Lastly, if you fancy yourself the next Slash, Jimmy Page, or Pete Townshend… you’ll want to pick up a Les Paul style guitar. It’ll get you that classic rock sound that you’re looking for. Les Pauls are equipped with “humbuckers” which produce a fat, meaty sound that’s rounder and less sharp than the single-coil pickups of a strat. The signal is also stronger so you’ll get more sustain.
Most Fender guitars are equipped with single-coil pickups. They have a lower output level than dual-coil pickups but sound brighter and sharper, which is perfect for clean and crunch sound. Both the Telecaster and the Stratocaster generally have an ash or alder body, a maple bolt-on neck and a rosewood or maple fretboard. Some other Fender models were also moderately successful (the Jazzmaster, the Jaguar or the Mustang). Squier, a brand that originally manufactured strings, was bought by Fender to become a sub-brand and sell guitars manufactured in Japan from 1982 onwards.

If you have an envelope follower, envelope filter, auto-wah or other dynamic touch-sensitive effect, this should go at the very front in most cases, as these effects are almost exclusively dependent upon the dynamics of your playing. Placing most other types of effects in front of them will compress the signal, thereby reducing dynamics and minimizing their performance.

The earliest boost pedals used a germanium transistor and was often in the form of a treble booster. The most famous treble booster is the Dallas Rangemaster which is rumored to have been used by Eric Clapton on the Bluesbreakers record, often referred to as the Beano record or Beano tone. (This is because Clapton is reading a Beano comic on the record cover). At the time Eric was using a Marshall JTM45 2×12 combo (commonly referred to as the Bluesbreaker because of this recording) and a Les Paul and man does it sound good. Allegedly he was using the Rangemaster to push the front end of the amp into more distortion. This has never been confirmed to my knowledge but is the source of much Internet speculation. But I have played an old Bluesbreaker amp with a Les Paul and it sounded pretty darn close.


Reverb effects are another staple in the toolbox of guitarists across all genres. Just like how delay effects produce a sense of depth and space, reverb effects provide the same ability, but with a different approach. Frequently, especially in modern music, reverb effects are so subtle that it’s hard to even notice that they are there. It’s only when they are removed do we realize that suddenly the sound has become too “close” sounding.


If you plan to be the more lead-orientated guitarist, good for you. You’ll get more chicks and a higher place in the band pecking order. You shouldn’t however, neglect your chordal playing. A song can exist without lead lines, but not without rhythm. Don’t be fooled, every one of your guitar heroes is invariably a demon on rhythm guitar too. It’s a prerequisite: you have to understand the chords, rhythm, and harmony of a song before you can play any meaningful melody on top of it.
Of course, there’s one other reason you might want to grab a mini amp for yourself, and that, perhaps surprisingly, is the sound. Many of the mini amps on the market today are designed and manufactured by the most iconic brands in the industry. That means you can get your hands on some pretty serious tone that may not fill an auditorium, but could be an interesting addition to a recorded guitar track.

My sound is pretty clean with no overdrives or distortion. Besides a tuner and a volume pedal, I use a delay and a reverb pedal (TC Electronics) and I have a freeze pedal as well (EH Superego). I’m never sure if the freeze pedal should come before or after the delay and reverb. By trying both options I can’t really hear a difference in the overall sound which I guess is fine. Any thoughts or recommendations are welcome.


As a musician, learning songs for whichever instrument you are playing is one of the best exercises. Not only do you get to practice your chops but you also get to learn exactly how a particular song is played. As a beginner/intermediate guitar player, learning songs is all about knowing where to put your fingers on the fretboard, listening to the strumming patterns used, and taking note of any special techniques or chord combinations. Being aware of these things as you learn songs will help you become a better guitar player and composer. However, as a new/intermediate guitar player, you
McCarthy's probably one of the toughest guitar masters on this list. His craftsman's hands know not only how to help your instrument make magic again but also (we assume) how to put you in an arm or leg lock and make you scream "Uncle" if you mouth off too much about your guitar's condition. It's probably why guitar tough guys like Zakk Wylde of Ozzy Osborne and Black Label Society, Izzy Stradlin of Guns 'n' Roses and Jason Newsted of Metallica gravitate toward his repair shop. (Not to mention the guys of Motorhead). They know they're dealing with a true master.
When it comes to acoustics, you can’t beat Taylor’s eco-sourced Tone Woods. The 114e features a solid Sitka Spruce top and layered Sapele back and sides, giving the Taylor a rich and full-bodied sound that is hard to tell apart from solid wood bodies more than twice the price. The electrics and built-in preamp are top notch and you can’t beat that Taylor neck for finger-friendliness if you’re just starting out with chords.​
With such a vast array of effects available, it can be hard to know where to start. One good way is to find out which effects your favorite players use. Artist interviews can be a great source of such information. Additionally, most players are happy to discuss their gear with fellow musicians. Talk to other guitar players you know, or chat up the guitarists or bassists at the local club before or after their sets.
You’ll need to get yourself setup with an account on some of the web stores selling components such as effects pedal specialty stores listed above, and some general component stores such as Mouser and Digikey. AMZ provides a list of the components required for each project. Make sure you check carefully the component requirements such as type of capacitors. Many components may have suitable electrical values but different physical layouts, so use the datasheets for your chosen component. Measure the spaces and holes on your PCB to make sure the components will fit. Remember that you’ll also need an enclosure in which to install the finished circuit and don’t forget things such as knobs, battery holders etc.
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I have the Epi SG400. It is very playable, and I think the stock PUP's are fine. It is a very versatile guitar. The only thing about the SG is it has a heavy neck. I mean strap one on, and that long neck just tugs down on my left shoulder. I actually tried to sell mine a while back just because of the heavy neck. I added a strap bolt to the top of the horn thing, or whatever you call it, and that helped. Some like the SG310 which is cheaper, but it has a bolt neck, and I think that will translate into an even heavier neck. Rhonda makes some SG clones as well. My only advice would be try straping one around your neck before you buy if you can.
Thanks to its small size and slim neck, you get to play this guitar and improve your skills with ease. The cutaway design also gives you easier access to the higher frets for tapping or other more advanced techniques. This guitar has a spruce top that improves the sound quality as it ages, meranti back and sides, and rosewood bridge and fingerboard.

Octave ('Other' category): This effect really surprised me because it tracks well, but inserting the compressor before the Octave plug-in improves the tracking even further. Distorting the post‑octave sound with the AmpSimulator gives a big distortion sound, even with only the Octave 1 level turned up. If you want more of a brontosaurus guitar, turn up Octave 2 as well. In general, I like to leave a fair amount of direct sound in the output mix. You can just as easily go in a cleaner direction by using only the Octave 1 output, and bypassing the AmpSimulator. Select the neck pickup on your guitar, pull back a bit on the tone, and you'll hear a sound that recalls jazz great Wes Montgomery.
This is another classic in Fender's guitar roster. The Squier by Fender, Vintage Modified '51 is another example of how phenomenal Fender is as a company. This guitar is capable of producing versatile tones because of the SH pickup configuration and rotary pickup selector. The neck of this guitar is C-shaped which makes string bending easy as you like. This guitar has a strat body shape which adds to its cool, classic look.
A very good option in the budget pedal market. Comes with a great number of effects to combine for solid sounds. Virtually all the factory pre-sets are worthless and are sort of demonstrations of what the pedal can do. But you have plenty of user saves and setting up good tones is straight forward and simple. The tuner in this and my handheld one never agree. Someone is lying!
National Reso-Phonic Guitars - World renowned for their resonator instruments. Unlike acoustic guitars, where the vibration of the wooden body creates the sound, in a resonator instrument the body acts as a speaker cabinet. When the strings are plucked, the vibration is transmitted through the saddle to the resonator. The resonator, or speaker cone, then amplifies that vibration.
Acoustic necks are usually listed as 12- or 14-fret necks. This number refers to the number of frets above the guitar body, not the total number of frets. On a 12-fret neck, the 13th and 14th frets will be on the body, and, thus, harder to reach than on a 14-fret neck, where they are extended beyond the guitar body. If you have small hands, look for an acoustic guitar with a smaller diameter neck.
A Phase Shifter creates a complex frequency response containing many regularly-spaced "notches" in an incoming signal by combining it with a copy of itself out of phase, and shifting the phase relationship cyclically. The phasing effect creates a "whooshing" sound that is reminiscent of the sound of a flying jet. This effect dominates the sound in the song Star Guitar by Chemical Brothers. The song was not played with any guitars but you can hear the phasing effect. The instrument being phased was actually a synthesizer. Some electronic "rotating speaker simulators" are actually phase shifters. Phase shifters were popular in the 1970s, particularly used with electric piano and funk bass guitar. The number of stages in a phase shifter is the number of moving dips in the frequency response curve. From a sonic perspective, this effect is equalization-oriented. However, it may be derived through moderate time-based processing. Some phaser pedals include:
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If you are familiar with - a special kind of - programming, you can use something like Pure Data or Max MSP. Pure Data (PD), for example, is an open source, visual programming environment for manipulating streams of data like audio (or video). With PD you are able to build your own individual FX chains or use community contributed patches (In PD speech "programs" are called patches). But I think it's not as trivial to use as out of the box products.
COST – I have touched upon this topic several times maybe but I feel like I need to reiterate. Amps are usually not a cheap thing to come by, especially if you want a tube amp. BUT practice amps are good because they help beginners develop their skills without having to spend several hundred. Needless to mention, even practice amps come at various prices. For instance, Donner Electric Guitar Amplifier 10 Watt Classical Guitar AMP DEA‌-1 we talked about is twice as cheap as Roland CUBE‌-10GX 10W 1×8 Guitar Combo Amp. While price often is a good guideline to which model is better you should always keep in mind that more famous brands will have more expensive models even in the cheap sections. Apart from that, keep in mind that an amp having a lot of great features and effects does not mean it’s good.  
The war over an electric guitar's tonewood, like the Princess Bride sword fight, has ranged all over leaving a wake of havoc whenever it's brought into a conversation. It's brought a few too many guitarists to the brink of insanity certainly. Regardless, everyone has an opinion about it and when the Internet comes into play, the world weighs in too.
Ovation backed off from its more exotic design directions and in ’77 introduced two more conservative models, the Preacher and the Viper, and its first solidbody basses, the Magnum I and II. The Preacher featured two equal cutaways, whereas the Viper sported more of a Les-Paul-style single cutaway, though neither would never be confused with a Gibson equivalent. Their shape was, in fact, essentially a downsized version of the Ovation acoustic outline. The Magnum shape was derived from the earlier Breadwinner and Deacon, with more contouring.
Kay/Valco went out of business soon afterwards, and in 1969 its assets were auctioned off. Syl Weindling and Barry Hornstein of W.M.I. (the main importer of Teisco Del Rey products) purchased the Kay brand name during this time. As a result of this, the names "Teisco" and "Kay" were used on Teisco Del Rey guitars for a while in the early 70's. In 1980 the Kay Guitar Company was purchased by Tony Blair and is currently active selling Kay brand and Santa Rosa brand guitars, Chicago Blues harmonicas and accessories and of course the Kay Vintage Reissue line of professional guitars and basses.
For the guitarist who's frequently on the road or often plays out, the pedalboard is an indispensable aid. Many pedalboards include custom-fitted travel cases or gig bags. With your effects already mounted on the pedalboard, performance setups are fast: just unpack the already-configured board, plug in your guitar and amplifier, and you're ready to play.
I bought this guitar about 1 month ago. I am a small girl 5'2". I just strap this thing on and walk around the house playing. The pickup sounds freaking great hooked up to my Marshall amp. I have several other guitars including a Taylor 210ce which I also love. But this guitar is great for traveling, camp fires, and just plain old jammin. I chose this over the baby Taylor because the Martin had a full heel on the neck where's the taylor baby did not. It also sounded better when I play both the Taylor and the lx1e side by side. I thought that the Martin had a better "feel" to is as well when holding it. It is a travel guitar so it doesn't balance as well when you are standing with the guitar strap but I don't mind that at all. I love this little guy
Vintage Gibson Les Paul Special model, introduced in 1955 This 1957 model is killer.Utilizing the Junior’s solid Mahogany body with single cutaway shape but  finished in what Gibson called Limed Mahogany which appeared white on black and white television sets which gives it the nickname of "TV Special"A neck pickup with accompanying volume and tone circuitry was also added making the Special an affordable but still professionally playable instrument. The Special was sold in this configuration until 1958 . Gibson’s surviving shipping records indicate approx. 1,452 Les Paul Specials were shipped in 1957. MORE HERE.
We began the process by creating a 'short-list' of brands that have amps selling in the sub $1000 price range with amps that have strong enough ratings to be short-listed for any of our other electric guitar amp guides. This gave us the following 22 brands to consider: Blackstar, Boss, Bugera, California Tone Research, DV Mark, Egnater, EVH, Fender, Hughes & Kettner, Ibanez, Laney, Line 6, Marshall, Orange, Peavey, PRS, Randall, Roland, VHT, Vox, Yamaha and ZT.
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