. All brand new guitars need proper setup after shipment to suit your personal preference that would strongly correlate to your playing style. We believe that your Local Guitar Shop can properly and safely adjust the truss rod and setup the guitar correctly for issues of fret buzz and bow neck. Truss rod adjustments are made to alter the straightness (flatness) of the neck. Truss rods often require adjusting when temperature and humidity change the amount of bow in the neck. Weather, specifically temperature and humidity, may have a dramatic impact on the way your instrument plays. All instrument woods expand and contract with seasonal actuations in temperature and humidity, and naturally, string height and playing action are affected. The neck needs a simple truss rod adjustment to correct any problems like fret buzz and bow neck which can be easily done by guitar experts. And also, you may adjust the bar of bridge. Please be advised that guitar necks are crafted from wood, and they will sometimes shift during shipping and as the temperature/humidity/elevation changes. An important part of maintaining your guitar is knowing how to adjust the truss rod. When a guitar experiences temperature and humidity swings, such as when seasons change, it can develop a slight bow in the neck that results in a guitar that plays buzzy or is suddenly much harder to fret. If this situation occurs, you can often correct the problem simply by tightening or loosening the truss rod.
Strumming Patterns: Tremolo is a tough fit here for the same reason as delay. Timing and repeating issues both tend to cause problems.Chords: This can work if used sparingly, especially when strumming patterns are simple and chords are allowed to ring.Short Arpeggios: Particularly if played during a verse, short arpeggios are easily benefited and improved by a light tremolo effect.Quick Solos: Any unique, lead guitar part that needs something extra can be a good spot for the tremolo effect. Usually this will occur during the bridge of a song.
Hybrid picking is a technique that makes use of both the pick and the remaining pick hand fingers. On the surface, it’s more versatile than playing with just with a pick. Digging deeper, you’ll learn hybrid picking has the same, yet different mojo than fingerpicking as well. At the end of the day, this technique is a very powerful one that will enable you to play things that would be otherwise impossible. Be it oddly accented phrases to wide interval licks to more intricate chordal ideas, hybrid picking opens up in credible options.
A Volume pedal is a volume potentiometer that is tilted forward or back by foot. A volume pedal enables a musician to adjust the volume of their instrument while they are performing. Volume pedals can also be used to make the guitar's notes or chords fade in and out. This allows the percussive plucking of the strings to be softened or eliminated entirely, imparting a human-vocal sound. Volume pedals are also widely used with pedal steel guitars in country music. It has also been used to great effect in rock music; the Pat McGee Band's live version of "Can't Miss What You Never Had" on General Admission illustrates what the pedal is capable of. Some volume pedals are:
This article was tremendously helpful! My daughter is entering college for music therapy, and she is already an accomplished pianist but needed a more portable instrument to see patients. We have been scouting out guitars for some time and are looking to get a quality instrument without breaking the bank. Thank you so much for this well-researched article.
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The key to getting a great guitar sound really is in the hands of the engineer, not his equipment. I've gotten great sounds in multi-million dollar rooms, and topped them in the smallest of home studios. You can do it too. The key is to constantly experiment and apply some basic physics. Try different mics, try moving them closer and farther, try different angles, try putting the amp in a corner, try putting the amp on a concrete floor, try it on a wood floor, try it on a floor with green shag carpeting, just try anything!
If you like the traditional look of a Fender Stratocaster, but want something a bit more modern with a little more output for heavier blues, rock, and metal tones, the ESP LTD SN-200HT is a fantastic value for the money. You’ll get a great range of tones thanks to the humbucker in the bridge position, and two single coils in the middle and neck positions.

Though comfortable playing many styles, Atkins was most often associated with country music and the acoustic guitar. By using a combination of his fingers and a thumb pick, he created his signature “fingerpicking” sound—a style somewhat inspired by fellow guitarist Merle Travis. Atkins even recorded a duo album with Travis, as well as with other respected guitarist like Doc Watson, Les Paul, Jerry Reed and Mark Knopfler.

Given the price tag, you’d expect the J-200 to be of a very high quality throughout, and we’re pleased to be able to say that it is. Every millimeter of the guitar has been expertly crafted, and nothing is an afterthought. The end result is a stunningly beautiful guitar that feels very special in your hands. No wonder everyone from Elvis to Jimmy Page has used a Super Jumbo in some form throughout history.


I bought my amp at my local music store. When I walked in, I told the sales person that I got my El Dorado and I wanted to buy an amp. I asked him if he would mind playing my guitar through the amps in my price range. He readily agreed because he is the person who found Big Lou Guitars on the internet after I tried every brand of electric guitar in the store and believed I needed a big nut guitar because my hands needed an action with more space between the frets and strings. He told me to bring it in when I got it because he wanted to try it. He plugged it in and went up, down, and across the fretboard playing riffs and chords. When he finished, he said “great action, I’m surprised – and the price!”
While they may be on the dry side, these books are convenient because they’re always available for reference. In an online class or an app, you might have to go digging through files or lessons to find that one scrap of information that was helpful. You also have to be on your phone or at your computer. For some people, the old way is still the best way.
The person who said "I have a friend who plays an ashton, and he actually thinks it's a good guitar, while he constantly has to put paper under the strings because otherwise everything above the 3th fret is literally unplayable. Poor guy" MAY I POINT OUT that they just stated how the guitar was in a poor condition but said nothing about why or how long the guitar has been played and all these essential details.
Oh and you play really great sounding exercises in blues, rock and country that encourage you to noodle around and find your own riffs and leads to play over the tracks which is something that I had never really been inspired to do before with any other book. The author doesn't just throw a bunch of tired, boring, public domain yankee doodles and scarborough fairs because he is too cheap to pay royalties or some crappy tunes that a kindergardener could write but actual original pro sounding tunes and riffs. Yes, I HAVE been around my fair share of crappy guitar lesson books, thanks for asking!
Fractal Audio is a relatively small company that competes directly with the world's biggest amp modeling and effects manufacturers. They built their reputation on the quality of their premium priced guitar processor called AxeFX, but has since expanded into relatively more affordable territory with the AX8 and FX8. Of the two, the FX8 gets our pick because of its incredible balance of quality, complexity and practicality. It is also fits this list better because it is a true multi-effects "only" unit, so there's no amp modeling feature to get hung up on.

Great playing and sounding bass. The Ibanez BTB series in a 'very playable' 4-string version. Huge tone is delivered via 2 active pickups that feature controls for volume, bass, midrange, treble and balance. We believe the pickups are actually made by Bartolini. 'Locking' 1/4 jack. Solid wood, natural finish body. Rosewood fingerboard on maple neck. Tuning is accomplished via quality, 'sealed' tuning machines. Rock solid and stays in tune. Set up great! Currently has 'nylon wound' strings for a softer 'jazz' tone. Frets show virtually no wear. Body finish has VERY little wear. Includes gig bag.
OM-42PS: Paul Simon’s signature acoustic model (manufactured in the 1997 model year) is based on the OM-42, which had not been manufactured since 1930. Alterations were specifically requested by Simon himself. From the original planned run of approximately 500, only 223 were produced, making these a collector’s item. A standard version of the OM-42 is in the current range.
As a result of requests by audio engineers to reduce onstage volume, in the 2010s, in many large venues. much of the on-stage sound reaching the musicians now comes from the monitor speakers or in-ear monitors, not from the instrument amplifiers. Stacks of huge speaker cabinets and amplifiers are still used in concerts in some genres of music, especially heavy metal, but they tend to be used more for the visual effect than for sound reproduction.

As their categorical name suggests, extended chords indeed extend seventh chords by stacking one or more additional third-intervals, successively constructing ninth, eleventh, and finally thirteenth chords; thirteenth chords contain all seven notes of the diatonic scale. In closed position, extended chords contain dissonant intervals or may sound supersaturated, particularly thirteenth chords with their seven notes. Consequently, extended chords are often played with the omission of one or more tones, especially the fifth and often the third,[92][93] as already noted for seventh chords; similarly, eleventh chords often omit the ninth, and thirteenth chords the ninth or eleventh. Often, the third is raised an octave, mimicking its position in the root's sequence of harmonics.[92]
In the 21st century, European avant garde composers like Richard Barrett, Fausto Romitelli, Peter Ablinger, Bernhard Lang, Claude Ledoux and Karlheinz Essl have used the electric guitar (together with extended playing techniques) in solo pieces or ensemble works. Probably the most ambitious and perhaps significant work to date is Ingwe (2003–2009) by Georges Lentz (written for Australian guitarist Zane Banks), a 60-minute work for solo electric guitar, exploring that composer's existential struggles and taking the instrument into realms previously unknown in a concert music setting.
Solid Body Guitars: For those looking for a more versatile array of tones blended with the deepest number of volume options and full-blooded sustain, the electric solid body is the right machine. The differences between various types of solid body models are vast — even between an SG, the most popular model Gibson makes, and a Les Paul, Gibson’s six-string flagship. A wide variety of tone woods, including mahogany, maple, alder, spruce, maple and, commonly for the fretboard, rosewood and baked maple, are employed. They are extremely versatile instruments and have been spotted in the hands of players as wide-ranging as Les Paul and Zakk Wylde.
I bought my first guitar several years ago and I’ve been happy with the purchase. But recently I’ve thought about buying a used guitar if I happen to find a good guitar at a bargain at a music store or pawn shop. I like the advice you gave for buying a used guitar: that I should stick with well-known brands and inspect the fret boards, neck, and other parts for needed repair. I’ll keep these tips in mind the next time I visit a guitar shop.
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As a long time player conveying the skill, craft and passion of this art, which is as much as a science, players of ANY and every instrument can unanimously agree that there are no “best” players. Some have great moments that were captured and regurgitated in the media time and a get which put them in a permanent vista. This is greatness? Hardly. I’ve seen A LOT of players, some included in the article and the majority chanted by the readers on this board screw things up beyond repair–some during the opening of their first song of the performance. OUCH that hurts…but it happens. Some completely lost track with what they were doing during a show casing of their solo work…oops. Yep it happens, like sometimes happens to singers who forget their lines–it doesn’t matter that they have written the song they were performing. Yea, we hear about this stuff every now and then, however at the end of the day, this doesn’t matter. The truth is, people hear only what they want to hear and will by their very disposition, ignore the negatives and embrace the positives of their work–alas this is why this supportive listeners are called FANS.

When you’re talking Gibson, mahogany is frequently going to factor into the brew. And that’s a wonderful thing. This is the classic ingredient of the multi-wood body, and one of the most common neck woods also, but is very often used on its own in single-wood bodies. On its own in an SG, Les Paul Special, or Les Paul Junior, mahogany’s voice is characteristically warm and somewhat soft, but extremely well balanced, with good grind and bite. It has the potential for good depth, with full (though not super-tight) lows, velvety highs, and a slightly compressed response. Overall, think round, open, warm.
Before you begin, it’s important to understand that a book can’t teach you guitar. They’re great as references and serve as a fine starting point, but soon enough, you need to take what you’ve learned and try to integrate it into a performative craft alongside other musicians. If you find yourself getting stuck, take the exercise you’re on to a jam with like-minded musicians who can help you work practically with the material. At the very least, set a backing track and learn how to time those new skills. So much of playing is about feel, which is a magical combination of timing and groove that only exists in the moment.

Older 1800s Martins are a challange to date (since they don't have a serial number like 1898 and later Martins). A "New York" stamp does not immediately suggest that the Martin guitar is from the 1830s for example. To accurately date pre-1898 Martins you must be familiar design and ornamentation appointments and the changes that took place in each model throughout the 1800s. Most useful though is the stamp, but you can only use the stamp on the INSIDE of the body on it's center backstrip (visible through the soundhole) to date a guitar. And even then you can only date to a period (and not to an exact date). For example if it says on the center back strip, "C.F. Martin, New York", then the guitar is pre-1867. If it says, "C.F. Martin & Co., New York", it is between 1867 and 1897. Note 1860-1890s Martins have a date (year of manufacture) penciled on the underside of the top. Check with a mirror, looking just below the soundhole and between the braces.
The Gibson-owned Epiphone Company makes around 20 models of the Les Paul, most are similar copies of Gibson-made models, although when inspected closely, the Gibson originals are most often superior in craftsmanship and materials. Made in places outside the U.S., the Epiphone Les Pauls are made from more commonly available woods using less expensive foreign labor and have less hand detailing than the Gibson models, and, as a result, sell for a lower price. Epiphone Guitar Co. has been owned by Gibson Guitars since the 1950s. Once Gibson purchased Epiphone they quickly began making lower-quality guitars based on Gibson designs.[24]
These pedals are different, but are both based on the same idea. Pitch shifters shift the whole pitch of your guitar up or down by a set amount (often an octave), giving you a higher or lower tone than would normally be possible. Jack white uses a Whammy pitch shifter in the solo for Seven Nation Army, which has a foot pedal that rocks back and forth (similar to a wah pedal) allowing you to go up and down a full octave or more smoothly and quickly.
Another thing to keep in mind is the purpose of the amplifier. And I don’t mean the actual purpose. We all know that I’m pretty sure. What I mean is what you will be using it for? Are you a beginner who wants to practice a lot in their basement before they ever take their guitar and amp into the daylight or maybe you have been playing for quite some time and want to record your music. MAYBE you have gathered all your strength and confidence (and your band) and decided to gig. All of these situations are somewhat different and various amps work for different purposes. While there are a lot of amps that do all of them together, sometimes getting an amp just for practice might be more efficient and, of course, affordable.
I also was amazed how well my Norma FG-7 played..its a parlor size acoustic guitar made of what looks to be all mohagony with a white pic guard kinda cool looking but it was a cheap guitar for the times.it was made in Korea...I acquired it in a small trade ...the bridge was broken on the peghead and luckily both pieces were still there as it still had 4 strings that looked original to me that held the two pieces together...lol....I re-glued the bridge...cleaned her up real well...re-strung her...and wow...I couldn't really contain myself as she sounded as well as a lot of other guitars out there today...although they aren't worth that much...it;s all in how they play and sound...so I believe they are a dandy for sure...but most will be a rebuild! have fun all and keep strummin'

There’s another wrinkle: vintage-style pickup magnets can weaken over time, resulting in a softer, smoother tone. Some pickups are designed to mimic this ageing process. Say you were looking for a vintage P.A.F.-style humbucker: You could choose between one of our models that that sounds like a pickup straight off the late-’50s production line (the Seth Lover humbucker), and another that mimics a similar pickup as it would sound and look today after decades of wear and tear (the Antiquity humbucker).
Randall is a guitar amp manufacturer that specializes in high-gain sounds, and they are revered in the metal community. A Randall tube amp is a force to be reckoned with, but thanks to the late Darrell Abbott of Pantera and Damageplan their solid-state sounds are just as legendary. Dime loved the harsh, scooped sound of Randall amps, and it became his signature sound throughout his early career.
Gibson originally offered a single cutaway from the guitar body, so that players could access higher frets.  Notice that Fender includes a double cutaway design so the player’s thumb also has access to the higher side of the neck.  Gibson used “3 On A Side” tuners, so Fender offered “6 Inline” tuning pegs.  It was these choices that created a large part of the visual appeal of the Strat.
Playing Electric Slide is great. I use the neck pick up mostly or the bridge pick up with the tone turned down as not to blow out peoples ear drums, but you can adjust to the tone you prefer. Most people adjust the strings a little further from the neck. I prefer not so I can bend and play normal too. Great slide players. Jimmy Page, Joe Bonnamassa, Joe Perry hope this was helpful
There were actually two bolt-neck DT-250s, both with basswood bodies and the very nice locking Powerocker vibratos. The regular model came in black or white and had a rosewood fingerboard. Well, a little boring. But the Transparent Red TRs came with a maple fingerboard stained red. Yes, that’s what we’re talking about! If you’re going to have a red guitar, you ought to have a matching red fingerboard. Hard maple, made slick with the red polyurethane.
Much like ESP, Schecter started out as a parts company which decided to start building their own guitars. Right from day one it was apparent that their mission was to deliver ultimate metal guitars. Everything from their design, to the choice of electronics pointed in this direction. It didn’t take long for Schecter to become one of the go to brands that has reached the elite level.
Harmoniser pedals are also very useful. You put in the key you are playing and which harmony you would like (3rds for instance – just like in a lot of Iron Maiden songs) and as you play, the harmoniser automatically creates the harmony you have selected. This is great if you are the only guitar player in a band, or if you like to experiment with new harmonies on the fly.
Frank Bowers Interestingly enough, they have completely different approaches to the job. Bo cranks his Gibson Firebird straight through a Peavey 6505 half stack with nothing in line but a tuner, while Frank rocks out on his Gibson Les Paul Customs through a Digitech GSP-2101 preamp, a Mesa/Boogie TriAxis preamp, a TC Electronics G-Major processor, a Mesa/Boogie 2:90 power amp, and a Marshall 4x12 cabinet. During their show, they each take jaw-dropping solos, and they share the spotlight on some of the best-executed twin leads since Thin Lizzy’s “The Boys Are Back in Town.” 

“Rock guitarists are incredibly conservative and traditional,” says Dr. Millard. “We like to think of ourselves breaking all the bonds and we go back to the fifties when rock and roll was revolutionary. It is not revolutionary. It is very traditional, very conservative, and musicians are really stubborn to change. We have a cultural understanding that old is better than good.”
SOLD ; Fresh releas from the JVG Vintage Vault collection.....Here she is a wonderful sounding Exotic tone woods LawSuit model Takamine from the PeaK and end of this so called Lawsuit copies. What can I say this beauty has it all the Exotic Tone Woods the beautiful TONE the superior workmanship this example exhibits the care from its one owner. Its condition is better than average it has no cracks, no checking, no warping nothing to report, it does have a very few minor chips or dinks overall way better than average not exactly new or mint like its overall gorgeous and is easily a solid 9.5/10 used vintage excellent, its neck is arrow straight proper relief is set and action is beautifully low and it makes playing this beauty a dream like pleasure. She's been professionally set up with a new set of Martin strings. Intonation is dead on and she rings like a bell. Very rare to see this model up for sale and available to buy this guitar is Amazing and is a keeper.... SWEET! Contact Joe to buy it at: JVGuitars@gmail.com Thank you for looking.
It was also in January of ’64 that the Westheimer Sales Company, 1414 South Wabash Avenue, Chicago, began advertising its New Kingston, the “S” line of quality guitars. These double-cutaway guitars included the #S-1 single pickup, #S-2 double pickup, #S-3 three pickup, the #S-2T double with tremolo, and #S-3T with tremolo. These were most likely versions of the little MJ and WG guitars.
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The Effect: By all standards, tremolo is one of the oldest, as well one of the simplest effects you can get these days. The whole idea behind a tremolo pedal is to give you that wave type effect by reducing and increasing the volume of your guitar’s original signal. You can adjust the speed of the effect and how deep those dips in volume are going to go.
Today's modern rock guitar sounds tend to be "drier" (less room ambiance and reverb), and most often use the close mic technique. There's really nothing to it. Simply use the close mic, run it through the compressor, set the compressor at a 3:1 ratio and adjust the threshold so that the compressor is usually working, but not squashing the signal too much. You will be able to make most of the tone adjustments you need at the amp or guitar, and chances are you won't need to tweak the console' s equalizer at all.
Adolph Rickenbacher was born in Switzerland in 1886 and emigrated to the United States with relatives after the death of his parents. Sometime after moving to Los Angeles in 1918, he changed his surname to “Rickenbacker”. This was done probably in order to avoid German connotations in light of the recently concluded First World War as well as to capitalize on Adolph’s distant relation to World War I flying ace Eddie Rickenbacker. In 1925, Adolph Rickenbacker and two partners formed the Rickenbacker Manufacturing Company and incorporated it in 1927. By the time he met George Beauchamp and began manufacturing metal bodies for the “Nationals” being produced by the National String Instruments Corporation, Rickenbacker was a highly skilled production engineer and machinist. Adolph soon became a shareholder in National and, with the assistance of his Rickenbacker Manufacturing Company, National was able to boost production to as many as fifty guitars a day.[4]
Manne guitars - This Italy based guitar manufacturer produces instruments with unique features. The first Manne guitar was built in 1986 and they continue to provide finely crafted instruments based on some very original design concepts. Manne's design philosophy: hand craft the finest stringed instruments then offer them to the public at a reasonable price.
Teisco produced guitars that were sold in the U.S. as Teisco del Rey as well as Silvertone, Beltone, Duke, Decca, Heit Deluxe, Jedson, Kimberly, Kingston, Lyle, Norma, Tulio and World Teisco, as well as some of the early Kents. At various times Teisco guitars were made for and sold under the now well-known Ibanez name. They have developed somewhat of a cult following in the U.S. which has resulted in some unrealistic prices for some models.
Seagull is a Canadian company that produces hand crafted acoustic guitars. It has solid top guitars which offer richer sound, broader dynamic range, and sound becomes better as time pass by. The neck of the guitar of the seagull guitar has either Silverleaf maple or Honduras mahogany. Silverleaf is less permeable than mahogany that provides an incredibly smooth sensation but has an identical denseness. Some really good guitars from the line up of Seagull are Original S6 Cedar, Entourage Rustic S6, and Entourage Rustic CW QI.
Fuzz boxes and other heavy distortions can produce unwanted dissonances when playing chords. To get around this, guitar players (and keyboard players) using these effects may restrict their playing to single notes and simple "power chords" (root, fifth, and octave). Indeed, with the most extreme fuzz pedals, players may choose to play mostly single notes, because the fuzz can make even single notes sound very thick and heavy. Heavy distortion also tends to limit the player's control of dynamics (loudness and softness) - similar to the limitations imposed on a Hammond organ player (Hammond organ does not produce louder or softer sounds depending on how hard or soft the performer plays the keys; however, the performer can still control the volume with drawbars and the expression pedal). Heavy metal music has evolved around these restrictions, using complex rhythms and timing for expression and excitement. Lighter distortions and overdrives can be used with triadic chords and seventh chords; as well, lighter overdrive allows more control of dynamics.[citation needed]
If you just want to send that current through to the amplifier unchanged, that would mean keeping all volume- and tone knobs turned all the way up. But the knobs can be useful. Underneath the volume knobs, the electrical signal is hooked up to two places; one line goes out towards the amplifier, and the other is effectively contained without being sent to the amplifier. The more you turn down the volume knob, the more of the signal you contain instead of sending it through the amplifier.
Some of the energy is not translated to string movement because it is lost. Where? To the body. Dependant on hardware and body composition, certain amounts of frequencies are absorbed by the body and therefore lost to be seen by the pickups. Body resonance is the OPPOSITE of what most people think. Those prevalent frequencies you hear ringing out of the wood are now unavailable to be transferred to the pickups. Remember, we can't create energy, only move it around. If a guitar is prominent in specific frequencies, it is only because other frequencies have been "removed" to make them stand out.
There are a few ways to save some money on your electric guitar (click for modal analysis). One way is to order online, for example from Amazon, which is usually cheaper than buying from a physical shop. Make sure that you know what the usual price for the guitar you want is, so that you can compare different sites, and in the best of worlds, use a discount code or wait until there’s a sale.
Bottom Line: The Boss ME-80 seems to be aimed at the beginner and intermediate guitarist who is getting into the effects game. What guitarists love about it is that it tries hard (and succeeds) at replicating the feel of messing with a pedalboard full of effects. Unlike the Line 6 POD HD500X, you won’t need the manual! We’re not necessarily taking a dig at the Line 6 pedal - that one very much has its merits, is FAR more customizable and editable, and arguably the effects and amp modeling sound a bit better. The Boss ME-80 is just a different style, and judging by the user reviews we read people really enjoy having all the knobs for all the effects immediately available. The Boss ME-80 is also a tremendous bargain considering how powerful it is. Sure, it’s not exactly cheap, but it’s a very well-made, intuitive, nice-sounding all-in-one multi-effects pedal which is great for practice, studio recording, and live use.

Seven-string electric guitars were popularized among rock players in the 1980s by Steve Vai. Along with the Japanese guitar company Ibanez, Vai created the Universe series seven-string guitars in the 1980s, with a double locking tremolo system for a seven-string guitar. These models were based on Vai's six-string signature series, the Ibanez Jem. Seven-string guitars experienced a resurgence in popularity in the 2000s, championed by Deftones, Limp Bizkit, Slayer, KoRn, Fear Factory, Strapping Young Lad, Nevermore, Muse and other hard rock and metal bands. Metal musicians often prefer the seven-string guitar for its extended lower range. The seven-string guitar has also played an essential role in progressive metal rock and is commonly used in bands such as Dream Theater and Pain of Salvation and by experimental guitarists such as Ben Levin.


For our example pedal board, we’ll pick the ST-2 Power Stack. Another category with many choices is modulation.These are effects like flanger, phaser, chorus, tremolo, and others. Let’s use the most versatile of these—the BF-3 Flanger. Another group is ambience effects, such as delays and reverbs. We’ll use one of each: a DD-7 Digital Delay and the FRV-1 ’63 Fender Reverb. There are some pedal effects that can add notes or alter the pitch of what you’re playing. For want of a more esoteric name, we’ll call these “pitch-altering” pedals. From this category, let’s throw in a BOSS OC-3 Octave.

Originally delay was achieved using a loop of magnetic tape - first on improvised arrangements with a reel-to-reel recorder, and later on dedicated machines. The tape would pass through a recording head, then a playback head, then an erase head. The timing of the delay could be adjusted by moving the heads, or changing the speed of the tape. Tape adds its own colour to sound, so the echo would have that added warmth.


The #1 cause of fret wear is the fretting hand pressure exerted by the player.  I have some clients that grip very tightly and wear frets quickly (Rob Fahey), and some that grip very lightly and take forever to exhibit significant wear (Jasan Stepp, Dog Fashion Disco/PolkaDot Cadaver).  Fret material hardness, string hardness and frequency of use all contribute to wear as well, but hand pressure is still the leading cause since frets do not wear themselves out.  Technique is different for every player, unique and personal and habits can be hard to change.  Just like brakes in a car, how hard and how much something is driven directly impacts wear and longevity.  Please see the refrets page for further thoughts on this topic.
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Personally, I don't like the fender and gibson knockoffs, and squire's aren't the best brand, but I have a squire telecaster, which is actually great quality, better than I expected, and it has a slightly more drier, shaky tone that an actual tele, which is a nice feature. My friend has a squire precision bass, and upon hearing it, I honestly thought it was an actual precision bass at first, so, if you must get squire, than consider either the tele or the precision.


Playing power chords right up at the ‘dusty' end (past the 8th fret) gets difficult, because the frets are so close together. In the next stage we'll learn how to play power chords with a fifth-string root too, which solves that problem. However, it's important not to rush ahead, so make sure you put your effort just into the sixth-string root chords for now.
Have you ever heard a bridge pickup that made a guitar sound like a giant mosquito attack? If you've run into this problem, The Tone Zone is the solution. The Tone Zone is hot enough to qualify as a high-output pickup, but it has a wider dynamic range - hard picking will produce a lot of power, and softer picking will be much cleaner and quieter. It's got tremendous bass and low-mid response to reinforce the bottom end and make the overall sound bigger. The highest single notes have depth, and chords sound huge. Patented dual-resonance coils reproduce more overtones than you'd expect from such a fat-sounding pickup. It makes a great match with an Air Norton.
In 1970, B.B. crossed over to the white rock audience with “The Thrill Is Gone.” In 1988, he virtually repeated the trick when he recorded “When Love Comes to Town” with U2. Always the humble student of the instrument, B.B. King became jazzier and better than ever as his life and career continued well into the new century. His loss earlier this year was deeply felt by the music community and, particularly, by the guitarist he influenced.

Here is a list of the schematics that are exclusive to this site. We created several and we have redrawn some schematics that were already available on the internet  for readability or ease of use (these needed an easier-to-read format, corrections or part identifiers).  Many of these schematics include “modernization” that are included and explained in the “Project” for the given schematic.  You may freely post links to any of the pages or files on this site, but please do not put copies of these files on your site. We frequently update our files.  If you want to see photos of the original units of any of these guitar effects see our  “Originals” board on Pintrest  Note: All Trademarks mentioned here belong to their owners and not to General Guitar Gadgets
Variable caps used for radio tuning have about 1000 times smaller capacitance than needed for guitar tone controls. The advantage of a variable cap, could one be made in the right range for guitar, or those many-caps-on-a-rotary-switch, is that the resonant peak is maintained regardless of setting. With Joe’s “cap fader”, that peak gets flattened out in the middle of the pot rotation. Doesn’t mean it’s a bad sound, but certainly different.

There were East coast and West coast distributors of wholly different instruments bearing the Hohner name in the late 70's-early 80's. One of them had decent guitars, the others were ****************e. Don't know which was which, but I do know the Hohner strat my friend bought new in Upstate NY c. 1980 was a stinkin' piece of crap. Not sure if it was a representative sample.
Here is s very nice 1976 Takamine F375s from the laswsuit era with the Headstock shape and logo style font replica of a Martin D-35 Exotic Brazilian rosewood guitar from 1962, An amazing likeness in looks obviously and she sounds sooooo sweet the 40+ years since she was built back in 1976 at the time of this build it has been said that Takamine had used aged woods of at least 20 years aging prior to its construction... this guitar has been extremely well cared for and it has barely a few scratches that will be sort of hard to find, the structural integrity of this guitar is excellent its neck set is excellent as is its action is low and as a result this guitar plays amazingly with no buzz smooth action and a pleasure to play. Frets have been lightly dressed and are nice too. Neck width is 1-11/16ths at the nut with a medium profile it feels like an old Martin to just perfect. It has been set up with a Martin bone nut & saddles set as well as new Martin 80/20 strings set she sings loud and sweet a pleasure to play with rich encouraging tone. This guitar is straight as can be with no cracks or separation on its body or neck with the only exception being its Solid Sitka Spruce top has 2 fine hairline cracks in the top and they do not go threw to the back side and are insignificant and have been properly sealed and buffed and you can not see them until the closest inspection, they are not progressing and have been stabilized professionally years ago. Other that the hairlines you cant see its near mint otherwise overall condition give this a very good to -excellent vintage used condition rating and a great choice fot the lover of these great exotic Brazilian Rosewood guitars, Japan does offer these Exotic Jacaranda Brazilian rosewood bodied guitars today but note they do not come with the OLD school Martin Headstocks or the old style Script logo they have the modern headstock Takamine design and logo oh ya a $4500-6000 price tag as well. You will find that this beautiful Rare guitar is a Bargain priced gem and should be played tonight as it is Ready to tour or Record tonight! .

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Gibbons has also twisted more than a few towering tall tales in his time, but his life is so surreal that it’s hard to tell where the truth ends and the trip takes over. His colorful manner of speech, known as “Gibbonics,” has made him one of Guitar World’s favorite interview subjects, especially since his poetic ponderings are loaded with insight, wisdom and a unique sense of humor.

Yngwie Malmsteen released his Concerto Suite for Electric Guitar and Orchestra in 1998, and Steve Vai released a double-live CD entitled Sound Theories, of his work with the Netherlands Metropole Orchestra in June 2007. The American composers Rhys Chatham and Glenn Branca have written "symphonic" works for large ensembles of electric guitars, in some cases numbering up to 100 players, and the instrument is a core member of the Bang on a Can All-Stars (played by Mark Stewart). Still, like many electric and electronic instruments, the electric guitar remains primarily associated with rock and jazz music, rather than with classical compositions and performances.[37] R. Prasanna plays a style of Indian classical music (Carnatic music) on the electric guitar.

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