Quality replacement pot from Bourns.   Knurled 1/4" shaft fits most knobs.  Low torque, carbon resistive element, great replacement in many applications using passive humbucker or single-coil pickups.   Note that length of threaded part of shaft is 3/8" - measure to make sure that this is long enough for your application, especially if the pot mounts through the wooden guitar body.   (This pot will not work on Les Pauls, for example).  250K, Special A2 taper preferred by guitar and bass players.  Nut and washer included.  Note: threaded bushing diameter is 3/8", like most 24mm "quarter-sized" pots.
For players that want to start off purely in the world of metal playing, this Schecter bundle should be right up their alley. The guitar itself has a lovely midnight satin black finish, with ready access to its 24 frets thanks to a generous cutaway. The dual humbucker pickups will put out plenty of power as well, allowing for more extreme styles of music to be played with ease. This particular set skips the accessories in favor of a mere amp, gig bag, and instrument cable, but the quality of the main instrument makes up for the omission of picks and the like.
The fretted instrument market is in many ways an excellent leading edge indicator of world economic conditions as a whole. China is not only rapidly advancing in the fretted instrument market but in all areas of manufacturing. Furniture factories in North Carolina are closing due to competition with imported Chinese products of equal quality for far less money. Numerous other industries are moving offshore. As you have all noticed the price of gasoline has risen dramatically in recent months. It should be noted that China now consumes approximately an equal amount of petroleum to Japan. This was certainly not the case five years ago. If OPEC and other producers pump the same amount of oil as they used to, but China emerges as a new player consuming this much fuel, it should come as no surprise that prices will go up. China now is a major importer of fuel, wood and agricultural products. Commodity prices in general are rapidly rising. China is not only becoming a world leader in manufacturing but it is becoming one of the world's leading consumers of all sorts of raw materials and commodities. While the per capita income in China and the per capita consumption of fuel is much lower than in the USA, their population is well over a billion people. At the rate they are going it will not be long before they consume fully as much fuel and other raw material as we do and have an economy which could rival the annual GNP of the USA. Not only are they an economic and manufacturing powerhouse, but they have a huge army. As their manufacturing capability increases not only quantitatively but qualitatively they become more and more of a super power. While the USA may have won the cold war with Russia, at the rate things are going as much as American consumers may benefit from inexpensive but high quality-guitars, furniture and other products from China, we may find ourselves in the uncomfortable position of no longer being the only world super power.
The fact is, the qualities of different strings can have an effect on your guitar’s resonance and tone, on the quality and responsiveness of your attack as a plectrist or finger picker, and impact your speed and other important factors. And think about your budget. Some coated strings list at nearly $20, while a good basic set of electric guitar strings can be scored for $3 to $4 on sale.
I picked up a Lyle 630L recently for $100. Best playing acoustic I've ever played and sounds awesome, but it has a few issues. First being the fact that it's been played long and hard, with at least 3 frets showing hard wear. I had to tweak the torsion rod and raise the adjustable bridge some to stop a few frets from buzzing, but one is still a stickler. Bridge has cracked between the peg holes but the pegs still stay secure. My thought is to use good epoxy to stabilize it. Any thoughts? Also, leaving the strings taught over the years seems to have warped the body some, but there are no cracks or finish peeling from it. One tuner has been replaced with another style tuner, (looks like crap from the back) and I'd love to replace it.

Jackson is regarded as a manufacturer of electric guitars and electric bass guitars, which was founded in 1980 by Grover Jackson. Their headquarters located in Scottsdale, Arizona, USA. They manufacture trendy and stylish guitars. Most of the music players choose a Jackson’s guitar for good performance. It is very apt for sharp and clear music. The price range starts from Rs. 13,380/- onwards (approx). For further details, visit jacksonguitars.com.
Cool guitar! And you’re right— most Harmony guitars aren’t worth much, or in other words, they aren’t very collectible. That said, I wonder how many guitarists reading this column started out learning to play on a Harmony. There are hundreds of thousands of Harmony guitars out there, and though these are mostly entry-level instruments, they’re very much a part of guitar history.
By 1970, however, market conditions were changing rapidly. Japanese manufacturers had greatly improved their quality as well as their range of product offerings. Japanese labor at the time was much cheaper than American, and the imported guitars offered more "bang for the buck" than American ones. In a relatively short time, brands such as Yamaha and Ibanez were outselling Harmonies and Kays. The Japanese guitars had more comfortable neck contours and had truss rods that actually worked. The Japanese rapidly improved the quality of their instruments as well as the variety of their offerings such that by the mid 1970s, Harmony, Kay and Danelectro had all ceased operations, and Martin, Fender and Gibson had eliminated most of the low-end student models from their lines to concentrate on a price range well above any of the Japanese imports. I went to Japan in 1974 and attended a music trade show there as well as visited numerous factories and music stores. I was absolutely astonished at the variety of offerings available. Whereas in 1970 most Japanese guitars were low-end student models which often copied currently available new American products, by 1974 the more progressive Japanese manufacturers were well aware that many vintage American instruments were far superior to the new ones of that time. As a result some of these Japanese manufacturers stared to concentrate on studying vintage American originals. Fuji Gen Gakki and Tokai started producing extremely detailed copies of old Les Pauls, Stratocasters, Mastertone banjos and other vintage American acoustic and electric guitars and mandolins.
Our site has a wealth of information about what goes into making a Taylor guitar and how to make this very important decision. We have guides for how to find the right fit for you. Learn about the subtle differences in shapes and styles. Delve into different types of woods and construction, which are vital to the flavor and tone of an acoustic. Explore the Taylor line by series to find the look and style you want for your instrument.

While many appreciate its bulk of features, there are a few who feel that Fender went overboard, and should've limited the voicings to just a few to ensure that sound quality is not compromised. On the other hand, there are some who felt that the extra features are nice, but they are turned off by the need to use a computer to get full access to all the controls.
Like 39% of the people said, they are simply the worst. The first guitar I owned was the Ibanez Gio, I thought it was amazing. I play it every now and then, but not too much anymore. For its price, I think it is the best starter guitar, 10 times better than any first act. I owned a first act, it was the worst guitar of all time. Me finger killed after playing it because the strings are so hard to push down, the frets don't even stay attached to the guitar. All beginner guitarist, don't get first act.
Modulation is where we step away from the more subtle (relatively) effects which serve to colour an existing tone, and into areas where you can truly begin to add flavour and texture to your tone. There are a few main types of modulation; chorus, phase, tremolo, wah and flange. Chorus subtly mimics your tone with a microscopically detuned duplicate, which when played together adds a nice warm layer to the sound. As an example, play the ‘e’ note on your second string (fifth fret) and the open ‘e’ first string at the same time. Naturally, there is a cent or two difference in the tuning. But you can see that two virtually (but not exactly) instances of the same note makes everything sound a bit bigger and a bit wider. That, in an admittedly basic form, is the chorus effect.
Includes hand cutting and shaping new fingerboard nut from scratch, and fitting it specifically for each instrument. Some variation in pricing is due to the unexpected difficulty in removing some nuts. It is highly recommended each instrument be set up to ensure optimal playability. Restringing is NOT included. Price excludes cost of blank ($6 for bone/synthetic)
Based on SGM-v2.01 (http://www.geocities.jp/shansoundfont/) with improved quality aoustic guitars (21mb) and basses (50mb) and also designed to run on apps such as Sweet Midi Player. This is a great GM SoundFont and the one I use on iPad/iPhone and PC.  You can comfortably run this GM Soundfont in Sweet Midi Player app on most iOS devices. For Windows PC you can install a new GM soundfont using the free program Coolsoft VirtualMIDISynth.
Bassists pairing an amplifier "head" of a certain wattage and a speaker cabinet (or speaker cabinets) with a certain wattage power-handling capacity may require advice from music store amplifier expert or an audio engineer. One of the reasons that many beginning bassists choose combo amps when they are starting is because with a combo amp, the manufacturer has ensured that the speaker and power amp are compatible from a power handling and impedance perspective. While there is a widespread belief that an amplifier with a rated wattage that is higher than the rated wattage on a speaker cabinet will harm the speaker, in fact, a clean, un-clipped power amplifier signal can be above the rated wattage of a speaker without damaging the speaker, as long as the power amp is sending out a clean, unclipped signal. There is a much higher risk of damaging a speaker when a clipped (unintentionally distorted) power amplifier signal is sent through it, even if the wattage is far below the rated wattage of a speaker. For example, a bassist could use a 700 watt power amp which is running with zero power amp clipping through a speaker cabinet rated at 500 watts without damaging the speaker; however, if a 100 watt power amp that is heavily clipping is plugged into the speaker cab, this could blow the speaker.
The lower portion is reserved for two footswitches – each for one of two available effects. It’s a busy stompbox, that’s for sure. However, the versatility it offers is hard to top, and the tone quality is definitely on a high level. Depending on how serious you are about your reverb, Mooer TVR1 Shimverb Pro (click for full review) can be a real force multiplier if used correctly.

The playing of conventional chords is simplified by open tunings, which are especially popular in folk, blues guitar and non-Spanish classical guitar (such as English and Russian guitar). For example, the typical twelve-bar blues uses only three chords, each of which can be played (in every open tuning) by fretting six-strings with one finger. Open tunings are used especially for steel guitar and slide guitar. Open tunings allow one-finger chords to be played with greater consonance than do other tunings, which use equal temperament, at the cost of increasing the dissonance in other chords.
Hum: other than singlecoil hum, it is almost certainly caused by a ground issue, either a faulty string ground or ground connection, or a ground loop. I highly recommend going to Star Grounding. Shielding is also recommended. See the guitar nuts site for more information on these topics. Single coils are very succeptable to rf frequencies such as emitted by flourescent lights, tv's, computers, motors etc. Also note that high load or other appliances running on the same electrical circuit can cause noises through your amp.
Chorus: Though it can be overused, light distortion works well as a filler for choruses in Christian worship and most other genres.Verse: You won’t typically hear a distorted verse, though at times a two guitar group can make this work. Generally, you’ll want to leave distortion for the higher intensity portions of a song.Bridge: A lot of Christian songs tend to lower intensity during the bridge, which means light distortion becomes a little less usable. Though for bridges that keep the tempo up, it can work pretty well.
Sweep picking provides you with a more economical way to pick one-note-per-string or combos of one-note-per-string and two-note-per-string instances up and down the string register. Not to be confused with raking, the idea here is to fret and ring out every note clearly (no cheating!). To do this, it’s of paramount importance you approach this technique slowly and be very critical of each note’s clarity. When starting to sweep pick, start with a locked wrist and don’t be afraid the experiment with varying pick widths.
The earliest guitars used in jazz were acoustic, later superseded by a typical electric configuration of two humbucking pickups. In the 1990s, there was a resurgence of interest among jazz guitarists in acoustic archtop guitars with floating pickups. The original acoustic archtop guitars were designed to enhance volume: for that reason they were constructed for use with relatively heavy guitar strings. Even after electrification became the norm, jazz guitarists continued to fit strings of 0.012" gauge or heavier for reasons of tone, and also prefer flatwound strings. The characteristic arched top can be made of a solid piece of wood that is carved into the arched shape, or a piece of laminated wood (essentially a type of plywood) that is pressed into shape. Spruce is often used for tops, and maple for backs. Archtop guitars can be mass-produced, such as the Ibanez Artcore series, or handmade by luthiers such as Robert Benedetto.
Now you see why these Spectrum 5s are so desirable! It is not clear, by the way, how many (if any) were ever made with ebony necks. The few I’ve personally seen had maple necks. Certainly the expense of the ebony would have been enormous and hard to justify on the Teisco brand name. Also, with the density of ebony, the guitars probably would have been hard to balance. In any case, these are the Holy Grails of Teisco!
Aside from what brands to choose from and finding out the right budget to spend on an amp. Initial search for a guitar amplifier generally leads beginner players on figuring out that there are actually different types of guitar amps in the market. This is where they start to care deeply enough to know which amp sounds better and what will fit their playing the best.
These soundfonts were started by converting some presets from the gig files using cdextract demo and then altered using Viena, Swami and SF2Comp. The gig files are better as they contain more samples and a better variety of presets that were not possible in the soundfont format. For instance, I could not include the Fender reverb samples as the release samples would all play at the same volume no matter where in the envolope the key was released. So, if you have a chance you would be better off to use the gigasamples. They can be used in LinuxSampler of which is free and runs on windows and linux. Some people need samples in sound font format though, so I have created these samples out of the same samples that I used for the giga samples. I also have an impulse response of the Fender Reverb that I made with voxengo for download on the Other Stuff page so you can use that if you want to get the reverb sound with the soundfonts. At the moment I use Freeverb3 for realtime impulse in windows and Jconv in linux.
by pedalhaven  @sofajams  always takes the best photos. Don't forget to DM/Tag us to submit your photos! ▪️ ▪️ ▪️ ▪️ ▪️  #pedalhaven   #pedalboard   #guitarpedals   #knowyourtone   #ambienttones   #pedalboards   #pedalnerds   #pedalporn   #guitar   #gearporn   #gearnerds   #pedalboardpeople   #shoegaze   #geartalk   #guitarsdaily   #gottone   #tonefordays   #guitargear   #reverb   #gearpost   #boardshot 

The Orchestra Model (OM) shape, with its sleek look and versatile acoustic voice, is one of C.F. Martin & Co's most popular guitar shapes. A number of iconic guitarists prefer this particular line, including legends like Eric Clapton and his protégé, John Mayer. I for one own an all-solid wood Martin OMCPA4, and it continues to exceed my expectations. While I have no regrets over my guitar, I have to admit that if I had the funds, I would have gone for the definitive Orchestra Model, the OM-28 E Retro.
I cut my template with a jig saw and a fine tooth blade to make sure it kept a straight edge. Then i mounted it to the body blank using small screws in the ares that would be routed out later like the neck cavity area and where the pick ups would be. You will want to start routing a bit outside your line or the edge of the template so you can get you router bit to the depth it will need to be at for the ball bearing to follow the template. I use a 1/2"x1" bit with a ball bearing guide on top.I make several passes around the body, lowering the router 1/4" at a time for smooth easy cuts. Once you have made your pass were the bearing runs along side the template, it is much easier to rout and you will end up with a nice squared edge to the body.
The newly designed Les Paul Recording guitar was released in 1971, in many ways as an updated version of the Les Paul Professional that had debuted two years earlier in 1969. The new guitar came with a new owners manual explaining the (somewhat complicated) controls, their operation, and giving other specifications, including recommended strings, action and control settings. Compare with the broadly similar owners manual for the Les Paul Personal / Professional

So you decided to play electric guitar. Once you get a guitar and an amp, the next step is to explore effects. Effects pedals can be separated into groups based on their functions. Understanding the different pedal groups is the key to getting the best sound when chaining them together. The largest pedal group is probably overdrives and distortions, and BOSS currently makes 16 different pedals in this category. For our example pedal board, we’ll pick the ST-2 Power Stack. Another category with many choices is modulation.These are effects like flanger, phaser, chorus, tremolo, and others. Let’s use the most versatile of these—the BF-3 Flanger. Another group is ambience effects, such as delays and reverbs. We’ll use one of each: a DD-7 Digital Delay and the FRV-1 ’63 Fender Reverb. There are some pedal effects that can add notes or alter the pitch of what you’re playing. For want of a more esoteric name, we’ll call these “pitch-altering” pedals. From this category, let’s throw in a BOSS OC-3 Octave. BOSS also has a few pedals that make your instrument sound like some other instrument. The AC-3 Acoustic Simulator will do the job. Some effects change your sound with filtering. This effect type can be used in different places in the signal path, so we’ll use the GE-7 Graphic EQ. A few BOSS effects defy categorization, but are nevertheless very useful in any signal path. The most common of these is the CS-3 Compression/Sustainer. Loopers fall into this category also, so let’s add an RC-3 Loop Station to the mix. And you might want the NS-2 Noise Suppressor to kill the noise in your rig, so let’s add that in, too. What about a tuner? The TU-3 is the most popular pedal tuner in the world.
In this style, the guitarist aims to render an entire song — harmony, melody and bass — in something like the way a classical guitarist or pianist can. Chord roots cannot be left to the bassist in this style. Chords themselves can be used sparsely or more densely, depending on both the individual player and his or her arrangement of a particular piece. In the sparse style, a full chord is often played only at the beginning of a melodic phrase.[4] The denser chordal textures, in contrast, approach chord soloing (see below). A third approach is to maintain a steady, busy bass-line, like a New Orleans pianist. Here, no more than two or three notes are played at a time, and the full harmony is indicated by arpeggiation. Exponents of this style often come from a country, folk or ragtime background, such as Chet Atkins, although it is also sometimes employed by straight-ahead jazz practitioners, for instance Martin Taylor. Chord-melody is often played with a plectrum (see Tal Farlow, George Benson and others); whereas fingerstyle, as practised by Joe Pass, George van Eps, Ted Greene, Robert Conti, Lenny Breau or hybrid picking as practised by Ed Bickert, Laszlo Sirsom and others allows for a more complex, polyphonic approach to unaccompanied soloing.
The question is now - do you need the entire bundle? When it comes to the presets, the guitars are all very unique, but because of the mass amount of tone-shaping available once you start twisting and manipulating away there becomes less and less of a distinction — the bundle being over a third less than individually purchasing them doesn’t help the decision making factor at all.   

If you’re just starting out, our new electric guitar for beginners may be more suitable for you. Otherwise, let’s get going on our picks (although it was tough to stick with only 10 models). If you want to practice or perform without wires, you can also look into a wireless system for guitars. Be sure to check out our best acoustic guitars article if you want a companion, or if you need extra gear, we have guides for those as well.


Replace components. From plugging in and unplugging my guitar so much, the stock input jack lost its grab. So I had an extra Radioshack one lying around, and I soldered it in. Now all my cords are held tight. I also had a problem(common with Teles as I understand it) with my input jack "cup" coming out with wires and all. Once you take a look at how it's held in there, it's an easy fix.


I've only been playing guitar for 3 years but it seems like no matter what I do no matter what pedal I use I just can't get that real band sound like the heavy rock bands do on recording but when I tried a marshall that all went away. Marshall has the perfect distorted sound (overdrive) and for the price ha you just can't beat it. I'm getting a mg100fx half stack and it all totals out to only $400 plus this amp can get so loud you can play in a bar or club with only half volume


Les Paul was an extraordinary pioneer of music and instrument development, and he also paved the way for popular music today from blues and jazz to rock, country, and metal.  The Les Paul electric guitar stems from one of the best electric git brands to date – Gibson.  This came to be with Paul’s and Gibson president Ted McCarty’s collaboration to find the best electric guitar with resonance and sustain but with less distortion.  Since they couldn’t find one, they had to make one.
that is not quite the reality since most are made in mexico or japan as they are of lower quality. You only meet those type of criterion when you buy a high handmade guitar which will be at least 1200 us or 1600 canadian. As you meet the entry level of solid wood prices better overall quality. It doesn't matter who makes the guitar : martin taylor, gibson, maton, collings, santa cruz, or even a high end a high high luthier like Olson, traugott or Ryan. The sound of the instrument and the perception that we have while we stroke a chord will define if we like the sound. We see how it feels, we look at a price that we feel comfortable with. Otherwise anyone would land a lowden, huss and dalton, bourgeois and the marquis version of Martin hd-28vs for instance. The personality of your style will infuence a lot of more then who makes it, because you buy the final product not the people who makes it.
Tube enthusiasts believe that tube amps produce a "warmer" sound and a more natural "overdrive" sound. Typically, tube amps use one or more dual triodes in the preamplifier section to provide sufficient voltage gain to offset tone control losses and drive the power amplifier section. While tube technology is, in many ways, outdated, tube amps remain popular since many guitarists prefer their sound.[15]
Good questions. Firstly, swapping the saddle around has the effect of moving the tapered top edge of the saddle closer to, or farther from (depending on which way it was to start with) the front of the bridge. If you're wanting the string to be as long as possible, for example, you'd need to make sure the saddle is oriented in such a way that the tapered edge is at the tail end (farther from the pickups). If you look at my pictures above, you'll see that my D-string saddle is originally oriented in this way, but in my case I need to SHORTEN the string, so I rotate it and this gives me more forward adjustment. Since you need to do the opposite of me, you'd therefore need to make sure your saddle has the same orientation as what mine had BEFORE I changed it. I really hope that makes sense.
Since there are 2 coils, you can have up to 4 wires with which to work, providing you with a great many tone options. Almost all independent pickup companies manufacture humbuckers with 4 conductor cable. Stock guitar humbuckers rarely have 4 wires coming out of them but sometimes it is possible to convert 2 wire humbuckers to 4 wire types. This is an exacting procedure with little room for error but the tone rewards can be well worth the effort. If you really want to give this a try, then click here.

Those who appreciate a more vintage design will love the Schecter S-II CUSTOM. It’s an original design which borrowed a lot of ideas from Gibson’s legendary SG series. Pickups are also in line with the overall theme, and they sound pretty great. There’s balance in the tone, the kind you don’t really expect to get from a Schecter. It definitely took me by surprise, a very pleasant surprise.

I had gotten rid of all my effects pedals a long time ago because I wasn't using them. So when I saw this little processor and the price I thought I would give it a Try. I was amazed at all the sounds and tones this thing puts out. For the little money you spent it is deff. worth it. I have not yet messed around with the drum settings but I will. This will be loads of fun to play around with. A deff. 5 star rating.

In all my years I have never seen filter cct's like this but as tleco tech the filters have never been variable, When I put my guitar together I had a 0.022uF and a 0.047uF and for reasons that I have long forgotten I put in a switching matrix that allows me to get 0.047, 0.022 and 0.015uF. After many revisions to the cct (it had coil taping and variable taping) I almost put in a 0.033uF and taking out the switching, well I ended up getting some single ended 9 Watt amp and all of a sudden this flexibility made scene I have one tone control that I can control the cut frequency a coil control pot and a volume control. Now the funny thing If I put in a single cap 0.015uF (as close as you can get) It doesn’t sound like the two 0.022 and 0.047uF in parallel, Its in the harmonics that get let through from what I can hear. But when all said and done could be something to give it a go.


With the PAC112V there is no harm going with the crowds. The Pacifica is a crowd-pleaser precisely because of its versatility – and so whilst it might have a very recognisable look, this electric gives you the opportunity to craft a sound that is entirely your own. The only drawback is its weight, which is not much of a drawback at all – particularly for this price.

Besides the guitar just being fantastically sampled and recorded, Silk owes a lot of its realism to the controls in the upper right-hand corner on the main screen. Swing, Timing, Feel, and Variance can all be effortlessly adjusted and do a fantastic job of recreating that natural human touch or really the human flaw.  Timing is my favorite because the ebb and flow of the tempo between individually picked notes really reminds me of my own fingerpicking technique (or lack thereof).


The Seismic Audio SADIYG-02 is based on the iconic Telecaster electric guitar. It comes with a single-cutaway body that's crafted from paulownia, a China native wood that's known for being light. The pickguard is already set into the body when you get the package, but you'll need to solder the input jack, the volume and tone knobs, the bridge pickup and the selector switch before you start using it.
Wes Borland (b. 1975) guitarist for Limp Bizkit has owned many Ibanez guitars, including a custom 4-string baritone guitar, although he no longer endorses them. He was mainly noted for playing an Ibanez RG7 CST which had selectable piezo and magnetic pickups, only 18 of these were made in 1999. Borland has a signature Yamaha guitar, but has been seen playing a Jackson with the reformed Limp Bizkit.

The Effect: Metal has become the prevalent genre when it comes to music that involves guitars. Dialing in a proper distortion can make or break the sound of your guitar as well as your entire band. Coincidentally, it’s so easy to go overboard with distortion, all while being certain you are on the right track. The very first step is to get a dist box that is suitable for metal. Something like Electro­Harmonix Metal Muff carries just enough punch to get the job done, but not enough to drown your tone completely with gain. You’ll find this to be a reoccurring theme with a number of great metal dist boxes. At the end of the day, it all comes down to your prowess and skill. Every good metal guitarist know that it’s all about the unity of equipment and knowledge. With that said, these pedals will get you started.


The Wave is a versatile stand-alone, tube driven analog spring reverb unit kit. It can be used in front of your guitar amp or as a line-level analog reverb effect for the recording studio. Two controls allow you to serve up a wide range of wetness from just a touch to over the top psychedelia. The "dwell" control adjusts the input signal level driving the tank and the "reverb" control adjusts the level of output reverberations from the tank.
Clarence White helped shape two genres: His acoustic flatpicking, first displayed as a teenager when he and his brother formed the Kentucky Colonels band, was key in making the guitar a lead instrument in bluegrass. Later, he set the stage for country rock and transferred that dynamic precision and melodic symmetry to the electric guitar. A top session man in the Sixties, he played on the Byrds' 1968 landmark, Sweetheart of the Rodeo. After he joined the band later that year, White brought a full-bodied rock elation to his California-inflected Nashville chops. "He never played anything that sounded vaguely weak," said the Byrds' leader, Roger McGuinn. "He was always driving… into the music." White had returned to bluegrass with the acclaimed Muleskinner album when he was killed by a drunk driver in 1973. He was 29. "Clarence was immersed in hard country and bluegrass," said Dan Auerbach of the Black Keys. "He incorporated those elements into rock & roll, and it totally blew people's minds."
Includes 9+ hours of in-depth training on all aspects of guitar. There are many variables that can impact the tone and quality of a guitar recording — from setup, string gauge, amps and pickups, to processing, effects and miking. Mark breaks it all down so you can confidently create awesome guitar tone and take your mixes, productions, performances and recordings to the next level.

Thanks. It sounds good without tone shaping ability but I wanted to hear the original sounds. It now has 2 capacitors tied together from the volume pot to 1 tone leg. I am guessing the original tone switch was wired with one cap. for the low & one cap. for middle and the 3rd tone leg was straight wired for treble high. I also wonder how the ground sweep worked on the tone selector?? I just need to know. I’m a DIY guy.


That really depends on what you are going for. There are good arguments for before everything and right after the tuner, but also for after the distortion and before your modulation pedals. If you put yours right after the tuner in the front of your chain, you can equalize your guitar tone before it hits anything and adjust your pedals accordingly.


Many artists discovered that the 3-way pickup selector could be lodged in between settings (often using objects such as matchsticks or toothpicks to wedge it in position) for further tonal variety, resulting in a unique sound when two pickups are combined. Jimi Hendrix would also move the switch across the settings while sustaining a note, creating a characteristic ‘wobbly’ sound, similar to that created by the wah-wah pedal. This effect can be heard in the Woodstock recording of Star Spangled Banner. Since 1977, the Stratocaster has been fitted with a 5-way switch to make such switching more stable. This switch is the same electrically as the original 3-way, but with extra detents for the in-between settings. Other subtle changes were also made to the guitars over the years, but the basic shape and features of the Strat have remained unchanged. In the 1970s and 1980s, some guitarists began modifying their Stratocasters with humbucking pickups, especially in the bridge position, to create what became known as a Fat Strat. This was intended to provide a thicker tone preferred in the heavier styles of hard rock and heavy metal. The popularity of this modification grew and eventually Fender began manufacturing models with a bridge humbucker option (HSS), denoted and separated from the original triple single coil by the title of “Fat Strat“, as a reference to the humbucker’s distinct sound, as well as models with dual humbuckers (HH), better known as “Double Fat Strats“. Fender also started making Stratocaster pickguards specially designed for guitar bodies routed for HSH (humbucker-single-humbucker) and HHH (humbucker-humbucker-humbucker) pickup configurations.
With a 25.5” scale length, the 314ce features a Grand Auditorium body shape with a playability-enhancing Venetian cutaway, allowing good access to the highest of the 20 frets. The top of the body is made from solid Sitka spruce, along with solid sapele back and sides, leading to a beautifully rich and powerful tone that’s well balanced between warm and bright.
Above here's a blast from the past. The reissue of the 1960's Harmony Stratotone H49 Jupiter. Originally this guitar was manufactured in Japan, but these babies came straight from China many years later. They copied them right down to the T including those Gold Foil Pups. Guitar is hollow body and has a volume, volume, tone, tone, master tone knob, with a really cool 3 way switch. They don't come up on Ebay to often and this ones like brand new but was briefly used. Sold

Pickups are meant to capture (pick up) the strings' vibration. Now, the pickup closest to the neck captures the strings' vibrations at their highest amplitude, which results in a warm sound with lots of lows. Conversely, the pickup closest to the bridge captures the strings' vibrations at their lowest amplitude, rendering a bright and sharp sound. So, the same pickup will have a different sound depending on its position. That's why most guitars are equipped with several pickups.
OK, our math isn't so great, so we've gone ahead and included an 11th amp in this list of 10. Although it's way too soon to be declared "iconic," PRS Guitars' brand-new Sonzera series of amps have been hot topics in gear land since they were introduced at the 2017 Winter NAMM Show. Let's just call them "instant classics." Featuring a rugged steel chassis, custom transformers and road-ready construction, each Sonzera model delivers serious tone with maximum reliability.
Schecter is one of the more recent brands to start building serious trust and authority on the guitar market. They started out as a parts company, only to cross into making their own guitars later on. It is no secret that Schecter guitars are first and foremost built with heavier genres in mind. Almost every model they offer packs so much range, though, that you can easily play anything you want without compromise.
I went to my local guitar store, and tested every one on the wall (under $1,000). I narrowed it down to two (the Ovation acoustic-electric of the same caliber, and this Yamaha FGX800C). In the end I ordered this guitar because of the excellent price on the "package" deal (hard case, strap, tuner, etc.). It sounds fantastic, stays in tune very well, is comfortable to play, and no "buzz". My limit of 4 stars is due to; 1) The strap is garbage...get a new one if you play with a strap. 2) The guitar only has a strap post on the rear of the instrument (it also doubles as the connection for the amplifier cord), and there is none on the front. You have to tie a string ahead of the nut. That gets in the way of the tuning and fingering of
A great app for playing and basic editing of general midi files is Sweet Midi Player which includes a lyric viewer for midis with lyrics/chords. You can load one of the General Midi SoundFonts above to greatly improve the sound quality. For Windows PC use the free program Coolsoft VirtualMIDISynth to install a new GM SoundFont (Get the latest version 2.1.0 for Windows 10).

From beginners to seasoned professionals, most guitar players will experiment with effects at some point in their musical journey. While learning to play your instrument well should be a top priority, messing around with effects can be a fun way to engage with your instrument and start learning its sound possibilities without a lot of hard practice. There's a huge variety of stompboxes out there, many with very low price tags that make great gifts and can add a new dimension of fun for beginning players.
If you’re making the crossover from electric to acoustic, then Takamine won’t be a particularly well known brand to you, but rest assured that they’re a top make when it comes to acoustics, and of course electric acoustics. The GN93CE-NAT is a mid-range electric acoustic that features some really nice touches, such as the rosewood fretboard, and is an interesting choice.
Let’s kick things off in style. This guitar is one of Epiphone’s mid range semi-hollow models. As such, it has to meet much more refined standards. Many wondered if Epiphone was capable of delivering such a guitar, but the answer is a strong yes. With its three Dogear Alnico pups, this thing is a beast. If you know how to handle a semi-hollow, you will find that Epiphone Riviera Custom P93 brings a lot of range. At least that’s the type of impression it left on me.
Simple mistake that the beginners do is not selecting the right pickup on the right time. For example Normally they put the switch for the bridge pickup for soloing or do the powerchords. But then, to do some plucking, clean strumming or ryhthm, they still using the bridge pickup. So the sound is so dry, They should change it to toggle number 2(or for 5 way switch, toggle number 2 or 4)
Run a length of wire (approx two feet is usually plenty) through the jack mounting hole and down into the cavity. When you see the wire in the cavity pull it up through the F hole. Make sure the wire is long enough for one end to stick out the jack hole, and the other to stick out the F hole. Tape the jack hole end of the wire to the guitar with masking tape, or tie it to the strap button. This will ensure it doesn’t fall through the jack hole while you’re working on the other end.
The 700-series models were solid-body instruments while the 800-series models were hollow bodied. This is a small enough product range to make a nice little collection and the guitars are made well enough to be used. (Many of the early Japanese guitars were cheap and simply unplayable right out of the box. I know... I had one.) However interest in them seems to be rising and thus, prices are following along.
For 2017, they introduced (or re-introduced?) the Firebird Studio. The Studio has regular tuners with protruding keys, and it has regular humbuckers instead of minis. It is not a Firebird, it is a Les Paul with the body of a ‘bird. This lie of a guitar sells for a whopping $1300, and the real version of the guitar - which is identical in every last detail to the cheaper 2016 model I own - now retails for $1500!
When you’re just getting into the electric guitar, there are a lot of items you’ll need to get going. This includes the guitar itself, tuners, straps, an amp, a bag or protective case, a stand, etc. Buying it all piece by piece can be rather expensive. It’s much more practical in financial terms to opt into one of the many starter packs on the market. If you want to know which ones are worth your time, here are the 8 best guitar starter packs for beginners:
Guitar tabs (which is short for tablature) is a type of musical notation for stringed instruments that show you which fret to play on each string, as opposed to standard staff notation, which shows you the pitch of a note. Beginner guitarists have a much easier time learning from tablature, but in the long run, it’s a good idea to learn the standard musical notation as well.
Reverb – The best analogy for reverb effects would be playing your guitar inside a pipe. That’s an extreme level of reverb, of course, and these pedals will allow you to go from there all the way back to subtler effects like the natural reverberation of a concert hall. This effect sounds great with a clean tone, but beware of using it with heavy distortion or else you might lose too much definition from your sound.
I'll start off by saying I am a novice guitar player. I've been playing off and on for 30 years, but more off than on. I've been playing on a hand-me-down Yamaha acoustic that was once a great guitar, but through many years of moving, poor storage and not doing anything other than the occasional set of new strings, that Yamaha just did not play well. One reason I was so off and on is that I could never get a clean sound from the Yamaha. I just thought I was not capable of learning guitar. Then, about a year ago, I tried out a friend's Fender acoustic and, after apologizing in advance for my poor playing ability, found that the same chords I struggled with on the Yamaha sounded crisp and clean on my friend's Fender, and I didn't have to make my fingers bleed
If you are serious about studying guitar and taking your playing to the next level, you must possess not just a command of chords and scales but an understanding of improvisation and how to express depth and feeling. This certificate program, taught by Berklee’s world-renowned guitar faculty, enables you to develop your guitar technique and hone your skills in any style, from rock, jazz, and country to metal, blues, and beyond. Upon completion, you’ll be able to recreate parts played by your guitar heroes—but more importantly, you’ll be better able to realize your own unique sound.

Although Ibanez’s S series is designed to be far more versatile than the RG guitars, its Iron Label collection is built for one, brutal purpose: heavy metal. The SIX6FDFM represents exactly what we consider a ‘value-for-money’ guitar: It sports many premium specs, is skewed towards a single use, and, at a little under $1,000, won’t hemorrhage your bank account.

First introduced as a 35th Anniversary Edition Guitar in 2009, it joined Taylor’s standard line up as a Specialty Model in 2010. The Baritone model features a Grand Symphony body and a longer 27-inch scale length which enables it to be tuned from B to B while maintaining normal string tension. It comes in either 6-string or 8-string option. The 8-string models incorporates a pair of octave strings that double the 3rd and 4th (D and A) strings. Solid wood back and sides available for the Baritone model are Tropical mahogany or Indian Rosewood with rosewood binding and an abalone rosette.
Dr Doug Clark-"I stumbled onto your site while looking for an entry-level classical guitar for my grandson in Denver, Colorado. Regrettably, I'm not resident in England (though I've been there many times), otherwise I'd be on your doorstep tomorrow morning. That said, might you have any acquaintances in America (firms similar to yours) whom you could recommend? We're limited at this point (8th form next year, at Denver School of the Arts), to around $300 US. Any advice or recommendation you can offer will be greatly appreciated. Watched Harry and Meghan's wedding twice! Wish them both, and England itself, a wonderful decade ahead. PS: I took up steel string acoustic guitar at about age 60. Hence my email "handle". Still working on my skills and loving it."
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Of course you can use a pair of headphones and any number of other devices to listen to your playing - many of them will produce pleasing tones from your instrument, and even let it sound similar to what you heard playing through the amp - but without the physical interaction between the guitar and the amp, that constant feedback tone that you heard and felt will not be possible. If, instead of playing through headphones you play through a PA system, or studio monitors, or even the stereo speakers on a computer, you can regain some of that real, physical feedback, but it will be different. And every amp brings in different tones, different kinds of feedback and fuzz and distortion.

Acoustic guitars vary by type. Some are designed for beginners, while others are customized for professional guitar players. Most of the major acoustic guitar brands are available in a variety of different styles, each designed to best suit a customers' specific playing needs. Ease and sound are certainly big factors to consider when choosing a new acoustic guitar.
I skimmed ahead and quickly realized that, at last, someone has written THAT GUITAR BOOK that we are all looking for when we start out but that no one seems to have written yet but that you hope to write someday when you finally figure out what you are doing so that you can help others and prevent them from wasting so much time and money and hopes....(takes a breath)
Combo amps come with a speaker built into the amplifier cabinet, making them heavier but more convenient. On the other hand, amp heads are lighter because they don't come with a speaker built-in. The amp head configuration allows you to freely choose the type of speaker and speaker cabinet that you prefer, with the complication of ensuring amp and speaker compatibility. Interestingly, there are now some amplifier heads that com come with built-in speakers that are only good for practice, making them technically a combo amp, but that's another story in itself.
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But older guitars are not always better than new guitars; they can have unreliable parts, or be difficult to maintain. A lot of these are upgraded to make great players grade instruments. Keeping the essence of the original vintage guitar, but adding a little of today's reliability. A great example is the 1960s Gibson Melody Maker; an all-mahogany set neck guitar with Brazilian rosewood fingerboard and beautiful nitrocellulose finish. Well-built by Gibson, in their Kalamazoo factory, but with very basic pickups, tuning keys and electronics. Upgraded examples are everywhere, and are exceptional value as players grade instruments. Then again some guitars, especially early Japanese and European models aimed at the student guitarists of the early 1960s are completely unplayable. Even the cheapest modern day guitars put these to shame. Before buying any vintage guitar it is a good idea to know exactly what you are buying!
These guys are the best in town! I had my Gretsch 6120 Upgraded with a new Pickup. They were quick and at a reasonable price. They do amazing work. They also have a great selection of guitars and Amps for sale. I highly recommend stopping by. If your looking for a new guitar for yourself or your kids they will help you find the perfect guitar for your price range. I highly recommend stopping by. They also do amp repair! Stop by and see for yourself.
Sooner or later you may want to experiment further: What happens if I use a different opamp here, or change a capacitor value there? Specifying your own components is the next step. Two of the specialty jobs in building a typical effects pedal are the design of the circuit itself, and the production of the printed circuit board (PCB) on which to install the components. The next logical step from a kit is to order a pre-built PCB and then customize the component and enclosure choices yourself. AMZ effects, is the go-to place for a huge variety of pre-designed PCB’s. The cost is quite low and the projects include clear documentation providing guidance on different options and components.
This interactive package (complete with a book, an instructional CD, a wall chart poster, a guitar pick and three sheets of fretboard stickers) equips the novice with everything he or she needs--short of an electric guitar and an amplifier--to become competent to play in a band within three months. The course is divided into twelve weekly lessons. Each lesson outlines the objectives of the week ahead and concludes with one of twelve specially commissioned backing tracks over which the novice can use the newly learned techniques. The book concludes with tips how to get the right sound from a guitar, amplifier and effects, as well as tips on forming a band, playing live and recording. If you've ever wanted to play in the band instead of just watching it, now you can!

Hey thanks soo much this really helps! Im a 15 year old girl and an intermediate guitar player but not too long ago a beginner, and i think as well my beginner guitar is holding me back from doing alot. I was wondering if there are any cheaper guitar brands with still a nice quality that you can get with expensive guitars because i have like no money. Also, do you have any recommendations on new amps or any posts about that?im also getting quite sick of my amp which is an ibanez with almost no nobs to mess around with, and my instructor says my amp is holding me back as well.
Are you in earnest need of a guitar and do you want to buy that right now. Well, if the answer to this question is yes, then you will have to stop and think for a while before you actually make the investment. This is because of the fact that buying a guitar is an expensive investment, so you must to be quick to arrive at a decision. Now you should be asking yourself some pretty interesting questions before you buy a guitar so that you do not have to regret later on in any way.

He was no virtuoso, and that's the whole point: By snatching electric guitar from note-shredding technicians and giving it back to artists, freaks and poets, Kurt Cobain became one of the most important players ever. Cobain didn't invent alt-rock. But with his love of Cheap Trick, the Melvins and Kiss, he gave it the metallic power necessary to conquer the world. His playing wasn't all untutored squall, either: See the unconventional chord progression and mastery of quiet-loud-quiet dynamics on "Lithium" – and pretty much every other Nirvana song.
Ooooohhhhh.... I used the Firebird 12 for two weeks on sessions in 1973.... I STILL solo the tracks I used that on... it's the BEST BEST BEST BEST OF ALL TIME !!!!!!!! FOR ANYTHING !!!!..... in fact, as I remember, the octave strings were wound different than the way Ric does it (high-low) and that even added to the incredible sound.....wanna sell the Firebird 12?
With smaller combos, it is worthwhile experimenting with their position within the room, especially when a distance mic is being used. For example, raising the combo further from the ground will result in a different reflected signal path length for ground reflections. Placing a reflective material such as hardboard or linoleum on the floor between the amp and mic will emphasise any coloration this produces. Where a small combo or practice amp lacks bass end, you can try to exploit the boundary effect by placing a mic in the corner of the room, then facing the amplifier into the corner. If the added bass is too much, move the mic and amplifier away from the corner until the tonal balance seems right.
It’s probably fair to say that drive pedals of all shapes and sizes outnumber the other types of effects. This is due to the fact that they form the backbone of your overall tone. It’s also probably fair to say that it’s one of the most subjective tonal changes you can implement. One man’s muff is another man’s screamer, so to speak. There are certain classics within the genre which may act as a gateway to stronger forms of grit though. Ibanez’ famous green Tubescreamer pedal is used by countless players on account of its versatility, whereby it can form the basis of a good quality blues tone. Or it can complement a distortion pedal by ‘boosting’ or tightening up the signal. Another favourite is the Electro Harmonix Big Muff, which has been used for decades by players looking to add a distinct fuzziness to their tone.

A low latency audio card will allow to run your guitar signal (via an adapter cable or a mixer) into the PC and through the Amp Sims, (the M-Audio 2469 is a good card for this and reasonably priced), this will allow you to drive/crank the simulators as loud as you'd like to get the tone you want; and control the overall volume with your PC, good speakers/monitors are a must for this.


It depends on whether you are playing with someone, or you just wanna start to play home in your bedroom. If you play with others, you need an amp that can play loud enough to follow the bass and especially the drums. Marshall make some great tubeamps, but also Vox make some great amps, where this one on 40 watt with effects incl are real good. Sound like a tubeamp, and have a 12ax7 in the frontamp.
Serial #59640 New York label Epiphone Triumph circa 1949. Blonde finish. Spruce top, tiger flame maple sides and back. Cherry neck with diamond mother of pearl inlay. Small nick less than an inch wide on left front. Original Frequensator tailpiece with nickel finish, partly worn. Grover tuners fastened with screws and glue. Edging on back body has .25” gap at connection.Blonde natural lacquer finish in good condition. Glossy and brilliant color. Shipping quote inside US only. Ask for quote outside the US. 

Next in line after pitch shift/harmonizer and envelope follower effects are pedals that directly interact with the pickups’ output levels, such as vintage fuzz, treble booster and Octavia/fuzz octave pedals. As with the dynamic filter pedals, placing any other effects that compress the signal in front of these pedals will limit their overall performance.
You probably won’t have to do this, but if you do, here’s how to go about it: First, slacken the affected strings and move them to the sides of the saddles. Then take some needle-nose pliers and remove one end of the retaining spring (different styles of bridge will use different types of retaining spring – sometimes there is an individual one for each saddle, in which case you might even need to remove the whole bridge to do this).
Yamaha is one of those names that you don’t often see outside the realm of keyboards and digital pianos. While their footholds in fairly limited on the stringed instruments market, their quality is well known. Yamaha builds some of the most balanced and best performing electric guitars in their respective categories. That is simple the truth. Now, they might not be as popular as other brands, but that is a whole different story.

If you have any comments about what you see in this web site,  we would love to hear from you.  Our E-Mail address is below.  Of course we are particularly anxious to talk to you about our repair services or our handcrafted guitars.  But  --  don't let that limit you.  We would love to hear your ideas about any guitar related topic.  (One such e-mail led to the harp guitar project)   We WILL respond, generally quite soon.    If you have a question that you would like to see addressed in our Q& A page, let us know.  Our E-Mail Address is: hoffmanguitars@qwestoffice.net


In this guitar lesson you’re going to learn 7 of the most basic guitar chords for beginners. These beginning guitar chords are the first ones every guitar player should learn. They are sometimes referred to as open position chords, because they are played in the first few frets of the guitar and all contain at least one open string. If you are looking for easy guitar chords for beginners, these are the ones to start with.
Replace components. From plugging in and unplugging my guitar so much, the stock input jack lost its grab. So I had an extra Radioshack one lying around, and I soldered it in. Now all my cords are held tight. I also had a problem(common with Teles as I understand it) with my input jack "cup" coming out with wires and all. Once you take a look at how it's held in there, it's an easy fix.
Is it fine if I buy an electric guitar that’s worth <900$ as my first e.guitar? I don't know why it's recommended not to buy a guitar that's more advanced than my level. I mean this guitar will last me for years, so why not go for the best from the beginning? Also, I need to learn how to differentiate between the various guitars if some are better for lets say metal. I listen to a lot of Children of Bodom, Korn, Metallica and more.
If you like to run all your effects into an amp set clean and get your gain sounds from pedals, you probably don’t ever need to consider using amplifier effects loops or a wet/dry/wet rig. If your amp(s) are set relatively clean, you will be able to use any of the effects listed above straight into the front of the amp—and they should sound really good.
There are tons of new tidbits of FU-Tone.com news! First off we would like to welcome Stephen “Stef” Carpenter of DEFTONES to the FU family! Recently I started working closely with Rem Massingill (Stef’s Tech) on this monster project. It started as most of these projects do – with lots of conversations and planning before turning the first screw. I work with dozens of techs in this business and I can tell you that Rem is “one of those guys”. He really knows his stuff, is a stickler for details and most importantly he knows TONE! Little did I know what I was getting into and the first two guitars on the slab were ESP 8 String models! This was out of the normal scope of my 6 and 7 string clients… I consider the guitar and guitar tone a never-ending learning process. I am constantly looking to learn from anyone that I can on my journey. Anyone who presents themselves as a know-it-all is full of shit or trying to sell you something (usually both!). After lots of twisting, tweaking and testing we got this off the ground and I am here to tell you that the tone was massive and bone crushing all while having an insane amount of note separation and clarity! Not to mention sustain for days that would make Nigel Tufnell jealous… As I stood on stage with Stef and Rem at sound check in New York while he put the 8 String ESP through its paces, I was pleasantly surprised to hear how brutal the tone was. All of the power and growl of a monster truck with the precision and control of a Ferrari. The smile on Stef’s and Rem’s faces said it all! This was just the first hoop that we jumped through together with a bunch of stuff in the hopper for these guys. If you have not been to a Deftones show on this tour, I highly suggest going out to catch them!
While many electric guitar amp cabs have "open back" designs (actually partially open back, as part of the back is usually enclosed in panels), open back cabinets are rarely seen in bass amp cabs, except in the smallest, least expensive practice bass amps. The reason that open back designs are not used with bass amp cabs is that open back designs make it hard to reproduce low-frequency sounds, which are crucial for bass cabinets. On electric guitar amp cabs, the reduction of some very low-frequency sounds may be desirable, as it makes the cabinet less "boomy"; however, for a bass cabinet, this loss of bass frequencies is generally seen as undesirable.

Also shown in ’60s Bizarre Guitars, but not in the Teisco book photo, is a ca. 1954 Hawaiian Teisco EG-R which was sort of shaped like a Gibson and which had the same pickup as the J-1, with more elaborate symmetrical metal rocket shapes on the sides, housing the volume and tone controls. A chrome dome sat in front of the pickup between it and the dot-inlaid fingerboard. The head was stubby and rectangular. This was very “Moderne” looking, very Buck Rodgers.
A true guitar polymath, Nels Cline has tackled everything from gothic country rock with the Geraldine Fibbers to a full remake of John Coltrane's late improvisational masterwork, Interstellar Space. He's best known, of course, as Wilco's gangly guitar hero, lurching into extended seizures ("Spiders [Kidsmoke]") or spiraling into lyrical jam flights ("Impossible Germany"). "Nels can play anything," Jeff Tweedy said. "We struggle with his spot in the band sometimes – but we always come to a place that's unique and interesting because we did struggle."
First, remove the knobs of the pots that you want to replace. Some knobs are held in by setscrews. Look around the shaft of the knob to see if there is a screw head then unscrew the screw and remove the knob. Most knob are mounted on split shaft pots. There are no setscrews on a split shaft pot. Friction and pressure hold the knobs on the shafts in this case. You can pull the knob directly off the shaft of the pot since there is no screw. If the knob is stuck on the shaft, I usually use heavy gauges guitar picks to try to pry up the knob. You may also wrap a thin rag around the bottom of the knob and pull the knob off the shaft. Regardless how you get the knob off, be careful not to dent or ruin the finish on the top of the guitar. It is easy to rip the knob off of the pot and accidentally drop it on the guitar. Once the knob is removed, you can unscrew and remove the nut on the top of the shaft.
The Wave's all tube design utilizes four dual triode vacuum tubes - three 12AX7s and one 12AT7 - and comes with a MOD® three-spring reverb tank. MOD® reverb tanks are deemed the closest to the original reverb tanks from the '60s made today. The Wave's reverb function can be switched in and out pop-free via the front panel toggle or with a footswitch. Footswitch sold separately (see P-H470 for compatible footswitch).
Samick is a Korean guitar manufacturing company, that is known first for constructing their pianos using imported pieces. The corporation is capable of manufacturing more than one million guitars each year. They have an acoustic guitar with good quality which makes an exceptional sound. The company sell its guitars under its own brands such as Abilene, Silvertone, Greg Bennett, and Samick.
The Tone knob is basically a filter to cut highs. And, once again, the pickup will sound best when turning it all the way up. With the ever-growing amount of effects amps have to offer and those available in pedal format, we often forget that this setting even exists. This basic control allows you to, for example, smoothen a jazzy sound or choke a way-too-shrilling fuzz, or anything else in that line that comes to your mind. Only your ears can tell if the sound is convincing or not!

Modulation effects (like phaser and flanger) follow effects like wah and overdrive. This allows the modulation effect to process and modify the tone built by the effects before it. If you put a modulation effect before the overdrive, then you are overdriving the sound of the flanger. This is a lot more difficult to control so the ME-80 places it after these effects.
While continuing to keep the E string depressed at the first fret, move up the neck from the 12th fret to the end of the fretboard, continuing to depress the string at each of the successive frets. As you move up the fretboard, watch if and how much the distance between the bottom of the string and the top of the frets in the 6-7th fret range changes, if at all. The less the gap rises, the flatter, overall, the neck is. Using this method you may discern that there is more curve in one area than another, and not necessarily centering on the 6-7th fret area. In some cases this curve will be resolved by changing the tension on the truss rod. In other cases, adjusting the truss rod tension will not resolve them, and fret leveling, refretting, or heat bending the neck(rarely) may be necessary.
The Guild Starfire V Electric guitar is a deluxe cutaway with loads of outstanding features that gives a fully expressive voice to the user’s playing style and taste. Designed as a semi-hollow electric guitar, the Guild Starfire V features a beautiful thin line body with little twin Guild LB-1bucker pickups that make it suitable for rock, blues, roots and a lot of other variety of music styles.

The solid body electric guitar was a major design advance introduced by Leo Fender in the early 1950s. The solid body guitar helped remedy the feedback problems of hollowbody instruments. They were also easier to make, which led to mass market production. Fender introduced the iconic Telecaster and Stratocaster. Soon Gibson also introduced their first electric guitars in a partnership with Les Paul to produce what would become the equally iconic Gibson Les Paul.
After your design has been properly plotted out on the poster board you can cut it out with an exacto knife. Make sure you stay as true to your lines as possible so you have a nice clean line to trace once your ready to. Then lay out the template on body blank and trace away. I like to cut the piece of poster board the same size as the body blank I am using. It makes it a lot easier to line everything up that way. Now you're ready to move on to the next step.
John and I weeded out a couple of guitars that arrived in far-from-playable condition because we think every guitar should be at least reasonably playable when you buy it. Avi Shabat agreed, saying, “The more messed up a guitar is when I get it, the more I have to charge for setup.” We also didn’t have the short-scale guitars set up, for two reasons: First, we think a guitar for kids—one that’s likely to be purchased at a low price and given as a present—should play acceptably right out of the box with no setup; second, all of the short-scale models we received did play very well out of the box, and all were equipped with strings of the same approximate gauges.
Most newbie guitarists want a small amp that sounds good but doesn’t cost too much. The amps listed above are that and more. However, there are some guitar players who mean business from the beginning, and won’t want to waste time on small beginner amps when they have the resources and ambition to grab an intermediate or pro-level amp. If you know you are going to stick with playing guitar, and if you can justify it in your budget, that’s not a bad idea.
i have played fender most of my life .Fast neck and comfortable .However when my musical interest changed to southern rock i decided to buy a gibson . The mahogony body sounds different as does the string thru design of my firebird .Now i play both .Out of the box i prefer gibson and dont need to change a thing .I see many fender players always looking for “that sound” changing pickups pots etc.and using many boxws to change the tone.All i use with my gibson is a wa wa and overdrive
This was my first attempt on building pedal. Now I'm hooked. It was such a joy putting it all together and quite a learning experience. I cannot emphasize on reading/studying the instructions thoroughly. I would rate the included instructions a 10, a 5 STAR. Very clear and easy for a novice pedal builder to understand and walk through. Very well illustrated as well. Take your time as you can easily overlook soldering connections. The main problem I encountered was a shorting problem. The two soldering terminals along each side of the tube socket were located very close to the tube base socket and volume/gain pots. Follow the instructions by running a wire between the volume and gain pots, as well as the tube socket. Once, I've addressed this problem, it was clear sailing from there.
“I like it because it’s light and simple,” Alana said, reflecting on its 5.1-pound weight. “It’s easier to get my hand around the neck on this one,” Charles noted. Both found the Les Paul Express’s rounded top shoulder to be more comfortable than the horn-shaped cutaways on most of the other short-scale models, and they felt the smooth finish on the back of the neck made it easier to play. The adults agreed. “I’m surprised—for a small guitar, it’s fun to play,” Ken Rosser said.
Older 1800s Martins are a challange to date (since they don't have a serial number like 1898 and later Martins). A "New York" stamp does not immediately suggest that the Martin guitar is from the 1830s for example. To accurately date pre-1898 Martins you must be familiar design and ornamentation appointments and the changes that took place in each model throughout the 1800s. Most useful though is the stamp, but you can only use the stamp on the INSIDE of the body on it's center backstrip (visible through the soundhole) to date a guitar. And even then you can only date to a period (and not to an exact date). For example if it says on the center back strip, "C.F. Martin, New York", then the guitar is pre-1867. If it says, "C.F. Martin & Co., New York", it is between 1867 and 1897. Note 1860-1890s Martins have a date (year of manufacture) penciled on the underside of the top. Check with a mirror, looking just below the soundhole and between the braces.
Description: Body Construction: Solid - Neck Attachment: Bolt - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 22 - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Tremolo - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Chrome, Diecast, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 5-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-S-H - String Instrument Finish: White, Black, Red, Sunburst
So leaving aside the complexities of exactly emulating acoustic instruments with speaker technology -- which we have all come to accept although no speaker can sound quite as sweet as (or at least not exactly like) the acoustical nuance of a fine wooden stringed instrument, we reach the vast majority of modern music - amplified sounds. Again, stringed instruments are among the most difficult to emulate, if not the most difficult to emulate technologically, because of the vast and infinitely variable set performance possibilities which in turn produce a vast and infinitely variable set of physical reactions. Even if MIDI notation can document the coordinated left-hand/right-hand performance of various pitches, velocities, durations and legato, our VST is strained to faithfully reproduce every possible physical result of every possible combination of performed licks.

CostHelper Electric Guitar Guide - [New Window] - Find out how much an electric guitar should cost. Get price guidelines and shopping tips for an electric guitar. A basic electric guitar with amplifier and cord starts around $200 to $400 for a beginner's outfit; a better quality kit can run $500 to $2,000, and high-end electric guitars are $2,000 to $5,000 or more for the instrument alone.
A note on right versus left when referring to the hands. Traditionally all guitarists, regardless of right or left hand dominance, were made to play a right handed guitar, most likely due to the lack of left handed instruments. To this day left handed guitarists and guitars are still fairly rare. When guitarists refer to the right hand, it can be assumed to mean the plucking hand, while the left hand is used to fret the strings.
There are also companies like Eastwood Guitars that are releasing their own versions of the Hi-Flier. Available for a pretty low sum, you can get Eastwood’s recreation of a Phase 4 Hi-Flier in both right-handed and lefty configurations. If you don’t find the world of vintage guitars too appealing, but you dig the look and feel of the Hi-Flier, this might be a prime option for you.

Launch price: $499 / £445 | Body: Chambered basswood body with arched-maple top | Neck: Maple | Scale: 24.6" | Fingerboard: Rosewood | Frets: 22 | Pickups: 2x Black Top humbuckers | Controls: Neck volume, bridge volume, tone, master volume, 3-way pickup selector | Hardware: Anchored Adjusto-Matic bridge | Left-handed: No | Finish: Gold, Silver Sparkle, Black
The Fender Bassbreaker 15 Amplifier Head presents a budget friendly option for those in need of great tone. You have 15 watts of pure power to channel here as well as a studio friendly Power Amp Mute so you can record straight into a desk - a great feature for those in need of a powerful stage and studio amplifier. This is a professional grade amplifier head that features 3 very unique tonal options and overdrive levels to provide you with a whole host of lush fender tones that range from glass like cleans to vintage overdrive. Perfectly paired with the Fender Bassbreaker 212 Guitar Cab.

Next up we have the specialty electric guitars. This category consists of several different types of electric guitars, but we’ll start out with 12-string electric guitars. The fact that the low E, A, D, and G strings all feature higher octave strings while the B and high e strings both have additional strings that are tuned the same, electric guitar 12-string models have a distinctive shimmer and richness to them that guitar players love. Guitar players who favor heavier genres like death metal or hard rock may want to add a 7-string, an 8-string, or even a 9-string electric guitar to their rig for when they need some extra low-end growl and power. Other specialty guitars include baritone guitars, double neck electric guitars, and pedal steel guitars & lap steel guitars.
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