This is a Japanese Fender Jaguar electric guitar played on the both pick-ups setting and is played through a Fender Bassman '59 Reissue with old valves in. This amp gives a really nice full clean sound. I have recorded it on the edge of break up so the low velocity samples come out clean and the high velocity samples come out with a bit of nataural power valve distortion. You can add more distortion with effects if you need it dirtier. It is hard to get this natural break up sound with effects which is why I have recorded it that way and if you add distortion it still has the natural bite of a valve amp (except with more distortion). This makes it very expressive just by the difference in tones at different played velocities. The lowest velocity is muted samples. Presets include a standard mapped guitar, a fake twelve string (octave harmonies on each key) and split voices of muted fifths at one end and solo guitar at the other end of the keyboard (for quickly creating tunes and ideas). There are other banks of the same presets except with long releases (for sustained notes), chorus and/or reverb added to give the different variations. The amount of reverb can be altered with cc12 and the amount of chorus can be altered with cc13. Reverb and chorus has to be enabled on your soundfont player to use them. The sound is suited to a lot of types of music. These guitars have been used for all sorts of music over the years. It has not much sustain and makes a bright clean sound.
I have an acoustic Decca and a brand new Fender acoustic. Not only is the Decca easier for me to play because I have tiny little doll hands, I think it would hold tune if I threw it out of a moving car. I put both the Fender and the Decca into storage for two years - I just got them out recently. The Fender popped the B string and took a good twenty minutes to tune. The Decca was *STILL* *IN* *TUNE*. Plans have changed; I am selling the Fender and keeping the Decca!

Leo Fender’s simple and modular design was geared to mass production, and made servicing broken guitars easier. Guitars were not constructed individually, as in traditional luthiery. Rather, components were produced quickly and inexpensively in quantity and assembled into a guitar on an assembly line. The bodies were bandsawn and routed from slabs, rather than hand-carved individually, as with other guitars made at the time, such as Gibsons. Fender did not use the traditional glued-in neck, but rather a bolt-on. This not only made production easier, but allowed the neck to be quickly removed and serviced, or replaced entirely. In addition, the classic Telecaster neck was fashioned from a single piece of maple without a separate fingerboard, and the frets were slid directly into the side of the maple surface—a highly unorthodox approach in its day (guitars traditionally featured rosewood or ebonyfingerboards glued onto mahogany necks). The electronics were easily accessed for repair or replacement through a removable control plate, a great advantage over typical construction, in which the electronics could only be accessed through the soundholes in the case of hollow-body instruments, or by taking off the pickguard after removing the strings (in a design popularized by Fender’s own later guitar model, the Stratocaster).


An excerpt: “The Dobro brand name has been identified with resonator guitars since 1929 and is currently owned by Gibson Guitar Corporation. Despite its registered trademark status, the Dobro name has at times been used generically to refer to woodbodied instruments with 1) an aluminum cone or “resonator” mounted so that the cone opens toward the top of the instrument and 2) an 8-armed spider assembly supporting the bridge.”
Many artists discovered that the 3-way pickup selector could be lodged in between settings (often using objects such as matchsticks or toothpicks to wedge it in position) for further tonal variety, resulting in a unique sound when two pickups are combined. Jimi Hendrix would also move the switch across the settings while sustaining a note, creating a characteristic ‘wobbly’ sound, similar to that created by the wah-wah pedal. This effect can be heard in the Woodstock recording of Star Spangled Banner. Since 1977, the Stratocaster has been fitted with a 5-way switch to make such switching more stable. This switch is the same electrically as the original 3-way, but with extra detents for the in-between settings. Other subtle changes were also made to the guitars over the years, but the basic shape and features of the Strat have remained unchanged. In the 1970s and 1980s, some guitarists began modifying their Stratocasters with humbucking pickups, especially in the bridge position, to create what became known as a Fat Strat. This was intended to provide a thicker tone preferred in the heavier styles of hard rock and heavy metal. The popularity of this modification grew and eventually Fender began manufacturing models with a bridge humbucker option (HSS), denoted and separated from the original triple single coil by the title of “Fat Strat“, as a reference to the humbucker’s distinct sound, as well as models with dual humbuckers (HH), better known as “Double Fat Strats“. Fender also started making Stratocaster pickguards specially designed for guitar bodies routed for HSH (humbucker-single-humbucker) and HHH (humbucker-humbucker-humbucker) pickup configurations.
The device can be mounted on and removed quickly from almost any flat-backed acoustic guitar, using a system of magnetic rails. The ToneWood-Amp is designed for guitars with either a magnetic or piezo pickup (bridge or soundhole), but the team behind the device say they're also putting together a “Technician-Free” pickup bundle for those guitars without a pickup.
Overdrive distortion is the most well known of all distortions. Although there aren't many electronic differences between a distortion an overdrive, the main audible one is that a distortion does exactly as the name suggests; distorts and clips the signal no matter what volume is going through it, the amount of distortion usually remains relatively the same. This is where an overdrive differs. Most overdrives are built to emulate the sound of a tube amp overdriving and therefore give the player control of the clipping through dynamics. This simply means that the effect gives a clean sound for quieter volumes and a more clipped or distorted sound for louder volumes.
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We all are now living in a great time considering the choices that we currently have. Even though it is a good thing every so often, it can actually be complicated to decide and buy the best electric guitar. If you one to have it for a serious reason, it will be realistic to own the one which comes equipped with guitar essentials like strap, carry-bag, picks, and if possible a good practice guitar amp.
It has great quality hardware and amazing sound because of the pickups. There are no flaws or nicks in the finish of the body. It needs to be set up though which can be difficult initially. Once you set up, you will be able to see its performance in action. The great thing about this guitar is that even though it is the cheapest electric guitar, it looks quite expensive to an observer.
Larry Robinson Fine Custom Inlays - They produce one-of a kind shell inlays for all kinds of guitars. One of a handful of inlay practicioners in the country, Larry has done exquisite work for major guitar manufacturers (Fender, gi bson, Yamaha,...), small production shops (Santa Cruz, Collings, etc.), single luthier shops (Klein, Ryan, Olson, Megas, and more), collectors like Tsumura and people who just want something to personalize their guitar.
Similarly to the previous model, this guitar has a mahogany body as well as a fine looking maple top. What is more, this unit has an elegant metallic gold finish that you might like. Among the features that make it stand out, we feel like it is important that we mention its practical Alnico Classic humbuckers and the fact that it has a Rosewood fretboard. Additionally, it comes supplied with trapezoid inlays.
The Old Standby is another model beloved by generations of harmonica players. Up until the 1990s, this model was a quality instrument made in Germany on a wood comb. Where the Marine Band was the choice of blues players, many country music players such as Charlie McCoy preferred the Old Standby. In the 1990s, Hohner began manufacturing this model in China on a plastic comb with a significant decrease in quality. Among harmonica fans the downgrade remains unpopular.[26]
I disagree, not saying that you can hear tonewoods but saying that it isnt just the string and pickups that make a difference. There is a huge difference in how a string vibrates and pickups do pickup resonances, otherwise a semi hollow would sound exactly like a solidbody and would never feedback. Get some humbuckers put them in a telecaster and then put them in a 335 and tell me they sound exactly the same. What is important is scale length (string tension), weight and various things like bridge design. Get a hardtail strat with strat pickups and then route it for a trem bridge ... it will sound different, maybe minor or major depending on what but it will change the tone.
The descriptions that follow are very broad, but if you look around the guitar world you can usually pin any solid-body guitar down to one of these general categories. Of course you’ll see wild shapes like the Gibson Flying V, Ibanez Destroyer, Dean ML and Jackson Rhoads. They may look like they’re from another planet, but if you check their specs you’ll see they follow the same basic design principles as any other solid-body electric guitar.
A fuzz pedal is essentially an extreme distortion effect. Because fuzz so radically alters the signal, it is often used sparingly for contrast, rather than as a meat-and-potatoes sound. Since it thickens up the tone so dramatically, fuzz can be fun for intros and solo guitar parts when no other instruments are playing. Jimi Hendrix playing "The Star Spangled Banner" is a classic example of fuzz-infused guitar.

Effects can be connected via insert points, or the effect send and return loop that is included in most consoles and DAWs (Digital Audio Workstations). When effects are used in the send/return loop, their Mix control should be set to 100 percent wet, so you add back only effected sound to the dry sound, which comes directly through the mixer channel.
Description: Body: Alder - Body Construction: Solid - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24" (61cm) - Headstock: 6 In-Line - Bridge: Tremolo - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Chrome, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch, Kluson Tuners - Pickups: Harmony Gold - String Instrument Finish: Goldburst, Redburst
The question is now - do you need the entire bundle? When it comes to the presets, the guitars are all very unique, but because of the mass amount of tone-shaping available once you start twisting and manipulating away there becomes less and less of a distinction — the bundle being over a third less than individually purchasing them doesn’t help the decision making factor at all.   
Steve is the best. He made time for me to come in and talk about the problems I was having with my electric bass. When I got there, he knew exactly what was wrong with my bass, and he adjusted it quickly and perfectly. He also gave me a lot of incredibly useful information about what he was doing and why. I could not recommend Steve Morrill more highly.

Fender Hot Rod Series Pro Junior III 15W 1x10 Combo - This tube-driven guitar combo with a 10” Eminence vintage-cone speaker reproduces the harmonically complex output and sensitivity to playing synamics that vintage Fender tone hounds love. Dual 12AX7 preamp and EL84 power amp tubes crank out the same celebrated midrange as vintage combos. Fender has updated the Pro Junior III with an external speaker jack, a more legible control panel, and internal tweaks.
JSL, I agree with you on the Mayer comment. Any one who is bashing him needs to listen to his latest live album. kid rips plain and simple. I have to disagree with you on the Van Halen comment, not that he isn't a great player, but to me his playing always lacked substance, no soul to it. Now, I can't stand Clapton, (I won't get into why), but he should definitely be on the list.

Modulation effects (like phaser and flanger) follow effects like wah and overdrive. This allows the modulation effect to process and modify the tone built by the effects before it. If you put a modulation effect before the overdrive, then you are overdriving the sound of the flanger. This is a lot more difficult to control so the ME-80 places it after these effects.


Taylor Guitars is an American guitar brand based in California. The company was founded in the mid 1970’s, and it has since grown into one of the largest and most respected acoustic guitar companies. Taylor guitars are recognized for their incredible quality, craftsmanship, and innovation, while still being an accessible guitar at a reasonable price.
The ghost Hexpander MIDI interface system adds MIDI capability to almost any guitar or bass.  Plug your guitar into pitch-to-MIDI converters by Roland or Axon and enter the MIDI sound universe.  The Hexpander MIDI interface provides responsive and accurate tracking unequaled be any other system on the market today.  Check out how affordable and easy it can be to make MIDI part of your music making.
Here we have a beautiful player with great heritage.. This guitar was an Import from Japan back in 1978 its a very well built guitar and employs the same x bracing seen on Martins. Workmanship is very high as is materials the vintage tone woods are beautifully mellowen and the tone has opened up nicely on this and so the volume is good on this guitar with a new set of straings now sounds like quite big a Piano...clear and clean god volume and reasonible bass.. Very good sound from this one..t also plays quite nicely with good play action not to low not to high...it plays very wel.. structually no cracks or serious anything to speak up just the most minimap superficial nicks as this vintage guitar qualifies for the xcllent vintage condition catagory. The finsh is wonderful and glass like shine to it and has a beautiful warm patine to it you can't get without waiting the near 40 years for it to age this way... this guitar will make somon a wonderful D-18 /28 style instrumnt to enjoy for another 40 years... If your like us you love vintage instruments and this is a bargain of a great lttle player, for a song.. You will be pleased. Thanks for looking if interested contact Joe at : gr8bids@comcast.net .
The looper is a little more limited and offers shorter loop time than its competitors (20-seconds), but hey, at least it has a looper. The inclusion of a USB means you can hook the DigiTech RP500 straight to your computer and start recording riffs and ideas. If you like, you can use the included Cubase LE software for all your recording needs. Furthermore, just like with the other pedals on our list, you can manage and adjust your presets from the provided X-Edit Editor/Librarian software, which is quicker and easier than scrolling through the menus on the unit itself. The DigiTech website has a pretty extensive Tone Library, where you can download and use a bunch of patches.
A giant when it comes to the British amplification companies, Vox is always in the conversation when talking about great guitar gear. And that’s no different when the conversation is about amps for beginners. As far as bang-for-your-buck options are concerned, the Valvetronix VT20X definitely ranks at the top – and with good reason: it features tube amp sounds, but with the versatility of a modeling amp (which it is). This impressive hybrid boasts 11 onboard models, 13 effects, and 33 preset programs – allowing you an astonishingly wide range of produceable sounds. And you can control the whole thing from your smartphone, making it easier than ever before. Excellent work, Vox.
I listen to a lot of internet radio, from soul to death metal. I think it's good to listen to a wide variety of music, even if you're not particularly into certain genres. Each genre has its own qualities when it comes to guitar, so spend time just... listening. Listen to how rhythms, chords and solos are used. You may not know how they're doing it just from listening, but you might like the sound of something which you'll then be inspired to go and investigate independently.
The same kind of automatic difficulty adjustment works in Rocksmith's Lessons feature, which is just what it sounds like: a set of tutorials to teach players everything from how to hold the guitar and basic picking techniques, to how to bend, slide, and hammer on notes. Get them right and you'll advance to ever more challenging material. Struggle, and the oh-so-polite instructor tells you he's just going to slow that riff down a little and give you another crack at it. Herein lies Rocksmith's greatest strength as a teaching tool—it gives you the ability to learn at your own pace without fear of judgment.
I ordered this item from their ebay store, roughly the same price with shipping, very easy to read point to point instructions, this was my first diy pedal, I've fooled around with a soldering iron but not enough to speak of. I bought it because I was not pleased with my Peavey Valveking 112's boost sound, it not only boosts the signal, it changes the tone, from the reviews I watched on youtube, it sounded like this pedal would do the trick, for the price, and the fun of a first time build, I love it, it boosts the signal with no change in tone, I'm not super impressed with the pedal's distortion tone, but I am spoiled with that saturated tube tone, there is some extra hum when I turn on the pedal, I don't know if this is my fault from the build, or what, but I would ... full review
Jump up ^ "New Sales Avenue Opened with Tone Amplifier for Stringed Instruments". The Music Trades. October 20, 1928. This tone amplifier is electrically operated either by alternating or direct currents. It consists of two major units -- an electro-magnetic pick-up and amplifying unit. The electro-magnetic pick-up is built within the instrument and is attached to its sounding board. The unit is connected with the amplifier, which produces the tone and volume required of the instrument.
The hollow body electric guitar rose to prominence when Gibson introduced the ES-150 back in 1936. Fully hollow body electric guitars (sometimes referred to as “Jazz Box” guitars) tend to have arched tops and large, deep bodies that allow the sound to fully resonate to produce an incredible full-bodied voice with amazing projection and depth. Jazz players and blues players really love the sound fully hollow guitars deliver. While the classic, larger-bodied fully hollow electric guitars definitely still exist, there are also a substantial amount of thinline fully hollow body electric guitars that guitar players may find to be more comfortable. Guitar brands such as Gibson, Gretsch, Ibanez, D’Angelico, Guild, and Epiphone provide guitar players with a fantastic array of fully hollow body electric guitars.
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