Started shopping here when I was just getting my feet wet with the music career, bought a Mexican Humbucker strat and went on from there. Over the next 3 years, after many pedals, amps, and other major gears, I've become a solid local musician. This place has the best service hands down to take care of your gear needs in your career, they find out what you need, let you demo the gear for as long as you want, and never forces you to make a purchase decision. I'm glad I can go to this place for all my gear needs and support, so I can spend most of my time on actual music. The employees are super chill, and you eventually get to know them and the bands they play in after a while. It's a really supportive community for local musicians.
Catalan guitar is most well recognized as being extremely romantic, often with a slow tempo and careful attention paid to tone quality, note sustain, and voice leading. In contrast, Catalan guitar can also be brilliantly virtuosic, with tempi in excess of 160 beats per minute. Unlike flamenco's improvisational tradition, Catalan guitar music is composed and meticulously notated.
In 1945, Richard D. Bourgerie made an electric guitar pickup and amplifier for professional guitar player George Barnes. Bourgerie worked through World War II at Howard Radio Company making electronic equipment for the American military. Barnes showed the result to Les Paul, who then arranged for Bourgerie to have one made for him. (info from Wikipedia, photo of Jimi Hnedrix from bassmiddletreble.files.wordpress.com)
Now that we covered the basic features, let’s talk about what really counts: the built-in effects, amp models, and usability. For better or for worse, people tend to compare multi-effects units with the experience and sound you get from owning a pedalboard full of individual pedals. Well, great news: the consensus is that the Zoom G3X feels a lot like using individual stompboxes; more so than any other multi-effects unit on the market. Zoom really nailed it when it comes to making an intuitive interface. If you look at the layout, you’ll notice 3 “stompbox-style” sections side by side, each with a little display and on/off footswitch. These are meant to feel like 3 guitar pedals next to each other. They’re technically 3 slots which can each hold an effect or an amp model. The Zoom has 6 slots total (you can scroll left and right to access them), and all 6 can be used at once. You’ve got LOTS of choices to shape your tone: 94 effects and 22 amp and cabinet models. Any type of effect you can dream up, the Zoom G3X has you covered. Tremolo, vibrato, compressors, filters, overdrives are all available, and many of the effects simulate popular pedals like the Tube Screamer, EHX Big Muff, Pro Co RAT, Boss DS-1, and the list goes on and on. Same goes for the amp modeling - you can emulate a Marshall, Fender, Orange, Vox, etc. and pair up different amp models with various cabinet models. You can make your effect chain in whatever order you want, which is great for the beginner who is figuring out pedal order for the first time, and the veteran who wants to experiment with unique pedal combos. From a user review:
This is not a complete list of former or current American guitar companies. Among the omissions are Steinberger electric guitars and basses, now part of Gibson and Carvin, who is still independently owned and sells only direct, not through distributors or stores. I have not included the past great archtop luthiers such as D’Angelico, D’Aquisto or current archtop makers such as Bennedetto. Nor have I included the many smaller USA luthiers who are currently building excellent guitars such as Huss & Dalton, Foggy Bottom or Collings.
Paul Gray (b. 1972 d. 2010) swapped his longtime association with Warwick basses for a customized version of the ATK bass series, the PGB1. He was impressed with the ATK bass after he bought one from a pawn shop and told Ibanez that he would endorse them if they put the ATK series back into production. He switched to his signature model shortly before recording of the Slipknot album All Hope Is Gone and used them until his death in 2010.
The L-00 carries over the airy nasal tone and midrange emphasis of the original, making it great for tasty slide and classic rock riffs. Your favorite blues licks will also have more oomph when played through this blues box. For something so small, this parlor guitar can compete with standard size acoustics in terms of volume. Its solid sitka spruce top and solid mahogany back and sides work together well to give this seemingly diminutive instrument great clarity and good low end.
The Epiphone ES-335 Dot was the world's first semi-hollowbody electric guitar, introduced in 1958. Today, it's made by Gibson, but it is still prized by jazz and blues musicians looking for a classic sound. Setting up the Dot involves adjusting the truss rod to correct for any underbowing or overbowing of the neck because of humidity changes. The bridge saddle on the Dot may also be adjusted to get the right distance between the string and the fretboard, called the “action.”

Still available in Japan in ’66, but not promoted in the U.S. by Teisco Del Rey, were the Teisco TG-64 “monkey grip” guitar, its companion TB-64 bass, plus the similar non-grip NB-1 and NB-4 basses. The three-pickup TG-64 had a striped metal guard and the four-and-two hooked headstock with a metal plate on the front. The TB-64 probably still sported a plastic guard and three pickups. However, in the Japanese catalog from ’66, the TB-64 appears to be a 6-string bass, with an elongated variant of the hooked headstock with a rounded tip and a four-and-two tuner arrangement.
10% of our readers voted for brands that were not listed in the survey. So, besides G&L, Jackson, Yamaha, Danelectro, Charvel, Cort, Washburn, Framus, Parker, Dean, B.C Rich, and Aria, you might also want to check Duesenberg, Wild Customs, Mayones, Caparison, Reverend, Blackat, Hagstrom, Peerless, Carvin, Guild, Cole Clark, Seagull, Meloduende, Suhr, Nik Huber, Feline, Ozark, Burns, Ruokangas, and Eko.
You don't have to use plug-ins! Some synths such as the Virus TI have very flexible effects built in. You don't have to create audio effects in your sequencer. For example, I use the Access Virus synth, which features a simple delay effect, with the added bonus that all its parameters are available in the modulation matrix. One favourite trick involves routing velocity to the delay colour parameter. For parts that get brighter with increased velocity, it adds extra animation and bite if the echoes also get brighter. Unusually, the Virus also features four-way audio panning, so you can position an audio signal anywhere between the main stereo outputs and a second pair. If the second pair of outputs is routed to an external effects unit, you can play with the concept of moving a note around in a space, where its position also determines the treatment it gets. More fun can be had by modulating reverb time and colour via an LFO. The same LFO can then be used to control filter cutoff, EQ frequency and maybe wavetable position too (if your Virus is a TI). In this way, timbral changes happen at the same time as effect changes. Paul Nagle
I purchased one online a little over a year ago. looks great and sounds even better. I had a serious problem with it staying in tune, changed the tuners and nut, it helped but not to the point where it needed to be. Too ban because this guitar plays and sounds great. I sold it for half the purchase price to someone not so concerned about sounding so in tune.
If you want to combine the dynamics of a well-recorded drum kit with the pumping excitement you get from heavy compression, send either the overheads only or the entire kit to a buss and insert a nice-sounding compressor there. Set the compressor to a high ratio and low threshold and mix in some of this with the song. You may need to adjust the attack and release controls to get the effect you're after, but you don't need to blend in much of the compressed sound to really add punch and weight to a drum track. Nicholas Rowland

Epiphone also makes several less common models of the Les Paul such as the “Les Paul Goth”, “Les Paul Goldtop”, “Les Paul Ultra” and “Les Paul Ultra II”, “Les Paul Custom”, “Les Paul Black Beauty”, “Les Paul Prophecy Series”, “Zakk Wylde Custom Les Paul Model”, “Slash signature Les Paul Models”,the “Les Paul Studio”, and the most current, “Joe Bonamassa ’59 Gold Top Les Paul”.[27][28][29]
Fender had an electronics repair shop called Fender’s Radio Service where he first repaired, then designed, amplifiers and electromagnetic pickups for musicians—chiefly players of electric semi-acoustic guitars, electric Hawaiian (lap steel) guitars, and mandolins. Players had been ‘wiring up’ their instruments in search of greater volume and projection since the late 1920s, and electric semi-acoustics (such as theGibson ES-150) had long been widely available. Tone had never, until then, been the primary reason for a guitarist to go electric, but in 1943, when Fender and his partner, Clayton Orr “Doc” Kauffman, built a crude wooden guitar as a pickup test rig, local country players started asking to borrow it for gigs. It sounded shiny and sustaining. Fender got curious, and in 1949, when it was long understood that solid construction offered great advantages in electric instruments, but before any commercial solidbody Spanish guitars had caught on (the small Audiovox company apparently offered a modern, solidbody electric guitar as early as the mid-1930s), he built a better prototype.
Valve amplification is more or less linear—meaning the parameters (amplitude, frequency, phase) of the amplified signal are proportional to the input signal—so long as the voltage of the input signal does not exceed the valve's "linear region of operation". The linear region falls between "1." the saturation region: the voltages at which plate current stops responding to positive increases in grid voltage and "2." the cutoff region: the voltages at which the charge of the grid is too negative for electrons to flow to the plate. If a valve is biased within the linear region and the input signal's voltage exceeds this region, overdrive and non-linear clipping will occur.[40][43]

Sawtooth ST-ES Carc is another affordable electric guitar that both beginners and intermediate players can use for practising their skills. It comes with a sycamore body with a black finish and has a pickguard or vanilla cream color. It comes with almost all the accessories needed - tuner, amp, picks, cables and basic online lessons too. You also get a gig bag with it which very few guitars give you and normally you have to buy it separately.
Derived from standard EADGBE, all the strings are tuned lower by the same interval, thus providing the same chord positions transposed to a lower key. Lower tunings are popular among rock and heavy metal bands. The reason for tuning down below standard pitch is usually either to accommodate a singer's vocal range or to get a deeper/heavier sound.[38]
Wouldn't it be great if you could determine what price constitutes a "fair deal" before you made a deal? We think so. That's why we've created iGuide's Real Market Data (RMD) pricing, our proprietary system that does the research for you. It's a guide that gives you updated information on what you should pay for an item or what you should expect to receive - without having to spend hours researching. iGuide's Real Market Data pricing system is the internet's best guide to market value pricing and the only pricing system designed with the consumer in mind. Our exclusive RMD pricing is based on real sales data, gathered from auction sites in near real-time. This ensures you get the most accurate pricing available, as quickly as possible!
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Fast forward to 2018 and ESP is still going strong, with a huge range of speedy guitars tailored for heavy rock and metal, including several 7- and 8-string models. ESP offers a range of popular models in the budget market (under its LTD subsidiary) as well as high-end guitars, played by some of the biggest names in heavy metal – Kirk Hammett, James Hetfield and Stephen Carpenter to name a few.
You should be aware of some drawbacks to using the 'free' sites over the licensed sites (or purchasing a book of official TAB). First, the versions of the songs at the free sites were created by folks who enjoy music and did their best to document how to play the song. It may not be correct. Second, even though these sites don't charge for access to the TAB, most are in the business of making money. You'll have to put up with advertisements, often including flashing banners and pop-up ads. Finally, the original artists do not get paid for these transcriptions. If you like what you find, you should follow-up by purchasing the official music from an licensed reseller.
I've been to a PRS factory and seen the precision and skill with which they are made. Their quality control is incredible: they test each one individually and make adjusments until it is perfect. They won't let a bad one get through so if you buy a PRS guitar, you are guaranteed a high quality guitar. I mean, with the high price you pay, how could they not be wonderful? Plus, they sound, feel, and look amazing. (I also got to see Paul himself; it was pretty cool. What a nice, humble guy.)
Guild is an American guitar company that makes some amazing semi-hollow electric guitars such as the Starfire and the Aristocrat. These are guitars that nail the retro-rock sound and have the looks to match. Many classic Guild models have been revived through the Newark Street collection. While these guitars are cool beyond words, where Guild really shines is in the acoustic arena.
RARE Epiphone Vintage FT-150 Bard Lefty Conversion with bone saddle. Spruce top, rosewood back and sides. Medium to low action. Beautiful sounding and playing guitar. Superb projection. Rivals guitars costing thousands.In excellent cosmetic condition with normal fretwear for a guitar it's age, and tiny dings here and there but nothing that stands out and looks gorgeous. Includes original right-handed, adjustable bridge. Includes hard shell case and original right-hand adjustable bridge if you wanna convert it back to a righty!
We carry many new and ‘lightly’ used instruments. So called “low mileage” instruments, in near mint condition, are our specialty. Currently in house: Santa Cruz, Bourgeois, Eastman, Fender, Larrivee, Martin, Epiphone, Gibson, Gretsch, Guild, Giebitz, Huss & Dalton, Sobell, New World Classical Guitars, Cordoba Classical Guitars, Loar, Recording King, G&L, LsL, Breedlove. Amps from Magnatone, […]
An American company that makes some amazing acoustic and electric guitars, Taylor guitars are considered as one of the best in the world. Like Martin, they can be expensive, but surely worth every penny. Taylor and Martin have the upper hand when it comes to acoustic guitar brands in America. One of the popular series is the 200 series and is of great value. For beginners, Baby and Big Baby, and the GS Mini are perfect choices as they are small-bodied.
We've already shown you one of Epiphone's Les Pauls. However, that guitar and this model we're looking at here are simply not comparable. Les Paul Standard features a much better set of pickups as well as hardware. Each of the four available finishes on this thing is superb and includes a number of subtle details which really add to the beauty. Most importantly, Epiphone's Les Paul Standard will give you a true taste of what a legit Gibson Les Paul tastes like without breaking the bank.
Yamaha-C5-Salamander-JNv5.1- Arguably the best free piano on the internet and better than many of the expensive ones as well. Modified for sf2 with five brightness levels with optional resonance and this set includes the new Dark, Mellow and Dynamic Grands.  All in a set at 592mb in size.  This version has the detailed 15 velocity layers for seamless expression.
Back in the good ol’ days, guitarists had to crank their amplifiers to eleven in order to obtain a nice and creamy distortion. Today, this is no longer the case. Thanks to overdrive pedals, you can basically drive every clean amp into overdrive – at any volume – and choose the amount of gain and shape the tone precisely as desired. The overdriven or crunch sounds are commonly used for rock, to slightly get that “breakup” clean tone or to play blues licks and solos. During the last two decades, guitarists found out that overdrive pedals are also perfect for boosting the crunch channel of their amps into total distortion – a technique often used during guitar solos, to give the sound that extra weight and girth – or, as with the famous Tubescreamer, to tighten up the bass response of the amplifier gain channel. The Boss SD-1 is a very popular choice for overdrive pedals, capable of great sounds. The legendary TS9 by Ibanez is also worth a mention – even considering that it’s available in Mini and Deluxe formats. And while we’re at it, why not give the Harley Benton Ultimate Drive a try? This little screamer can boost your amp into full overdrive at a very competitive price.
Fretsizes can be confusing.  They are small measurements but have a big impact on feel and the size designations can vary.  Its best in my opinion to think and talk of frets in their actual crown widths and heights rather than the old Dunlop numbers (the originator of the 6xxx numbering system) as they can mean different things to different people; i.e. Warmoth lists 6105 as .095-.047" while USACG has is at .090-.055" - these are two very different feeling fretsizes. 

A way to increase the usability of the sound acquired this way is to wire a capacitor in series with the pickup that has its electric polarity reversed. This filters out that pickup's lower frequencies and thus preserves the corresponding frequencies from the other pickup. The resulting sound is fuller and stronger, yet still different from the standard in-phase combinations, resembling the sound of a "cocked wah" (a wah-wah pedal set in a fixed position). The capacitor used for this is usually in the 20–100 nF range.[23]


Situated just under the Spectrum 5 were the Teisco K guitars. Indeed, these Ks may have been introduced slightly before the Spectrums, since they appear in a 1966 Japanese Teisco brochure that does not contain the Spectrum. A second ’66 Japanese Teisco brochure contains both Ks and Spectrums. The K guitars were very similar in profile to the Spectrum, except that the horns were not curved, and flared out more or less equally in a more tulip shape, though still pointing slightly inward. These still had the German carve relief, 22-fret rosewood fingerboards, plus the new hooked headstocks. Inlays, however, were dots, and the vibratos were the more pedestrian Japanese version of the Bigsby. Pickguards were the new striped metal affairs introduced the year before, extending from above the strings down through the lower bout control area.
By 1961, at least, the makeover was complete. The old mini Les Paul, the J-1, was changed to become a sunburst double-cutaway solidbody. These had widely flaring equal cutaways, a single rectangular neck pickup, a large pickguard which covered most of the treble side, a wooden adjustable bridge, covered tailpiece, volume and tone. The bolt-on neck now had a more Gibson-style open-book head shape (with round logo sticker). The fingerboard had the old large dots with two small octave markers. The J-1, in a number of forms, would survive at least through 1966, if not longer. It is presumed that the J-2 was still around and that it had also become a double-cutaway; it most certainly was still in the catalog, as a double-cut, in ’62.
“I started to get really frustrated, and I said, ‘I know! I’ll fix you!’ I got a single-sided Gillette razorblade and cut round the cone like this [demonstrates slitting from the center to the edge of the cone], so it was all shredded but still on there. I played and I thought it was amazing, really freaky. I felt like an inventor! We just close-miked that in the studio, and also fed the same speaker output into the AC30, which was kind of noisy but sounded good.”
Interestingly, the 2019 version of this guitar doesn't stray too far from the more expensive Standard model in terms of looks - some even prefer it over more expensive models because of its streamlined appearance. While there are no high grade tonewoods involved, the Les Paul Tribute still uses the same mahogany body and maple top combination. The 24.75" scale length neck also follows after the Standard model, complete with a 22-fret rosewood fretboard and a 1.695" nut width. As the name suggests, this model features a slim taper neck profile that modern players will appreciate. Finally, it is equipped with a 490R humbucker for the neck and a 490T humbucker for the bridge, which reproduces the sound of old Les Pauls from the '60s.
Players discovered that, if you put the switch in the right position, you could get the neck-and-middle and bridge-and-middle sounds. Jimi Hendrix is a popularizer of this technique, and it became popular enough that the Strat got wired stock with five-position switches. Eventually the middle pickup was made reverse wound and reversed polarity, so that neck-middle and bridge middle would effectively be noiseless, humbucking positions.
While the Line 6 PODHD500X is no longer the flagship guitar processor, it is still very much in demand in the market, as evidenced by the overwhelmingly positive response that it continues to get from users and expert alike. It follows after its predecessor, albeit with a more powerful CPU and improved interface via colorful LED rings around the footswitches.

Some of the best guitar compositions come from simple experimentation; that's why jam sessions are so great. When you want to have your own personal jam session, using a headphone amp is a fantastic idea. That way, you can keep your genius to yourself until it's ready for its first audience. You'll have the freedom to experiment all you want without having to worry about unwanted ears listening in, and that'll give your new riff even more of an impact when you unveil it on your main amplifier.
Not a bad article, but I’d go even cheaper. As a long time guitar and bass player (no longer gigging) and father, with guitars high and low cost in the house, I would advise parents to get a new Yamaha, Epi, or Squier (or a good used one of those) for a couple hundred $ or less and a decent Fender or Vox,, Spider, etc modeler amp for the same and see what happens. It has been hard to keep my kids interested, hurts the fingers, and my guitars have low action and play like butter. It isn’t like Rock Star! Reportedly 90% drop out in the first year, and by the time you are my age maybe 99% have quit! Lot of used stuff in the closets out there! So go to a decent store or a friend who plays and seek their help and advice. And get it set up by someone who knows what they are doing. My current favorite setting out and being played a lot is a 1996 Korean Squier Strat Deluxe, used for $99. So if they say spend over $400 total amp and guitar, ask someone else! They lose value real fast!
Johnny Marr is a chief architect of the post-modern rock-guitar aesthetic. As the guitarist for seminal Eighties poetic pop stars the Smiths, he created a tonal palette and crisp stylistic approach that still forms the roadmap for much modern rock guitar playing. It was Marr who created the orchestral guitar soundscapes that enhanced the moody drama of Smiths singer Morrissey’s introspective lyrics and ironically detached vocals.
I'm looking for a similar guitar. My first electric in 1969, purchased used for $50.I lost it sometime in the 70's, but still have a picture of it. It was a sunburst finish cutaway violin shaped body with Bigsby type tailpiece and a tunable bridge with a flip up mute bar. The headstock is similar to a Gibson but the neck was thinner.I can't remember how it played or sounded.I'm just looking to replace it for nostalgic reasons. I also recently purchased a Kent Les Paul copy I found on e bay while searching for kenr guitars.I have seen the framed ads but I have yet to find that model.
The question is now - do you need the entire bundle? When it comes to the presets, the guitars are all very unique, but because of the mass amount of tone-shaping available once you start twisting and manipulating away there becomes less and less of a distinction — the bundle being over a third less than individually purchasing them doesn’t help the decision making factor at all.   
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