I have a genuine UK built carlsbro guitar combo amp. No cheap Chinese built chipboard here. Combo amp has twin channels,with twin master channels with footswitch selector pedal and a 12" celestion G12 speaker. Excellent condition. Good sparkling clean sound. With a boost overdrive switch on the clean channel as well. Has a separate distortion channel. And dual switch A/B selectable master chann ...

Planning for this review started right after the January 2018 National Association of Music Merchants (NAMM) show in Anaheim, California. We didn’t notice any significant introductions in the under-$200 electric guitar category during our time there, but new guitars can appear at any time. We’ll be watching out for them, and we’ll get our hands on them as soon as we can.
Finally, there was a mysterious lap – clearly Valco – which had no real National or Supro equivalents. This had tapered shoulders that swept down, wing-like, to the bottom, which had a little concave cutout. It was covered in ivory plastic on top, with black-lacquered sides. It had a rosewood ‘board with dot inlays. The pickup was the new exposed-pole single-coil with a bolt-on handrest, in front of narrow rectangular plate that held the saddle and attaching holes. Volume and tone knobs sat on little mini-plates on either of the strings. Another atypical downscale version of the National New Yorker was offered at the same time by Montgomery Ward.
Fretwire can vary from some makers as it is shaped by extrusion thru a series of roller dies and the dies wear.  I have observed actual Dunlop 6105 in my shop varying from .088” to .090” wide and from .052” to .055” tall.  Due to the inconsistent size and tang formation, I generally do not use Dunlop fretwire these days, instead preferring the more accurate German made Jescar or the Japanese made Stewart McDonald fretwires.  Both Jescar and SM have very well formed tangs and barbs and are very consistent. I will refer to the Dunlop numbers below but only for very general description – always verify actual sizes!
Coupling an SM57 with a small-diaphragm KM84 condenser finds favour with Bill Price and John Fry, while Mike Hedges chooses his favourite Sennheiser MKH40. Bill Price also mentions the importance of finding a very close phase match between the two microphones. "What one had to do was balance those mics equally, grab a pair of headphones out in the studio that were turned up nice and loud, and fractionally position one of the mics so that they were perfectly in phase at high frequencies, because if you had one mic five inches away and the other six inches away you'd obviously get really bad phase shift that would take the top off the guitar sound."
Some big ideas there Mike! Not too sure about copper wire being magnetised though, last time I checked that was only ferrous materials… As for grounding, you should check out the “star-grounding” scheme described over at GuitarNuts: http://www.guitarnuts.com/wiring/shielding/shield3.php Some great info on that site, you should have a browse around!
Another Martin creation, the 000 shape guitar is almost the perfect halfway house between a dreadnought and a parlour. Its classic hourglass figure meant it sat comfortably on the knee, endearing it to players of folk and other fingerpicking-heavy styles of music. The shape ensured it had the perfect balance between playing and comfort, and was often seen on the lap of no less a player than Eric Clapton. However it wasn’t averse to a bit of heavy strumming when the occasion called, and it’s large bottom end ensured it could keep pace when playing with others.

If your audio track suffers from a lot of spill, or includes chords, the pitch correction may not work correctly. Where spill is loud enough to be audible, you'll hear this being modulated in pitch alongside the wanted part of the audio as it is corrected. As a rule, chords are ignored, so guitar solos, bowed stringed instruments and bass parts (including fretless) can be processed, and only single notes will be corrected.
Double-neck (or, less commonly, "twin-neck") guitars enable guitarists to play both guitar and bass guitar or, more commonly, both a six-string and a twelve-string. In the mid-1960s, one of the first players to use this type of guitar was Paul Revere & the Raiders' guitarist Drake Levin. Another early user was John McLaughlin. The double-neck guitar was popularized by Jimmy Page, who used a custom-made, cherry-finished Gibson EDS-1275 to perform "Stairway to Heaven", "The Song Remains the Same" and "The Rain Song", although for the recording of "Stairway to Heaven" he used a Fender Telecaster and a Fender XII electric twelve-string. Mike Rutherford of Genesis and Mike + the Mechanics is also famous for his use of a double-neck guitar during live shows. Don Felder of the Eagles used the Gibson EDS-1275 during the Hotel California tour. Muse guitarist and vocalist Matthew Bellamy uses a silver Manson double-neck on his band's Resistance Tour. Rush guitarist Alex Lifeson is also known for using double-neck guitars in the live performance of several songs. In performances of the song "Xanadu" during the band's 2015 R40 anniversary tour, Lifeson played a white Gibson EDS-1275 double-neck guitar with six-string and twelve-string necks, while bassist Geddy Lee performed with a double-neck Rickenbacker guitar with four-string bass and twelve-string guitar necks.
When creating your tone with effects, understanding the order in which you connect your effects is very important. Creating an effects chain is a lot like making a sundae. The Ice cream is the base of your sundae, followed by toppings and finally sprinkles. If you put the sprinkles and toppings in before the ice cream, the flavours will still be there and it may still be a delicious sundae but it is a lot harder to see what extras you added underneath all that ice cream.
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For those of you out there with a stereo or home theater system, you'll be fine as long as you run the audio directly from the xbox through that. But since I have neither, I was stuck. I ended up bringing down my old CD player from my bathroom, just to see if that would work. SO much better. But since I didn't want to leave that ugly thing sitting under my TV in my living room I went out and checked around for speaker prices. After the money spent on the game and the guitar, I didn't really want to put too much more money into this. I ended up with a Turtle Island headset for $40. It seems to be doing the trick. Just be prepared for this extra expenditure if you don't have an external speaker system in place.
The Super Chromonica 270 Deluxe is an updated improvement on the Super Chromonica, featuring tighter reedplate fixtures, thicker reedplates, round holes in its chrome-plated mouthpiece, a smoother slide mechanism which can be remounted for left-handed use, and a round-edged comb for more comfortable holding.[36] The Deluxe is also available with a gold-plated mouthpiece and coverplates, known as the Super Chromonica Gold.[37]
Paul Simon, the great wordsmith, speaks as vividly through his guitar as his lyrics. Weaned on early doo-wop and rock & roll, Simon got caught up in the folk revival during the mid-Sixties, traveling to England to study the acoustic mastery of Bert Jansch. He has continued absorbing new influences, as on "Dazzling Blue," off his most recent album, So Beautiful or So What: "All that folk fingerpicking is what I did with Simon and Garfunkel, but [here] it's on top of this rhythm with Indian musicians playing in 12/8." At 70, he's as nimble as ever.
Following the lead of Electro, which was having some success with their cast aluminum alloy bodies, Dobro – still a separate company – introduced its first cast aluminum Dobro Hawaiian electric lap steel guitar, probably in late 1934. Along with the aluminum lap, Dobro also debuted the Standard Guitar, and the Mandolin. Accompanying these was the Dobro Amplifier. All four listed for $67.50. These are all shown in the ’35 Tonk Brothers catalog.

Lotus started with the elite league of Japanese craftsmen and initially made excellent Morris-branded guitars, but trying to keep up with the heavyweights such as Matsumoku Aria Pro II and Fuji-Gen Gakki Ibanez was difficult. Mismanagement and, especially, the inability to market their initial superb-quality guitars soon had Lotus' owners scrambling for cheaper labor, ending in India with poor quality and eventually no takers for their product, as Chinese and Indonesian guitar producers stepped up with instruments of comparable quality at similar prices.


I've been to Steve about a dozen times with my guitars, families and friends instruments and have sent several people there and have nothing but great things to say.  He is reasonably priced and likely one of the most talented and experienced Luthier's in Boston.  It's rare to see any establishment get 5 stars from so many people and Steve deserves it!  Only thing is, if you're in a rush to get your instrument back, go somewhere else where they do it quickly and without much thought/TLC.  Steve takes his time to do it right and has a lot of customers because he's the guy to go to in the greater Boston area. Highly recommend!
This is the classic effect that many people first buy and overuse. Chorus works by inaudibly delaying each note to thicken and sweeten your original sound. If set too high it can make your sound overly ‘sugary’ so use it sparingly with electric or acoustic and it will provide some sparkle over a song section. With chorus’s you get what you pay for so the overall sound quality of a £25 unit might become irritating in the long run.

I believe its an 80's model it has some wear n tear but makes it look good and ventig. But there is nothing on it but the bently sign on the headstock.its jet black has a bridge not string through. Two hummbuckers I guess. A treble and rhythm switch up by the neck on the top. It is a 22 fret with pearl inlays. Someone shoot me an email n ill send picks of it. Just want to know what I got my hands on.
I started using cobalt .010 and I've found they have plenty of clarity and bite. Please keep in mind there are many factors going into your sound. Amp, guitar pickups, strings, pick type, etc. Don't be disappointed if you get some premium strings that don't change your sound if your pickups can't pick up the movement very well. Start at a regular light. .010 is plenty flexible, and they won't break as often as a 8 or 9. Don't get caught up in the rookie mentality of "THIS is what kind of guitarist I will be, so I need everything to fit that." Experiment with different sizes and types.
The guitar is one of the most beloved musical instruments of all time. Guitarists tend to wear that title with pride, and their instrument becomes an extension of the player’s distinct personality. Because of this, players tend to develop a strict loyalty to the guitar brand of their choosing. Luckily, there are many great options out there today, with niches that cater to virtually all genres and styles. This guide will weigh the pros and cons of the five best guitar brands on the market, to help you make as informed a decision as possible on which brand will best suit your needs.
Now check both the open and the 12th fret notes again. You’ll have to tune the open string again because by moving the saddle, the tension of the string will have changed and so will need to be retuned. Once you have correctly moved the saddle so that both the open string and the 12th fret are in tune, you can move on to the A string. Repeat until all of the strings have been done. Note that on this particular guitar, the (thick) E, A and D saddles could not be moved far enough forward to intonate correctly, so I had to swap their orientation to give a bit more distance.
The 1934-’35 Dobro amplifier was a square cabinet covered in imitation leather with a leather suitcase handle, the eight corners protected by metal bumper guards. The grill was curiously covered with a down-sized version of a Dobro resonator plate cover, probably made by Rickenbacker. It had back-mounted controls, five tubes (5Z3 rectifier, 56 and 79 preamps, and two 2A3 power outputs) and a 12″ Utah speaker. This amp was built for Dobro, with the cabinet coming from Bulwin of Los Angeles and the chassis coming from Webster of Racine, Wisconsin.
What is the best guitar brand? That's subjective, and often based on a consumer's past experiences with a specific brand. This list includes a vast majority of the most recognizable guitar brand names that are currently on the market. This list includes those guitar brands that consumers might wish to learn more about, including electric and acoustic guitar types.
Joe is a musician, engineer, and producer in NYC. Over the years, as a small studio operator and freelance engineer, he's made recordings of all types from music & album production to v/o & post. He's also taught all aspects of recording and music technology at several NY audio schools, and has been writing articles for Recording magaz... Read More
Well, we are not part of the study! The study has been conducted, and he’s just giving you the results, it was written nowhere that you had to guess which wood was which or anything of the sort. This doesn’t imply that his little kid (cause this is his son’s science project, remember) performed any form of double-blind test, but still your remark is completely inapplicable and actually turns back on you, that make a big fuss about this article’s sloppyiness, only to attack it with wrong logical reasoning.
In 1962 or 63 (possibly as early as 1959) Guyatone guitars began arriving in the U.S.. If you look around the internet you will see that they could be found under a variety of brand names and were sold in drug stores, department stores, even auto parts stores, as well as music stores. There were two lines of Kent guitars: a Standard series and a “Pro-series”. They were made by Teisco and Guyatone. I haven't been able to get my hands on any of these early solidbodies so I don't know if "the Professional Group" guitars are actually worthy of the "professional" designation and slightly higher pricetag or if it was all about marketing.
While musicians intentionally create or add distortion to electric instrument signals or vocals to create a musical effect, there are some musical styles and musical applications where as little distortion as possible is sought. When DJs are playing recorded music in a nightclub, they typically seek to reproduce the recordings with little or no distortion. In many musical styles, including pop music, country music and even genres where the electric guitars are almost always distorted, such as metal and hard rock, sound engineers usually take a number of steps to ensure that the vocals sounding through the sound reinforcement system are undistorted (the exception is the rare cases where distortion is purposely added to vocals in a song as a special effect).
The same no-compromise attitude that gives the Newporter Player its uniquely killer vibe extends to every aspect of its construction. It features optimized bracing for reduced mass and superior resonance, a Graph Tech - NuBone nut and saddle for greater sustain and a Fishman preamp system that makes it easy to plug in without sacrificing the guitar's natural sound. Its lightweight mahogany neck features a comfortable, easy-to-play, slim-taper "C"-shaped profile suitable for any playing style, and its walnut fingerboard and bridge further augment this instrument's vibrant tone.
Hum in pedalboards is usually “ground loop hum.” You have two paths to ground, your audio ground and your power supply ground. You could use an expensive power supply with isolated grounds. But all you have to do is break one of the ground connections. You could disconnect the audio ground at one end of each of your patch cords. Or better, if you use one power supply, connect the hot and ground to only one of your pedals. Clip the ground wire on all the other pedal connections in your daisy chain. The power connections will then get their grounds through the audio grounds. No more hum
High frequency tweeters, typically horn-loaded, are included in some bass instrument speaker cabinets. Vox's 1960s-era "Super Beatle" amplifier was an early enclosure that used horn tweeters. During the late 1960s Acoustic's 260 Series guitar amp used a treble horn in the dual 15" loudspeaker 261 guitar enclosure, and Kustom's nearly 5-foot-tall (1.5 m) 2J + 1H guitar enclosure used two 15" speakers and a 15" diameter treble horn. Horn-equipped cabinets were not available for bass players until much later.

Run a length of wire (approx two feet is usually plenty) through the jack mounting hole and down into the cavity. When you see the wire in the cavity pull it up through the F hole. Make sure the wire is long enough for one end to stick out the jack hole, and the other to stick out the F hole. Tape the jack hole end of the wire to the guitar with masking tape, or tie it to the strap button. This will ensure it doesn’t fall through the jack hole while you’re working on the other end.

For my tastes, position 1 on a clean tone can be a bit too boomy. Even if one backs the volume a bit to take the edge off, it doesn't quite suit acoustic-style strumming. Position 2 is perfect for these sorts of things, though. I'd always use it for the small high chords you often find in funk and reggae. Position 2 is also a nice way thinning a distorted tone without it cleaning up too much, like Position 1 with the volume dialled down does. If you have your rig set so Position 1 screams, Position 2 will sing.
The Line 6 Spider IV is a good option for beginners not entirely sure what they are looking for. The amp models and effects allow it to achieve a wide variety of tones that are appropriate for almost any style of music. The Killer Ant and Hot Rod Pro Junior III do have better tones, but both are more expensive and less versatile. The Line 6 Spider IV is good for guitarists that want to be able to try a bunch of different sounds until they find something they like. It’s a very solid choice for any style of guitarist.
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Make sure that only the notes you deliberately play actually sound. Guitar strings aren't isolated systems like the tone generators of a synthesizer; if you simply leave them open they may ring even though you've never actually played them. Always watch out carefully for such “rogue sympathetic vibrations” and make sure you properly stop strings that sound in unintended ways.

You might recognise this in the tone knob above. The only difference is that R11 is a variable resitance from 0 to 250 Kohm, and C4 is a fixed value. Several guitars have several combinations of R11 and and C4 to achieve different cut-off points. When R11 is 100% position, the resistance is maximised, so there is little incentive for eelctrical current to flow to C4. The signal is not affected as much.
Since digital effects use DSP, manufacturers have made the most of the processing power by adding amp modeling features. To the point that amp modeling has become a standard feature, and has even overtaken effects in popularity. If you already have a good amplifier, then amp modeling is not important, but it's still a good addition for the extra versatility amp modeling provides.
You can simulate any sound of three pickup guitar with two pickup guitar and vice versa, the only problem is getting it with proper wiring or customizing it. Even they will not sound the same may be close enough for your application or even better. And don't forget about potentiometers problem. The 250K potentiometer will cut some frequencies from humbuckers while 500K make singles brighter than they are by default. It may be not a problem or critical to choosing favorite tone :D
Its ok to put diffrent brand pickups in, i have a guitar with an iron gear hammer head at the bridge for heavy riffing and a slash signiture at the neck for sweet blues solos. I had it wired diffrent though, 1 master tone 2 volumes and a blend knob, with the 3 way switch in the middle i was getting too much hammer head due to its out put being higher, so the blend knob allows me to fine tune the mix of the pickups.

I put the pots into a wiring jig I made for Les Pauls: a piece of pickguard plastic with holes to match the LP control arrangement (cardboard works just as well). This lets me do my wiring outside the body, and everything fits back in neatly.The guitar’s controls were on a metal mounting plate. We decided to ditch the plate, sticking with the ’50s theme.
But the biggest difference between the American Special Strat and the Highway One model is in the pickup configuration. This guitar comes equipped with three Texas Special single-coils, which are overwound Alnico V pickups known for their tight bass, clear highs and pronounced mids. Famously, they’re also found on the Stevie Ray Vaughan signature Strat. And significantly, these pickups retail for about $200 for a set of three.
An excerpt: “The Dobro brand name has been identified with resonator guitars since 1929 and is currently owned by Gibson Guitar Corporation. Despite its registered trademark status, the Dobro name has at times been used generically to refer to woodbodied instruments with 1) an aluminum cone or “resonator” mounted so that the cone opens toward the top of the instrument and 2) an 8-armed spider assembly supporting the bridge.”
Due to distortion's critical function in modern guitar styles, by far the lion's share of stompboxes are distortion units of one kind or another. Most of these feature intensity and tone controls, but often vary wildly in terms of the sounds they create. You'll be amazed at the different types of distortions that can be produced, from rich, creamy, smooth, and melodic sustain to harsh, jagged, and piercing breakup tones. Many distortion units produce a broad range of textures.
Tribute Legacy Electric Guitar Candy Apple Red Rosewood Fretboard. The G&L Legacy blends contemporary refinements from the Leo Fender-designed S-500 and Comanche models with classic Alnico V pickups. If your holy grail is faithful Alnico single-coil tone with modern refinements and superb craftsmanship, the Legacy makes for an excellent choice. The Legacy's vintage-spec CLF-100 Alnico V pickups have that unmistakable chime and quack reminiscent of the best examples from the late ˜50s, thanks to the work of Paul Gagon, G&L VP Engineering. Gagon found his inspiration reviewing original prints stored in Leo's private laboratory at G&L, but that was just the start. About 30 years ago, Gagon was an R&D engineer at another company when he was tasked with finding out what was so special about the early bolt-on guitars many players raved about. Gagon tirelessly analyzed many examples of what were considered holy grail guitars, spending time out on the shop floor talking to builders still working in the pickup department since the ˜50s, all on a quest to discover where the real mojo was - and wasn't. What he learned from the builders matched his own engineering analysis. You see, back in the day, the actual spec of pickups coming down that old production line varied considerably. That meant coming up with the right specs for the Legacy pickups was more challenging than simply following the prints. Gagon's persistence paid off as the Legacy garnered rave reviews from both players and magazines like Guitar Player and Guitar World. This axe is no slave to the past, however, starting with Leo's PTB (Passive Treble and Bass) system which functions on all three pickups for dramatically more variety than the vintage setup. What's more, the Legacy features a Leo Fender-designed Dual-Fulcrum vibrato, a work of engineering art which allows bending up or down with unsurpassed stability, while offering a silky feel through its beefy aluminum vibrato arm. The Legacy is...
Les Paul DID NOT design the guitar that bears his name! Ted McCarty and his team at Gibson came up with it and took it to Les at Delaware Water Gap where he was living and recording (no planes flying over). Ted showed it to Les and he said, "They're getting too close to us, Mary, we better join 'em." The only contribution that Les made to the original guitar was that lousy wrap around the bottom trapeze tailpiece that was quickly dumped...
With that budget you can look about anywhere you choose. Try epiphone, maybe a boutique builder along the lines of your ideal, even a good kit that you rough in and take to a great tech/Luthier to trim finish….but about the Gibson…play em yourself, don’t get upset by a bunch of rumbling that’s largely bad noise. What your hearing is chatter largely perpetuated by their competition. They had a rough patch when they had ALL their imported wood jerked out from under them do to a screw-up of paperwork, wouldn’t at all surprise me if the government changed the rules and didn’t tell anybody(again). You can imagine what Gibson had to do to stay afloat, compromise was inevitable. I’m sure they more than anyone regret that, but you know everyone else in the industry was plenty happy to keep the scuttlebutt going, they ALL hate you when you’re on top. She. I was with strings and things of Memphis, Gibson came out of packing set up beautifully, usually perfectly in tune or nigh on to it. No other maker came close at all. By the way , I’m not a Gibson guy, the only one I’ve had is for sale, I prefer a more modern platform, that’s just my preference. But I still have to give props where they’re due…say, if your interested in an SG ’67 reissue at a good price, hit me up. I’ll give you the skinny on it, all right and wrong, and beat the brakes off any price from a shop!
Taylor's rise to fame has been relatively quick, thanks to their combination of impressive build quality and tone. Their diverse list of celebrity endorsers also helped, which include artists from different musical styles like Tony Iommi, Jason Mraz and Taylor Swift. Founded in 1974, the company has grown to be a major competitor in the acoustic guitar market, challenging older and well established brands in many price points. The Taylor 110ce is one of their more popular models, a mid-priced acoustic with solid spruce top that makes for a great entry point for intermediate players who want a "branded" workhorse acoustic.

Secondly, I have an Epi Les Paul 1960 Tribute that i had PLEKD, which made a big difference to how it plays. However; i have an ongoing issue with it since, the G string always plays muted - i have changed the strings several times since but to no avail, other than that it plays really well in my opinion albeit i am only a learner with little experience. I have gone through the steps in your article but again all to no avail - have you any ideas as to what may be causing the muted tone (that's how i'd describe it anyway) and any thoughts on a possible solution you may have would be welcomed.
I Have a '70 lyle hummingbird and its a solid spruce top and mohagony neck back and sides. My guitar luthier fully inspected it. Mine is in near mint condition and sounds identical to the '64 Gibson Hummingbird my luthier has. He was trully freaked out by this.. ha ha He keeps trying to buy it from me but im affraid im hanging on to mine. It seems there is alot of contradictory information on these guitars. It is super hard to get more than a small paragraph of info on these things. One site out there has several catalogs from lyle guitars but they require a payment or paid membership to view them. If you are interested google lyle guitar catalogs. There is one that sold for 600.00 at joes vintage guitars.com Its Identical to mine. If I find any more info Ill post as discovered.

Whether you have your sights set on a dreadnought acoustic or a classic Squire Strat, the guitar value packages found here consist of everything a player needs to make their guitar learning experience an exciting and enjoyable one. From Fender, Dean and Alfred to Jasmine, Ibanez and Martin, all the big names are here. You'll have no problem finding the perfect guitar value package that pertains to your specific music tastes. 

Guitar straps may be small, but they play a big role in your performance and comfort level during gigs or practice sessions. A top quality strap keeps your axe securely in place while you're shredding on stage, and reduces stress on the arm and shoulder. More than simply functional, guitar straps add a decorative look to your stage presence to complement your own personal vibe. To that end, El Dorado offers a variety of stylish, durable guitar straps to add to your accessory collection, allowing you to spend less time wrangling straps and more time focusing on the more important task of making awesome music.
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The 4000 series were the first Rickenbacker bass guitars, production beginning in 1957. The 4000 was followed by the very popular 4001 (in 1961), the 4002 (limited edition bass introduced in 1977), the 4008 (an eight-string model introduced in the mid-1970s), the 4003 (in 1979, replacing the 4001 entirely in 1986 and still in production in 2012), and most recently the 4004 series. There was also the 4005, a hollow-bodied bass guitar (discontinued in 1984); it did not resemble any of the other 4000 series basses, but rather the new style 360-370 guitars. The 4001S (introduced 1964) was basically a 4001 but with no binding and dot fingerboard inlays. It was exported to England as the RM1999. However, Paul McCartney received the very first 4001S (his unit was left-handed, and later modified to include a “zero fret“).
What type of environment are you playing in? This is an important consideration when determining how many watts your amp should have. If you practice in an apartment surrounded by neighbors, a low wattage combo option is going to minimize potential conflicts. If you play live gigs in small club environments, it is possible to get by with as little as 50 watts. Larger venues require a larger amp that can move more air with its speaker. You should also take in to account how many other musicians you are playing with, and if there is a second guitarist, as you will want a tone cuts through the mix as opposed to getting buried.
Finally, amidst all the considerations about tops and shapes and tones, don't underestimate the importance of choosing a guitar that you like. Choose one that feels comfortable, whether you are sitting or standing. Make sure you pick a guitar that responds to the way that you play, and don't settle on a "good" guitar if you don't like the way it sounds to your ears.

Paul Reed Smith is a relative newcomer having been born just 2 years after the Stratocaster was created, and founding PRS Guitars in 1985, but in that relatively short period of time PRS have made a huge impact on the guitar world, have been used by the likes of Carlos Santana, Ted Nugent, Dave Navarro. and Mark Tremonti, are now the 3rd biggest electric guitar manufacturer in the USA, and have earned their place among the best electric guitar brands.
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