{"eVar4":"shop: guitars","pageName":"[gc] shop: guitars: teisco","reportSuiteIds":"guitarcenterprod","eVar3":"shop","prop18":"skucondition|0||historicalgrossprofit|1||hasimage|1||creationdate|1","prop2":"[gc] shop: guitars","prop1":"[gc] shop: guitars","prop17":"sort by","evar51":"default: united states","prop10":"brands","prop11":"teisco","prop5":"[gc] shop: guitars","prop6":"[gc] shop: guitars","prop3":"[gc] shop: guitars","prop4":"[gc] shop: guitars","channel":"[gc] shop","linkInternalFilters":"javascript:,guitarcenter.com","prop7":"[gc] category"}
These guitars use very cheap materials. I bought a washburn WM24v PROE for $300 and it come with Mahogany body & neck, phenolic fretboard, emg81/85 and original floyd rose... Ibanez RG costs $400 and comes with basswood body, bolt on maple neck, rosewood fingerboard, shoddy pickups and a licensed floyd that WILL NOT stay in tune. Poor quality for money, if you get a Ibanez go for a fixed bridge/string-thru because their trems are HORRIBLE! Original floyd is the only way to go!

Taylor does produce a more budget friendly line of instruments with the 200 series, which is ideal for beginners looking to capture their famous sound at a fraction of the price. Taylor also produces small bodied guitars such as the Baby, Big Baby and GS Mini, which rival their full bodied instruments at a lessened price and are perfect for kids and beginners to learn on (6).
The President was produced by Hofner in Bubenreuth, Germany, specifically for Selmer, who distributed the brand in the United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, and other commonwealth nations. The President was a hollow body electric acoustic, available as a full body or thinline, and with blonde or brunette finish. It was a great playing guitar that sold fairly well in the second half of the 1950s, throughout the 1960s, and into the very early 1970s. The example shown here is a full-body depth guitar in blonde - and as a 1965 guitar, one of the last to feature the rounded Venetian cutaway. From late 1965 until 1972, the President sported a sharp Florentine cut. Naturally, such an electric acoustic suggests jazz and blues, but many of the original British Hofner President players were part of the rock 'n roll, skiffle and beat scenes of the late 50s and early 60s.

Description: Flamed 10-Top, Gold Hardware Model. Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Maple - Flamed - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 22 - Inlay: Mother Of Pearl - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25" (64cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Tremolo - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Gold, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 5-Way Switch, Locking Tuners - Pickups: Dragon II - String Instrument Finish: Blue Mateo, Ruby, Gold Metallic, Whale Blue, Dark Cherry Sunburst, Violin Amber Sunburst, Emerald Green, Vintage Yellow, Black Sunburst, Gray Black, Natural, Black, Amber, Tobacco Sunburst, Orange, Black Cherry, Vintage Natural

While Gretsch is known for semi-hollow and full hollow body guitars, and it is only fitting that one of their semi-hollow chambered body models make this list, specifically the Gretsch Electromatic Pro Jet Bigsby. Being part of their Electromatic line, brings with it all the Gretsch goodness minus the premium appointments, at a very accessible price point. It is a true archtop thinline guitar, that passed the same attention to quality and detail that more expensive Gretsch guitars also go through.
In addition to guitars, Gibson offers consumer electronics through its subsidiaries Gibson Innovations (Philips brand), TEAC Corporation (TEAC and Esoteric brands), Onkyo Corporation (Onkyo and Pioneer brands), Cerwin Vega and Stanton,[6] as well as professional audio equipment from KRK Systems, pianos from their wholly owned subsidiary Baldwin Piano, and music software from Cakewalk. (See section #Instruments)
Both pickups were controlled by a separate volume control, with one master tone control. Another toggle served as a coil tap. The Ripley project went nowhere, however, the body styling would reappear on the upcoming Korean Celebrity series. It is very possible, since this shared the Ultra Hard Body model designation and was made in Japan, that the mystery Japanese guitars were essentially the same.
Beginners face this very common problem when they go for the cheaper options. The strings are usually far from the fret board, and due to lack of knowledge, many think that this is how it was meant to be. Such a guitar brings pain to the fingers since force has to be applied to lower the string to the fret board so as to produce sound. All these difficulties make it very hard for a beginner to learn the guitar. For you to learn the guitar quickly and without problems, you should get a guitar whose distance from string to fret is less.
Most of the time, a chord diagram will not show you the finger numbers. They will leave that up to you, because different people sometimes play chords differently. Some people cannot play an A chord like this, because their fingers are too big, and this fingering is very cramped for them. Instead, they play an A with a mini-barre, using the same finger for more frets. For example, I could bar my 1st finger across the 4th, and 3rd strings at the second fret, then place my 2nd finger on the 2nd string, second fret (see image on the left). This gives me more room between the frets, and also frees up my 3rd and fourth fingers to pick out melody and bass notes. It’s just a preference, you can play the chord how you prefer.
As a player and lover of the instrument, I can tell you unequivically that you are all right. Run a line straight into the board and wood doesn't make a difference and you will add effects in your mix. Or stand in front of a Marshall stack with a couple of humbuckers catching the feedback and you appreciate Honduran mahagony for its tone. You can certainly tell a difference in the sounds you make and especially feel the difference in your hands. And if you can't agree on these concepts, you dishonor the instrument and the craft of luthiers. As my buddy Terry keeps telling me, 'Shut up and play.' Peace out fellow geeks.
Search out any discussion about tone and tonewoods on the internet and you will quickly find a wide variation of opinions among players and builders alike. However, the majority will almost always list "tonewoods" and/or specific species of Spruce and Cedar as the key to getting the desired tone from a guitar. Indeed, many beginning builders agonize over wood choice combinations as they relate to tone, with more experienced craftspeople offering suggestions that seem to assure the correct … [Read More...]
Adolph Rickenbacher was born in Switzerland in 1886 and emigrated to the United States with relatives after the death of his parents. Sometime after moving to Los Angeles in 1918, he changed his surname to “Rickenbacker”. This was done probably in order to avoid German connotations in light of the recently concluded First World War as well as to capitalize on Adolph’s distant relation to World War I flying ace Eddie Rickenbacker. In 1925, Adolph Rickenbacker and two partners formed the Rickenbacker Manufacturing Company and incorporated it in 1927. By the time he met George Beauchamp and began manufacturing metal bodies for the “Nationals” being produced by the National String Instruments Corporation, Rickenbacker was a highly skilled production engineer and machinist. Adolph soon became a shareholder in National and, with the assistance of his Rickenbacker Manufacturing Company, National was able to boost production to as many as fifty guitars a day.[4]
But add some effects to the blend and the results can be even more interesting. Keyboard-like tones can be generated by rolling off the tone pots and employing digital delay, expanding the sound of your band without overstuffing the van, and the gentle application of a phase shifter or wah-wah can bring an interesting voice to warm, low tones. Jimi Hendrix’s “Pali Gap” is a classic example of the latter.
Ear Wring is a ring modulator controlled by three phase distortion oscillators and one LFO. Depending on the pitch, this can go from a gently oscillating tremelos to fuzzy, synth-like freak-outs. An optional harsh fuzz can be added to the signal before modulation. Mixed with the dry input signal and fed into an amp simulator, Ear Wring can add some meat to your guitar tone.
I found one at a local shop, 60's Norma, resembles a Strat LIKE guitar, but with a sweet design... It has two switch where you would fidn hte pickup selector on a gibson les paul. Its got a few nicks and such, but it sounds REALLY good and the guy only wants 60 bucks, I plan on buying it, re-fretting, and doing some custom fix up on the body. And He said pretty much everything is original... A pretty sweet guitar if you ask me... If and when I buy it I'll get a picture, email if interested!
5.  Customer installed strap button on heel of acoustic.  This was a simple job that went horribly wrong because a pilot hole wasn’t drilled.  Result:  Cracked heal.  Fix:  Careful application of cyanoacrylate glue and touch up refinish.  I’ve also seen strap button installations on guitars with bolt on necks where the pilot hole has hit the threaded insert in the heel.  Make sure you know where the insert is placed on that particular guitar before you drill.
If you stick to a simple chromatic scale (all the semitones), you also run the risk of the pitch correction moving the audio to the wrong note if the singer is more than half a semitone off pitch. A user scale, containing only the desired notes, generally works much better. Some systems also allow you to dictate the correct notes via MIDI. If the song contains sections in different keys or that use different scales, it is often simplest to split the vocal part across several tracks and then use a different pitch-corrector on every track, each one set to the appropriate scale for the section being processed.
In late 2012 I decided that I had all the modern guitars I needed. I’m not gigging much, just writing and recording. There were a couple of vintage guitars I was interested in. A Vox teardrop, especially the Mark IX, and the Fender Coronado. The Voxs turned out to be too expensive for me, especially the Mark IX, which was a 9-string beast meant to sound similar to a 12-string. Those are very rare and priced out of my range. The Coronado, I might be able to afford one day, but I’m not as interested as I was. The new reissues sell for about $700, but they’re different from the originals in several important ways.

{ "thumbImageID": "Mustang-PJ-Bass-Pau-Ferro-Fingerboard-Olympic-White/K29653000001000", "defaultDisplayName": "Fender Mustang PJ Bass Pau Ferro Fingerboard", "styleThumbWidth": "60", "styleThumbHeight": "60", "styleOptions": [ { "name": "Olympic White", "sku": "sku:site51500000055415", "price": "574.99", "regularPrice": "574.99", "msrpPrice": "575.01", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Fender/Mustang-PJ-Bass-Pau-Ferro-Fingerboard-Olympic-White-1500000055415.gc", "skuImageId": "Mustang-PJ-Bass-Pau-Ferro-Fingerboard-Olympic-White/K29653000001000", "brandName": "Fender", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Mustang-PJ-Bass-Pau-Ferro-Fingerboard-Olympic-White/K29653000001000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Sonic Blue", "sku": "sku:site51500000055422", "price": "574.99", "regularPrice": "574.99", "msrpPrice": "575.01", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Fender/Mustang-PJ-Bass-Pau-Ferro-Fingerboard-Sonic-Blue-1500000055422.gc", "skuImageId": "Mustang-PJ-Bass-Pau-Ferro-Fingerboard-Sonic-Blue/K29653000003000", "brandName": "Fender", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Mustang-PJ-Bass-Pau-Ferro-Fingerboard-Sonic-Blue/K29653000003000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Torino Red", "sku": "sku:site51500000055423", "price": "574.99", "regularPrice": "574.99", "msrpPrice": "575.01", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Fender/Mustang-PJ-Bass-Pau-Ferro-Fingerboard-Torino-Red-1500000055423.gc", "skuImageId": "Mustang-PJ-Bass-Pau-Ferro-Fingerboard-Torino-Red/K29653000002000", "brandName": "Fender", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Mustang-PJ-Bass-Pau-Ferro-Fingerboard-Torino-Red/K29653000002000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } ] }
1W 1x6 1x8 acoustic Amp Amplifier Amplifiers Amps Battery Powered Amps Beatles beginners combo amps Danelectro Disclaimers Effects Pedals Electric Guitars Epiphone Fender Fender Amps Fender Mustang Gretsch Guitar guitars Ibanez Les Paul Marshall modeling amps Orange Amplifiers Orange Micro Crush Peavey Amps pignose Portable Amps Practice Amps Review Reviews Rogue Solid State Amps Starter pack stompboxes Stratocaster Telecaster Tube Amps Vox Vox Amps Yamaha

Zactly!!!!!!!! Terry Kath, hands down the greatest ever! Hendrix is on everybodies list as the best, well Jimi said Terry was the best and if Jimi said it it's good enough for the rest of us. I just can't believe it took until Sept. 24th 2009 for someone to put his name down! To bad he valued the band concept more than his ego or he would be more well respected.
1950s: occasional Adirondack red spruce. In 1952 or 1953, rumor has it Martin bought a large supply of Engelmann spruce from government surplus. Though Martin preferred Adirondack Red Spruce, it was no longer available after the mid-1940s because all of the large trees had been decimated. Martin would have liked to switch from Sitka to Engelmann because he felt that Engelmann was closer to Adi Red Spruce than Sitka was. He could not however find anyone who was cutting Engelmann commercially, so they went back to Sitka.

Gibson did not take Fender too seriously at first; Fender were just an amplifier company that made a few guitars. They didn't regard the solid-body Broadcaster launched in 1950 as a serious musical instrument, lacking the depth of tone of a Gibson electric-acoustic. But music was changing, guitarists wanted different sounds, and music was getting louder. Fenders instruments proved to be more appropriate for the emerging musical scenes. Over the next decade Fender created a number of solid-body guitars that defined genres. Guitars like the Stratocaster, Telecaster and Precision and Jazz basses proved to be exceptionally popular and have stayed in production ever since.

Postscript: About that “capacitor type doesn’t matter” statement: Them’s fighting words in many online forums, especially in the stompbox realm. You’ll often see the inclusion of some rare “mojo” capacitor cited as a selling point for a particular product. I used to think I sometimes could hear a difference—until I built a couple of effects with quick-change sockets for comparing cap types. The audible differences were negligible, no more meaningful than the variations between two caps of the same value and same type. My advice is, if someone tries to sell you anything based on cap type, proceed with much caution. I now strongly believe that cap type is of no importance, at least in guitar and analog stompbox applications.
These two components work in tandem to influence tone and playability. The bridge is mounted to the lower portion of the guitar body. The strings are routed over it before terminating on the body or on a tailpiece. Bridges are designed to compensate for varying string lengths, gauges, and metals, ensuring that the strings remain in tune with each other. Bridges usually allow adjustment of the string's length to bring each string into tune along the entire length of the fretboard. This process is called intonation, and is an important part of setting up a guitar for optimal performance. Some bridges permit string height adjustments that affect the the ease with which the strings can be fretted, and is often referred to as the guitar's "action."
{"eVar4":"shop: guitars","eVar5":"shop: guitars: electric guitars","pageName":"[gc] shop: guitars: electric guitars: first act","reportSuiteIds":"guitarcenterprod","eVar3":"shop","prop2":"[gc] shop: guitars: electric guitars","prop1":"[gc] shop: guitars","evar51":"default: united states","prop10":"brands","prop11":"gretsch guitars","prop5":"[gc] shop: guitars: electric guitars","prop6":"[gc] shop: guitars: electric guitars","prop3":"[gc] shop: guitars: electric guitars","prop4":"[gc] shop: guitars: electric guitars","channel":"[gc] shop","linkInternalFilters":"javascript:,guitarcenter.com","prop7":"[gc] sub category"}
Guitar-Sunbeam : Precisely transmits the eternal electric guitar, ideally suited for modern production. It combines an extensive library of strum patterns, brute force, arpeggios and real riffs with real-time performance monitoring. An innovative playback engine allows you to create an almost infinite number of variations of chords and you get convincing, musical results.
Launch price: $1,499 / £1,399 | Body: Ash | Neck: Maple | Scale: 25.5" | Fingerboard: Maple/rosewood | Frets: 22 | Pickups: 2x V-Mod Single-Coil Telecaster | Controls: Volume with treble-bleed, tone, 3-way selector switch | Hardware: 3-saddle, strings-through-body Tele bridge with compensated brass saddles, 6-screw mounting with removable modern 'Ashtray' bridge cover | Left-handed: Yes | Finish: Mystic Seafoam, 2-Color Sunburst, 3-Color Sunburst, Black, Butterscotch Blonde, Candy Apple Red, Crimson Red Transparent, Natural, Olympic White, Sonic Gray
The guitar offers a beginner some great features in sound and playability. For starters, it is technically a Les Paul (giving you a great “cool factor,” which is important when you’re first starting out). It cuts a couple corners that a Standard or Special Les Paul won’t, like the fact that it’s a bolt-on neck, and there are proprietary single coil pickups (as opposed to the standard humbuckers you’ll usually find in a Les Paul).

NOTE: In these diagrams, the volume and tone controls are viewed from the rear. The volume and tone controls are variable resistors, also known as potentiometers (or "pots" for short). In electric guitars, the values for either of these usually is about 250K to 1 megohm. The capacitor in the circuit is for the tone control and these values usually are from .02 to .047 mfd (short for microfarad).
Playing power chords right up at the ‘dusty' end (past the 8th fret) gets difficult, because the frets are so close together. In the next stage we'll learn how to play power chords with a fifth-string root too, which solves that problem. However, it's important not to rush ahead, so make sure you put your effort just into the sixth-string root chords for now.
We perform within include rings. Personal big assortment of pedals, a few I really like, a few foul odor. I quickly discovered how the just people who worry about the results tend to be additional music artists. The actual people( ladies dance mostly) might treatment much less. Therefore right now I acquired the tuner, as well as generate your pedal with regard to single sculpt.... that is this, as well as my personal sculpt rocks ! as well as straight forward. With regard to facilities felines it might be another tale.
CP = manufactured by ???; some speculation is that CP stands for Cort Plant or that models with this designation were made by a partnership of Cort and Peerless or perhaps even that it indicates production at Cort's Indonesian plant which is known as Cort PT (although this last possibility seems highly unlikely since the instruments are marked as "Made in Korea"). (2003–2008)
Harmony pedals are often used to generate vocal harmonies, but can also do wonders for bass and guitar sounds. Some vocal harmony processors use the signal from your guitar to create two- or three-part vocal harmonies. Most harmony effects let you specify precisely how much higher or lower you want the accompanying note to be. Modern artists such as Steve Vai and Robert Fripp have created interesting music using a purely pitch-shifted signal with none of the original signal mixed in.
The Epiphone Broadway is a hollow body archtop guitar that has been in the Epiphone guitar lineup since 1931. The Broadway was initially an acoustic archtop, but after Gibson took over Epiphone in 1957 the “Broadway” designation was given to a new electric archtop. The electric model was reissued in 1997 and continues to be in production, and we’ve selected it for this list of best electric guitars.
In general, the typical situation is that HSH gives me options of cleaner/thinner/clearer tones which aren't as achievable with HH (even with volume and tone pots in use!). These are options I use very frequently, and I'd feel pretty restricted with HH! Though of course, this isn't the case for everyone. Indeed, I'm quite fascinated at the variety of tones Ron Thal and Andy Timmons get from the overly-simple SH set up they prefer!

Just as it’s important that the guitar, amp and effects are performing to spec, make sure that all cables are functioning properly (it’s uncanny how many times a lead that was working fine yesterday suddenly develops a fault just before a take). It’s a good idea to ensure that spares are available. That goes for strings, too – valuable recording time can be lost just because a string has broken and no one has a spare. Some engineers will try to insist you use brand new strings when recording, but don’t be bullied into it if you prefer the warmer sound of a played-in set; that applies especially to bass, as new bass strings can introduce undesirable harmonic content into the sound.
The more contact the bridge has with the body, the better the sound will be transferred into the body. On the other hand, we have non-vibrato bridges which provide an anchoring point but have no control over pitch or tension of strings. Both bridges have their own pros and cons but non-vibrato bridges provide better tuning stability and solid contact between the body and the strings.
: : : Does anyone know for sure where these originated. I have been told Vox (the England years) made this flat bodied plank guitar in the skiffle days of early 60's/late 50's. Mine is painted white(by hand) with a large black pick guard that curves to envelope the two chrome "toaster" pickups ,bottom of neck, and three control knobs.The strings have a moveable maple bridge(not secured) and a small chrome hardtail heel.The neck has a zero fret at top and 19 more playing frets.There are dot inlays at the 3rd,5th,seventh,ninth,12th,and 17th frets.The headstock is of natural finish light maple with a top edge cut at a sloping angle like Hofner.It has brass tuning pegs,gears and gear plates and the keys are white plastic.The beautiful short neck is true ,natural maple.Along one of the tuning gear plates is the numbers: 35515 which are etched into the wood. Four bolts without any plate hold the neck base to the plain body and a green decal above the pegs at top face of headstock reads: Shadow. The fret board is rosewoodand is laid on neck without bindings.It has six strings and sounds like a short scale Baritone guitar. It also only has one strap peg at bottom since they used to put the other end of strap on a tuning key. No other holes are seen for any former peg at other end of body(where normally found). Please send any info on this small,early,simple but awesome sounding electric skiffle guitar from England(Vox?).Thanks!!!!! VoteinNovember
×