And it took a long time because inevitably the tremolo would go out of time with the track because the tremolo doesn't stay in regular clock time. Also we would go out with each other's amps, so we had to keep looking up at each other after every fifteen second bursts and kind of fess up, "Oh yeah, mine kind of went out of time." It took long time, but I'm glad we did it that way because if we had cut and pasted two seconds of audio, it wouldn't have had the same dynamic quality throughout the six minutes of the song, or however long it is.

Electro String also sold amplifiers to go with their electric guitars. A Los Angeles radio manufacturer named Van Nest designed the first Electro String production-model amplifier. Shortly thereafter, design engineer Ralph Robertson further developed the amplifiers, and by the 1940s at least four different Rickenbacker models were made available. James B. Lansing of the Lansing Manufacturing Company designed the speaker in the Rickenbacker professional model. During the early 1940s, Rickenbacker amps were sometimes repaired by Leo Fender, whose repair shop evolved into the Fender Electric Instrument Manufacturing Company.
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While most instruments made by Harmony and Kay were much cheaper than Martins, Gibsons or Fenders, the upper-level, more elaborate ones actually cost more money than some lower-end and even mid-priced Gibsons and Martins. A top-of-the-line Harmony, Kay or Silvertone made by Harmony featured inlay, binding and multiple pickups, switches and knobs, and cost more than a Les Paul Junior or Special and in some cases fully as much as a Les Paul Standard. While one of these instruments in near-perfect condition today might fetch $1,000 or more, it certainly would not have been nearly as good an investment as spending less to buy a Les Paul Junior and sure enough not as good an investment as spending an equal amount to buy an original 1959 sunburst Les Paul Standard.
Hollow Body Guitars: Guitars with hollow body construction were the first mass-produced round-neck models built, in the 1930s. Jazzman Charlie Christian was the most-fiery champion of the early hollow body electric, using a Gibson ES-150 — a model first released in 1936 — to record vastly influential sides with Benny Goodman, Lester Young. Buck Clayton and as a leader in his own right. He also used the ES-150 to help invent the art of single-note lead guitar.
Playing Small Gigs? If you play small gigs, such as at pubs, clubs etc, small places with capacity of 200 persons or less, you won't need a massively loud amp. A 15-Watt Valve amp will be more than loud enough, such as the Fender Blues Junior or Vox AC-15. You can use louder valve amps, such as a Vox AC30 or Fender Hot Rod DeVille, but in most cases you won't need to set the volume more than halfway up (or less!) Valve amps sound louder than solid state amps, so even though a 15-watt valve amp is loud enough fro gigs, a 15-watt solid state amp will be only recommended for home practice. Good solid state amps include the Orange Crush 20 RT and Blackstar ID:30TVP 30W. Both are loud enough for mid-sized venues and sound superb.

Gibson Les Paul Standard Electric Guitar This iconic instrument is regarded by many as one of the best electric guitars in the world because of its looks, sound and feel. The 2019 Gibson Les Paul Standard features a figured maple top, mahogany back and neck, rosewood fingerboard with cryogenically treated frets, calibrated BurstBucker Pro humbuckers and an asymmetrical Slim Taper neck shape for total playing comfort.


Maton JB6 is a 1970s guitar manufactured by Maton. It features a thin solid body, short scale 24 fret design, two humbucking pickups, two tone controls, one volume, in/out phase toggle for bridge pickup and standard three way pickup selector toggle switch. The body has double cutaways, set neck and heavy metal base plate supporting a stop piece and bridge for increased sustain.
Sure, your pickups pick up the sound, and your amp amplifies it, but even before they get to handle it, your precious tone has already been formed by the interaction of string and wood. Pluck a string, and you set into motion a transference of vibrational energy from the strings into the wood of the body and neck (via different coupling elements such as bridge saddles, nut, and frets). The spectrum of sounds kicked out by this acoustic interaction is the biggest determining factor at the heart of the sound that eventually reaches the listener’s ear, however you delay, spin, or distort it along the way. Let’s look at the characteristic voices of a few tone woods, and see how they contribute to our guitar’s sound.

Archives of the best free VST plugins (electric guitar and acoustic guitar plug-ins) for download. We have created audio / video demos for the most of VST plugins so that you can hear how they sound before you decide to download them. You don't have to register for download. The most of VST plugins in our archives are provided with a link to VST plugin developer so that you can donate to the author if you wish.
I am a learning myself Shreya.I purchased a Fender Model CF60 (£100) .This is a high quality "Folk guitar" from a reputable long standing company.It's got a lovely mellow tone and the size is not to big.Buld quality is excellent.At the end of the day it's all subjective.I recommend you go to your local musical instrument shop and try a few.All the Best Dean
Rhythmically I can make Shreddage II sound as authentic as a mock up can get for that instrument (which means, mostly authentic)...through conscientious (more like anal-retentive) programming and manual round robins. But of course it's always a much better idea in this case to just do the mock up and eventually get an actual guitar player yourself to record. It's extremely hard to get that edgy lead thing going, bent up and held vibrato notes.
I have been playing Guitar and Bass for over 40 years. The items in this article not only enlightened me by explaining things that I did not even know, It helped me decide to make some changes to my current guitar, rather than spend a bunch of money on a new guitar that would probably be inferior to what I currently own. THANK YOU to the folks who furnished this information.
Stay tuned for the second part of our series/parallel discussion next month. We’ll pick up the soldering iron and explore some sweet parallel/ series switching options for our Strats. This will also close out our run of Stratocaster mod columns. When we finish the series/parallel discussion, we’ll switch over to Telecaster and Esquire mods. Until next time, keep on modding!
Probably one of the greatest is Glenn Schwartz, formerly of the James Gang and Pacific Gas & Electric. Considered to be a "white" Jimi Hendrix, he was asked by Jimi to play at what was to be his last birthday party. Glenn played behind his back and with his teeth (now with his gums) before Jimi ever did. Now out of the limelight (and out of his mind) Glenn plays (and preaches) on Thursdays at a blue collar bar in Cleveland. ONE F*CKING INCREDIBLE PLAYER. Should be on any list.
The Epiphone Broadway is a hollow body archtop guitar that has been in the Epiphone guitar lineup since 1931. The Broadway was initially an acoustic archtop, but after Gibson took over Epiphone in 1957 the “Broadway” designation was given to a new electric archtop. The electric model was reissued in 1997 and continues to be in production, and we’ve selected it for this list of best electric guitars.
Another great option if your budget for an acoustic is $500 or less is the BG 40 from Blueridge. It has a sitka spruce top with mahogany back and side. It features scalloped bracing for a clean and crisp tone. Owners describe it’s tone as loud and bassy, and compared the neck width to that of an electric. This could be a plus for those with smaller hands. This guitar also features a bone and nut saddle and East Indian rosewood fingerboard for smooth playability. Based on customer feedback, this is a great budget choice that won’t let you down.

You can do this using a fairly slow tracking time in Auto-Tune so that the bend dynamics aren't changed in any obvious way — it's just that when you finish bending, the note will come to rest on a precise value. Not that I'm suggesting you need to do this, of course, but the day will come when a client plays a never to be repeated take that is perfect apart from a few bend intonation problems...
This how-to guide will cover the aforementioned effects, as well as fundamentals like the function of typical delay controls, and where to place your unit in an effects chain. Although there are countless delays on the market—many of which have mind-boggling features—we’re going to use a basic delay pedal setup similar to what you’ll find on a Boss DD-7 as our reference point. We’ve also provided some sample settings so you can get the most out of your delay pedal right away.
Although Ibanez’s S series is designed to be far more versatile than the RG guitars, its Iron Label collection is built for one, brutal purpose: heavy metal. The SIX6FDFM represents exactly what we consider a ‘value-for-money’ guitar: It sports many premium specs, is skewed towards a single use, and, at a little under $1,000, won’t hemorrhage your bank account.

A Twitter follower once asked me what electric guitar I’d recommend for a beginner with a max budget of around $200 total (for guitar, amp, tuner, etc.). So, I wrote a blog post for her where I recommended two all-in-one “starter packs” that are a great value for someone with such a low budget. The guitars in those starter packs are worth around $150, give or take.
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The Cordoba C7 spruce-top has a natural finish, complete with rosewood back, sides, fretboard and bridge, and the traditional looking inlay that Cordoba is known for. Plus, there are the Savarez Cristal Corum high-tension strings that come with it, which give the guitar its clear, clean sound. Of course, you might want to change to another set of nylon strings, should you wish it, depending on the sound you truly want.

The tone selector on an electric guitar controls the capacitor, which basically filters out high frequencies. The same way a high-cut filter (or low-pass-filter if you prefer) works on a standard equalizer. By dialing down the tone, you remove brightness and treble. The pickup selector does just what it's called.. Selecting which pickups being used to capture the vibration of the strings, and translates the energy into electric current, though the configuration and number of "presets" can vary from guitar to guitar, depending on how many pickups it has etc. If you're a handyman you can even configure this yourself.
Martin is a famous America-based company known for is a variety of impressive electric and acoustic guitars. Their guitars are predominantly manufactured in Pennsylvania and Nazareth. The history of Martin guitars dates back to 1833. From then on, Martin has managed to maintain classiness and quality in their guitars to satiate the thirst of pro players in America.
From the standpoint of theoretical perfection, the Baxendall tone control is the opposite of the Fender tone stack. With bass and treble variations that are mostly independent, the frequency response is quite flat when both controls are set to the middle of their range using linear pots. Using the opamp/feedback form of the controls means that there is no signal loss that needs be made up elsewhere. This is virtually the standard for hi-fi tone controls. However, there are some guitar amps which use this form of control, tweaked a bit to match the guitar frequencies. 

The Effect:Distortion is one of the most popular and desired guitar pedal effects, especially among rock, hard-rock and metal players, The Kinks, Jimmy Hendrix, Metallica, to name a few. Prior to the introduction of effect pedals on the market, Distortion was mostly achieved by forcing an overwhelming amount of electricity passing through a guitar amp’s valves. Nowadays this is no longer necessary. Arguably one of the most famous and newbie friendly option and at the same time prime example for a distortion pedal is the classic Electro-Harmonix SOULFOOD.
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Why We Liked It - Whether you want to find an electric guitar to play sweet country tunes or something completely different, this is a great guitar! It’s extremely versatile and is therefore one of the best ones we’ve tried for beginners so far. That doesn’t mean it can suit more advanced musicians and many other skill levels as well, but especially for beginners, versatility is key.
The volume pedal is about as simple as a pedal can get. It is basically an external volume knob that you work with your foot. They are an excellent way to control the volume of your rig and can be placed at different places in your guitar chain. When placed first for example it can be great for volume swells (as we will see), reducing your amp gain by acting like your guitar’s volume knob. If placed after your gain section it will bring down your overall volume without reducing changing your tone or gain. You can really experiment with the placement of a volume pedal to see what matches your needs.

Hidesato Shiino (1947–). Music-Trade.co.jp. Dai-Show Corporation. — The person who involved with a lot of remarkable Japanese guitars including: Yamaha FG, Fernandes & Greco models, Morris & H.S. Anderson (named after his son; well known as Prince's Hohner Telecaster), early ESP, Vesta Graham & Vestax (now known as DJ brand), Akai Guitar 1997 series, D'Angelico, etc.
I just thought you'd like to know that Takamine produced for other names. I've just bought a 1973 Wayne which has a Takamine label inside stating it was made for Wayne. Its a Takamine 375 thats a Martin D35 copy. Wayne were guitar makers in Melbourne Australia in the 1950s and 60s and began importing under their name briefly in the 70s. It sounds amazing.
EMG DG20 David Gilmour Wired Pickguard   New from$329.00In Stockor 8 payments of $41.13 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING Seymour Duncan SH4 JB Humbucker Pickup   New from$79.00In Stockor 4 payments of $19.75 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING Gibson '57 Classic Humbucker Pickup   New from$164.99In Stockor 4 payments of $41.25 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING EMG JH Set Custom James Hetfield Signature Pickup Set   New from$249.00In Stockor 6 payments of $41.50 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING See All Electric Guitar Pickups
The EB-18 was the first electric bass the Martin company produced in 1979. The single-pickup EB-18 was a partner to Martin’s E-series electric guitars. Its scroll-shaped headstock was reminiscent of the Stauffer-style pegheads of early Martins. The EB-28 was added to the line a year later. It had a mahogany body and PJ pickups. Both models were discontinued in 1983.
Pressing a string against a fret reduces the vibrating length of that string to the distance between the pressure point and the bridge, thereby controlling pitch. On nearly every Western fretted instrument, the distance between frets is a semi-tone of equal temperament, assuring the easy achievement of strong sounding chords and single notes that fit our hemisphere’s usual expectations for rhythm sounds and melodies. Understanding the virtues and limitations created by the order of frets opens up the door to ways to escape their constricts, like bending strings, playing slide, using whammy bars, delving into extended technique or trying fretless instruments.

20 pages, black and white with color front cover. In the middle of 1981, Rosetti took over distribution of the Gibson line in the UK. Rosetti were a very big name in Britain, having distributed Epiphone since at least 1963, as well as Hagstrom and others. This catalogue was produced at the tail end of 1981, and introduces a number of models to the UK, such as the MV-II, MV-X guitars and the Victory basses, the GGC-700 and the Flying V bass. Some of these models were so short-lived that they were actually never included in US brochures. The cover image (reproduced in part here) showed some of the earliest demonstration models, including a Victory with a highly unusual white scratchplate.

This is like an echo where the sound you play repeats either once or multiple times depending on how you set the pedal. At low repeat settings this fills up the sound which is useful if there aren’t many other musicians. With lots of repeats it sounds rhythmic and huge. This effect relies heavily on the speed of the repeats keeping time with the song tempo. With practice it’s easy to set correctly but get it wrong and it can sound like your chords are running away from you.
The other US-based manufacturers were from Chicago Harmony (formerly owned by Sears), National-Dobro (Supro/Valco) and Kay. Chicago was the largest guitar manufacturing area of the US at the time. The only other manufacturer of Silvertones during this period was the Japanese-based company, Teisco (or Teisco Del Ray as it was formerly called). Teisco created some of the wildest designs for Silvertones, in our opinion. The earliest model was the TG1. This was the first guitar to incorporate an amplifier and speaker into the body of the guitar. Although some people look down on the Japanese guitars we think they've got some really interesting sounds and innovations not found on American made guitars.
Jump up ^ The Guitar (From The Renaissance To The Present Day) by Harvey Turnbull (Third Impression 1978) - Publisher: Batsford (ISBN 0-7134-3251-9) - p113 (Chapter 3 - The Twentieth Century) - "Segovia's visits to South America also inspired new music. The Mexican composer Manuel Ponce (1882–1948) responded by producing a greater number of extended works than Turina and Torroba had achieved."
top 5...Top 5!...I had recently bought a gaming console after not owning one since the ps2 so not the biggest gamer but getting into it again has been fun when there free time to waste ha overall it's a pretty good game haven't stopped playing it just need to finish it up to continue the side story...What I'm disappointed is with the actual story of the game, which for me was very predictable and disappointing...I don't get how this game gets so many appraisal which for me is a good game for sure...but far, far, far away from one of the best games ever made as many say.
Vacuum tubes (called "valves" in British English) were by far the dominant active electronic components in most instrument amplifier applications until the 1970s, when solid-state semiconductors (transistors) started taking over. Transistor amplifiers are less expensive to build and maintain, reduce the weight and heat of an amplifier, and tend to be more reliable and more shock-resistant. Tubes are fragile and they must be replaced and maintained periodically. As well, serious problems with the tubes can render an amplifier inoperable until the issue is resolved. In the 2000s, high-end tube instrument amplifiers (along with a small number of hi-fi power amplifiers used by audiophiles and high-end studio microphone preamplifiers) survive as the few exceptions, because of their perceived sound quality.
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You have 16 different modulation effects including chorus and flange, 12 overdrive/distortion effects including high gain monsters and smooth creamy overdrives, 14 mono and stereo delays and reverbs and 22 amp models including tube and solid state amps from Fender, Marshall, Orange, Diezel, and mesa Boogie. It’s safe to say, you’ll find it hard to get bored of this thing!
Processed Pitch Shifts: Few pitch-shifting algorithms are transparent enough to allow you to transpose anything by more than a couple of semitones without obvious side-effects. If what you're processing is going through an amp modeller, however, you can get away with much more radical changes. You can even do effective swoops and dives in pitch by progressively increasing the amount of pitch-shifting you apply to a note, and pitch changes of an octave or more can sound good, although they probably won't sound natural at these extremes. Sam Inglis
The Duo-Sonic is a short-scale student model that has become highly prized for its excellent playability and tone, making it one of the best electric guitars for beginner guitarists with cash to spare. This updated model - with its slab alder body, flawless in sparkly Surf Green - features the classic offset Fender waist that gives the series its name. The three-ply white/black/white scratchplate also plays host to a chrome-tipped three-position pickup selector switch and knurled (aka easy-grip) volume and tone knobs servicing two pickups, a neck single coil plus a bridge humbucker. The latter is also coil-splittable via the push/pull tone knob. We've encountered guitars at more than twice the price that don't play anywhere near as well as this thing does. Oh, and it doesn't matter what size your hands are. If we had to use a song to describe the tonal range of the bridge pickup, we'll have Smells Like Teen Spirit, please. A clean setting here echoes the clattering rhythm voice of the song's intro while a fuzz box unleashes a racket not unlike the heavy sound Kurt craved. If it sounds like we're typecasting this guitar then rest assured the Duo-Sonic is versatile enough to handle country picking, surf, indie, classic rock, whatever. Plus, the neck pickup warms things up perfectly for clean or dirty blues lead or jazz chords.
Kramer Guitars is the manufacturer of electric guitars & basses originated from America. Inearly’s off origination in 1970’s, they produced aluminum necked electric guitar& basses & in later 1980’s they started producing wooden-necked guitars catering to hard rock and heavy metal musicians. This is the brand of guitar that challenges the quality of guitars made by Gibson. Made of maple wood and aluminum inlays, this makes one of the finest make of bass and electric guitars. These are highest priced electric guitar which starts from 90,000 to 1.5lacs. These are one of the most powerful ranges of electric guitars used by professional musicians.
If straightforward lessons aren't what you're looking for, fear not: Rocksmith 2014 tries to refresh your picking skills through games that veer into the ridiculous. I tried out Return to Castle Chordead, which revels in delightfully bad NES-style graphics (the game challenges the player to zap the hungry undead by playing the correct chords). Scales Racer—which, you guessed it, teaches the major and minor scales—puts the player in a car fleeing the police. Pick the right notes and you zip between lanes, eluding the fuzz.
Les Pauls are all about that heavy metal feel and heavy weight. When they were first introduced, they had two p-90 single coil pickups. Today, they use double humbucker pickups for outputting a thick, sustainable sound. Like Tele and Stratocasters, they have a single cutaway shape. Heavy rock musicians love Les Pauls. Fender offers an affordable range of Les Paul electric guitars compared to Gibson, but Epiphone by Gibson is a hot item for the beginners.
#5? Are you joking? I have a PR-200 that I've owned for 15 years. I hate it. The action is ridiculous unless your fingertips are made out of adamantium or whatever the heck Wolverine is made from. The sound is muddled and a clash of midrange. Sustain is nonexistent. The frets have flattened on the high strings. News flash- I'm not spending $350 to re-fret a $279 guitar. Epiphone may make some good high end guitars but I don't trust them. If you make crappy low end guitars why should I trust your brand? You were supposed to get me to fall in love with the brand but you've made me hate it. My next guitar will be a Yamaha, Martin or Taylor.

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• Ready-made sound : ELECTRIC SUNBURST offers a high-quality set of effects, amplifiers and cabinet emulation. Three distortion and four modulation effects provide the sound of classical pedals, while five amp models and a choice of ten cabinets offer an authentic guitar sound – exactly the same. Finally, a high-quality console equalizer, two compressors, tape emulation, reverb, delay and tap delay allow you to get a real guitar sound!
Carvin is well-known for their fantastic guitars and amazing amplifiers, but that’s not all. There is one aspect in particular that makes Carvin guitars just a little bit more unique. They only sell their instruments by special order. Going to a random guitar shop to try a Carvin is just plain impossible. The only way you can test one is by going to one of their few stores in California. The base models cover just about any style you can imagine. From acoustic guitars to electric basses, they’ll cover your needs. When it comes to styles, they have those heavy metal jagged edges to smooth curves. They are highly customizable and it’s a certainty that they’ll have what you want. If you’re extremely picky or just know exactly what you want, Carvin will help you get your dream guitar. You can choose the tonewood, materials, different colours and finishes, basically anything and everything is available.
Find a local music store to outfit you with a guitar suited to you needs and skill. Chords take a lot of practice and a skilled music teacher will save you a lot of time. I have played publicly with live bands and though each player’s skill levels were different we still made a good sound. Find a simple song with just a few simple chords and practice until you learn the chords and strumming pattern. Then move on to a new song. My catalogue of songs has over 1000 songs at different skill levels. Don’t give up or you will never be happy! The price for a quality instrument will be worth it in the long run!
A diagram showing a wiring modification for a Les Paul or a similar electric guitar with two humbuckers. Wiring schemes using four push-pull pots for additional pickup combinations were made popular by Led Zeppelin guitarist Jimmy Page and later produced as a signature model by Gibson. The modification shown in this diagram is an evolution of the original concept combining coil splitting, phase cancellation and parallel/series switching for a total of 22 different pickup combinations.

Searching 'guitar' on YouTube, Google, etc can be overwhelming. Ten billion results come up. I wish we could just be nice to kids with questions. I noticed this answer mentioned "pickups" several times. Kid probably has no idea what a pickup is. My brother showed me the switches, pickups, and explained them to me in five minutes, in person on a real guitar. It was like being taught magic.
An excerpt: “The Dobro brand name has been identified with resonator guitars since 1929 and is currently owned by Gibson Guitar Corporation. Despite its registered trademark status, the Dobro name has at times been used generically to refer to woodbodied instruments with 1) an aluminum cone or “resonator” mounted so that the cone opens toward the top of the instrument and 2) an 8-armed spider assembly supporting the bridge.”
When Schecter was first founded in 1976, the company’s original purpose was to produce replacement parts for other guitar manufacturers. In 1979, they produced their first guitar and it all took off from there. Today, Schecter is one of the highest rated guitar brands. If you’re looking for a guitar to play metal in particular, Schecter could be the brand for you. Schecter is well-known for their brutal heavy metal sounds. They have a decent range of models, including basses. Schecter’s arguably most famous guitars are the Hellraiser series. They are usually closer to $1000, but it could be worth it for you. When played correctly, the heavy metal distortions and gains that blast out of the amp is fantastic and if you’re a bit more gentle you can even get some softer sounds out of it. The same can be said with most Schecter models, but they favour heavy metal, so if you’re not looking to play heavy metal, you might want to look elsewhere.
The new AC15 'Twin' retains the all-important dual-EL84, cathode-biased output section of its forebear, but otherwise it's very different. A quick scan across the top panel reveals two inputs for independent access to either normal or top boost channels. One benefit of the bigger, 2x12 enclosure is that it provides ample room for a full-length reverb tank, housed in the bottom. There's also an in-built tremolo effect, with controls for depth and speed. But the whole point of this amp is the pair of 25-watt Celestion G12M Greenback speakers. They are the speaker of rock in so many cases and while purists might hope for Celestion Blues, they would add a good £300 at least to the price; and he increased power handling of two Greenbacks on the end of just 15 watts is quite a tantalising prospect. It's fair to say that even with the master volume set-up, the magic doesn't really start happening until the amp's lungs are at least half way open, but happily, that's not far from perfect for many of today's pub and bar gigs - it may even be too much for some. The AC15 'Twin' does sound magnificent when clean, but listen carefully to those amps or this and it's rarely completely undistorted. That harmonically rich drive that was never supposed to be there is the key characteristic that latter day, non-master volume AC users find hardest to replicate.
Any vibration we can hear as "sound" is composed of some distribution of overtones above the fundamental frequency. Overtones exist in a set fashion based on the physics of vibrating waves and the ratios between them. The only difference in tone between any instrument is caused by a different prominence and distribution of these overtones. When a string is plucked on an electric guitar the vibrations move into the body of the guitar as well. The resonant properties of the wood will cause some of these overtones to be "summed" and exaggerated while others will "cancel" to some degree. The vibrating string will be influenced, however slightly, by the vibration of the guitar, in turn changing the distribution of overtones on the vibrating string - essentially creating a feedback loop.

Paul Gray (b. 1972 d. 2010) swapped his longtime association with Warwick basses for a customized version of the ATK bass series, the PGB1. He was impressed with the ATK bass after he bought one from a pawn shop and told Ibanez that he would endorse them if they put the ATK series back into production. He switched to his signature model shortly before recording of the Slipknot album All Hope Is Gone and used them until his death in 2010.
I've met and talked to Andrew as his shop is 20 minutes from me. When you talk guitars to Andrew, you will get the feeling that this man knows his guitar building. He strives for perfection in his small WV workshop. There is plenty of evidence seeing some of his production models hanging on display. His quiet voice belies his guitar building abilities. As a luthier, his personal hand made guitars command a big price tag. But when you understand how he builds them, you'll understand why. One day, I'll own one his creations from his workshop. But until then, I'll just drool over the pictures. Not sure why his production models are rated at 42 though.

More and more are finding themselves downsizing their pedalboards, if not totally swapping all their stompboxes for a multi-effects unit. There are also many who are looking to upgrade their existing guitar processor. Whatever your case may be, it is our intention to help you find one that fits your needs, or at least point you to the right direction.
Kramer Guitars is the manufacturer of electric guitars & basses originated from America. Inearly’s off origination in 1970’s, they produced aluminum necked electric guitar& basses & in later 1980’s they started producing wooden-necked guitars catering to hard rock and heavy metal musicians. This is the brand of guitar that challenges the quality of guitars made by Gibson. Made of maple wood and aluminum inlays, this makes one of the finest make of bass and electric guitars. These are highest priced electric guitar which starts from 90,000 to 1.5lacs. These are one of the most powerful ranges of electric guitars used by professional musicians.
In general, using an acoustic electric guitar expands your possibilities. You are no longer limited to the volume the guitar itself is capable of producing, which can come in pretty handy at times, nor having to mic an amplifier either. With an acoustic electric, you can perform in just about any venue that's worth its salt, without dealing with close miking and a lot of post-processing like equalizing out the boomy low-end.
A low latency audio card will allow to run your guitar signal (via an adapter cable or a mixer) into the PC and through the Amp Sims, (the M-Audio 2469 is a good card for this and reasonably priced), this will allow you to drive/crank the simulators as loud as you'd like to get the tone you want; and control the overall volume with your PC, good speakers/monitors are a must for this.
Hi Jeff. I just wanted to point a couple of things that IMHO are not 100% accurate. Most probably its just to make things not too complicated, but I think is important to notice them. First, resistance is not frecuency dependant, and therefore it doesn´t have any effect on high frecuency content. However, Impedance does, and impedance is the resistance on the AC world (and a guitar signal is an AC signal). Therefore, the reason both long cables and pickups loose high frecuencies as they get longer is because the capacitance in them increases, and capacitors have a certain impedance (once again, resistance in the AC world). So you may actually be true, but its because of impedance created by the capacitance and inductance present on the pickup. Will continue..

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I just read all of the comments and couldn't believe how long it too for someone (John Corcoran) to mention Les Paul. As for the 'tard who "knows" better players than Robert Johnson, just remember that Johnson INVENTED the sound and everyone else is just copying him or building upon his foundation. This list might work better split up by genre. Segovia may be one of the best guitarists ever, but he doesn't work with the others on the list. Stanley Jordan is incredible, but he'd be out of place on this list. What about Charo – yes, the Coochie Coochie girl from Hollywood Squares plays a mean classical and flamenco guitar! TopTenzMaster – let's see a bunch of subcategory lists…
Even with a H-H configuration, you could utilize coil splitting to achieve single coil-ish sounds. While arguably this does not give a "true" single coil sound, if humbucker sounds are mainly used, this can be enough. My impression is that most people aren't using the middle position that much, I think the way forward is to try different pickup configurations to find out what you need.

Masacre takes a great deal of my time, but in normal days I am also a guitar teacher in my hometown, Medellin. I counsel young rock bands as well, with the purpose of sharing my knowledge and experience with those who start in this road. I've been part of the selecting jury at several local rock festivals and when I am available and things work out, I join some of my friends and put together tribute bands to play at local clubs, paying homage to those bands that inspired us since childhood, such as Black Sabbath, Kiss, Ozzy Osbourne, Dio, and others.
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This happens when discussing variables within a number of different art forms—you simply can’t rely on scientific equipment to make some assessments. You can’t trust the gadgets; instead, you have to rely on your ears. Even relying on your ears can be difficult because it is, once again, a subjective discussion. “We don’t hear what’s out there,” Millard says. “We hear what we think we hear. It’s the psychological or neurological way we hear. To think we hear what sound is out there is so naïve and so wrong.” Trustworthiness aside, this brings us to another concept that pops up frequently when discussing the nature of tone: the role of good old fashioned, organic, human beings.
As a musician, learning songs for whichever instrument you are playing is one of the best exercises. Not only do you get to practice your chops but you also get to learn exactly how a particular song is played. As a beginner/intermediate guitar player, learning songs is all about knowing where to put your fingers on the fretboard, listening to the strumming patterns used, and taking note of any special techniques or chord combinations. Being aware of these things as you learn songs will help you become a better guitar player and composer. However, as a new/intermediate guitar player, you
The movie is very hauntingly beautiful, and it's especially highlighted by an awesomely haunting score, and some breathtaking visuals. The story is interesting, but it's definitely slow-paced, and the climax is much more of an intellectual payoff than a spectacular action scene (which many viewers might be hoping for). So I can definitely see why some people would hate this film, but I loved it. It's one I definitely won't forget anytime soon too, and it's great to see Natalie Portman (my old favorite actress) back in top form! watch movies online pro
Most electric guitars feature multiple pickups. Some will have two or three single-coils. Some will have two or three humbuckers. Many offer a combination of single-coil and humbucker pickups. This combination offers the player a wide range of tonal options. Pickup configurations are often abbreviated by referring to single-coils with an "S" and humbuckers with an "H." The placement of each pickup is indicated from the neck down towards the bridge. Thus an SSH configuration has single-coils at the neck and middle positions and a humbucker at the bridge.
Living Colour’s Vernon Reid agrees but also speaks to a larger shift. He remembers being inspired when he heard Santana on the radio. “There was a culture of guitar playing, and music was central,” adds Reid, 58. “A record would come out and you would hear about that record, and you would make the journey. There was a certain investment in time and resources.”

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When gluing a set neck guitar it’s important that you don’t use an excessive amount of glue. The glue should be applied to the base of the neck and base of the neck cavity. Try to limit the amount of glue so that it doesn’t come into contact with the edges of the neck or pickup cavity as this can impact on the tonal quality of the guitar and sustain.
I went to work for Southland Musical Merchandise Corporation on August 1, 1972. The company had been formerly owned by a very honest man named Harry Greenberg. Earlier in 1972 he sold out to Onsite Energy Systems and everything changed from "let's make the best product at the best price" to "let's see how high we can make our profit margin - to hell with quality".
There sure are a lot of electric guitar options to choose from in this day and age. Thankfully, your choice doesn't have to be a difficult one to make thanks to world-leading guitar companies like Epiphone. In fact, Epiphone specializes in a wide range of electric guitar value packages, assembled specifically to help budding enthusiasts begin their musical journey on the right foot. If learning how to play the guitar is something you've always wanted to try but were never sure where to start, consider this section your launching pad.
In 1941, CMI became the national distributor for National Dobro products. In ’42, Victor Smith, Al Frost and Louis Dopyera purchased controlling interest in the company. By this time, however, the world was at war and almost all instrument manufacturing ground to a halt as all segments of industry converted to production of materials to support the war effort. In October of 1943, with builders in wartime hiatus, the new owners changed the company name to Valco Manufacturing, incorporating the first initial of each partner’s given name (V-A-L-Co).
Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 22 - Inlay: Block - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Tune-O-Matic - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Diecast, Gold, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Black
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Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Ash - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 5 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Inlay: Pearl - Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Headstock: 6 In-Line - Bridge: Tremolo - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Black - Pickups: Ibanez - String Instrument Finish: Natural Blue
A middle ground between solid and hollow-body guitars, semi-hollows are hollowed out but have a solid block of wood running through the center of their bodies. This achieves the increased sustain and reduced feedback of a solid-body guitar while retaining the mellow tones of hollow bodies. For this reason, semi-hollow guitars became exceedingly popular with blues players like Chuck Berry and Freddie King. Their duality — sweet and mellow but also some awesome, crunchy sounds — makes them great all-purpose guitars with classic sound.
If you are new to electronics, the essential tool you most likely need to buy is a decent temperature controlled soldering station. A basic one such as a Weller WLC100 can be had for less than $40 and will do the job just fine. Really nice ones with digital temperature readouts from Weller or Hakko are $100-$150 and as much as you will ever need for a home pedal shop. The soldering pencils have interchangeable tips, so you can keep a selection of different sizes. The one that normally comes with a new station will be suitable for most through-hole pedal kits.

One of the most impressive guitars on this list when it comes to style is this C-1 SGR from Schecter – a respected brand in the world of rock and metal. With a design that’s heavily influenced by their premium C1 models, this affordable alternative features a solid basswood body that’s arched and contoured for great comfort, allowing unhindered access to the 24-fret maple neck.
Have you ever looked at a guitar and wondered, "How do they make that?" Or thought to yourself, "I bet that I could build my own guitar," but never actually tried it? I have built several electric guitars over the years and through trial and error have learned many helpful tips that anyone who might want to tackle this sort of project needs to know before starting out. This kind of thing does require some wood working skill and also requires some specific tools as well but not all the fancy stuff that a guitar manufacture has. Building an electric guitar is time consuming and requires the completion of several steps before your project gets finished but be patient and you'll be happy with the results. I tend to go into detail so as not skip any steps or tips you need along the way, and use pics from other projects that I did as well so you can get more that on reference. If you set out to make a guitar you'll find that it takes quite a bit of time so you'll have time enough to go back and read other info if you just want to skim through the first go round. So I hope this helps all the future guitar builders out there!
Capacitors used in guitar circuits aren’t polarised, so it doesn’t matter which way round you fit the legs - we normally go with the printed side facing out from the pot. They’re measured in microfarads (uF) and will be marked with a number. You can experiment with different values and materials for different results, but if in doubt, just swap it for what you already have.
Much like ESP, Schecter started out as a parts company which decided to start building their own guitars. Right from day one it was apparent that their mission was to deliver ultimate metal guitars. Everything from their design, to the choice of electronics pointed in this direction. It didn’t take long for Schecter to become one of the go to brands that has reached the elite level.
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I thin Yamaha LL16 is one of the best acoustic guitar on the market . Yamaha is known for making affordable, quality guitars, and this is one is no different. It features a solid spruce top, solid rosewood back and sides, and an ebony fretboard. It is smaller than the dreadnought guitars – a fact that is neither good nor bad but that does affect the way the instrument sounds and feels.
The National String Instrument Corporation for manufacturing these louder guitars was founded probably in 1927, in Los Angeles, by John Dopyera, George Beauchamp, Ted Kleinmeyer and Paul Barth, when production and advertising began. The company was officially certified as a California corporation in 1928. For a detailed accounting of those early years, I recommend Brozman’s book, The History and Artistry of National Resonator Instruments (Centerstream Publishing, Fullerton, California, 1993). This is a horribly confusing relationship, so stick with me; we’ll try to put it right.
The materials and the methods of classical guitar construction may vary, but the typical shape is either modern classical guitar or that historic classical guitar similar to the early romantic guitars of France and Italy. Classical guitar strings once made of gut are now made of such polymers as nylon, with fine wire wound about the acoustically lower (bass side) strings.
The reason being that guitar manufacturers will usually look to keep costs down in the pickup department. This is particularly true for budget models, which will usually be fitted with stock pickups that do the job, but fall short of truly impressing. So guitarists with an affordable, but playable guitar may wish to upgrade their pickups, to make their favorite axe gig-worthy.
The GE-7 Graphic Equalizer is good to have after the overdrive in case you want to use it to scoop mids or bump certain frequencies for solos. (To show that these are not hard rules, it also works pretty well if the EQ is after the compressor but before the overdrive. But this changes how the EQ sounds, since you would be distorting it with the overdrive, so try it in the suggested position first.) Also, it’s good to have the EQ before the noise suppressor, since EQs can add noise as they boost tone at various points in the frequency spectrum, including any noise that is already there.
Selling my guitar rig i used here in RSA Not splitting up 1 x tech 21 sansamp psa1.1 preamp,studio standard 1 x crate Powerblock 150w mono or 2x 75w stereo amp 1 x 4x12 quad box,custom built with plywood not cheap chipboard, loaded with celestion G12s All as good as new Too heavy to ship overseas Can swop for something lighter i can carry on a plane

That’s what this book is about and it delivers in spades. It sharpens your will to learn and how to set goals rather than your actual technique. If you need to reinvigorate your desire to learn and find the importance of why you are learning in the first place, this book that will apply Zen lessons to the art of learning guitar in a way that is very motivational (but not in a shove spiritual dogma in your face kind of way). If that is what you are looking for in a guitar book, it is hard to beat Zen Guitar.

Harmony was the largest US guitar manufacturer between the 1930s and late 1960s. At the height of the guitar boom in the mid-1960s, Harmony was building more than 1000 instruments per day. Not only were they producing Harmony-branded guitars, there was a time when the Chicago-based factory was making guitars for 57 different brand names and trademarks. At one point, Harmony was selling 40 percent of their guitars through Sears & Roebuck under the Silvertone brand.


With that budget you can look about anywhere you choose. Try epiphone, maybe a boutique builder along the lines of your ideal, even a good kit that you rough in and take to a great tech/Luthier to trim finish….but about the Gibson…play em yourself, don’t get upset by a bunch of rumbling that’s largely bad noise. What your hearing is chatter largely perpetuated by their competition. They had a rough patch when they had ALL their imported wood jerked out from under them do to a screw-up of paperwork, wouldn’t at all surprise me if the government changed the rules and didn’t tell anybody(again). You can imagine what Gibson had to do to stay afloat, compromise was inevitable. I’m sure they more than anyone regret that, but you know everyone else in the industry was plenty happy to keep the scuttlebutt going, they ALL hate you when you’re on top. She. I was with strings and things of Memphis, Gibson came out of packing set up beautifully, usually perfectly in tune or nigh on to it. No other maker came close at all. By the way , I’m not a Gibson guy, the only one I’ve had is for sale, I prefer a more modern platform, that’s just my preference. But I still have to give props where they’re due…say, if your interested in an SG ’67 reissue at a good price, hit me up. I’ll give you the skinny on it, all right and wrong, and beat the brakes off any price from a shop!
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Reverb – The best analogy for reverb effects would be playing your guitar inside a pipe. That’s an extreme level of reverb, of course, and these pedals will allow you to go from there all the way back to subtler effects like the natural reverberation of a concert hall. This effect sounds great with a clean tone, but beware of using it with heavy distortion or else you might lose too much definition from your sound.

While the Boss ME-80 doesn’t have anything in terms of extras to really blow expectations out of the water, it includes some nice and handy features. The onboard looper works well and has 38 seconds of loop time, which is enough time to do some basic jamming over some chords. And speaking of jamming, the AUX input on the back of the ME-80 is nice, since it allows you to plug in an iPhone/metronome/mp3 player/any other music playing device and jam along with your music (this is fun and a feature we would actually use). The USB output lets you take patch editing over to your computer, in BOSS's Tone Studio software. Cool, but not necessary since editing patches is actually very easy and actually quite fun on the unit itself (no complicated menus to go through - just fun knobs!). One idiosyncrasy to be aware of is that if you plug anything into the headphones jack, the speaker simulator is automatically enabled. This is great for solo practice in your headphones, but note that that’s the only way to actually switch it on.


The first guitar amplifiers were relatively low-fidelity, and would often produce distortion when their volume (gain) was increased beyond their design limit or if they sustained minor damage.[3] Around 1945, Western-swing guitarist Junior Barnard began experimenting with a rudimentary humbucker pick-up and a small amplifier to obtain his signature "low-down and dirty" bluesy sound. Many electric blues guitarists, including Chicago bluesmen such as Elmore James and Buddy Guy, experimented in order to get a guitar sound that paralleled the rawness of blues singers such as Muddy Waters and Howlin' Wolf,[4] replacing often their originals with the powerful Valco "Chicagoan" pick-ups, originally created for lap-steel, to obtain a louder and fatter tone. In early rock music, Goree Carter's "Rock Awhile" (1949) featured an over-driven electric guitar style similar to that of Chuck Berry several years later,[5] as well as Joe Hill Louis' "Boogie in the Park" (1950).[6][7]

You’ve decided to pick up an axe and learn to shred like one of the pros. While mastering the guitar is no easy feat itself, before you even start jamming you’ll probably find yourself looking through site after site trying to find the right instrument. It’s hard. There’s an expansive list of components to be taken into account: body styles, wood types, pickups, bridges, necks — and that’s just scratching at the surface.
There are over 200 choices of electric guitar strings, combining Ernie Ball's diverse selection of materials, string gauges, and styles. Ernie Ball electric guitar strings come in a variety of different high quality materials including M-steel, cobalt, nickel, stainless steel, titanium, and bronze. Our guitar string sets are available for 6-string, 7-string, 8-string, 9-string, 10-string, and 12-string guitars.
As much a sculptor as a guitarist, Pajo’s work in post-rock progenitors Slint was a frightening, seemingly rootless display of guitartistry that glided between extremes. Songs formed and dissolved without notice, turned inside out and back again, always at wildly unpredictable volumes. Pajo’s uncanny knack for both creating and shrinking spaces on tape would eventually become the blueprint for later luminaries like Tortoise, with whom he also played.
Getting the right amp for your acoustic electric guitar is definitely something you want to think about. You can have a guitar that sounds stunning when plugged in, but not so much when playing acoustically. Reversely, you can also have a guitar that sounds absolutely beautiful acoustically, but sounds like a tin can when plugged in. Sometimes, this is just due to plugging into the wrong amp.
Arch top body size is equivalent to the flat top 000 body size, 15" wide across the top, carved sruce top, back is not carved but is arched by bracing, rosewood back and sides, unbound elevated tortoise pickguard, style 28 type multiple bound top and back with white outer layer, zipper zigzag backstripe, trapeze tail piece, rosewood fingerboard, vertical "Martin" peghead logo, nickel plated parts, sunburst top finish.
This depends on personal preference; changing the order of drive pedals changes how they sound when used together. For instance, a clean boost placed before a heavy distortion or fuzz will result in a louder boosted signal hitting the heavier distortion circuit which in turn works that circuit harder and you get heavier distortion. If you place that clean boost after the heavy distortion, it will just make the original distorted sound louder. Experiment with different placement order and you will find your own preference.
This particular Duo-Jet belonged to a right-handed gentleman who had owned and played it upside down from 1971 to 2008. The Duo-Jet was Gretsch’s answer to the Gibson Les Paul Custom, and the overwhelming majority of these were black, with a sprinkling of Cadillac Green from 1956-1958. In addition, the single-cut Silver Jet 6129 was offered with some custom sparkle colors from 1954-1960. This guitar was refinished in Orange a long time ago, before the second to most previous owner acquired it in 1971.

They are the most common effect group and are used by almost every guitar player from Stevie Ray Vaughan to Yngwie Malmsteen. Most amplifiers have channels for overdrive or distortion, but having these effects as pedals allows you greater variation in tone and allows you to “push” the cleaner channels of your amp harder, giving a different sound to the overdrive channel.


Many community, vocational or technical colleges offer technical and musical programs for those who wish to become guitar technicians. Many are instrument construction and/or repair programs. Guitar tech courses include construction, set-up, structural repair, fretwork, structural design and finishing for acoustic and electric guitars. Any courses involving musical theory and music technology may be helpful in advancing a guitar tech's career.

The Takamine brand helps prevent big brand manufacturers from setting their prices too high - by showing them that great guitars can be produced at reasonable prices. On top of their bang per buck reputation, Takamine is considered as the pioneer of installing built-in pickups into acoustics, something that is now a common configuration offered by majority of guitar builders. The Takamine P3NY showcases how impressive tonewoods and electronics can be implemented without ridiculously jacking up the price.
Once you've mastered a few songs on the guitar, you may want to record what you can do so others can hear you shred a wicked solo. Or you may want to use your recording to help improve your skills. In either case, recording your electric guitar outside of a studio can result in poor sound quality that is less than desirable or noise complaints. Depending on your situation and equipment, there are many factors you'll likely have to tweak on your way to getting the best recording, but with a little effort, you'll soon be able to listen to an awesome recording of your musical ability.
Amp: Gain- increases and decreases how much gain your sound has. Treble- increases and decreases high frequencies in your sound, AKA the brightness of your tone. Mids- increases and decreases the middle frequencies in your sound, AKA the 'punchiness' of your tone, if that makes any sense. Bass- increases and decreases the low frequencies in your sound, AKA how much 'thump' it has.
Peterson, Jonathon (2002). "Tuning in thirds: A new approach to playing leads to a new kind of guitar". American Lutherie: The Quarterly Journal of the Guild of American Luthiers. 8222 South Park Avenue, Tacoma WA 98408: USA.: The Guild of American Luthiers. 72 (Winter): 36–43. ISSN 1041-7176. Archived from the original on 21 October 2011. Retrieved 9 October 2012.
BAJAAO brings to you the best top notch Electric Guitars from across the world, with the lowest price guarantee. We have a huge range of electric guitars to help you find the one that fits your requirement and budget too. We are dedicated to make sure that we have an instrument that suits you whether you are looking for a beginner’s electric guitar or a seasoned professional’s axe, from the best brands worldwide such as Ibanez, Cort, Fender, Gibson, Aria, Epiphone, Washburn, Walden, Cort, ESP, PRS, Jackson, BC Rich, Dean, Pluto, Squier, Schecter, Greg Bennett, Taylor, and a long list of other brands to buy from. Buy the best Electric Guitars online with BAJAAO.com with the best and affordable price in India. Make your shopping experience a wonderful one with us.

After choosing the best guitar brand for you, there are still things you need to consider before buying an electric guitar. First, you must consider how much you’re willing to spend. You need to set a budget and pick your guitar accordingly. Take into consideration that electric guitars require gear like cables, amplifiers, and pedals, which you will also need to include in your budget. The second important thing you need to keep in mind is your music preference. The style of music you want to play has a major role in the kind of guitar you should get. Take a look at the guitars of your favorite musicians and make your choice based on that. Lastly, bear in mind that there are lots of different body shapes for guitars. The three most popular categories are single cutaway (ex: Les Paul), double cutaway (ex: Stratocaster) and exotic (ex: ESP). The right guitar shape will ensure your satisfaction and will make playing your instrument much more enjoyable. Keeping all these things in mind will guarantee that you pick the best guitar for yourself.
If you are inexperienced, it is only recommended that you attempt to setup a guitar that is of little value to you, both financially and sentimentally. If you don’t have one that fits these requirements, then it is best to pay the cost of a guitar setup as performed by a professional. The primary risk while setting up the instrument is over adjustment. Working any part of the bridge too much will cause wear and tear, and irreparable damage to the neck is often the result of improperly adjusting the truss rod. It is always hard to justify ruining a perfectly good instrument in order to avoid guitar setup cost.

The Yamaha Pacifica has long proved a benchmark for quality and specification, and the 112V remains one of the best electric guitars for beginners. The 112 is far from fancy and simply concentrates on the bare necessities. Yet the construction is of excellent quality. Trust us, if looked after this will be a guitar for life. By design it's an altogether more modern, brighter and lighter take on a hot-rod Strat. But when we say brighter that doesn't mean overly shrill. In fact the bridge humbucker will surprise some, it's beefy without being too mid-range heavy and although the coil-split proves a little bland played clean, with a distortion boost it's a pretty useful gnarly and wiry rhythm voice. It's good to have the choice too when mixed with the middle pickup - switching between the full and split coil here is subtle but, especially with cleaner 'class A' amp voicings, there's enough character difference to be useable. The solo single-coils impress - plenty of percussion and with a little mid-range beef added from the amp these get you to the correct Texas toneland. Neck and middle combined produces a fine modern Strat-like mix - the added brightness will cut through a multi-FX patch nicely.

One other effect that depends on EQ modulation is the wah pedal. As you rock forward on the pedal, the sound becomes more trebly. As you rock back, the treble range is muted. In the middle positions, a wah produces a nasal, midrange-heavy tone that is interesting and useful in its own right. Since you can change the wah's tone constantly while you're playing, it's a very dynamic and expressive effect that can become an integral part of your playing. Jimi Hendrix was one of the first guitarists to exploit the wah’s capabilities.
Capacitors (often referred to as "caps") have several uses in electric guitars, the most common of which is in the tone control, where it combines with the potentiometer to form a low-pass filter, shorting all frequencies above the adjustable cut-off frequency to ground.[12][13] Another common use is a small capacitor in parallel with the volume control, to prevent the loss of higher frequencies as the volume pot is turned down. This capacitor is commonly known as "treble bleed cap" and is sometimes accompanied by a series or parallel resistor to limit the amount of treble being retained and match it to the pot's taper.[14]
Particularly if you want to get into recording and production, this Blackstar model is ideal. With six distinct “voices” from Clean Warm to OD2, as well as 12 stereo effects, there is a huge range of tones and options to play with. Together with the patented ISF control it allows for a nuanced choice of timbres, allowing you to immerse into exactly the sound you are after in gloriously deep Super Wide Stereo.
In a very basic sense, your pickups create a magnetic field that is disturbed when guitar strings are vibrated above it. This, in turn, converts the vibration of the guitar strings into a current. The current is then sent through to your output jack where the signal then passes through your lead into your amplifier, where it is amplified. Different gauge strings vibrate at different rates e.g. an A string will typically vibrate at 440 cycles per second (440 hertz) which creates a current of 440 hertz in the pickup.
The Quebec-based Robert Godin decided to create his own music instrument company in 1972. Today, the manufacturer sells its products under different brand names: Norman (entry-level and mid-range acoustic guitars), Art & Lutherie (entry-level guitars), Simon and Patrick (mid-range and high-end guitars), La Patrie (classical guitars), Seagull (entry-level and mid-range acoustic guitars), and Godin for electric guitars. Some models are equipped with a piezo and/or "synth" pickups. The body shape is pretty classic, somewhere between a Les Paul and a Telecaster. Among the most famous Godin players we have John McLaughlin and Leonard Cohen. The brand catalog is sorted in different series: Performance Series, Signature Series, Multiac (acoustic/electric hybrid), Passion Series (high-end instruments), 5th Avenue Series, plus some very original single models like the Glissentar, an acoustic/electric 11-string nylon-string fretless guitar!
Just like Fender, Epiphone – the Gibson subsidiary – know a thing or two about budget acoustics, and this DR-100 (reviewed in full here) more than proves that! With a range of finishes, the DR-100 features a classic dreadnought body shape, with back and sides made from laminated mahogany, with a select spruce top, and black pickguard sporting Epiphone’s iconic E logo.
With that in mind, the quality of said effect is satisfactory, to say the least. You maybe won’t see the same level of refinement as you would in some stand-alone models, however its reverb comes across as fairly organic. On top of that, you are presented with several decent options. All of that aside, the real value of this Zoom comes from its ability to combine up to 6 effects at any given time.
In addition to the Les Paul, Gibson is a brand well known for pioneering some classic guitar shapes and constantly innovating, introducing concepts such as the humbucker, the digital guitar, and – most recently – the Min-ETune automatic tuning unit. Since the fifties, Gibson electric guitars have been used by everyone from James Hetfield to B.B. King.
Overdrive / distortion pedals are one of the most important effects on your board and are very much a personal taste. The ones on my pedal board change all the time, I have more than a few that I really like; Analogman King Of Tone, Pete Cornish SS-3, Ibanez Tube Screamer, Boss Blues Driver, Nobels ODR-1,  Zen Drive, MXR Distortion +... and I like and use all of them. Probably my all-time favourite os the King Of Tone, but on a budget, the Nobels ODR-1 is great value and runs with the very best!

15 Series: Constructed of solid all mahogany woods, featuring herringbone rosette, matte finish and A-frame “X” bracing. Models include D-15 and OMC-15E. Also acoustic bass guitar BC-15E. John Frusciante of the Red Hot Chili Peppers favors this series, himself owning two vintage O-15 acoustics. Used on solo albums (most notably on Curtains) and albums with the band (like the recent Stadium Arcadium), Frusciante’s O-15s can be seen in action during live performances of songs, including Venice Queen (most memorably at Slane Castle) and Desecration Smile. Chris Martin ofColdplay also uses Martin & Co. 15-series, which can be seen during Mylo Xyloto concerts. Martin also made a line of D-15 style guitars for Guitar Center/Musician’s Friend. The Guitar Center model is called the DSR and has a solid sitka spruce top with solid rosewood back and sides. Musician’s Friend had two models labeled as a simply Custom-D. Both models have a solid sitka spruce top as well as either solid rosewood or mahogany back and sides.
In 1952 the pickup selection circuit was modified by Fender to incorporate a real tone control. Between 1953 and 1967 the neck could be selected alone with a pre-set bassy sound and no tone control, in the middle switch the neck could be selected alone with the tone control and finally the bridge could be selected with the tone control. Although this provided the player with a proper tone control, this assembly did away with any sort of pickup combination. Eventually from late 1967 Fender again modified the circuit for the final time to give the Telecaster a more traditional twin pickup switching system: neck pickup alone with tone control in the first position, both pickups together with the tone control in the middle position and in the third position the bridge pickup alone with the tone control.[2]
I have a Samick Avion AV7 that I've been having trouble with a buzzing low E string when strumming with the first four frets. The bow is .013" and I set the 12th fret E string height to 2.5mm which helped, but not cured. I used a depth gauge to measure my frets, most measure at .043-.045" but the last two frets (21,22) measure at .052". At this point, would it be best to loosen the truss rod a 1/4 turn, or should I address the high frets, or could it be something else altogether? Thanks for the information.
A Distortion pedal is a must, it really helps bring out those chords, solos and riffs and makes sure they stand out. It gives you the volume jump when you need it and changes the overall sound of your guitar, giving it power and aggression. Of course, you don’t always have to dial in the pedal for bone crushing riffs as a distortion pedal can provide a smoother sound, but at least the option is there!
Other handheld guitar and bass resonators on the market, manufactured under the tradename SRG, produced by Aescher Europa, in Germany, are available in both monophonic (one note at a time) and polyphonic (multiple notes at once) models, which include multiple onboard trigger switch effects, such as HPF (high pass filter) for enhancing harmonics and producing feedback effects, and LPF (low pass filter), producing a bass boost with a cello sound on heavy gauge strings. Later EBow models, such as the plus Ebow, contain a mode slide switch on the back, which allows the player to either produce just sustain or overtone feedback in addition to sustain.[69]

On stages and in recording studios all over the globe, the Epiphone name can easily be found thanks to the incredible amount of work that's put into every instrument they design. So with that in mind, which is the right guitar value package for you? You certainly have plenty of choices, but starting with the top-rated items is a great way to speed up the decision-making process. For example, check out the Les Paul electric guitar player pack. Featuring an Electar-10 amp with overdrive, gig bag, pinch-on tuner, strap cables, picks and of course the classic Les Paul Special II in ebony, this package has it all. Plus, it also includes free online eMedia guitar lessons, so you'll be impressing family and friends with face-melting riffs in no time.
The ‘HSS’ refers to the pickup combination, with a humbucker and two single-coils, which is a versatile arrangement for both clean and distorted playing, especially when coupled with two tone controls and a five-way pickup selector switch. An excellent price for a good brand, and perfect for newbies. Make sure to check out the full review of this guitar.

As you will note in the earliest catalogs, Ibanez guitars were first "copies" or "reproductions" of guitar models originated by several American guitar manufacturers and manufacturers from other countries. They were not forgeries, as they were never sold with misleading logos or with the intent to deceive. Ibanez models replicated such styles as the Gibson Les Paul, Fender Stratocaster and Telecaster, Rickkenbacker styles, and others. Due to their high quality, Ibanez guitars and those made under other brands, such as Greco and Aria, quickly earned a reputation around the world as quality instruments at a great value. There is a form of urban legend that circulates in the guitar community that has many variations, but usually involves either Gibson or Fender suing Ibanez, Aria, or some other Japanese manufacturer, with the intent to stop that company from manufacturing superior copies. The truth is less glamourous. Only one company ever sued another, and it was Norlin (the owner of the Gibson brand at the time) suing Hoshino (owner of the Ibanez brand) and the suit was focused only on the "open book" headstock shape common to Gibson guitars and replicated on the Ibanez guitars. The suit was brought in 1977, but by then Ibanez had already changed the headstock shape on its copy models, so the suit was settled out of court. No other company was ever sued by any other company. However, this episode has given rise to the term "lawsuit" guitar, which is used to describe any Japanese copy guitar made in the shape of an American manufacturer's model.
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This guide is as marvelously written as it is exceedingly informative. It takes a long look at each of the major and minor American guitar companies — Gibson chief among them — and recounts the story of every guitar to come off their workbenches. Buoyed by scads of historical photos and thoroughly researched copy, this book earns its place at the top of this list.
The palm mute is a playing technique for guitar and bass guitar, executed by placing the side of the picking hand below the little finger across the strings to be plucked, very close to the bridge, and then plucking the strings while the damping is in effect. This produces a muted sound. It was popularized by Black Sabbath in the song "Paranoid". - winner333
The Octavia was created by Roger Mayer for Jimi Hendrix in 1967. It’s musical debut can be heard on “Purple Haze” on the Are You Experienced record. One of the many ground breaking sounds on this recording. The pedal produces a doubling effect an octave above the fundamental note. The octave is similar to a ring modulator in that it is kind of dirty and strange sounding.
The more difficult nut to crack in emulating the full drive train of a modern guitar is the instrument itself. That breaks down into two categories -- acoustic and amplified. VSTs and the gear that emulate the performance logic and physics of a guitar can get close to an acceptable reproduction of acoustic instruments but that last mile will be a hard gap to close. That's because the resonate bodies of most instruments -- especially stringed instruments -- are shaped differently than speakers. The materials, the inertial matrix, they're just not the same. The resonance of a stringed instrument originates at a single point of impact with the string, much as a speaker's sound originates at a sort-of single magnetic point, but inertia carries the vibration of a bowed or plucked string through a 3D body to produce 3D acoustics that cannot be exactly matched with a forward facing speaker -- or by speakers facing front and back. Close, but no exact match. We might argue that speakers can render sounds closer than a human ear can detect, but nuanced vibrations picked up in the bones and fluids of the human body could arguably betray a difference.
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Coupling an SM57 with a small-diaphragm KM84 condenser finds favour with Bill Price and John Fry, while Mike Hedges chooses his favourite Sennheiser MKH40. Bill Price also mentions the importance of finding a very close phase match between the two microphones. "What one had to do was balance those mics equally, grab a pair of headphones out in the studio that were turned up nice and loud, and fractionally position one of the mics so that they were perfectly in phase at high frequencies, because if you had one mic five inches away and the other six inches away you'd obviously get really bad phase shift that would take the top off the guitar sound."
The strings on your electric guitar have a major impact on its sound and playability. If you’ve taken a look at the huge Musician’s Friend guitar string assortment, you’ve likely realized that there’s a lot to consider in figuring out which strings are right for you and your instrument. Keep reading to find the strings that best match your electric guitar, music, and playing style.

The list of musicians who are (or who have been) in love with their vintage Fender Bassman amps—especially the 4x10 tweed variety made between 1957 and 1960—is pretty much endless. Just for starters (past and present), there's Eric Clapton, Buddy Guy, Mike Campbell, Mike Bloomfield, Jimmie Vaughan, John Fogerty, Josh Homme, Brian Setzer, the guy up the street from me... . Again, this is just the tip of the iceberg, people. After all, many professional music industry analysts have heralded Fifties 4×10 Bassman amps as the greatest amps—ever.

Most commonly associated with classic rock, the Les Paul lives up to its reputation as a rock ‘n’ roll machine. However, the guitar is actually capable of a lot more. Something many don’t recognize about the Les Paul is that in the right situations it actually has a gorgeous clean tone. Les Paul, the famed inventor and namesake of the Gibson Les Paul, used the Les Paul extensively in his career. The famed jazz guitarist did go on to use a highly modified version of the Gibson Les Paul, but he did use the original variant of the instrument when it was initially released. Bob Marley also used a Les Paul to great effect.


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I just thought you'd like to know that Takamine produced for other names. I've just bought a 1973 Wayne which has a Takamine label inside stating it was made for Wayne. Its a Takamine 375 thats a Martin D35 copy. Wayne were guitar makers in Melbourne Australia in the 1950s and 60s and began importing under their name briefly in the 70s. It sounds amazing.
As of 2012 Taylor Guitars has more than 700 employees. The company maintains two factories: One in El Cajon, California and the other, 40 miles away in Tecate, Mexico where the entry-level guitars of the Taylor line (the Baby, Big Baby, GS mini, and 100-200 series) are made along with the Taylor guitar cases. In early 2011, the company opened a distribution warehouse in the Netherlands. Also that same year, the company, along with Madinter Trade, S.L., partnered to purchase the Crelicam ebony mill in Cameroon. [6]
The following effects are a step up from your basic overdrive, distortion and fuzz, with more specialized sounds. In this category, you’ll find pedals that include effects such as time delays or frequency modifications – things that go beyond changing the shape of a sound by also changing the pitch, rhythm or both. Others are simpler, but still offer enough tone-altering potential to set them apart from the basic pedals.

Fender guitars are generally equipped with single coil pickups, resulting in a brighter tone compared to humbucker pickups, for instance. This is part of Fender’s charm, and contributes to the characteristic tone of their instruments. Single coils are designed to cut through the mix with their bright sound, but a drawback is that this can cause issues with humming (1).
When the Fender company was bought from CBS by a group of investors and employees headed by Bill Schultz in 1985, manufacturing resumed its former high quality and Fender was able to regain market share and brand reputation. This sparked a rise in mainstream popularity for vintage (and vintage-style) instruments. Dan Smith, with the help of John Page, proceeded to work on a reissue of the most popular guitars of Leo Fender’s era. They decided to manufacture two Vintage reissue Stratocaster models, a maple-fretboard 1957 and a rosewood-fretboard 1962 along with the maple-fretboard 1952 Telecaster, the maple-fretboard 1957 and rosewood-fretboard 1962 Precision Basses, as well as the rosewood-fretboard “stacked knob” 1962 Jazz Bass. This project was very important and critical to the company’s survival. These first few years (1982–1984) of reissues, known as American Vintage Reissues, are now high-priced collector’s items and considered as some of the finest to ever leave Fender’s Fullerton plant, which closed its doors in late 1984.
i am writing this now because i can't even look at this guitar without thinking about this experience, and still can't enjoy playing this very expensive and special vintage piece. i went to great lengths to get all the way to this shop, it was extremely difficult, several trains, a really long walk. then i waited a truly insane 3 months, and then went to the same lengths to pick it back up. he did say to me to bring it back, but that was impossible. never in my life, in NY or LA, or anywhere in between have had to wait more than 1-2 days for any service on any guitar. in my experience he takes on way more work than he can handle and apparently doens't do a thorough job. 3 months is obscene. 1 month is unacceptable. bad experience, 100% waste of time & money. if he refunded my money it would not come close to the amount of time i had invested in getting here & back. truly negative experience. waste of much time.
The Builder’s Edition V-Class K14ce - one of four new 2018 V-Class launches that also include a K24ce, 914ce and PS14c - is quite a statement of intent. It combines the new V bracing with a notably different, more comfortable, Grand Auditorium style. Of course, its build-quality is nothing short of exceptional as we’d expect, and not least at this price. We’re also reminded of the K14ce’s high-end lineage, however, by the paua ‘spring vine’ inlay that lies down the majority of the black/dark brown ebony ’board, while a lighter koa purfling stripe sits just inside the ebony edge-binding and continues around the headstock, which is again ebony-faced with a relatively demure paua inlay. The aged-gold Gotoh tuners perfectly fit the slightly worn-in vibe - hugely understated class, just like the green abalone dots in the ebony bridge-pins. While there’s plenty for those who love details to admire, the modern Taylor guitar is hugely sorted in terms of playing feel. V-Class, Builder’s Edition? Get used to those terms. Taylor has upped the ante. Considerably.
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If ever there was a candidate for compression, bass is it. This instrument has a wide dynamic range (even more so when slap techniques are employed), but it usually needs to sit at a very steady level in the mix. But should compression be applied during recording, to control the levels going down, or later, during the mix, to insure the best blend in the track? Well, the answer is probably both, but with potentially different approaches to squashing the signal. During recording, a Limiter might be the ticket, to control transient peaks that might overload ADCs, producing pops and spikes that can ruin a take. A classic fast VCA compressor/limiter (like the dbx 160) could be employed to handle peaks, without really reducing the player’s dynamics at this early stage. Then when mixdown rolls around, more gentle compression can be introduced (like the smooth squash of an optical compressor like the LA-2A), to tighten up the dynamics, as needed for that particular mix. Applying the right kind, and amount, of compression/limiting at all stages will assure you get nice clean recordings, that can be properly squeezed into the mix when the time comes. 

The Uni-Vibe was released in 1968 and became an immediate favorite of Jimi Hendrix, David Gilmour, and Robin Trower. It is actually a phase shifting effect, but what makes it groundbreaking is its use of an LFO (low frequency oscillator) to create the sweeping effect. It also uses a photocell to control the speed of the sweeping effect. That is basically a little light bulb inside the unit that will pulse at whatever speed the rate knob is set to. Also the brighter the pulse of the bulb the more dramatic the effect.


Entwistle also experimented throughout his career with "bi-amplification," where the higher frequencies of the bass sound are divided from the lower frequencies, with each frequency range sent to separate amplifiers and speakers. This allows for more control over the tone, because each portion of the frequency range can then be modified (e.g., in terms of tone, added overdrive, etc.) individually. The Versatone Pan-O-Flex amplifier used a different approach to bi-amplification, with separate amplifier sections for bass and treble but a single 12-inch speaker. The Versatone was used by well-known bassists such as Jack Casady and Carol Kaye.
The Badazz U1820 guitar and U1820B bass were essentially bolt-neck copies of the new Guild S-100 introduced in 1970, the so-called “Guild SG.” This was a solidbody with slightly offset double cutaways. It had a bolt-on neck with a Gibson-style open book head, outlined decal logo, block inlays, bound 22-fret rosewood fingerboard (rounded end), two of the 12-pole humbuckers with the narrow center black insert, finetune bridge, Hagstrom-style vibrato (as found on early Guilds), two volume and two tone controls, plus three-way. The bass was the same without the vibrato and with dots along the upper edge of the fingerboard. These were available in cherry red, orange sunburst or natural (“naked”). List price for the guitars in ’71 was $199.50 with case, while the basses cost $220. These pickups, by the way, while being somewhat microphonic (as with most early Japanese units), scream, if you like a really hot, high-output sound.
That protection, the MPA argued, ensures that people who create written music and related products earn a fair return for their efforts. They earn income from the sales of books, sheet music, lyric sheets, and other published materials. These individuals and companies work with the creators of music to produce well researched, accurate materials for sale to the public. The creation of these publications require substantial investments of time, materials, and fees. The free posting and distribution of TAB, lyrics, or other music notation, they argue, harms those who made those investments, and followed established business and legal procedures.
The most basic, original pickup design is a single-coil pickup. It’s composed of a single magnet with fine wire wrapped around it, creating a magnetic field that captures the strings’ vibrations converting them into an electronic signal. Single-coil pickups tend to be bright and crisp sounding. The tone they produce cuts through dense band sounds well, but they are also prone to generating hum and are subject to magnetic interference. Many great artists play guitars equipped with single-coil pickups. Eric Clapton, Stevie Ray Vaughan, John Mayer, Merle Travis and many others are famous for their use of single-coil tone.
Many of the Cordobas, such as the C7, come with a gig bag or case, which makes it easier to keep your guitar in great condition, especially if you purchase a humidifier block. If you head over to the Amazon listing for this guitar, you might see that the reviews are the same for this guitar as they are for another Cordoba instrument, so there really isn’t much extra information, unfortunately.​
One other thing to note is during the 1960's there was a lot of consolidation in the Chicago guitar manufacturers. In the 1940's National and Dobro merged to form Valco. One of Valco's sub-brand's was Supro which sold guitars under the Sears moniker Silvertone but they also manufactured guitars for Montgomery Wards as the "Airline" brand (Jack White of the White Stripes plays an Airline "Layfayette" reso-glas guitar) and there were a few other house brands too. In 1968 the conglomerate Valco closed it's doors. Also in 1968 Danelectro was shut down by MCA which had purchased it in 1966. Kay also went out of business and the remains were bought by Teisco. The only major brand that survived the 1960's to continue making these amazing guitars through the early 1970's was Harmony. We believe that's because they were the largest of all guitar manufacturers in the 1960's.

A middle ground between solid and hollow-body guitars, semi-hollows are hollowed out but have a solid block of wood running through the center of their bodies. This achieves the increased sustain and reduced feedback of a solid-body guitar while retaining the mellow tones of hollow bodies. For this reason, semi-hollow guitars became exceedingly popular with blues players like Chuck Berry and Freddie King. Their duality — sweet and mellow but also some awesome, crunchy sounds — makes them great all-purpose guitars with classic sound.
Started shopping here when I was just getting my feet wet with the music career, bought a Mexican Humbucker strat and went on from there. Over the next 3 years, after many pedals, amps, and other major gears, I've become a solid local musician. This place has the best service hands down to take care of your gear needs in your career, they find out what you need, let you demo the gear for as long as you want, and never forces you to make a purchase decision. I'm glad I can go to this place for all my gear needs and support, so I can spend most of my time on actual music. The employees are super chill, and you eventually get to know them and the bands they play in after a while. It's a really supportive community for local musicians.
I bought mine used in 1989 in a mom and pop music store in the North GA mountains in Cumming GA and have loved it everysence I Know very little about it except that I would not trade it for a new one. The sustain in the body of the overtone note is fantastic and rare to find.I use d'Addario phosphorus bronze strings 11 - 52 and would not change anything about this guitar,fantastic!!! Thanks Victor
Another application of a fuzz pedal is available when the user has control over the the amount of feedback signal routed back into the transistor loop while the pedal is engaged. By configuring the feedback to more sensitive levels, the pedal will feed back into itself causing oscillation*. As the pedal oscillates, certain frequencies will be produced, causing a singing sustained note without the guitarist playing anything at all. The player can consequently play over the note produced to cancel out the feedback loop, but once the player stops the pedal will feed back into itself producing the configured signal once again.
To finish, here's one damn good last trick: doubling an electric guitar with... anything else. I know that's pretty vague but I must say that I had a hard time putting it any other way. The goal is to listen to your guitar sound and analyze it to find out what it lacks. Then you "only" need to find a sound that can fill this "hole." For instance, a friend of mine once told me he doubled a crunchy guitar sound with a sample of a lightbulb being rubbed on his boot with the goal of emphasizing the strumming sensation. Much less arcane, there's the famous example of the particularly "fat" riff on Radiohead's Airbag. If you listen to the intro, you can hear that the riff is being doubled with a cello, which obviously adds a lot of the breadth to the sound, as I'm sure you'll agree. I would love to keep on giving you more ideas in this regard, but the scope of this method is so wide and open that the only thing I can tell you is to let your imagination fly, experiment and have fun!

Overall length is 28 1/2 in. (72.4 cm.), 10 in. (25.4 cm.) width, and 1 5/8 in. (4.1 cm.) in depth, measured at side of rim. Scale length is 15 1/4 in. (387 mm.). Width of nut is 1 3/4 in. (44 mm.). All original and complete, and quite clean overall; there are a few small dings to the finish and some light checking-almost inevitable on the Eko-made Vox instruments. The only notable finish marring is one spot where a superglue repair to a cracked pickguard corner left a bit of residue behind. A very nice little player, with an awful lot of chime! Excellent - Condition.

Guitar Center Twin Cities provides comprehensive guitar repair services for the Roseville area. Our repair technicians are as passionate about your guitars and basses as you are, and we have the experience needed to keep them performing at their best. Whether you need a quick adjustment to make your guitar easier to play, or a complete guitar rebuild, we have the tools and know-how to take care of your instrument. Guitar Center Twin Cities can also help build a maintenance plan that fits you and your guitar or bass needs, including custom setups, restrings and more. We also take care of fret repairs, hardware and pickup installations, upgrades and customizations, bone and graphite services and more.
Finally, if you’ve been looking around at different instruments you may have noticed some really cheap guitars by brand names you’ve never heard of. I always recommend starting out on a quality guitar made by a company you can trust. However, I’m also not going to look down on anyone who has to get something less expensive because it is all they can afford.

SOLD OUT: Here we had a 40+ year old 1972 Alvarez 5080 Acoustic guitar that was built by the master guitar builder Kuzio Yairi. He used 30 year old vintage aged tone woods when they built this guitar over 40 years ago.. that would make this wood arround 70 years old... Thats right...you can say that about a new Martin can we... not going to get tone like this from a new Martin either. This is one high class example replica of the Martin 000-28 this model is quiet rare and beautifully adorned with exotic tone woods plese refer to the pics. Just have a look at the beautiful exotic old growth Jacaranda Brazilian Rosewood back, sides, fingerboard...headstock overlay .., ebony pins with MOP and brass ring all high end classic detailed appointments... notice the real patina this guitar plays real well and has been played and it shows... in a good way to my eyes.. I love it. So will you just have a look... no visable issues, no cracks to be found, inlays, bindings, pickguard, tuners,frets.....all good..and sound is rich and has a nice sustain and is a pleasure to play... fresh from the JVG shop with a fresh bone saddle & nut & new Martin Marquis strings sweet! A must HAVE 40 YEAR OLD VINTAGE YAIRI 000-28 STYLE, Claptons favorite for good reason... SORRY THIS GUITAR HAS SOLD gr8bids@comcast.net Thank you for your interest.
By the late twenties, the idea for electrified string instruments had been around for some time, and experimental banjo, violin and guitar pickups had been developed. George Beauchamp had himself been experimenting with electric amplification as early as 1925, but his early efforts involving microphones did not produce the effects he desired. Along the way Beauchamp also built a one-string test guitar made out of a 2X4 piece of lumber and an electric phonograph pickup. As the problems at National became more apparent, Beauchamp’s home experiments took on a more rigorous shape, and he began to attend night classes in electronics as well as collaborating with fellow National employee Paul Barth.[1] When the prototype electric pickup they were developing finally worked to his satisfaction, Beauchamp asked former National shop craftsman Harry Watson to make a wooden neck and body to which the electronics could be attached. It was nicknamed the frying pan because of its shape, though Adolph Rickenbacker liked to call it the pancake.[6] The final design Beauchamp and Barth developed was an electric pickup consisting of a pair of horseshoe-shaped magnets that enclosed the pickup coil and completely surrounded the strings.[1]
If you want to explore the two-channel tubes amps, start with Vox. The British brand is known for making workhorse amps that were used by classic rock’s best, and this small 15 watt option will give you all the tone is a small package that you can crank up in small spaces. Along with a simple set of controls, it features a by-passable effects loop for those players who are experimenting with different gear.
I purchased this about 8 months ago (it is my first acoustic guitar) so I could learn to play again, I'm a singer by trait, but wanted to pick up a guitar again after a very long break. I did not want to spend a lot of money, but I didn't want junk either, while at the same time I wanted something that would translate well into performing live too. I did my research, and personally, it came down to this or the Yamaha APX-500 (But I really want the Mrk 1 not 2), so I settled for this.
The size and shape of the ME-80 is comparable to the Line 6 POD HD500X, though the Boss measures a few inches smaller, and also weighs a few lbs less. This is a Boss product, and as such it’s built like a tank. No worries whatsoever over the build quality of the chassis, knobs, and footswitches. Starting with the rear of the ME-80, you can see the I/O is pretty basic - mono input for your guitar, stereo output, a headphones jack, AUX in (so you can plug in your iPhone and jam along to your favorite tracks), and a USB port. Like the Zoom G3X and the Line 6 POD HD500X, you can use the Boss ME-80 as a USB interface for your computer and record your guitar straight into your favorite DAW. Oh and one small inconvenience is that you’ll need to buy the power supply separately. Why Boss doesn’t just include one for a unit of this quality and price, we don't really understand. If you do end up getting the ME-80, this is the power adapter you want. It can also use 6 AA batteries which is good if you need to use this on-the-go, but we don’t recommend it as it will suck those batteries dry in no time.
We all are now living in a great time considering the choices that we currently have. Even though it is a good thing every so often, it can actually be complicated to decide and buy the best electric guitar. If you one to have it for a serious reason, it will be realistic to own the one which comes equipped with guitar essentials like strap, carry-bag, picks, and if possible a good practice guitar amp.
The Effect:Reverb pedals have remained a staple pick in each guitarist’s arsenal in order to provide that extra sound refinement and enhancement when necessary. It may be tricky, learning to apply the right amount of Reverb, as too little may go unnoticed, and too much may sound silly, yet finding that sweet spot is definitely thrilling and satisfying. Great option for every beginner (or a so called must have guitar pedal) is the Boss FRV-1 63 Fender Reverb Pedal. If you want to dig deeper into the reverb effects, check out our dedicated article, the plethora of reverb pedals for you to choose from will surprise you.
The Jeff Beck Oxblood is available in limited numbers. The first 50 of these historic guitars were aged at Gibson Custom to look like Beck’s original, then signed, numbered and played by Beck himself. The next 100 guitars were prepared with Gibson Custom’s V.O.S. finish, bringing the total run to 150 instruments. Each one also comes with a standard Gibson Custom case.
In 2004, the Gibson Custom Shop introduced the Slash Signature Les Paul Standard, a guitar that Gibson has used ever since as the “standard” non limited edition Slash Les Paul (this guitar is in the Gibson range all year round).[33] This guitar features a plain maple top with a Dark Tobacco Sunburst finish, and has a piezo pickup with a switch located near the tone and volume knobs .[32] In 2008, Epiphone issued the Slash Signature Les Paul Standard Plus Top, which was modeled after the Gibson Custom Shop model.[32] It has a solid mahogany body, flame maple top, and a Dark Tobacco Burst finish.[34]
When connecting more than one pickup, it’s important to follow the manufacturer’s color codes and wiring diagrams so that the phase relationship is correct. The phase relationship of a pickup is determined by the winding direction of the coil and the polarity of the magnets. The two coils of the traditional humbucker are connected in series with the phase relationship shown in Fig. 1. Most modern Stratocaster® style guitars with three single-coil pickups are supplied with a reverse wound/reverse polarity middle pickup for a parallel hum canceling effect when the guitar is switched to a two pickup position (e.g. neck & middle pickup together) as shown in Fig. 2.

Also offered by Sears in ’42 was the Supro Baton Guitar Outfit, with lap and amp, except for a carved Silvertone logo on the head, identical to the Supro outfit. One other Silvertone amplifier was clearly the Supro Supreme. Another five-tube amp with a 12″ speaker was also offered, which appeared to be a Valco product, but which model is unknown. This had a cabinet covered in a “grey checked material,” and featured a round grill cut by two horizontal bars, typical of Valco designs.


Another relatively drastic but easy and cheap way to hot-rod your guitar’s sound with its current components is to alter how and where its volume and tone pots are connected to each other. The difference can be subtle—and it’s more a matter of preference than what’s “correct”—but it can make the difference between a guitar that is just OK and one that really is a joy to play.
Mostly everything about a guitar in this price range feels premium, and the sound quality and playability is enough to put a smile on any guitarist’s face. You also start to find advanced features such as brand-name pickups, active pickups, and EverTune bridges, as well as unique signature models that are too expensive for manufacturers to produce as a budget line.
Its ok to put diffrent brand pickups in, i have a guitar with an iron gear hammer head at the bridge for heavy riffing and a slash signiture at the neck for sweet blues solos. I had it wired diffrent though, 1 master tone 2 volumes and a blend knob, with the 3 way switch in the middle i was getting too much hammer head due to its out put being higher, so the blend knob allows me to fine tune the mix of the pickups.
The Omen line is made for everyone, but perhaps leans just slightly toward the shredding crowd. This guitar features a maple bolt-on neck which features a rosewood fretboard with pearloid inlays. The inlays are a nice touch at this price, if you’re into that sort of thing. The pickups are Schecter Diamond Plus humbuckers and offer a well-balanced tone that can also be aggressive when needed. Twenty-four jumbo frets means this is good for speed.
We recommend you choose the headstock shape that appeals to you most. The shape of the headstock does not significantly affect the sound or performance of the instrument. Some of our headstock shapes are pointier, which means they can get damaged more easily when dropped or bumped. Choose from our existing shapes, or, send us a drawing of your original design - we can build that, too!
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The steel-string beauty is crafted from solid Sitka spruce on the top, which features solid Indian rosewood back and sides, and a slim mahogany neck and rosewood fretboard. You’ll notice some impressive decoration on the BR-160 (as we mention in our full review), including an exclusive Dalmatian-style tortoiseshell pickguard, accurate 14:1 butterbean-style tuners, and an elaborately decorated motherof-pearl headstock.
I got this lyle acoustic (w-400) for $40 at a yard sale - it is THE MOST INCREDIBLE GUITAR you could ever ask for - looks just like a martin d-18 - solid spruce top - sweet figured mahog b&s's - back of headstock even has the valute like a martin - just kicks my buddies real d-18 to pieces - he's so jealous - if you get the chance to own one don't pass it up - it will probably be too cheap to pass up and you WILL regret it later (like I have been kicking my own ass for decades for passing up a 60's Gibson byrdland for $400)
Hertz Guitar is a well known brand, which manufactures high quality guitars. The company was originated from Shanghai,China and North Korea. Their musical instruments were introduced on September 2009. They offer world class quality instruments from world class branded production houses. They maintain international standard. It mainly focuses on musical instruments as well as accessories. They manufacture a wide range of guitar. Available at below Rs. 12,040/- (approx).
It wouldn't be called a tribute if it didn't follow convention, so having a mahogany body with an arched maple top is expected. Epiphone also designed the neck to mimic the playability of old LPs, giving this guitar a 1960s SlimTaper D profile. However, what makes the Epiphone Les Paul Tribute Plus stand out is the use of two Gibson USA '57 Classic humbucking pickups, which essentially gives this Les Paul a more premium Gibson voice, at a fraction of the price.
Why is Mesa Boogie so low?! Have Mesa Boogie ever made a bad amp? Look how many guys endorse their gear. Have you ever tried a Dual Rectifier or Mark V? It will tear you to shreds. They are AMAZING amps. Best part, they're all tube. Line 6, why the hell are they fifth. Why are they in the top 15? They are nothing but crap digital rubbish. Play a real amp like a Mesa Boogie, line 6, pft. Mesa Boogie is the best amp brand by far.
Warwick Electronics manufactured the first wah-wah pedal,[citation needed] The Clyde McCoy, in 1967 and that same year Jim Morris of Kelsey-Morris Sound developed the first octave effect, which Jimi Hendrix named "Octavio". In 1968, Univox began marketing Shin-ei's Uni-Vibe pedal, an effect designed by noted audio engineer Fumio Mieda that mimicked the odd phase shift and chorus effects of the Leslie rotating speakers used in Hammond organs. The pedals soon became favorite effects of guitarists Jimi Hendrix and Robin Trower. Upon first hearing the Octavia, Hendrix allegedly rushed back to the studio and immediately used it to record the guitar solos on "Purple Haze" and "Fire".[43] In 1976, Roland subsidiary Boss Corporation released the CE-1 Chorus Ensemble, the first chorus pedal, created by taking a chorus circuit from an amplifier and putting it into a stompbox.[44] By the mid-1970s a variety of solid-state effects pedals including flangers, chorus pedals, ring modulators and phase shifters were available.[45][46]
A full step down from standard. Used by bands such as Korn, Paradise Lost, Dream Theater (on "False Awakening Suite" and "Illumination Theory" from the self-titled album), Emmure, Obscura, ReVamp, and Fear Factory (on most songs from Obsolete and Digimortal, "Drones" and "Bonescraper" from Archetype, "Moment of Impact" from Transgression, and most songs on Mechanize, The Industrialist and Genexus)
Do you have an old guitar that requires knowing how to repair a damaged guitar body? Read on and learn some neat tricks for repairing body damage on a guitar. Body damage on a guitar ruins the acoustics. Body damage on a guitar body really make it useless in the playing arena. If you are looking to bust out that old guitar but need some handy advice on how to repair some old damage, MadeMan has the fixes for you. This article will give you the fixes for larger damage and the annoying little nicks and teach you the way to repair them.
Some of the smaller amplifiers that I like to talk so much about are not really that small. I mean, the Marshall MS4 Mini Micro Full Stack Battery Amplifier is anything but small, in terms of sound at least. It has a powerful volume output that is hard to ignore for anyone, be it in some bar or in the street or at some gig. The tall tower like shape of the guitar is exceptional in design and yes, while the stack is a little on the big side, the affordable price of it and the quality of tone and volume is definitely worth the little bit of a size problem. Definitely worth your consideration!
One day I want to own a Martin IN ADDITION to my Gibson.. but having tried both a lot.. the D-18, the D-28... I went with the J-45. The J-45 is special in that it has slim shoulders - you won't get an enormous boom out of it when un-amplified. But the sustain is super fine, and as accompaniment to the singer and as a tool for the songwriter, it is rock solid and it gives, gives, gives, then gives some more. Plus, it's sexy as hell - every boy might think he longs for a Martin, but every girl goes home with the guy with the Gibson.
About 30 years ago, a fellow co-worker began teaching me how to play electric guitar. I believe it was an Aria Pro Strat. He had been playing for 20 plus years at this time and was a very good teacher, he owned a 1958 Les Paul. I have not played since he was in a car wreck in 1990 as he could not return to work. He was however able to continue to play, its just our schedules never allowed the time to take lessons. He passed away in 2011, and since I retired last year, I’d like to take up lessons. I found your article very helpful in selecting an electric guitar. It mentions a lot of things most people do not consider when buying.
Hugh Padgham adopted a similar tactic for recording Andy Summers' Roland JC120 when working with the Police: "The chorus [was] always switched on in order to produce the slightly out-of-tune guitar sound that was all the rage during the early '80s. The amp's two 12-inch speakers would each be close-miked with a Sennheiser MD421, panned left and right — one speaker would produce a straight signal while the other would be chorused, and these would sometimes be double-tracked the other way around in order to produce an especially wide stereo picture."
With $500 in your pocket, buying a good amp becomes a lot easier. In fact, it’s probably as expensive as most casual guitarists would ever need to go. This category includes a big choice of both amp heads and combos, solid-state and tube amps. While they make great practice amps, they are all worthy of small to medium-sized gigs and studio recording. For example, you can find the excellent Peavey ValveKing II. This little amp head offers the same beastly tone as the iconic full-size 6505, with 20 watts of power and solid controls.
While anything with decent gain could be used for metal, a dedicated metal amp is the only thing a dedicated metalhead would want to use. These amps are actually very similar to other styles of amp, with one big difference – they are loaded with massive gain, which is essential for metal. A perfect example of what makes a great metal amp is the EVH 5150III. Designed with Eddie Van Halen, this all-tube amp head is an absolute beast in term of power and gain, with face-melting distortion and 50 watts of power.
An electric guitar works on the principle of electromagnetic induction. This means that an electric guitar has electromagnets in its system which generate magnetic fields. Apart from this, an electric guitar has an amplification system which amplifies the sound waves generated by the guitar’s string. It is this combination of electromagnetic induction and amplification system that makes an electric guitar run.
The Guitar Chords: Easy-to-Use, Easy-to-Carry, One Chord on Every Page does one thing extremely well: it is spiral bound. It’s more of a reference than anything else, but one that musicians of all levels will appreciate. It covers the gamut of chords with not just one but two variations of each one. Of course, many have more than that, but it’s good information just the same.
You can do this using a fairly slow tracking time in Auto-Tune so that the bend dynamics aren't changed in any obvious way — it's just that when you finish bending, the note will come to rest on a precise value. Not that I'm suggesting you need to do this, of course, but the day will come when a client plays a never to be repeated take that is perfect apart from a few bend intonation problems...
Peavy amps are especially well appreciated by the metal community, thanks to their good overall reliability and the high volume of sound some models produce. The 6505 Series is a favorite of metal guitarists due to its power and versatility. This is most often used as a head for double stacks of speakers, but it can also be purchased as a 2×12” and 1×12” combo for convenience.
I once had RARE rogue made in the early 90s, set up exactly like some of the best ibanez.s. Shark fin inllays, cool headstock, grover tuners, real floyd rose, etc, even the pickups used were authentic dimebuckers. Rogue made these to compete with bigger names and sold them for around $200, best guitar ever. I wish I had never sold it. I still have pics if anyone wants to see it.

This guitar has a maple neck which is coated with a thin satin finish and has a C-design which is easy for beginners to handle. It features an alder solid body. The vibrato design is enhanced with the addition of block saddles for adding firmness to the tone. They also give a precise breakpoint for the strings. Speaking of pickups, the PAC 112v is equipped with a 5-way blade pickup selector. There are master tone and volume controls for the neatest output. This guitar is available in seven finishes, natural satin, old violin sunburst, raspberry red, sonic blue, black, and silver metal.
Jazz guitars are big bodied, often semi-acoustic, and designed to coax out some wonderfully rich, warm tones. Historically, jazz was played on acoustic guitars. However, in the days before amplification, the guitar often became lost in the mix of the big band sound. Until, that was, the introduction of arch top acoustics. Containing a magnetic pickup, arch tops ushered in a new era of guitar manufacturing. This meant that players could be heard in the way they wanted.
The United States Department of Justice found emails from 2008 and 2009 in which Gibson employees discussed the "gray market" nature of the ebony wood available from a German wood dealer—who obtained it from a supplier in Madagascar—as well as plans to obtain the wood. It filed a civil proceeding in June 2011,[40][43][44] the first such case under the amended Lacey Act, which requires importing companies to purchase legally harvested wood and follow the environmental laws of the producing countries regardless of corruption or lack of enforcement.[44] Gibson argued in a statement the following day that authorities were "bullying Gibson without filing charges" and denied any wrongdoing.[39][45] Arguing against the federal regulations and claiming that the move threatened jobs, Republicans and Tea Party members spoke out against the raids and supported Juszkiewicz.[46]

The DI approach most likely to capture the spirit of the original sound is to take a DI feed from the speaker output of a conventional guitar amplifier and feed this into the type of speaker simulator that also includes a dummy load to keep the amplifier happy (valve amplifiers can be damaged by running them into an open circuit). Emulators with a built-in load are generally very much larger than the regular DI box-size emulator-only products. Some of the emulator-only devices can be run from a speaker output, but you still need to plug in either a separate dummy load (usually an 8Ω resistor rated at over 100 Watts on a heat sink) or the original speaker to protect the amplifier from possible damage. Apart from the dummy load, which is passive, the circuitry may either be passive or active.
As players such as Bobby Broom, Peter Bernstein, Howard Alden, Russell Malone, and Mark Whitfield revived the sounds of traditional jazz guitar, there was also a resurgence of archtop luthierie (guitar-making). By the early 1990s many small independent luthiers began making archtop guitars. In the 2000s, jazz guitar playing continues to change. Some guitarists incorporate a Latin jazz influence, acid jazz-style dance club music uses samples from Wes Montgomery, and guitarists such as Bill Frisell continue to defy categorization.

Eventually, silicon transistors replaced germanium ones, helping to combat the inconsistent sounds of the germanium version (each circuit varies, and they were often affected by hot temperatures). Silicon completely changed the distortion, making it brighter, edgier, and more aggressive, as exemplified by the famous Electro-Harmonix Big Muff. The later introduction of the integrated circuit provided even more stability. Digital emulators can now universalize effects in a standalone unit. Materials don’t lie, however; when compared to their analog ancestors, the digital units lack the unique wildness of the germanium effect.
A standard Squier Stratocaster is mass-produced in factories located in Indonesia or China. For its construction, Squier usually uses woods readily available in those countries, such asagathis and basswood. They also use stamped metal hardware and multiple pieces of wood in construction to reduce waste and to lower costs. In some cases, the body is laminated, much like a plywood, rather than consisting of two or three solid pieces glued together.

The body is pre-drilled and crafted from basswood, while the maple neck is meant to be glued into the neck joint, something that requires a bit of care and precision. Because of its hollow body design, installing electronics can be a bit of a challenge, but very doable as attested to by reviews. Note that wood is raw and unfinished, so you'll need a bit more sanding and patching before you paint on it.


Distortion is usually generated by three distinct sources: the power amp, the preamp and the speakers. Many players overlook power amp distortion when trying an amp, but the power amp section is the source of what guitarists describe as low-end chunk and balls. Audition the power amp by turning the master volume way up and turning down the gain. The sound should be lively, with a crisp attack that jiggles your trousers.
Hi Dan! Thanks for the kind words! As somewhat of a newbie, you may find a semi-hollow-body guitar more flexible and versatile, especially if you are still finding trying to figure out what genre you are going to focus on. If you are set on the hollow-body go for, but ,if you are on the fence, the versatility of the guitar is something to consider. Those are my thoughts. Good luck!
But here at Uberchord (click to download the free guitar learning app) we get that your dream is maybe about playing electric guitar. And if that’s what you want to do, then starting out with a good electric instrument makes sense. But what makes a “good” guitar? Well, if you are confused about what kind of Guitar to buy, you can check out our post on: Types of Guitar: Beginner’s Guide to Buying A Guitar.
The primary means of identifying the model number of Kent guitars is via a label on the back of the headstock. Through the years many of those labels have fallen off or been peeled off. They do not add anything to the appearance of the guitar. The 700 and 800 guitars had a round foil sticker with the model number and sometimes serial number pressed into it, kind of like Dymo tape labels. The look a lot nicer than the white paper one used on earlier models, but they still can fall off over the years, and they are harder to read.

He or she might even graduate to an acoustic guitar with steel strings long before ever obtaining an amplifier for the acoustics in question, let alone an electric guitar to plug into it. And who are the heroes of the guitar? For the last 50 years it's been Jimi Hendrix, Eric Clapton, Jimmy Page, and Tom Morello, to name just a few innovative names. All of these players made their reputations on electric guitars pumping through amplifiers, and at least one of them–or one like them–is likely the reason you picked up a guitar in the first place.
	PRS McCarty 594 Electric Guitar	The PRS McCarty 594 is a vintage-inspired electric guitar with plenty of premium appointments such as a . It’s part of the Core Electric Series, the company’s lineup of high-end guitars. This means that the McCarty 594 has all the bells and whistles you can expect from a premium instrument. For pro musicians, this is an investment worth every penny.	

Classical guitars have nylon strings, which are softer than steel strings, and easier to press down. However, the neck is much wider on a classical guitar, which can be a struggle for beginners. The action is likely to be higher, as well. In general, they are softer-toned and don't project as well as a steel string acoustic, which makes for quieter practising, which could be a consideration.
For electric guitar amplifiers, there is often[vague] a distinction between "practice" or "recording studio" guitar amps, with output power ratings of less than one watt to 20 watts, and "performance" or "stage" amps of 30 watts or higher.[citation needed] Traditionally,[according to whom?] these have been fixed-power amplifiers,[jargon] with some models having a half-power switch to slightly reduce the listening volume while preserving power-tube distortion.
The Gibson-owned Epiphone Company makes around 20 models of the Les Paul, most are similar copies of Gibson-made models, although when inspected closely, the Gibson originals are most often superior in craftsmanship and materials. Made in places outside the U.S., the Epiphone Les Pauls are made from more commonly available woods using less expensive foreign labor and have less hand detailing than the Gibson models, and, as a result, sell for a lower price. Epiphone Guitar Co. has been owned by Gibson Guitars since the 1950s. Once Gibson purchased Epiphone they quickly began making lower-quality guitars based on Gibson designs.[24]
Compressor: Compressors make loud sounds quieter and quiet sounds louder by decreasing or "compressing" the dynamic range of an audio signal.[60] A compressor is often used to stabilize volume and smooth a note's "attack" by dampening its onset and amplifying its sustain. A compressor can also function as a limiter with extreme settings of its controls.[61]
I have 8 guitars and 5 Gretsches and I'm currently playing this one the most. It's very bright, which if you play a Martin you might not like. Like super duper bright. No really, brighter than that. But I like it. Unplugged it's good but not very loud, so it's a nice practice guitar, but you're going to want to plug in at the coffee shop or larger.
Before deciding on how to go about mic’ing the amp, listen to the sound in the room. If the guitar is being recorded as part of a rhythm track in the same room as drums and other instruments, the only option may be to use a close-mic’ing technique, unless you don’t mind dealing with the other instruments bleeding into the guitar track. Recording guitars in isolation, as an overdub, presents more options for ambient room mic’ing. Experiment with mic positioning to achieve the right amount of room sound and the desired bass and treble response. Distance-mic’ing in a very live-sounding room can create an appealing slapback echo-type sound, while close mic’ing gives you absolute flexibility in the mix.   

The solid-body electric guitar is made of solid wood, without functionally resonating air spaces. The first solid-body Spanish standard guitar was offered by Vivi-Tone no later than 1934. This model featured a guitar-shaped body of a single sheet of plywood affixed to a wood frame. Another early, substantially solid Spanish electric guitar, called the Electro Spanish, was marketed by the Rickenbacker guitar company in 1935 and made of Bakelite. By 1936, the Slingerland company introduced a wooden solid-body electric model, the Slingerland Songster 401 (and a lap steel counterpart, the Songster 400).
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