Of course, there’s one other reason you might want to grab a mini amp for yourself, and that, perhaps surprisingly, is the sound. Many of the mini amps on the market today are designed and manufactured by the most iconic brands in the industry. That means you can get your hands on some pretty serious tone that may not fill an auditorium, but could be an interesting addition to a recorded guitar track.
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Pitchshifters change the pitch of the note played via a user-specified amount. The range of pitch deviation depends on the equipment used, but many pedals are capable of raising and lowering the pitch two octaves above and below the fundamental pitch. The amount of pitch deviation can be set or controlled via a foot pedal (which typically offers smooth, continuous pitch control). Typically, such function will be used with the original signal, resulting in a Harmonizer: the pitch is altered and combined with the original pitch to create two or more note harmonies. These harmonies are typically programmed in discrete integer multiples of the fundamental tone. When used with an expression pedal, it provides a smooth, abeit slightly digital, bend-like effect. Pitch shifters can also be used to electronically "detune" the instrument. Some examples are:
Guyatone produced electric guitars for major guitar manufacturer Suzuki. The company also produced their house brand Guyatone. Badged guitars produced by Guyatone include Barclay, Broadway, Coronado, Crestwood, Futurama, Howard, Ibanez, Ideal, Imperial, Johnny Guitar, Kent, Kingston, Lafayette, Marco Polo (electrics only), Montclair, Omega, Orpheus, Prestige, Royalist, Saturn, Silhouette, Silvertone, Vernon, Winston and Zenta, an impressive amount of names produced by a single company. Other badges that may have been produced by Guyatone are Beeton (not to be confused by the Beeton Brass Guitar company founded in 1994), Bradford, Canora and Regent.
Bought an ovation a couple of years ago and it hasn't failed me yet. Mine's a fairly lower in the range Ovation Celebrity, but it's excellent. One of the most comfortable feeling guitars I've ever held, good projection, nice tone, even been known to out do a Gibson further down the neck. Plus bonus feature is that it does sound so much clearer and warmer out of the amp
Before it gets shipped to you, each Monoprice guitar undergoes a setup, tuning, and inspection process by Master Luthier Roger Gresco here in Southern California. The setup ensures that the neck is straight, the action is right, and that it will stay in tune. Additionally, it comes with everything you need to get started, including strings (installed), a heavy-duty zippered black gig bag with shoulder strap, and a truss-rod wrench.
This is a very general question, but I will attempt to answer. I'll not get into brands, buy what "feels" right and has a good tone. If, a beginner, a good acoustic can be bought new for $200.00 - $300.00. If, you are an experienced or professional player, "The Sky is the Limit" only limited by how much you want to spend. My first guitar was used, and I paid $50.00. Now, I play a Gibson Song Writer, $3500.00. Hope this helps.
The 1934-’35 Dobro Hawaiian had the relief sections around a round central bridge/pickup “cover” with a Dobro “lyre” logo between the pickup and the neck. The more-or-less rounded lower bout (cutout at the butt) culminated in two little pointed shoulders, which then tape into the neck, giving it an almost “Spanish” look if you squint and ignore the cast designs. The tapered head had two cutouts in the middle and a triple-stepped top extended on the bass side. The principal difference between this earliest Dobro and the one shown in Gruhn/Carter is the tailpiece, which was a curved, cast-in affair, unlike the rectangular tail on the later version. Also, the side relief panels are painted black, with the whole thing clear-coated to seal it. On this first Dobro electric lap there is no volume control. The jack is on the but, in the bottom cutout, next to the strap button.
Tremolo is the gentle art of making your signal subtly cut in and out of volume. Think of all those old surf records. Phase and flange are quite similar in essence; phase emulates the sweeping of the frequency band, alternating between cutting the bass and treble frequencies, while flange does a similar thing but with a slightly more extreme sound. Wah is perhaps more well known; the Jim Dunlop Cry Baby wah pedal has been used for decades by players of all genres. Adding a highly distinctive wah-wah sound can elevate a solo into something infinitely more interesting. Or it can add a bit of that classic wakka-wakka sound you hear on classic funk records.
One of the quirkier instruments to emerge from the JMI/Vox operation in the 1960's (And that's saying something!) The Mando-Guitar never really caught on in a big way but remains a very cool and actually quite functional oddity. This is essentially an double-strung octave guitar; some describe it as an "octave 12 string guitar" but the strings are actually tuned in unison, not the octave arrangement of a conventional 12-string. The idea was to make an instrument that played in the mandolin range but was tuned as a guitar, as few of the Beat-era guitarists who were JMI's customers had a clue how to play mandolin! A few of the first Mand-Guitars were produced at Jennings' Dartford, Kent factory but the great bulk of extant examples were built by Eko in Recanati, Italy. With its small artist-palette shaped solid body and short 15" scale neck this is a very handy instrument, and with two Vox pickups has a fairly wide range of tones. There have been a number of similar instruments inspired by this design created in more recent decades, but the Vox Mando-guitar remains the original and coolest of all mini-guitar efforts.

We recommend you choose the headstock shape that appeals to you most. The shape of the headstock does not significantly affect the sound or performance of the instrument. Some of our headstock shapes are pointier, which means they can get damaged more easily when dropped or bumped. Choose from our existing shapes, or, send us a drawing of your original design - we can build that, too!
Lawsuit Takamine F375s Hand built in Japan and still in excellent vintage condition! Build type is Rare Exotic Tone woods series Jacaranda Brazilian Rosewood back-sides-fingerboard & headstock overlay JUST Gorgeous. Its workmanship is really top shelf by any standards, We installed and set up with Martin Marquis 80/20 strings 12's, as well as setting this guitar up with a New bone nut & saddle, Condition is very good with a few minor hard to see scratches on its back you have to look closely sometimes at an angel ( clear coat only not threw to wood ) general play here and there as any 37 year old guitar that has been played would get... dinks and such but nothing major to detract from its obvious outward beauty, This example has an excellent neck its 1-11/16th's at the bone nut, fingerboard is very good as are the frets at 90%, its straight and has a nice meaty feel, has the Martin design detail of the Diamond Volute on back, original tuners are excellent as well, a warm vintage vibe to this 37 year old vintage Gem. Tone is rich with good volume she Sings well!!! JVG Rated 9/10 higher if it wasn't for the few minor clear coat scratches in its clear coat not to the wood that I can see more like swirls and such may be possible to fine grade 3000 wet sand and polish out its possible if it doesn't sell soon when I get the chance I'll do it, its a commitment because it may not sand out alone it may require a few thin clear lacquer applied and buffed out to cure it forever if so a guitar of this caliber deserves the attention.. ( the price will go up after I do that work ) and that really doesn't have to be done to make this guitar just very good -excellent vintage it would bring it very close to mint!.... aside from the few minor scuffs this guitar still qualifies as vintage excellent right now, just thought I would point those out. So to be clear about this listing the way you see it now is the way it is offered.Its a F375s and not the EF375s yet This guitar has a factory installed transducer type pickup installed and it sounds wonderful, Its said to have been installed by original owner in Tokyo by Takamine shop its a very clean job I call it CLEAN where they do not make extra unnecessary holes for output jack instead they use the END PIN hole and its a combination strap pin and or output jack, So this guitar is either Acoustic or Electric really nice in deed in SUPER Condition well above average. This beautiful instrument comes with its original hard shell case it to is in very good vintage condition its heavy duty molded type with plush black interior all functional fully. This is the total package. Contact Joe to buy: jvguitars@gmail.com .
We also decided to test a separate group of smaller guitars with scale lengths (the distance from the string nut at the top of the neck to the bridge that supports the strings on the body) in the range of 22 inches, as compared with 24.75 to 25.5 inches for most full-size electric guitars. These models may be more comfortable for kids because their smaller hands won’t have to stretch as far, and many adults also like them because their compact size makes them easier to travel with.
Launch price: $999 / £899 | Type: Amp modeller/multi-effects pedal | Amp models: 33 | Effects: 42 | Connections: Standard guitar input, minijack stereo aux input, standard main outputs (L/Mono, R), XLR main outputs (L/Mono, R), standard stereo phones output, standard Send (L/Mono, R), standard Return (L/Mono, R), MIDI in, MIDI out/thru, USB, expression pedal | Power requirements: Mains power (IEC lead)
Of all the guitars in the world, this ends up as number 42!?! OK, amateurs, time to tell the truth, these guitars are the best, simply flawless and amazing. Don't talk about your Yamahas or your Ibanez or even Fender for that case! Those are just decent guitars. You will fall in love with the John Petrucci models; they have clobbered, I mean nearly humiliated Gibson. Try these, then think again.
I don't have enough good things to say about this shop. Are you used your music shop being being run by snotty musicians who judge you based on the skinniness of your jeans or number of piercings? Well, this ain't that shop. James, the owner, is super helpful and knowledgeable, and stocks his shop with really top quality gear. I'd recommend this place primarily for pedals and amps, as well as for checking out some small batch electric guitar manufacturers (like their gorgeous Asher collection). That being said, they have a really nice selection of Breedloves, Rain Songs, Guilds, Martins, Gibsons in the acoustic section as well. They also do top-notch repair on equipment. I brought in my Princeton Reverb for a speaker swap, and the work was completely cheaply and flawlessly. They definitely have a loyal customer in me going forward!
If you want free and private, other than the basic version of Eagle, there is KiCad, which is an open source tool developed by GIPSA Lab, which is a research institute out of Grenoble in France. Like Eagle, there are Windows, Mac, and Linux versions, whereas Circuit Maker is Windows only. There are also tools now being offered for free by some of the big component dealers such as Mouser.

The Effect: Metal has become the prevalent genre when it comes to music that involves guitars. Dialing in a proper distortion can make or break the sound of your guitar as well as your entire band. Coincidentally, it’s so easy to go overboard with distortion, all while being certain you are on the right track. The very first step is to get a dist box that is suitable for metal. Something like Electro­Harmonix Metal Muff carries just enough punch to get the job done, but not enough to drown your tone completely with gain. You’ll find this to be a reoccurring theme with a number of great metal dist boxes. At the end of the day, it all comes down to your prowess and skill. Every good metal guitarist know that it’s all about the unity of equipment and knowledge. With that said, these pedals will get you started.


It has been said that Barney never played his signature Kays. On the contrary... Barney Kessel has been photographed in concert with the Kay K8700 Jazz Special on multiple occasions, has made appearances at Waldo's Jazz Club on the television classic "Johnny Staccato - Television's Jazz Detective" and has been confirmed by son Dan (who also recorded with the Artist on several famous recordings) to have used the Artist to record countless rock, pop, r&b and blues hits with the most popular performers of the early '60s.
The V40 expands the elusive low-to-medium gain range, putting a wide spectrum of subtly shifting overdrive textures under your fingers. There are rotary controls for gain, EQ and master volume. The real fun starts with a two-position voice switch, which subtly changes the V40's character. Voice 1 is centred more on the early 60s 'blackface' tone; Voice 2 is edgier and a touch more aggressive, evoking the tweed amps of the 1950s. A small toggle switch called 'mid kick' adds a touch of extra gain in the midrange, not least to give weedy single coils a lift for solos. There's also a digital reverb with a front-panel level control and on/off switch. Then there's the standby switch, which has two 'on' positions for high power (approximately 40 watts) and low power (seven watts). This switch also works in the V40's single-ended mode, offering a choice of around 1.5 watts in the high-power position and 0.5 watts in the low-power setting. The V40's sonic palette made us sit up and take notice. By reducing the gain, all the mildly overdriven and chime effects normally squeezed into a fraction of the gain knob's travel now occupy the whole range. The V40 Duchess is a unique design - many of its competitors feature high-gain lead channels, teamed with high headroom and often uninspiring clean channels. By focusing on those often-overlooked but highly effective low-to-medium overdrive sounds, the V40 has effectively carved out its own niche, and looks set to become popular for blues, roots, jazz and country players.

Hopefully, this list of easy guitar riffs has provided you with some ideas of memorable riffs you can learn as a beginner or intermediate player. The great thing is, there are tons of resources out there to help you learn all of these songs. Depending on which medium you prefer to learn from (written, audio, or video) links to each are included above for all songs.
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This is a fantastic tool for acoustic solos artists, worship leaders, session players or an acoustic rig that lacks a lot of control or a preamp source. Moreover, the Venue provides the additional functionality of tuning, feedback control, an effects loop and a built in DI box. Its price is usually on the higher end, though you can check used pricing which often dips significantly below retail. However, buying a preamp, tuner, noise gate and DI box separately would run you a lot more than what the Venue costs.
When you’re just getting into the electric guitar, there are a lot of items you’ll need to get going. This includes the guitar itself, tuners, straps, an amp, a bag or protective case, a stand, etc. Buying it all piece by piece can be rather expensive. It’s much more practical in financial terms to opt into one of the many starter packs on the market. If you want to know which ones are worth your time, here are the 8 best guitar starter packs for beginners:
Nashville studio engineer Glen Snoddy discovered the Fuzz-Tone sound when recording Marty Robbin’s 1960 hit “Don’t Worry About Me.” Allegedly an overloaded transformer blew in a Langevin tube module, transforming Grady Martin’s bass guitar into a distorted, heavy fuzz. Some put the event down to another case of amplifier malfunction. Either way, Martin continued to use the tone throughout 1961 while Snoddy transistorized the malfunctioning circuit through trial and error, and sold it onto Gibson in 1962.
OK, I’ve put a new set of strings on now. We’re now going to carry out the following steps, just like we did in the general electric guitar setup post. 1. Check and adjust neck bow (how straight the neck is) 2. Check and adjust saddle height 3. Check and adjust the intonation (how far back or forward the saddles need to sit at the bridge to keep your guitar as in tune as possible no matter what fret you’re playing)
Boombox Guitar Tuner will get the party started. Just play a note, and it shows. Other guitar tuners don''t use the microphone, like Boombox Guitar Tuner, because it''s written with cutting-edge Flash 10.1 technology. Boombox Guitar Tuner is free to download or use online, so why waste your money on other expensive guitar tuners at the music shop? Try tuning your guitar once using Boombox Guitar Tuner, and you''ll see that it takes just seconds .

Route the body. You’ll need to make a cavity (a hole that goes partly through the body of the guitar) in the back of the guitar to fit the electronics for the volume, tone, pickup selection controls. You will cover it later with a bit of material (usually hard plastic). You’ll also need one cavity in the front of the guitar for each of its pickups. Rout the pickup cavity (or cavities) to the depth recommended by the manufacturer.[9]


Add a maple top to the mahogany body, as do a great many Les Paul models, and a blend of characteristics comes forward. The mahogany’s depth and richness remain, but the maple provides added snap, clarity, and definition. It also tightens up the lows and adds more cut to the highs. For many players this sonic evolution is highly desirable, whereas others might prefer the smoothness of the pure-mahogany design.


ZPS (ZERO POINT SYSTEM) OF ZR TREMOLO Main Spring Stopper Tremolo Block Stop Rod With the guitar tuned correctly, adjust the Main Spring make sure that the Stop Rod makes contact with the Tremolo Block and Stopper. If the Stop Rod does not make contact with the Tremolo Block and Stopper, adjust the Main Spring adjustment screw until contact is made.
The steel-string and electric guitars characteristic to the rise of rock and roll in the post-WWII era became more widely played in North America and the English speaking world. Barrios composed many works and brought into the mainstream the characteristics of Latin American music, as did the Brazilian composer Heitor Villa-Lobos. Andrés Segovia commissioned works from Spanish composers such as Federico Moreno Torroba and Joaquín Rodrigo, Italians such as Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco and Latin American composers such as Manuel Ponce of Mexico. Other prominent Latin American composers are Leo Brouwer of Cuba, Antonio Lauro of Venezuela and Enrique Solares of Guatemala. Julian Bream of Britain managed to get nearly every British composer from William Walton to Benjamin Britten to Peter Maxwell Davies to write significant works for guitar. Bream's collaborations with tenor Peter Pears also resulted in song cycles by Britten, Lennox Berkeley and others. There are significant works by composers such as Hans Werner Henze of Germany, Gilbert Biberian of England and Roland Chadwick of Australia.
The ADA MP-1 was a legend for it’s superior versatility at the time of it’s release. Since first becoming available during the 80’s, players vied after it for it’s midi switching capability via footswitch. Paul Gilbert is most famous for his loyalty to the amp during the spawn of his career.  It runs on two 12AX7 preamp tubes and has three main voicings — Solid State, Clean and Distortion. One downfall of this amp stems from it’s lack of an input volume control, but thanks to a host of mods available nowadays for this thing, one can look really look past this minor flaw. On top of that, you can find them used for around $250! A steal for 80’s tone-in-a-box.
Necks are described as bolt-on, set-in, or neck-through, depending on how they attach to the body. Set-in necks are glued to the body in the factory. They are said to have a warmer tone and greater sustain.[citation needed] This is the traditional type of joint. Leo Fender pioneered bolt-on necks on electric guitars to facilitate easy adjustment and replacement. Neck-through instruments extend the neck the length of the instrument, so that it forms the center of the body, and are known for long sustain and for being particularly sturdy.[citation needed] While a set-in neck can be carefully unglued by a skilled luthier, and a bolt-on neck can simply be unscrewed, a neck-through design is difficult or even impossible to repair, depending on the damage. Historically, the bolt-on style has been more popular for ease of installation and adjustment. Since bolt-on necks can be easily removed, there is an after-market in replacement bolt-on necks from companies such as Warmoth and Mighty Mite. Some instruments—notably most Gibson models—continue to use set-in glued necks. Neck-through bodies are somewhat more common in bass guitars.
Yamaha’s also excel in terms of their playability, which is an especially important characteristic for beginners. Too many players sacrifice quality to save money on their first guitar, with the result being that they now have to deal with difficult playability that poses extra challenges to the learning process and can sour the learner’s experience with the new instrument. Yamaha offers an enticing balance between cost and quality.
I thank Roger Evans “How to play guitar” for his easy & intuitive written method, a good reason why he is a bestseller & outselling your hard-pushed videos. I can assure you, you will be a better teacher if you buy his book, and you will a top teacher if you read his other books such as “How to Read Music”, “How to play piano”, & ” How to play keyboards”. You will thank me for this advise and you will be a better asset to your potential students.

Figuring they know what they want in an amp far better than I do, I gave our panelists no instructions, other than to keep in mind that these amps were primarily for beginners and secondarily for more experienced players looking for a cheap portable amp. After each panelist tried all the amps, I asked their opinions of them. We didn’t discuss the prices since they were all so similar, but we did discuss some other practical considerations such as weight and size.
Launch price: $779 / £849 | Body: Mahogany with maple top | Neck: Maple | Scale: 25" | Fingerboard: Rosewood | Frets: 24 | Pickups: 2x 85/15 'S' humbuckers | Controls: Volume, tone (with push-pull coil-split), 3-way selector | Hardware: PRS vibrato, PRS SE tuners | Left-handed: Yes | Finish: Fire Red Burst, Tobacco Sunburst, Trampas Green, Whale Blue
So the actual vibrating length of the string should be the same in all cases, and if that's all that affects the magnetic field then none of the other things mentioned above should affect that signal. Do a simple test protocol such as plucking each string with the identical pick, record the waveform, overlay them and look for differences in the waveform.
For any venue, it's important to bring along the right amp. A huge amp in a tiny club is not only overkill; it's also extra setup work that you can avoid altogether with a smaller combo amp. On the flipside, a little amp in a big theatre could mean that some of the audience won't even hear you. Take your time deciding what the best option is for you.
The 700-series models were solid-body instruments while the 800-series models were hollow bodied. This is a small enough product range to make a nice little collection and the guitars are made well enough to be used. (Many of the early Japanese guitars were cheap and simply unplayable right out of the box. I know... I had one.) However interest in them seems to be rising and thus, prices are following along.
Vibrato design is slightly changed and enhanced with the addition of block saddles for adding a fair amount of firmness to the tone. Likewise, they also give a precise breakpoint for the strings. Talking about pickups, pac 112v is equipped with 5-way blade pickup selector. Similarly, master tone and volume controls are also provided for the neatest output.
I have a vox valvtronics amp I bought a while ago it has a real preamp tube and loads of very accurate effects great reverb 3 kinds good modulation effects awesome distortion and tube overdrive and very important it is easy to adjust effect level and a power knob that lets you adjust output 1 to 60 watts like a pr attenuator its great so you don't loose that sound of a cranked up amp when you don't want it to loud it also has a easy to use tuner this amp is very user friendly unlike some modeling and effects carrying amps and you can easily adjust effects levels with separate knobs no confusion also a pedal to control effects is available for about 50 dollars is a great studio or small gig still amp and saves a lot because all of the effects it offers its like having a vox tone labe on top of a amp exactly you can sound like van halen led Zeppelin pink floyd lady gaga or the beatles and more and the price is very competitive to all others in its category
This guitar has an interesting makeup of tone wood. First, the body is Mahogany just like the Iron Label model. The top of the guitar is Poplar Burl, where a burl is actually a type of growth on a tree in which the grain has become somewhat deformed. It sounds bizarre but, Burl is highly prized for its rarity and beauty and is often sought after by wood sculptors and luthiers alike.
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So the actual vibrating length of the string should be the same in all cases, and if that's all that affects the magnetic field then none of the other things mentioned above should affect that signal. Do a simple test protocol such as plucking each string with the identical pick, record the waveform, overlay them and look for differences in the waveform.
I recognize that these lists are really the preference of the writer and that in itself makes the list valid. However……Robert Johnson at #1? I realize that many people studied him and he was a great guitarist for his era, but he wasn’t even the best guitarist of his era. That title goes to Son House, who taught Robert Johnson. The fact is that you could have had a Clapton without a Robert Johnson. Johnson wasn’t the only player whom Clapton was inspired by.
-Would be nice to edit the string colors, add training modes telling you which finger to hit the note with, how many times to play through a sequence (so you learn/memorize the song, vs just respond to the game - i.e is the chorus sequence repeated 4 times before moving onto the next part of the song?),indicating strumming patterns to help with timing (newbies tend to down pick everything and just pick faster when the notes are closer vs switching to an up-down strum) etc.
With the bridge in a locked position, bring the strings to your preferred tuning and check the neck curvature. If you don't intend to keep the instrument in standard concert pitch, tune it as you intend to normally tune it- half a step down, three steps down, whatever. Also, you should have the gauge of strings you intend to use on the guitar at this point, if you did not already. Both the string gauge and the tuning of the strings dictate the amount of tension that is going to be pulling on the neck, and everything about the adjustments you are about to make is affected by the tension on the neck.
To wire three two-conductor pickups we only need one pole. Common goes to volume pot input and 3 switched terminals are connected to pickup outputs. That way, we will select one pickup in positions 1-3-5 and two pickups wired in parallel in positions 2-4. When middle pickup has reverse polarity, noise will cancel out in positions 2-4 and they will be wired in so called “humbucking” mode.
So I'm babysitting this guitar for a broke person and I happen to be not so much broke and he left this guitar over here. Not that I'd take advantage of anyone, but after playing it, I wouldn't mind having it. I went through 3 pages of google and didn't really find any info on that or ebay. It's a P37. It's a dread. Looks pretty cheap judging by the ornamentation. It's painted black with decal inlays and all that classy stuff. I haven't measured it but the fretboard is really wide, the neck is really skinny and D shaped. I think it has a shorter scale length too... and the finish looks thin. It seems old because the saddle barely pokes out and the action is still rather high but then the soundboard doesn't belly out. The bridge is raised all around the saddle though, so it could just be a strange bridge setup. It is rather loud. It says "quality handcrafted guitars" under the company name in the soundhole, not sure if I believe it, but the totally different neck, action and volume level than what I'm used to, makes it pretty fun to play.

This is a really special, limited edition guitar. Gibson are well known for their premium products, and the J-200 Standard certainly lives up to that billing. What we have here is Gibson’s modern interpretation of the legendary Super Jumbo that has been around in some incarnation since 1937. It’s an enlarged, round body style for big sounds and presence.


The tone from a Bourgeois produced with master grade Cocobolo wood using hot hide glue is superior to any guitar I have played, I can get an incredible reverb sound by applying a light percussion on the body with my forearm, this guitar is expensive but worth it. I believe Bourgeois builds 400 guitars per year, the other major producers production is 400 guitars per week.
In the Guitar Setup & Maintenance course, Greg Voros devotes an entire DVD to electric guitars. Rather than talk in the abstract about setting up all electric guitars, he’s picked two very popular ones to use for demonstration purposes. He’ll teach you how to adjust the action, the bridge, and the pickup heights, as well as how to adjust the neck for precise relief, in order to get the best action possible on your electric guitar.

Fender’s legendary tone is enough to win just about anyone over, and they cater to a wide range of customers by offering the more cost friendly Squier series. While their classic electric guitars are favored by plenty of players, their acoustic selection and Jazzmaster offerings have their fair share of supporters as well. No matter what you’re looking for in a guitar or what price range you’re shopping in, you’re likely to find a good fit with Fender.
The woods used on the body and neck are worth considering too, although are unlikely to be a defining factor when you consider your purchase. Basswood features heavily as the body wood of many guitars in this price range because it’s affordable and has decent tonal properties. You will also find cheaper to produce woods like poplar and alder, although the traditionally more premium mahogany is also found on affordable guitars these days.
The advantage of this specific package is that you’ve got everything you need to get started right away: guitar (duh), amp, strings, tuner, guitar cable, picks, gig bag, strap, and instructional DVD. Those of you who just wanna get a guitar and start, this is your choice. Squier also makes similar package, but I recommend this over the Squier because the parts (electronics) are higher quality, although the Yamaha costs a little bit extra.
While a straight DI approach can work for clean sounds, simply plugging a guitar into an overdrive pedal and then routing the output of the pedal into your recording system will sound unnaturally thin and raspy because there are no speakers to take away the unwanted high end, but that hasn't stopped some people using it as a 'trademark' sound! For a more conventional sound, a speaker simulator is needed to filter out the unwanted higher harmonics. A passive speaker simulator, such as the original Palmer Junction box can be placed directly after an overdrive pedal or a regular guitar amp preamp output, but it will need to be recorded using a mic input rather than a line input (passive filtering always results in a reduction in level). Active equivalents (usually battery or phantom powered) are also available, which may offer a greater range of tonalities.
While these guitars are known for their warm woody sound, they are capable of being used in almost any genre that doesn’t require massive amounts of gain, which is prone to feedback.  The guitarist for the Black Keys, Dan Auerbach, is a modern example of a player who will drive the instrument to distortion, but still maintain the jazzy blues quality these instruments are known for.
Some effects produced dramatically weird sounds that were largely impossible to pull off. The peculiar 1948 DeArmond Trem-Trol (used extensively by rock-and-roll pioneer Bo Diddley) altered the volume of the guitar signal by exposing the connecting pin to a brass-and-glass canister half-filled with shaking, water-based electrolytic “Hydro-fluid.” The shaking—and often leaky—fluid washed over the pin and would bend the signal’s volume, causing an oscillating, watery tone. In the words of Chris Gray, one of its few remaining owners, “This is not a subtle effect—it adds all its personality to your sound whether you’re ready for it or not.”
What about Derek Trucks? Mark Knopfler? Trey Anastacio? Chuck Berry? Even Eddie Van Halen deserves some credit–more than John Mayer does for guitar playing. John Mayer's fame as a guitarist piggybacks on his commercial success, which is a result of targeting a demographic of 13 year old girls. He's no doubt a skilled guitar player, but over-rated as a guitarist relative to guys like Van Halen, Knopfler, etc.
If we've learned anything from this experience, it's that Rocksmith 2014 will do everything it can to try and teach you how to play the guitar, and it's got an amazing array of tools and lessons to do just that. But just like taking lessons from an actual instructor, you have to be willing to put in the time and practice, Practice, PRACTICE, even if it's boring—there are no shortcuts to properly learning your craft. And no matter how many zombies I kill in Rocksmith 2014's Return to Castle Chordead, I'm not really learning chords; instead, I've just learned how to play a video game with a real guitar as the controller.
In the guitar’s electronics, the potentiometer and capacitor form a path to ground. The capacitor presents lower impedance to higher frequencies, and vice-versa, so the tone control works by “throwing away” high frequencies. How much of the highs get thrown away is determined by the tone potentiometer, which presents an equal resistance to all frequencies. As you turn down the tone, you decrease the resistance presented by the pot. Low frequencies still find this path to ground to be a difficult one (high-impedance) because of the capacitor, but high frequencies see an easier path than the one into the amplifier (which traditionally has a fairly high impedance load in the transistors of the “pre-gain” stage, around 1Megaohm), and to they take the easier path, reducing the presence of high frequencies that are amplified and output as sound.

• Stop: A stop tailpiece is a bar, typically made of an alloy, which is held to the body of a guitar by large screws threaded into embedded sleeves. They are most often aluminum, zinc or brass based, with the latter the most costly. Aluminum has a few advantages. When the stop tailpiece was perfected by Gibson over a half-century ago, the originals were made of aluminum. Many players prefer those today for the vintage vibe, but aluminum is also the lightest weight tailpiece alloy, which some believe allows the strings and the guitar’s body to connect — which is another function of the tailpiece — in a more resonant fashion. It’s best to be careful while changing strings with a stop tailpiece, because they sometimes fall out of their sleeves and can scratch the finish.
The Japanese copy juggernaut got off to a fast start, and the second major Univox guitar was the Lucy, a lucite copy of the Ampeg Dan Armstrong, again produced by Arai, introduced in 1970. This guitar had a surprisingly thin bolt-on neck (especially compared to the Ampeg original) and a slightly smaller body. The fingerboard was rosewood with 24 frets and dot inlays. This had a fake rosewood masonite pickguard with volume, tone and three-way select. Like the Ampeg, the Lucy had a Danelectro-style bridge/tailpiece with little rosewood saddle. Unlike the Ampeg – which had Armstrong’s groovy slide-in epoxy-potted pickups – this version had a pair of the chrome/black insert pickups jammed together at the bridge. Other Japanese manufacturers also made copies of the Ampeg lucite guitar, notably carrying the Electra (St. Louis Music) and Ibanez (Elger/Hoshino) brand names, with versions of the slide-in pickups. In ’71, the Univox Lucy (UHS-1) was $275 including case. Just how long the Lucy remained available is unknown, but it probably did not outlive the original and was gone by ’73 or ’74.
The biggest determining factor on how easy a guitar is to play is the 'action' - distance from the strings to the neck. When it is very low it is easy to press the strings down to touch the fret; when it is too low the strings will buzz when you play. If a guitar's action is too high it will be very hard to play, and for a beginner, this can be pretty disheartening.
For every guitarist who’s dreamt of combining the biting twang of a Telecaster® with the sleek, ergonomic contours of a Strat, we created this limited-edition guitar: The Whiteguard Strat. Tele hardware, electronics and playing feel? Check. Ash Strat body with lacquer finish and custom-shaped white pickguard? Check. The unique style and sound you can only get from Fender? You better believe that’s a check.
Featuring the Wilkinson WTB Bridge this classic 3-saddle design has been around for over 50 years and is still regarded as the ultimate tone machine. Staggered brass saddles offer individual string intonation never before available in a design of this type. The baseplate itself is a faithful reproduction of the original, made from steel, very important in a bridge of this style due to the tonal effect it has on the magnetic field of the pickup mounted in it.
Speaking of tiny little helpers that could fit anyone, let me introduce to another seemingly impossible amalgamation of great sound and great look. The Line 6 Micro Spider 6-Watt Battery Powered guitar amplifier has a whole lot of qualities that make it the favorite small amplifier of so many musicians who are constantly on the go or don’t have too much space. With its small form and light body it can be easily transported anywhere you go, while its battery negates the need to be constantly plugged into an outlet and hoping that you have some kind of source of energy. The best part of the amp is of course the sound of the guitar, which is quite outstanding for the price it is offered up at. One of the best options of small guitar amplifiers available for you that I want you to remember when you start attempting to make a decision on buying one. Great stuff to have, really.
So much has changed since our last refresh – where do we begin! First we answered some common questions that you might have. Then we reviewed our top ten chart and individual categories, and removed several older models including the Gibson Les Paul Faded T 2017, Epiphone’s G-310 SG, and the ESP MH-50. We added many others including one of the greatest guitars ever made, the Ernie Ball Music Man John Petrucci Majesty Monarchy, the premium Fender Eric Clapton Stratocaster, the Yamaha RevStar RS420 and Mark Holcomb’s signature PRS MHHB2 SE.
John and I weeded out a couple of guitars that arrived in far-from-playable condition because we think every guitar should be at least reasonably playable when you buy it. Avi Shabat agreed, saying, “The more messed up a guitar is when I get it, the more I have to charge for setup.” We also didn’t have the short-scale guitars set up, for two reasons: First, we think a guitar for kids—one that’s likely to be purchased at a low price and given as a present—should play acceptably right out of the box with no setup; second, all of the short-scale models we received did play very well out of the box, and all were equipped with strings of the same approximate gauges.
Traditional sets can sometimes feature vastly different tensions between strings, causing players to compensate with altered techniques. New York string icon D’Addario set out to even the playing field with its Balanced Tension XL sets, which boast mathematically equalised resistance for a similar feel from string to string. That means even effort when bending, strumming, plucking and slapping, and even improved dynamic control.
People didn’t like the Les Paul Trio at first. With a thrice-weekly performance slot on NBC’s Fred Waring’s radio program, The Chesterfield Hour, listeners often wrote in to complain about the “strange and unpleasant sound of the newfangled electric guitar Les Paul was playing”. In the late 1930s, there were many demands to fire him; today, the Les Paul guitar brand is an essential part of pop culture, and Paul himself is both in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and the National Inventors Hall of Fame.
Second, the right side of the pedal is a feedback controller and a series of knobs that allow you to adjust the Sonic Maximizer feature. This hallmark of the Acoustimax basically streamlines your guitar's tone, matching up the lows and highs of your acoustic's resonance and projecting them at the same time. Without this feature, the tone of an amplified acoustic can be inconsistent, projecting higher frequencies earlier than the low end resonance.
I hope the list is somewhat correct on peoples lists although it is just an opinion! and just a small thought and insight on angus young he might not make the top 50 for me he plays just a few chords and everything sounds the same, he is with a unique voice and a band who was made by bon scot that put ac/dc on the map!! I know of no really good guitar player that names angus young as their inspiration or was influenced by angus young it is just that his work was too simple!!
Tailpieces are the end of the highway for guitar strings. Or maybe the beginning, since strings are first threaded through or over tailpieces, or pegged into them, before they are pulled along the fretboard for their big meeting with the tuning pegs. Essentially their function is to anchor the strings, which means most guitar tailpieces must be strong enough to withstand the combined tension of at least six strings without lifting off.
So, here's the story I heard from the guys in this shop, one of whom claims to have met Trev at NAMM. He said Fender (and maybe Gibson?) owe him a bunch of money for custom parts and design fees and whatnot, so he started the Vintage line as a sort of f*** you to them. Don't know if it's true but they're so much like a real tele I could see him getting sued, assuming they're not afraid of him countersuing for unpaid invoices. Who knows, maybe it was all a sales ploy. In any case all the sales pitch I needed was playing one. Plays as nice as my MIM Deluxe for half the price.

Ibanez is considered to be one of the best-selling electric guitars and bass guitar brands. But, they also produce a quality acoustic guitar for acoustic guitar players. The V series is really popular for newbies, making it one of the best acoustic guitar brands for beginners. Their guitar uses mahogany wood on the neck, and back and sides of the guitar. It also includes a rosewood bridge and rosewood guitar fretboard.

[Attention Korg Pa3x /Pa4x owners and Korg Pa700/1000 owners- I have a special version of this 6-velocity layer piano in .set format that will load to your Korg in compressed format at 116mb (equivalent to 232mb) - This set sounds wonderful on the Korg and uses 22 oscillators for outstanding realism including resonance, key-off and pedal effects. Send me an email (see bottom right) and I can provide a download link or go to the demo on SoundCloud here Korg Pa Yamaha C5 and follow the download link]


TASTING NOTES: A straight-on mic always provides the strongest impact and widest frequency range. An angled mic can soften a speaker’s harsh edge while adding interesting texture. In a multi-speaker cabinet, the off-axis mic tends to pick up more sound from the non-miked speakers, adding additional texture via phase cancellation. And while you only hear two mic positions here (straight on and angled), there are multiple off-axis options, from a barely off-center mic to one pointed toward the speaker’s outermost edge. Aim at the center for maximum punch and intensity. Aim toward the edge for slightly softer, more nuanced tones.
The Boss Katana Head is a full featured amplifier head that can handle stage, recording and practice duties. It does this with its built-in power attenuator, which lets you choose between 100W, 50W and a super quiet setting of 0.5W. To complement the 0.5W setting, Boss even added a built-in 5" speaker into the amp head - making the Katana head to be technically a combo amp in head form factor. Complementing its versatile power rating is its built in amp modeling, which gives you five voicings from acoustic, to clean to high-gain. As expected, this amp comes with essential effects from Boss, with over 50 of them to choose from, 15 of which can be loaded to the amp for quick use, albeit limited to just 3 effects running simultaneously. Finally, all these features are packed in sleek looking profile that feels really solid, as expected from Boss.
The looper is a little more limited and offers shorter loop time than its competitors (20-seconds), but hey, at least it has a looper. The inclusion of a USB means you can hook the DigiTech RP500 straight to your computer and start recording riffs and ideas. If you like, you can use the included Cubase LE software for all your recording needs. Furthermore, just like with the other pedals on our list, you can manage and adjust your presets from the provided X-Edit Editor/Librarian software, which is quicker and easier than scrolling through the menus on the unit itself. The DigiTech website has a pretty extensive Tone Library, where you can download and use a bunch of patches.
Any vibration we can hear as "sound" is composed of some distribution of overtones above the fundamental frequency. Overtones exist in a set fashion based on the physics of vibrating waves and the ratios between them. The only difference in tone between any instrument is caused by a different prominence and distribution of these overtones. When a string is plucked on an electric guitar the vibrations move into the body of the guitar as well. The resonant properties of the wood will cause some of these overtones to be "summed" and exaggerated while others will "cancel" to some degree. The vibrating string will be influenced, however slightly, by the vibration of the guitar, in turn changing the distribution of overtones on the vibrating string - essentially creating a feedback loop.
Many consider the D-28 to be ultimate expression of the dreadnought form. ‘Reimagining’ such a guitar could be a poisoned chalice. Fortunately, you can still feel the gravity of that 184 years of history in its high-end guitars. The latest D-28 features forward-shifted bracing, a wider nut and vintage-style aesthetic changes, but it’s the new neck design that really makes this the most comfortable and accessible dreadnought playing experience we can remember for some time. The sound is balanced and maintains the very definition of an ‘all-rounder’. Notes ring out with sustain - that clear piano-like definition we love from Nazareth’s craftsmen. Harmonics come easy and, with strumming, the high mids and treble have choral qualities that don’t overshadow the lower mids. Despite the tweaks, our test model still largely feels like the acoustic equivalent of Leo Fender’s Stratocaster design. Just as that outline is most synonymous with ‘electric guitar’, so to the D-28 continues to embody the dreadnought in look and sound.
So frustrating!!!! That guy Dino!!!! Guitar exists in other type of music beside rock you meatheads!! Turn off Vh1′ top 100 countdown and try exploring some other types of music. If you play guitar and you think rock is the only style to be played…then I’m very sorry but you probably are absolutely terrible at the guitar. Hate to break it to you but compared to people like Django Rheinhardt and Chet Atkins….Eddie Van Halen and Steve Vai bloooooowwwwwww!!!!!!
Yamaha is likely a good place for acoustic players as well, as the company offers a number of solid entries in this category. Despite the friendly price, Yamaha consistently puts out quality instruments that feature not only sturdy construction, but sound quality good enough to give the big guys a run for their money. The FG800 is one of the best rated acoustic guitars out there, with a price tag that’s viable for just about any budget. Their acoustic guitar starter packs are great for beginners as well (5).
The Japanese guitar industry in the '60s and '70s followed an interesting trajectory. At first, Japanese factories were tasked with building cheap emulations of American designs. As time went on, their output grew more unique and bizarre due to a particular Japanese artistic flair combined with an impulse to out-do mainstream American guitars they were emulating. This resulted in wild models from the likes of Teisco which featured exaggerated body angles and totally unique finishes and pickup configurations. Moving into the mid-'70s, the craftsmanship found at Japanese factories like the Fujigen plant rivaled that found in the US. This ushered in the controversial "lawsuit era" where Japanese brands like Ibanez built extremely close replicas of Fender, Gibson and other guitar brands.
Combo amps come with a speaker built into the amplifier cabinet, making them heavier but more convenient. On the other hand, amp heads are lighter because they don't come with a speaker built-in. The amp head configuration allows you to freely choose the type of speaker and speaker cabinet that you prefer, with the complication of ensuring amp and speaker compatibility. Interestingly, there are now some amplifier heads that com come with built-in speakers that are only good for practice, making them technically a combo amp, but that's another story in itself.
When recording an electric guitar, the amp is the instrument as far as the mic is concerned, and mic position is important. While a lot of sound comes direct from the speakers as you'd expect, a significant level is also emitted from the back and sides of the box via panel vibrations. Also, an open-backed cabinet throws about as much sound out of the back of the box as it does out of the front. Choosing a mic for recording electric guitar isn't difficult, as virtually any decent mic of any type can be made to produce usable results. If I were to generalise, I'd say that British recording engineers tend to use cardioid, dynamic models while American engineers seem to prefer capacitor microphones. The dynamic mic produces a solid sound with a smooth high end, while the capacitor mic's increased definition produces a brighter, more open sound when used in the same way. However, the mic position has just as much bearing on the tone as the mic itself.
Like many others, Reinhold Bogner (born in Ulm, Germany, like the EL84 tube!) started his career with Fender mods. He founded his company in 1989 in Los Angeles and succeeded in earning a reputation among guitar amp manufacturers. His brand became famous with models like the Ecstasy 100A and 100B, where "A" stands for American (with 6L6 tubes) and "B" for British (with EL34 tubes). Among its famous users, you'll find Steve Stevens and Steve Vai (apparently your name must be Steve to be Bogner's friend).
Alongside the Stratocaster, Les Pauls have defined rock ’n’ roll. Everyone from Jimmy Page to Slash to Zakk Wylde has wielded one of these, and the guitar’s fat, creamy tone with near-endless sustain is instantly recognizable. Not everyone can afford a bona fide Gibson, though, but the Epiphone Les Paul Standard makes those sounds accessible to most of us.
the guitar was made for gretsch by Tokai Gakki in the very early 70's.they sound sweet play great, i have one also .at age 40 it needs very little more then a frett job to fix it back to like new. mine is a model 5989. is 6028. I don't hink it is worth much. It''s just an old japaneses import. It is a well made guitar and I enjoy playing it since my other guitar got stolen....

Here we have a VERY WELL MADE 1978 Vintage Japanese Quality Replica of G!b$@n Dove Acoustic guitar. This is a "SUPERB" top of the line model its Premium woods used in its construction along with very good workmanship see the bindings and the detail wow...and has now over the past 28 years has wonderfully aged into a very nice vintage guitar in its own right. The Vintage aged spruce top is of a high quality on often seen today with a woderful aged finish, also see the sides back & neck all made of premium grade mahogany WoW! The finish is SUNBURST and was done by a master no doubt I compair this very favorably with any G!b$@n for its fit & finish and sound! Believed to be from the same factory as the Aria and a few others exported to St. Lousi music in the 70's...this example is in very good - excellent original condition rated 8.5++/10 Quite a clean example. The frets are in good condition the neck is straight and tuners work well all and all a very enjoyable player with a wonderful rich tone. A Gig bag or case is optional and is available. Dont be fooled by the low price under $400 this guitar would cost over $1200 today out of Japan! Thie is a Bargain find get her before shes gone. .


Pedals of this template offer a sound that’s considered “natural,” “warm” and “tubey” partly by achieving smooth, symmetrical clipping, and partly by reining in harsher high harmonics that can result in sounds that are heard as jagged and spikey in other pedals. The truth is, opamps really don’t clip in the same way that tubes do, but they are manipulated in these designs to simulate a generally “tube-like” sound. Other early overdrive pedals were designed around discrete transistorized clipping and boosting circuits, though many leaned toward distortion units as properly defined, and added more artificiality to the sound—hence the Tube Screamers’ near-instant popularity when it was introduced.
Her dad was Broadway star John Raitt, but Bonnie's artistic parents were blues giants like Howlin' Wolf and Mississippi Fred McDowell, whom she met and performed with early in her career. She learned fast: Starting with her acoustic slide workout on 1971's "Walking Blues," Raitt rolled out a fearsome repertoire of blues licks, fingerpicking with the best and wielding a slide like an old master. Most of all, she set a crucial precedent: When guitar was still considered a man's game by many, Raitt busted down that barrier through sheer verve and skill.
Hollow: Although a bit more rare than the previous two, it may be exactly what you’re looking for if it fits your style. Hollow body electric guitars sound a lot like acoustic guitars, giving us that brighter sound but having trouble with higher volumes since feedback is likely to occur (especially in medium to higher volumes). It has a round and full tone with great bass response, giving jazz players a big grin when they hear it.

Guitar models currently include the Master Class, American Series, Oregon Series, Cascade series, Atlas series, Passport Plus, and Passport, as well as 12-string models and Bass models. The Voice series, reviewed by Guitar Player in 2012, was praised for the quality of construction and various innovative elements, including a “Tru-Voice Electronics System” which, according to Dave Hunter, “for live performance … comes closer to a seamless acoustic-to-amplified transition than virtually any other flat-top I’ve played.”[2]

This fuzz sounds great! Different from a standard fuzzface or tonebender sound, and much more musical in my opinion. Not buzzy at all, very smooth. It is not one of those over-the-top fuzz sounds. It's more of a fuzzy overdrive. But really the amount and quality of the fuzz is highly dependent on the transistors. Q1 seems to effect the amount of output, and Q2 changes the character of the fuzz. I tried many combinations and ended up using 2N2222's for both (BC109's also sounded great!). One other ... full review
The first “real” guitar I ever bought for myself as a teenager was an Ibanez RG much like this one, and I played that guitar for almost 10 years before buying yet another Ibanez RG. Note that this model does not have a tremolo, which means great tuning stability and fewer headaches when it comes to changing strings, tuning, and setup. However, you won’t be able to perform any crazy whammy tricks, so be sure you’re okay with that. Mahogany body, two hot humbuckers, jumbo frets, and an ultra-stable 3-piece maple neck. Hard to beat at this price point. Love it.
The fact that his guitar playing is as relevant today and is still loved by generations (even those who weren’t even born at the height of his success!) is proof that Eric Clapton is a guitar hero in many people’s eyes. Who can forget him singing, with just his string guitar, about his late son in ‘If I Saw You In Heaven’. The overwhelming emotion is enough to send shivers down your spine.
Guitarists love to get loud. I remember when I got my first electric guitar, I took it and my amp out onto my grandmother’s back porch and did my best rendition of The Man Who Sold The World, over and over again — at full blast — for several hours. In suburbia, in the middle of the day, I didn’t receive a lot of complaints. If I tried that today, in my Los Angeles apartment surrounded by grumpy neighbors, I might not be so lucky.

Here we have a great mid - late 1970’s Alvarez 5047 model its kind of rare and seldom seen and she is a wonderful example of Japan’s answer to the Martin 00028 with the Herringbone rosette and rosewood body and in this case they used a wonderfully high grade beautifully grained rosewood for its body back and sides and fingerboard and bridge at that it looks to be a rich looking Jacaranda Brazilian rosewood type you can be the judge of that just have a good look at our pictures, at any rate its workmanship is excellent as is its fit and finish work is all of a high grade. Well balanced sound board with good volume and a sweet tone with its gorgeously straight grained solid spruce top is beautiful and easy on the eyes as well and up close you can tell its genuine vintage with its thin skin finish its grain highs and lows are visible the Japanese truly were masters - experts at thin poly finish and this one has it. This is the famous S.L.M. model it was imported by Saint Lewis Music back in the Lawsuit era days the 1970's these were made especially nice for SLM as seen here. Bindings all round are excellent overall condition is JVGuitars rated at very good its not new of course its over 40 years old it has only minimal insignificant scratches or doinks true vintage in its own right yet - excellent used vintage and is considered above average for a played 40+ year old instrument. No cracks no buldges or warpage anywhere this guitar is straight no repairs and all original and was excellent when we took this in on trade.We simply cleaned - oiled and polished the entire guitar and it has a good set of Martin 80/20 phosphorous bronze strings set of 12’s… this guitar plays very well now with excellent string action, its neck is a really great one RARE for the Japanese with its more meaty V profile much like the old Martin. Condition, condition, condition, Easy on the eyes and that vintage tone and fun to play are 6 darn good reasons to own this ALVAREZ 5047 Japanese Vintage 0029 with that gorgeous rosewood… Any questions ask Joe at: JVGuitars@gmail.com.


This guitar could have rocked around the clock. Bill Haley and many other early rockers used guitars just like this baby. They have a sound of their own, and just breath taking, to say the least. This Harmony H38 dates to about 1957-59. She's completely original except for the button input jack that someone installed. This guitar puts a chill in cool. There's just something about playing a Vintage Harmony. $799.99
Later, around 1963, rebadged Guyatone and Teisco guitars appeared, both in the U.S. and a few in the U.K., also as Futuramas. That was the beginning of several years of Guyatone-made Kents. The Teiscos seemed to be part of the 1963-64 freshman-class only. After starting with an initial group of both Guyatone and Teisco guitars, the importer seemed to settle on Guyatone as a main supplier.
The 5150 III EL34 50-watt head downsizes EVH's high-gain format, and boasts three channels: channel 1 (clean) and channel 2 (crunch) share the same EQ but feature separate gain and volume controls on clever, dual concentric pots; channel 3 (lead) gets its own dedicated EQ. A global presence control on the front panel and a global resonance control on the rear panel tune the power amplifier’s high and low frequency response to taste. The 5150 EL34 also takes MIDI program change commands, so you can sync it to MIDI-compatible effects units and floor controllers. The EL34 version of the 5150 is important because Van Halen’s groundbreaking early work relied exclusively on heavily-modified Marshall Super Lead heads, which used EL34s. Sat firmly in hot-rodded Plexi territory, the 5150’s channel 1 is capable of sparkling cleans, with enough gain for mildly driven blues sounds. Channel 2’s higher gain is perfect for crunch and classic rock leads, while Channel 3 launches into the stratosphere with gain levels that are cheerfully insane, yet works a clever magic trick by retaining most of the dynamics that are often lost at such extremes. This means the 5150 sounds properly cranked up, even at quite low practice levels. EVH’s 5150 III 50W EL34 is a highly-effective weapon for the modern rock and metal player that puts tone before unnecessary complexity.

Acoustically I own a Martin for the living room. Best sound but I won't let it leave the house. (Taylor people are so defensive, but lets face it Martin owners never have to say "Oh it sounds just like/as good as a Taylor") I own an Ovation, the thing is bullet proof, a little thin on sound but can take it anywhere. If I plug it in, it has amazing electronics and sounds 10X better. I own an Ibenez exotic wood, pretty but a stiff box that just does not resonate, hate it.
I have been using a Belcat tube 50R guitar amp. I've owned all the top amps,Fender, Marshall,Mesa,Peavey. This Belcat amp,with pedals, is one of the best sounds I've ever gotten. It's not heavy like a twin,and the clean sound is great, although it's hard to beat a Fender Super reverb,or a twin for pure tone,but I don't like how Fenders sound with distortion pedals. I have a Marshall Combo and a Blackstar HT Club 40,love them both,but I've been using the Belcat. It's distortion,on it's own,is a blues type, not heavy, but with a Rat it screams, or a Boss Blues driver,or Ibanez Tube Screamer,you can get just the sound you're looking for. Too bad they're not making them anymore, it's really a good amp!
Anyone who’s shopped for any kind of guitar recently knows that not only has the number of brands increased, the number of models offered by most major manufacturers has increased. Between Squier (Fender) and Epiphone alone, you’ll find about 20 different models under $200, and that’s not even counting the different color options. When you add newer brands (some of which seem to exist only on Amazon), you could easily end up with more than 50 different models—far too many to run past a testing panel because, as we learned from our ukulele tests, when you have more than about 10 instruments to test, it gets tough to sort them all out.
The V40 expands the elusive low-to-medium gain range, putting a wide spectrum of subtly shifting overdrive textures under your fingers. There are rotary controls for gain, EQ and master volume. The real fun starts with a two-position voice switch, which subtly changes the V40's character. Voice 1 is centred more on the early 60s 'blackface' tone; Voice 2 is edgier and a touch more aggressive, evoking the tweed amps of the 1950s. A small toggle switch called 'mid kick' adds a touch of extra gain in the midrange, not least to give weedy single coils a lift for solos. There's also a digital reverb with a front-panel level control and on/off switch. Then there's the standby switch, which has two 'on' positions for high power (approximately 40 watts) and low power (seven watts). This switch also works in the V40's single-ended mode, offering a choice of around 1.5 watts in the high-power position and 0.5 watts in the low-power setting. The V40's sonic palette made us sit up and take notice. By reducing the gain, all the mildly overdriven and chime effects normally squeezed into a fraction of the gain knob's travel now occupy the whole range. The V40 Duchess is a unique design - many of its competitors feature high-gain lead channels, teamed with high headroom and often uninspiring clean channels. By focusing on those often-overlooked but highly effective low-to-medium overdrive sounds, the V40 has effectively carved out its own niche, and looks set to become popular for blues, roots, jazz and country players.
Hey dan, others: My first guitar was a Palmer, my parents purchased it for me from our small town's jewelry store. That was like 1968. The guitar was an electric with two pick-ups and "wabble-stick" (tremelo). It was a beautiful natural wood tone sunburst. Jewelry stores have not been known to carry the best in guitars; but I had a lot of fun learning to play that thing. I still have it; can't bring myself to part with it, though I now have three acoustics (Yamaha, Alvarez (12 string), and a Fender (DGS21, a Peavey bass and Lyon series Washburn. I'd say, for your money, your better off with a washbun. The neck action on them is very impressive. My Palmer is now in disrepair. I need to resolder the pick-ups. The key-board was quite nice; some bridge problems, however, a bit of a rattle. Maybe the nut needs to be reset. I don't know where to find them now, but I understand that they're still out there somewhere.
In order to achieve supreme neck grip comfort, the fretboard edge is finished with a smooth curve that extends from the border between the fretboard and the neck, and then to the surface of the fretboard. The detailed neck shape is precisely carved using a ball mill for ultimate consistency. The width measurements of the fretboard are at 42mm at the nut and 56.4mm at the last fret. These dimensions allow for an easy grip in the lower register, and a more modern feel in the higher register.
So I got this kit last week full of hope yet penssive knowing that these kits from over seas have lots of problems. On first inspection the kit was okay, Nothing, I thought at the time, a little TLC couldn't fix. Here I am getting ready to install the electronic today, level the frets, string it in and play. As I opened the pakage with all of the tone and volume pots I noticed one thing super wrong right away.

The neck is also crafted from mahogany, topped by a 20-fret rosewood fingerboard with a standard scale length of 25.5" and a nut width of 1.75". In contrast to its vintage looks, the neck follows a slim "C" profile that is as easy on the hands as it is on the ears. Finally, this guitar is wrapped in a nice gloss cherry red finish that stands out easily on any stage. Check this one out if you're looking for a quality mahogany body acoustic guitar with an old school vibe.
Clean or replace switches. To clean switches use solvent such as contact cleaner in a spray into the toggle itself, you may also use other solvents such as WD-40, always work the solvent around by using the switch as indented. To replace switches first obtain a proper switch that applies with your guitar, then soldering in accordingly. Work in a well-ventilated space to avoid harmful fumes from solder or solvents.
Once The Beatles became tied to Vox amplifiers (a deal was struck early in their recording career whereby they would be provided Vox equipment for exclusive stage use), the quest for more power began. John Lennon's first Vox was a fawn-coloured twin-speaker AC15, while George Harrison's was a fawn AC30 with a top boost unit installed in the rear panel. They were later provided with twin black-covered AC30s with the rear panel top boost units. Paul McCartney was provided with one of the first transistorised amplifiers, the infamous T60, which featured an unusual separate cabinet outfitted with a 12" and a 15" speaker. The T60 head had a tendency to overheat, and McCartney's was no exception, so he was then provided with an AC30 head which powered the T60's separate speaker cabinet.
Guitarists love to get loud. I remember when I got my first electric guitar, I took it and my amp out onto my grandmother’s back porch and did my best rendition of The Man Who Sold The World, over and over again — at full blast — for several hours. In suburbia, in the middle of the day, I didn’t receive a lot of complaints. If I tried that today, in my Los Angeles apartment surrounded by grumpy neighbors, I might not be so lucky.

In August ’68, Ovation added three more models – the Hurricane 12-string and the Typhoon I and II basses, all with chrome hardware. The K-1120 Hurricane was a Tornado with the extra strings, advertised as offering a “harpsichordian” effect. This lasted only a year and was gone by ’69. The initial Typhoon basses had slightly smaller bodies than the guitars, with stubbier, more flared horns. These lasted only a year until ’69, when the body styling changed to that of the Gibson-style guitars. The K-1140 Typhoon I bass had one Schaller pickup and a covered bridge/tailpiece assembly. The K-1240 Typhoon II was a two-pickup model with a three-way select. This was also called the Williwaw (“mountain wind”) in some Ovation literature, but it was never really called that. The Typhoon I was only available in the stubby body and was discontinued in ’69. The Typhoon II changed model number in March ’70, becoming the K-1222. This model made it until June ’72.
On these guitar tracks, I did use a little bit of the 1176. I don’t overcompress on these tracks, I just basically want to get a little bit more sustain out of the notes, so I have it setup so that there’s plenty of attack that comes through. I’m not trying to control that so much as I am the sustain of the note, and get a little bit more length out of it, though I’m pretty gentle with that. Then it just goes into Pro Tools and I record it as is.
Combo or Head + Cab? Again, this is a personal choice. It's easier to have a combo, but a head + cab combination might be easier (& lighter) to carry, as you can carry both parts separately. Of course, if you're in a metal band, you simply MUST use a really loud head amp (no matter how small the venue is) and a 4x 12" speaker cabinet. That's just how it is...it's in the rock bible, somewhere! We've put together a complete guitar amp buyer's guide to help you figure out what you need.
Gibson ES-335 Figured Electric Guitar The Gibson ES-335 thinline archtop semi-acoustic electric guitar is a popular choice among blues, rock and jazz musicians because of its warm tone and near-zero feedback. The 2019 Gibson ES-335 Figured model features a thermally engineered chambered maple center block, a hand-wired MTC Premiere control assembly, an ABR-1 bridge with titanium saddles and all-new MHS II humbucking pickups.
The ’38 Supro line contained two lap steel models, still made of wood, but substantially different from the model seen in the ’38 Sorkin/’39 Grossman catalogs. The Supro Avalon Hawaiian Guitar had a rectangular body with rounded corners and two concave “cutaway” shoulders. The head had a slight curve to it. The fingerboard was made of polished aluminum, and the guitar was finished in gloss black. An enameled handrest covered the single pickup and strings passed into a slotted rectangular metal tailpiece. On either side of the fingerboard, just above the handrest, were two square plates embossed with the Supro logo and containing one control knob each, for volume and tone. Without case this cost $40. Note that this was the first appearance of tone controls on Supro brand guitars.
This workshop includes: lecture, demonstration and hands on experience in advanced guitar electronics.  Students will study alternate guitar wiring schemes demonstrated by instructor Scott Walker, and stereo wiring and Onboard Effects loop options will also be covered.  This class will focus on signal paths, diagrams, and component selection, in passive and active circuits.  Students will learn about basic preamp design.
went to great lengths to get here for a basic set up on a vintage les paul. after 3 months of long waiting guitar was no better off, it was different, but just as bad and completely unplayable. he may have spent 30 seconds tweaking the truss rod, but didn't do the necessary or requested fret leveling to resolve all the dead areas up high. unbelievable after 3 months to have a guitar unplayable after traveling such lengths to get here & back. when FINALLY picking up he was running down the stairs leaving early, i barely caught him so didn't get a chance to play it before taking it home, or would have had a chance to address this disappointment. there were dead frets all over the high strings. he clearly didn't perform the service that i paid for. a year later that vintage les paul is still in the same unplayable condition and needs a full service by a real luthier. i am writing this now because i can't even look at this guitar without thinking about this experience, and still can't enjoy playing this very expensive and special vintage piece. i went to great lengths to get all the way to this shop, it was extremely difficult, several trains, a really long walk. then i waited a truly insane 3 months, and then went to the same lengths to pick it back up. he did say to me to bring it back, but that was impossible. never in my life, in NY or LA, or anywhere in between have had to wait more than 1-2 days for any service on any guitar. in my experience he takes on way more work than he can handle and apparently doens't do a thorough job. 3 months is obscene. 1 month is unacceptable. bad experience, 100% waste of time & money. if he refunded my money it would not come close to the amount of time i had invested in getting here & back. truly negative experience. waste of much time.
If you’re looking for a unique sound that delivers an exaggerated twang, than the Gretsch G5422TDC Electromatic is the best electric guitar to offer these features. Designed with wider frame and a hollow body, this guitar utilizes “Black Top” Filter’Tron pickups to deliver a dynamic sound that is both bright and focused in its tone. The toggle has three positions that allows the user to customize the balance of the tone, and all strings on the guitar are able to deliver strong intonation due to the Adjusto-Matic bridge. The vibrato tailpiece adds resonance and depth to the sound quality, and by utilizing maple for the body frame there is a clarity provided within the tone that is unique to that design. With a three position pickup, open-back tuners, and a rosewood fingerboard, this retro style guitar provides a high-quality option for musicians alike. Here’s a great G5422TDC video for some samples of that warm hollow-body sound.
Just so you know, if you’re not a big fan of black electric guitars, Davisson has rolled out several colors like blue, vintage sunburst, red and pink for you to choose from. My choice was classic black, though! Now, my first impression of the 39” guitar as I unpacked it, was of sheer wonder. I mean, it was really tough to visualize the sturdy construction in terms of the menial cost. Of course there are letdowns, such as the body that is made of basswood instead of maple (that is used in premium guitars), which gives you sort of a mediocre feel. Even the material used for crafting the chrome bridge, humbucker pickup, pickguard and strings, is pretty average. But if you look at the overall feel, design and ergonomics, this model definitely deserves a round of applause!
mid-1939 Popscicle bracing on D body sizes. See the above picture for what the popsicle or T-6 or upper transverse graft brace is. The popsicle brace was added to the underside of the top of the guitar, below the fingerboard. The brace was added to help prevent top cracks alongside the fingerboard. Since the first D body size was made in about 1934, problems obviously came about and Martin added the brace by 1939. The brace does not appear in pre-1939 Martin D-sizes, but transitioned in around 1939, and is present in all 1940 and later D models. Without the popsicle brace, the top is attached only by the strength of the spruce fibers and a 1/2" x 2" glue area where the top overlays the soundhole #1 brace. With the popsicle brace there is an additional 1" x 2" glue surface directly under the fingerboard. Unfortunately the popsicle brace can deaden the sound of the upper bout area of the soundboard, and the popsicle brace doesn't always prevent the top from cracking along the fingerboard either. As people search for why the old Martins sound so good, they examine every aspect of them and the popsicle brace usually enters the conversation. Here's some data on popsicle braces:
To set up guitar pedals, use a short patch cable to connect your guitar directly into the tuner pedal if you’re using one. If you’re using filter effects pedals, like auto-wahs and envelope filters, connect them next. Plug in your compressor pedal after the filter pedals, followed by pitch-shifting, overdrive, and distortion pedals. Set up your modulation pedals, like chorus, flanger, tremolo, or phaser pedals, near the end of the chain so they’ll have a richer sound.
This pickup is a solid choice for those who might want to keep their options open in terms of style or who have a responsibility to multiple genres and music types. Typically you’ll use the JB model for the bridge and the Jazz model for the neck, matching the configuration for notable users such as Seymour Duncan himself, Randy Rhodes and Jeff Beck.
While it may not look like a classic amplifier, if you're into classic rock style tones for home use, the Yamaha THR10C is probably the amp that you really need. Ideally, we would all be rocking with big amps, but not all of us have the space or acoustically tuned rooms to let loose. And since we are using low volume amps more often, Yamaha designed their THR line to be the best in providing you with just that - low volume performance for jamming, practice or recording. The THR10C is part of this line, featuring the same 10W setup and stereo 3" speakers, but with tones that replicate the sound of classic amps. It also houses some essential effects which include reverb, delay, chorus and more. In addition to the usual clean to overdriven tones, Yamaha also equipped this unit with acoustic guitar amp and bass amp models, so you can directly play or record with those instruments. All these features are packed in a distinct and portable profile, and is powered either by the supplied AC adapter or via 8 x AA batteries.
One unique application of a fuzz pedal involves starving the pedal of voltage--which will produce a scratchy, velcro-like tone. This is desirable by some musicians because it is a highly unique sound and is often employed by more avant garde musicians. This sound can be achieved by purchasing a power supply with a sag output, or using a nearly dead battery, although the pedal won't last long when using that method.

It depends on what you call important. Does an electric guitar's tonewood affect the tone? No. Sorry. When the thing capturing the sound is directly under the thing generating the sound and, it makes no sense for the wood, which vibrates in a secondary fashion, to have any effect on a tone that has already left the guitar. Think of it in layers, like this:
(https://rytmenpinne.wordpress.com/sounds-and-such/salamander-grandpiano/) (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/). Some versions on this site have been carefully edited down to 6 velocity layers and looped at the almost inaudible tail ends to reduce Ram usage but the quality is almost indistinguishable.  They are based on a nicely sampled Yamaha C5 Grand. Samples have been normalised, re-attenuated, latency reduced and modified for sf2. Three or more brightness levels are available plus optional resonance.
Claimed to have been invented by guitarist Victor Griffin of Pentagram (who tunes it 1/2 step down).[37] Also used in the song "March of the Fire Ants" by Mastodon, "Rusty Cage" "Holy Water", and "Searching With My Good Eye Closed" by Soundgarden on their Badmotorfinger album, "Cowboy Hat" and some of "Silver Side Up" by Nickelback, "Gasoline", "Shadow on the Sun", "Bring Em Back Alive" and "The Worm" by Audioslave and "Prison Sex" by Tool. Today is the Day have used it on every album since Temple of the Morning Star, Shining use it on most of their album Blackjazz, and Black Label Society used this on much of their early material, often to emulate a 7-string guitar. Used also by Silverchair in the songs "One Way Mule" and "The Lever" from their album "Diorama".
This study proposes a systematic approach for modelling and three-axis CNC milling of solid wood parts used in stringed electric musical instruments, mainly in electric guitars and basses, through CAD/CAM technology. Design and manufacturing philosophy undertakes particular characteristics of tonal woods, so as to produce high-quality resonant musical instrument parts with high accuracy. To do so, it is crucial to identify design features and to apply the appropriate machining strategies and parameter values based on obtained knowledge, as these have a great impact on both the acoustic characteristics of the parts and on the total appearance of the instrument, thus making it more appealing in a competitive market. Customization of musical instruments is well received among professional musicians who wish to stand out during their performance, as well as to own an instrument of uniquely original shape and sonic properties. Keeping custom instruments cost reasonable is a challenge, unless the overall production is systematic and modular. The proposed approach was developed and tested on a custom solid electric guitar, which was then finished and assembled with off-the-shelf components to form a great looking and sounding electric guitar.

For the younger children in the 4-8-year-old range, a scale length of about 22.7 inches is a good fit. Although some electrics come in scale lengths down to 22.2 inches, the extra length will keep your child from outgrowing the guitar too soon. For comparison, adult full-size guitars such as the Fender Stratocaster have a scale length of 25.75 inches while Gibson Guitars are an inch shorter. So if you are confused that what to buy for your new learner or the little one, you can go with the product that fits perfectly in your requirements.
3) Incomplete sentences due to text running off the edge of the page on page 101, another grievous layout error. You will be paying for the following paragraph "On the next page is a basic single pickup wiring diagram for telecasters using one pickup. this with either the bridge or neck pickup. The pickup will have a volume and tone control. plenty of good sounds with this setup.If you want to play around with the tone, you can or weaker capacitor. Ading a stronger capacitor sends more treble to the ground, and giv bass tones. Note: there are many ways to wire pickups to the pots. This is just one examp "
Squier affinity series, looks and sounds great, Fender & Gibson had to start somewhere, so everyone wants to be a star & copy, but everybody's hands and minds are different, don't need to be a star or copy cat to make a name, if the guitar feels good and sounds good, so be it. Be the First, off-brand- (Star),,,,, take the cheap version to new and higher heights,
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These guitars appear to have lasted through 1989 or so. In 1990 the Stinger line shrank dramatically. Three guitars and two basses were listed in the Guitar World 1990-91 Guitar Buyer’s Guide. The three guitars in ’90 were the SSX, SPX and SSL. These were basically Strats (gone were the arched tops). The SSX now had three single-coils and fixed bridge/tailpiece. The SPX offered two humbuckers with a coil tap switch. The SSL had one humbucker and one single-coil, with a tap on the ‘bucker, and a traditional vibrato.

Controls available are extensive, but pretty straight forward and the quality of the entire package defies logic when you consider the price. In terms of budget reverbs, this one is among the best you can find at the moment. Behringer keeps pushing the line further and further by delivering quality and versatility to those who are limited financially.
Like Kleenex for tissues or Dumpster for large garbage containers, the brand Teisco has become a kind of shorthand for “strange looking Japanese guitar from the 1960s.” When someone posts a picture on a forum of a vintage Japanese guitar that he’s trying to identify, five people will immediately shout out “Teisco!” Occasionally, they’re even right.
This kit contains everything you need to build your guitar.  Just add your finish materials to the body and neck.  These kits aren’t just a collection of random parts- each neck has been custom fitted to the body to ensure a good, snug fit.  Includes a finished, predrilled body, fretted neck, all electronics and hardware. Wood is raw and unfinished, may require sanding and patching or other preparation prior to applying a finish.
Yamaha F-310 Acoustic Dreadnought guitar in very good-excellent used condition no cracks or issues it looks great and the neck angle is excellent as well so as a result this guitar plays well with good fingerboard action with plenty of room on the saddle to lower action even more in future years if ever needed. Frets look good at 90-% with no ruts on fingerboard noted, truss rod is working fine, nut is 1-11/16ths. Yamaha specs (all of the F310 are made like this). It has 20 frets and a slim taper neck,The top is spruce, laminated, with natural finish. The sides and back are made of Meranti Indonesian Mahogany type wood , fingerboard and bridge are made Indian Rosewood, and the neck is of Nato. It's a full dreadnought guitar style, and just looks great.this one is in exceptional used condition better than average. Sound is good with nice volume and its tone is getting mature,,nice tone. No Cracks no issues no repairs and looks to have a bone nut and saddle this helps it have such a mature natural tone, Its sounds better than other F310’s Ive played I like this guitar and its price is right. any questions or to buy this guitar contact Joe at: JVGuitars@gmail.com .
Good point Gary. The T5 is in a separate category. I found it to be useless as a true acoustic. Thin, weak tone due to its shallow body. Plugged in as an amped acoustic just so-so, and as an electric for rock with overdrive or distortion, pretty good. The Ovations with deep contour bowls, like my Elite 2078, while not so easy to hold, are better at everything, especially unplugged tone, and cost half as much.
On September 6, 2018, the company announced that a global settlement has been reached with respect to the company’s reorganization plan upon emergence from Chapter 11. Under the plan, the company will be focused on its core musical instruments business with "essentially no debt." Current Chairman and CEO Henry Juszkiewicz will step down as CEO and assume the role of consultant. With immediate effect, Brian J. Fox, the company’s CRO, will oversee daily operations until a new CEO is appointed.[59]

Seagull is a Canadian company that produces hand crafted acoustic guitars. It has solid top guitars which offer richer sound, broader dynamic range, and sound becomes better as time pass by. The neck of the guitar of the seagull guitar has either Silverleaf maple or Honduras mahogany. Silverleaf is less permeable than mahogany that provides an incredibly smooth sensation but has an identical denseness. Some really good guitars from the line up of Seagull are Original S6 Cedar, Entourage Rustic S6, and Entourage Rustic CW QI.
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Whether you're recording or just plain playing for the fun of it, a headphone guitar amp is a great thing to have. You can even choose headphone amps that will work with pedals, mixing consoles and other connections, giving you a ton of versatility in how you use them. If there's one thing that's universally true about these amplifiers, it's that no guitarist should be without at least one.
Very disappointed! This was a gift from Santa this morning and the amp failed miserably. Would not work at all. Not with a battery or an adapter(which by the way is not included). Amp started to smell like it was burning/melting even though it showed no power at all. Son is very disappointed to say the least and so is mommy. Only thing he wanted was an electric guitar and he couldn't even enjoy it this morning. How do I explain returning it to Santa...
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