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The Uni-Vibe was released in 1968 and became an immediate favorite of Jimi Hendrix, David Gilmour, and Robin Trower. It is actually a phase shifting effect, but what makes it groundbreaking is its use of an LFO (low frequency oscillator) to create the sweeping effect. It also uses a photocell to control the speed of the sweeping effect. That is basically a little light bulb inside the unit that will pulse at whatever speed the rate knob is set to. Also the brighter the pulse of the bulb the more dramatic the effect.
Thirdly, yamaha has been known for musical instruments for a long long time and is the biggest producer of musical instruments. On its logo, it has got two tuning pegs meaning unlike any other musical brand, it is the most diverse. The only reason that people say fenders and gibsons are better is because they were the original makers of contempory electric guitars and the fact that they're well known. So basically, all you're paying for is the badge.
Replacing pickup rings and restoring covers. These rings are usually plastic and cannot be restored but covers are normally metal on Les Paul styles. You may not want to rub steel wool across your covers so follow the method of cleaning painted bridges to avoid unwanted scratches. Also, replace your pickup rings properly with rings that are the same length and/or color and make sure the screw holes do not need to be resized.
Variable 2: Speaker configuration. In Clip 2 you hear cabinets with varying numbers of speakers. First comes the 1x12 sound of a midsized Fender combo amp. Next is a 2x12 Fender-style cabinet. After that is the distinctive sparkle of a tweed-era 4x10 Fender Bassman. The last phrase is a classic 4x12 Marshall stack with 25-watt Celestion Greenbacks. These sounds represent a single mic on a single speaker, yet you can differentiate single- and multi-speaker cabinets due to leakage from adjacent speakers.
For those of you out there with a stereo or home theater system, you'll be fine as long as you run the audio directly from the xbox through that. But since I have neither, I was stuck. I ended up bringing down my old CD player from my bathroom, just to see if that would work. SO much better. But since I didn't want to leave that ugly thing sitting under my TV in my living room I went out and checked around for speaker prices. After the money spent on the game and the guitar, I didn't really want to put too much more money into this. I ended up with a Turtle Island headset for $40. It seems to be doing the trick. Just be prepared for this extra expenditure if you don't have an external speaker system in place.
A Zoom G3X review is not complete without talking about the inclusion of a tuner and looper with built-in rhythm patterns. Just like all of this pedal’s functions, calling up the tuner is very easy; you just hold down the middle footswitch for a couple seconds. As we covered in our best looper pedal guide, a looper is an indispensable practice tool, and the fact that you get a pretty nice one in this unit is a huge plus in our book. The G3X gives you 40 seconds of loop time, which is ample time to record something interesting. You get 41 very basic drum patterns, and while they don’t sound amazing, it’s nice that they sync with the looper. Have a look at this 3 minute demo video of a performance using the looper and other Zoom G3X effects:

My first electric was one of these (1962, I was 14) . My mother bought it by mail order, probably from the Bell's catalogue. I remember coming home from school every day for what seemed like weeks hoping it had arrived! It was very crudely made with a plywood body (mine was in a red finish). The neck was wide and flat (think that was ply too!) and the action appalling! I remember the original strings were copper wound and left you with green fingertips! I remember the price was around 14 pounds, quite a lot at the time! Even at that age I wasn't impressed for long and soon traded it in for a Hofner Clubman. Wish I still had it now though!
This is a right handed 2018 Gibson Custom Shop Explorer, Extra/Elbow Cut, with a heavy aged relicing, Natural Finish, Gold plated Nickel hardware. This model is patterned after the 1958 Explorer owned by Eric Clapton. It is brand new with OHSC, COA, and all paperwork/tags. The weight is light at only 7 lbs, 12 oz. This is only one of a limited run of 5 in the Natural Finish. I also have the same guitar in Cherry finish, one of only 5 in the Cherry finish.
It depends on what purpose the noise suppressor will fulfill. You may need more than one placement depending on your purpose. If you position it behind the tuner, it will remove any unwanted noise from the guitar signal before it gets modified with the pedals (this is the most common placement). Guitarists also use the noise suppressor or noise gate pedals after an overdrive to cut the riff sharply.
Emil Dopyera (also known as Ed Dopera) manufactured Dobros from 1959 under the brand name Dopera’s Original before selling the company and name to Semie Moseley. Moseley merged it with his Mosrite guitar company and manufactured Dobros for a time. Meanwhile, in 1967, Rudy and Emil Dopyera formed the Original Musical Instrument Company (OMI) to manufacture resonator guitars, which were at first branded Hound Dog. However, in 1970, they again acquired the Dobro name, Mosrite having gone into temporary liquidation.
Dan Erlewine first saw this Tele back in the 1960s, before Mike Bloomfield recorded with it on Bob Dylan’s Highway 61 Revisited album. That was also before Bloomfield and Dylan were booed for going electric at the 1965 Newport Folk Festival. And before Bloomfield recorded the first Paul Butterfield Blues Band album with this guitar. There’s a lot of history in this Telecaster!
Read Full Review This electric guitar from Schecter has an awesomely low price for beginners out there with a genre of music in mind is to play rock and lots of heavy metal. The guitar has similarities in design with the Schecter Omen 6 series which is a higher model to the C-1 SGR, but the C-1 SGR also has the humbuckers for its pick-ups controlled by master volume, single tone control and a 3-way toggle to switch between pick-ups to get near on what the higher model can do.
No matter what style of music you are into, you won’t have to look far to find a like-minded guitar builder. The electric guitar can trace its roots back to the big-band days, and there are several companies that excel at creating excellent guitars for jazz. Likewise, there are those companies that have grabbed on to the heavy metal genre and make guitars built for extreme mayhem.
Chorus pedals can provide a nice subtle doubling effect to the guitar or an extreme “watery” effect when maximized. Famous tunes that use chorus is “Come As You Are” (1991) by Nirvana, and “Brass in Pocket” (1979) by The Pretenders. But basically almost any clean guitar sound in the 80’s had some chorus on it! Certain effects are timeless such as overdrive, reverb and delay. Other effects like chorus can evoke certain time periods such as the 80’s so that is something to keep in mind when using an effect.

At 10.8 pounds and 11.4 by 12 by 6.7 inches, the Crush 12 is one of the smallest amps we tested, so it’s easily portable and stashable—although with just 12 watts and a 6-inch speaker, it’s the least powerful of our top picks. It has a ¼-inch headphone jack but no line input, so you can’t connect a smartphone for play-along sessions. While our sample came in the company’s iconic orange color, it’s also available in black—although as Wirecutter editor-at-large Geoffrey Morrison put it, “Buying an Orange amp in black is like buying a sports car with an automatic transmission.”
: Decca's flat-top acoustic guitars seem to usually sell for $50-75. They're not highly regarded because (a) acoustic guitars don't have the collecto-mania of electric guitars, except for certain brands (Martin, Gibson, etc.), and (b) the tonewoods Decca used were inferior to solid spruce as used by the aforementioned makers. Indeed, Decca often used plywood, which doesn't yield very good tone in an acoustic.

Once you have the essential elements in place-a great amp, guitar, and guitarist-you almost can't help but get a great guitar tone. Crank the amp up to the appropriate level and begin with some mic comparisons. It's especially telling to audition different types of mics: for example, dynamics, ribbons, and large-diaphragm condensers. (I rarely use small-diaphragm condensers for miking guitar amps; on the other hand, I've found that almost any microphone will strike gold once you find the right spot for it.)


Hum cancelling: hum cancellation is caused by reverse polarity, reverse winding keeps a revrse polarity pickup in phase with a non reverse polarity pickup. To reverse the direction of the winding, simply swap wires, using hot as the ground and ground as the hot. Polarity can be changed on many pickups. If the pickup has bar magnets, simply flip them over. If the pickup uses alnico polepiece AND has the new plastic bobbins such as is common on Fenders, the polepieces can be pushed out with a screwdriver and reinserted "upside down". If the bobbin is fiber DO NOT attempt to flip the polepieces; the wire is wrapped directly around the polepieces and will almost certainly be damaged.

If you’re looking for an acoustic-electric guitar that sounds great but comes at an affordable price, then you can’t go wrong with the Oscar Schmidt OD312CE. This guitar features 12 strings for a depth and richness you couldn’t achieve with a 6-string guitar. The sound of the strings is further amplified by the select spruce top for a ‘woody’ warm tone.

The guitarist and composer Francisco Tárrega (b. Vilareal, Spain in November 29, 1852-d. December 15, 1909) was one of the great guitar virtuosos and teachers and is considered the father of modern classical guitar playing. As professor of guitar at the conservatories of Madrid and Barcelona, he defined many elements of the modern classical technique and elevated the importance of the guitar in the classical music tradition.
Compression: A "limiter" is envisioned as a circuit which prevents the output signal from exceeding a certain limit. If it did this by clipping, it would cause distortion, but if it can do it cleanly by just progressively reducing the amplification of the incoming signal, then it may properly be called a compressor. A compressor reduces the overall dynamic range by "compressing" the gain of high amplitude signals while maintaining the design gain for lower amplitude signals.
The truth is that you can play any genre of music with just about any type of electric guitar. Many blues players run Gibson Les Pauls with beefy humbuckers, while Iron Maiden completely broke the stereotype that you can't play metal with a Stratocaster.  Guitar effects pedals really changed the game too. However, some guitars do actually deal better with certain music genres.
Vibrato should definitely be #1. All of those shred heads are choosing sweeps and tapping. I like sweeps and taps, but the vibrato and bends are the best and most important techniques in guitar because not only you can play good, but you can also add soul to your playing. You don't have to tap or sweep to be a better player than the other who doesn't use taps.
Randall is a guitar amp manufacturer that specializes in high-gain sounds, and they are revered in the metal community. A Randall tube amp is a force to be reckoned with, but thanks to the late Darrell Abbott of Pantera and Damageplan their solid-state sounds are just as legendary. Dime loved the harsh, scooped sound of Randall amps, and it became his signature sound throughout his early career.
Speaking of Cambridge in the late sixties, of course Dave Gilmour was another who came out of that scene, but he and Nick were far from alone. For example, there was (and is) Fred Frith. I’ve never warmed to his music but it’s certainly different and he and his group have changed people’s ideas of what music is. You deserve it to yourself to check him out before you dismiss him. Then there’s Derek Bailey, who ploughs a parallel furrow, but for sure knows how to play a guitar. Personally, in that vein, I find Billy Jenkins much more fun – fans of Tom Morelli’s style should be checking all these guys out.
My services include re-frets, fret dressing, fret end dressing, action adjustment, truss rod adjustment, intonation setting, nut replacement, bridge saddle replacement, acoustic pickup installation, electric pickup fitting/replacement, output jack replacement, pot replacement, re-wiring, sound post setting, tuner installation, brace re-gluing, broken headstock repairs, strap pin installation, re-strings, bridge setting, tremolo setting, Floyd Rose setting, custom scratch plate cutting, tuning problems, restoration, polishing, cleaning, wiring modifications...Get in touch I'm sure I can help!
Go to iOS Ram List  Both the above sets convert your device or PC to the equivalent of a high-end sound module for your midi keyboard.  It has the full 15-velocity-layered version of the Yamaha C5 Grand (592mb) along with lots of other sounds. This set also includes extra string sounds that are in the Nice-Strings-PlusOrchestra set (all except the harp).

It's important that an acoustic guitar feels comfortable for a beginner guitarist. How a guitar feels may vary from player to player. Is the fretboard easy to play? Is the body of the guitar the right size (hopefully not too big)? An acoustic guitar with too big of a back-end may cause irritation to the inner side of the strumming arm. Also, make sure the fretboard is flat and there is no buzzing. Are the tuning heads easy to turn? And make sure the strings are not too high off of the fretboard.

Those aspiring to kill the next-door neighbour’s lawn by the malevolent force of their playing alone would do well to speak to their local dealer about Schecter’s Demon-6. Updated with fresh set of Schecter active humbuckers and a super-smooth wenge fretboard for 2018, the Demon-6 is a mean- looking S-style that’s built for shredding  - and it’s also available as a seven-string for a little extra. It’s one of the most powerful and playable instruments on the market at this price. Its thin-C profile neck, cut from maple with a satin finish, is super-quick. Shredders will love that a light touch is rewarded on the fretboard - that wenge feels slick ’n’ slinky. The bridge’s construction fits the two most important tenets in bridge design: it’s no-fuss and industrial-strength. The Demon-6 feels indestructible. It might make you feel likewise; at least, its active pickups (powered by a nine-volt battery that’s easily accessed via a clip on the rear of the instrument) will ward off most predators if you crank the gain high enough. Tonally, that’s the Demon-6’s wheelhouse. The bridge ’bucker has plenty of grunt but an abundance of top-end that metal soloists will love. Overall, the Demon-6 is a metal guitar, designed to summon something much more sinister, and it delivers in spades.
After the wah or EQ, try throwing in your phasers, flangers, chorus or vibrato effects. Because they’re following overdrive/distortion, wah and EQ, you will find that modulation effects gain a richer and more complex sound than they would have on their own or toward the front of your chain. But annoyingly, putting them right at the end of your chain can also be somewhat limiting because these types of effects tend to overpower others that go before it. Modulation effects work best right in the middle of the effects sequence.
Loose frets are especially problematic in certain old guitars, but are generally very easy to fix. You'll be amazed at the difference you can make with just a few tools, a bit of knowledge, and a little time. Fixing loose frets can eliminate fret buzz, remove sharp fret ends, and greatly improve the tone of any guitar. If your luthier bill will be greater than the value of your guitar, definitely time to have a go yourself!
Sometimes a pitch shifter will retain the original signal while adding in the new shifted pitch.  The new shifted note can be set at a given intervallic distance from the original and will automatically harmonize any given series of notes or melody.  In short, it will harmonize the guitar by duplicating the melody at a 3rd, 5th, or whatever interval you define.

So half of it is finding a happy place in terms of neck size. The other half is the setup. String height is usually adjustable, with electric guitars, which is a good thing in your case. Lower string height means you don't need to push down on the string as hard to play the notes. When you find a guitar that feels good to you but the strings are kinda hard to push down, talk to the store about having it setup and intonated with a very low string height... some people use the term "fast" action.
The PRS Silver Sky is the result of a close collaboration between Grammy Award-winning musician John Mayer and Paul Reed Smith. More than two and half years in the making, the Silver Sky is a vintage-inspired instrument that is at once familiar but also newly PRS through and through. This model was based off of Mayer and Smith’s favorite elements from 1963 and 1964 vintage instruments, resulting in an idealized version of a vintage single-coil guitar. The attention that was paid to every detail sets this guitar apart.
While audio feedback in general is undesirable due to the high frequency overtone, when controlled properly, it can provide true sustain of the sound (instead of using a distortion/compressor to make quiet notes louder, or a feedback of a signal in a circuit as in a delay unit). Several approaches have been used to produce guitar feedback effects, which sustain the sound from the guitar:
Kay/Valco went out of business soon afterwards, and in 1969 its assets were auctioned off. Syl Weindling and Barry Hornstein of W.M.I. (the main importer of Teisco Del Rey products) purchased the Kay brand name during this time. As a result of this, the names "Teisco" and "Kay" were used on Teisco Del Rey guitars for a while in the early 70's. In 1980 the Kay Guitar Company was purchased by Tony Blair and is currently active selling Kay brand and Santa Rosa brand guitars, Chicago Blues harmonicas and accessories and of course the Kay Vintage Reissue line of professional guitars and basses.
A bass amplifier or "bass amp" is a musical instrument electronic device that uses electrical power to make lower-pitched instruments such as the bass guitar or double bass loud enough to be heard by the performers and audience. Bass amps typically consist of a preamplifier, tone controls, a power amplifier and one or more loudspeakers ("drivers") in a cabinet. While bass amps share many features with the guitar amplifiers used for electric guitar, such as providing an amplifier with tone and volume controls and a carrying handle, they are distinct from other types of amplification systems, due to the particular challenges associated with low-frequency sound reproduction. This distinction affects the design of the loudspeakers, the size and design of the speaker cabinet and the design of the preamplifier and amplifier. Speaker cabinets for bass amps usually incorporate larger loudspeakers (e.g., 15" speakers are more common for bass than for electric guitar amps) or more speakers and larger cabinet sizes than those used for the amplification of other instruments. The loudspeakers themselves must also be sturdier to handle the higher power levels and they must be capable of reproducing very low pitches at high sound pressure levels.

Fender also supply a variety of signature models, each with specifications similar to those used by a well-known performer. Custom Artist guitars are the Custom Shop versions of the Artist Series line, which significantly differ from the standard production models in terms of quality and construction, making these instruments much more expensive. As well as the other Custom Shop instruments, the Custom Artist guitars are available either as Team Built or Master Built items, some being exact replications of the specific artist’s original instrument, better known as “Tribute” series (featuring various degrees of “relicing”, such as Closet Classic, New Old Stock, Relic and Super Relic treatments, depending the model). Artists with models available in the signature range include:

FRET LEVELING ("Filing", "Dressing"...) $150.00 Worn or uneven frets can he filed level in many cases, if there will remain enough height on the fret to suit the customer (and practical playability). Frets must be lowered to the height of the lowest pit that can be found. Sometimes, replacing the most worn frets is appropriate. Includes "set up" adjustments.

For quite some times now, many musicians have been making use of the distinctive sound and look of Koa wood construction on instruments. Designed to meet the taste of Hawaiian culture and tradition, the Koa wood on the ESP LTD EC-1000 is native to Hawaiian island, boasting a remarkable history and well-deserve popularity for its recognizable natural reddish and grain pattern eliciting a well-balanced sound while adding tone brightness without affecting the guitar’s warmth.
Together with Marshall and Vox, Hiwatt is considered to be one of the main contributors to what we commonly refer to as the “British sound.” The company’s history is older than the name, with owner Dave Reeves building his first custom unit in 1963. This earned a great deal of praise on the local scene for its reliability and virtually established the company’s character.  
On August 21, 1965, during a Beatles concert tour, Randy Resnick of B-Sharp, aMinnesota music store, presented Harrison with a second model 360/12 FG “New Style” 12-string electric guitar, distinguishable from Harrison’s first 12-string by its rounded cutaways and edges. There was a television documentary produced by KSTP TV in Minneapolis documenting this event.
Del Rey, of course, is Spanish for “of the king,” which explains the crown. This was no doubt added to the Teisco name, in part, to suggest quality. However, it was also a way to add the de rigeur Spanish cachet necessary for “Spanish” guitars of the time. It was convention that “Spanish” guitars carried Spanish names, except for the well-known brand names – Gibson, Fender, Martin or Kay; thus the plethora of imported guitars named Greco, Ibanez, Goya and Espa�a. Of course, none of these were made in Spain, but rather in Japan, Japan, Sweden and Finland, respectively!

Look, as far as we know, our asymmetrically coiffed party pal has never held a guitar in his life. But no contemporary musician has a more primal understanding of adrenaline-pumping, pulse-raising, chest-caving bulldozer riffs than dubstep mosh ambassador Skrillex. Somewhere between the unfiltered piston-pumps of nü-metal and the twinkling emocore melodies that weaned him is a gaping sarlacc of yawping melodies and buzzsaw edges. The bass drop to “Scary Monsters and Nice Sprites” might just be this generation’s “Smoke on the Water” — look no further than the obscene number of “Skrillex guitar cover” videos on YouTube!
Buying a new guitar amp is easy. But, as you will have seen, ending up with the right amplifier for you isn’t as straightforward. Amps are not something you buy every day, so take your time, read our guide, use our categories and charts as inspiration, and ultimately you will find something that will suit you and your playing perfectly. Good luck in your hunt for the perfect amp!

The noise out of my chain drives me nuts. I want it when I want it, not when all is shut off. I am running a Clapton Signature Strat with humless pickups into my Blues Deluxe. No effects and it is quiet as the dead of night. Plug in the effects (All Boss BTW) and it just starts humming. I have been playing with it and cant seem to isolate the culprit (s)… Frustrating.
In order to play your favorite song, you’ll need to learn guitar chords. Use the images and instructions below to learn how to play each chord. The ChordBuddy device can be used for assistance in knowing where to place your fingers In the images the circles represent where you will be placing your fingers (I=index, M=middle finger, R=ring finger, P=pinky). The X’s represent strings that you will not be strumming while the O represents strings that will be played without any frets.

An extremely wise Liverpudlian once said: "Life is what happens to you while you're busy making other plans." Well, we've been busy with life and now, after a few year's hiatus, it's time to present the first phase of our new collection. For your consideration are some truly unique guitars: Silvertones, Danelectros Harmonys, a Supro 60, an Eko Florentine, and many more. Also, did we mention for all you Shagg's fans, there's a pretty stunning Avalon AV-2T. There's more to come very soon, stay tuned. Welcome to VintageSilvertones.com!
Yamaha’s Pacifica Series spans many ability levels and price ranges, with notable models such as the entry-level PAC112 proving one of the most popular beginner’s guitars on the market. Then there is the RevStar Series, which launched in 2015 – another beautiful collection, inspired by the street-racing motorbikes of London and Tokyo in the sixties.
All product names, logos, and brands are property of their respective owners, and are in no way associated or affiliated with The Top Guitars.  Product names, logos, and brands are used solely for the purpose of identifying industry-standard products and brands used by The Top Guitars for the business of post production sound, and any related awards or honors therein. Use of these names, logos, and brands does not imply any co-operation or endorsement.
Archives of the best free VST plugins (electric guitar and acoustic guitar plug-ins) for download. We have created audio / video demos for the most of VST plugins so that you can hear how they sound before you decide to download them. You don't have to register for download. The most of VST plugins in our archives are provided with a link to VST plugin developer so that you can donate to the author if you wish.
I am writing this due to the mixed reviews that I read before buying this. This is a really powerful device. I have had a POD 2.0 for years. This is just as good and is also small, portable, and inexpensive. Most of the criticism that I read is that it is not well made and durable. It is well made, but I don't think it is designed for gigging. It is perfect for practicing or interfacing with a home studio. If this is your application, then you will be very satisfied. One other thing that I found true of this and similar devices that I own is that the quality of the headphones makes a big difference. If you use studio quality headphones it will sound great, if you use music player headphones it will just sound good. I haven't ... full review
The type of potentiometer you should use will depend on the type of circuit you are designing for. Typically, for audio circuits the audio taper potentiometer is used. This is because the audio taper potentiometer functions on a logarithmic scale, which is the scale in which the human ear percieves sound. Even though the taper chart appears to have a sudden increase in volume as the rotation increases, in fact the perception of the sound increase will occur on a gradual scale. The linear scale will actually (counterintuitively) have a more significant sudden volume swell effect because of how the human ear perceives the scale. However, linear potentiometers are often used for other functions in audio circuits which do not directly affect audio output. In the end, both types of potentiometers will give you the same range of output (from 0 to full), but the rate at which that range changes varies between the two.
String sage Ernie Ball reckons it’s made some of the world’s strongest strings with the Paradigm set, which promises longer string life while retaining the company’s iconic Slinky tone and feel. Ultra-high strength steel can be found in the wound and plain strings, plus reinforcement at the ball end, enabling them to lock in tune fast and hold up to aggressive styles. There’s even plasma-enhanced wrap wire for increased corrosion resistance, too.
The final spot in our top 5 list goes to the DigiTech RP500, the second-largest of the DigiTech RP line of multi-effects pedals, but definitely the most popular out of the lineup. Like Boss and Line 6, DigiTech is no stranger to making very good guitar effects. Their parent company Harman also owns Lexicon, famed for their top-of-the-line reverb sounds, which DigiTech very much benefits from. The DigiTech RP500 is a multi-effect unit with amp modeling, a looper, USB connection, and an onboard expression pedal. Out of the 5 pedals on this list, it draws the most comparisons to the Zoom G3X and the Boss ME-80 (both in terms of price and features). Throughout this review we’ll make sure to cover how it stacks up against those.
• How wear alters playability: Fret wear – grooves worn in the frets from pressing down on the strings, depressions created by bending, lowered overall fret height from usage – can all cause buzzing noises to occur at points where frets are located along the neck. Luckily, these problems can typically be addressed by having the frets leveled and dressed several times before a fret replacement job is necessary, since fret replacements are costly.
The previous drawing illustrates the electrical and magnetic function of a single-coil pickup. Some pickups might use six permanent magnets in place of the six pole pieces to create the magnetic field, but the idea is the same: create a steady magnetic field around a coil in proximity to the guitar string. The name "single-coil" pickup becomes more significant when compared to the humbucker or "dual-coil" pickup.
Now, none of this should take away from the actual tones, which are beautiful, even when not fully convincing.  I haven’t commented on Instant Guitar’s GUI yet and that should tell all you really need to know. It gets the job done well, but looks unfortunately ugly — or at the very least bland and not matching the high-quality of the sounds found in this line of guitar VSTs.

Still in the ’64 line was the MJ-2L, pretty much unchanged, except for the new hooked headstock in later ’64. Given the evidence of Westheimer’s Kingstons, the MJ-1 and MJ-2 were probably still available. The BS-101 solidbody bass also remained, with the new, hooked three-and-one headstock. Also still in the line were the WGs, including the WG-2L, WG-3L and WG-4L. Many of these are found with the squarish Bizarro Strat head well into ’65, but they are also pictured in the ’64-65 catalog with the new, hooked four-and-two head, so expect to find either.


Additionally, the instrument gets a good once-over for all other miscellaneous needs. Every Calibration & Reset is tailored to the individual player and there are never any charges for adjustment once the service is initially completed. Every Calibration & Reset is guaranteed for 60 days from completion (though typically adjustments are made well past the 60 day mark for free). No Calibration & Reset is done until you're completely happy with the way your guitar plays. The only limitations are the laws of physics, which despite our many attempts, we have yet to find ways to break.
went to great lengths to get here for a basic set up on a vintage les paul. after 3 months of long waiting guitar was no better off, it was different, but just as bad and completely unplayable. he may have spent 30 seconds tweaking the truss rod, but didn't do the necessary or requested fret leveling to resolve all the dead areas up high. unbelievable after 3 months to have a guitar unplayable after traveling such lengths to get here & back.
Vibrato: Vibrato effects produce slight, rapid variations in pitch, mimicking the fractional semitone variations produced naturally by opera singers and violinists when they are prolonging a single note. Vibrato effects often allow the performer to control the rate of the variation as well as the difference in pitch (e.g. "depth"). A vibrato with an extreme "depth" setting (e.g., half a semitone or more) will produce a dramatic, ululating sound. In transistorized effects, vibrato is produced by mixing an instrument's audio signal with a carrier wave in such a way that generates frequency variations in the sound wave.[81] Guitarists often use the terms "vibrato" and "tremolo" misleadingly. A so-called "vibrato unit" in a guitar amplifier actually produces tremolo, while a "tremolo arm" or "whammy bar" on a guitar produces vibrato.[83][84]
Even though pickups are the main component tasked with interpreting string vibrations and indirectly turning them into sound, your choice of wood still matters. Although the effect is subtle, certain woods will give you better sustain, more definition, and so on.  And in the end it's the accumulation of all of these choices that determine your ultimate sound.
Fender’s legendary tone is enough to win just about anyone over, and they cater to a wide range of customers by offering the more cost friendly Squier series. While their classic electric guitars are favored by plenty of players, their acoustic selection and Jazzmaster offerings have their fair share of supporters as well. No matter what you’re looking for in a guitar or what price range you’re shopping in, you’re likely to find a good fit with Fender.
Paul Kossoff, of Free and Back Street Crawler, favoured a 1959 Les Paul Standard. In 2011-12, Gibson’s Custom Shop made a reproduction of Kossoff’s Standard, featuring a so-called “green-lemon” flametop, two-piece carved maple top, mahogany body and neck, Custom Bucker humbucking pickups and kidney-bean shaped Grover tuners similar to those Kossoff had installed on the instrument. 100 Kossoff models were made to resemble the guitar at the time of Kossoff’s death in 1976, with another 250 in a VOS finish.
I once did a setup on one that belonged to a friend but it was really wrecked so it wasn't perhaps a fair representation. It seemed to be well built though and the neck was nice enough. The tone was decent too although not exciting - exactly what you'd expect from such a guitar. Overall I'd say it was better than the cheaper squiers (SEs, Affinities etc).

I use a cheap zoom effects box (actually because it has a fabulous digital tuner built-in) and if I want to play at home I plug that into the stereo. Don't have it any louder than you would a CD etc .. (ok maybe a bit ;-) ) gives you the flexibility of all the effects sounds plus because it's stereo (assuming you hve the speakers a few feet apart) you get that feeling of it being "large" when really it's not that loud.
Basicly it is a HD digital sound interface plus with a MIDI controller and footswitch. It is has unique design with different HOST mode and switching MODE to work with the host softwares. We are proud of that it is now maybe the best thing you can find to use on stage with software FX. The special designed analog signal chain mixing with the digital codec give the best dynamic response and sound quality. We did AB with lots of other interface and be so confident on its performance.

This is just what a guy or gal needs to help him or her make an informed decision on making a electric guitar purchase. All the topics and explanations of the given topic, pick-ups, machine heads etc… were easy to follow and understand. Not a lot of tech talk that would either confuse or intimidate a perspective buyer, that is a feat in its self kudos to your writers. keep up the good work.

When Bob Dylan described the Band's "wild mercury sound," he was really talking about Robbie Robertson's guitar, as exemplified by his torrid, squawking solo on "Just Like Tom Thumb's Blues" from their 1966 tour. But by the time the Band were making their own LPs, Robertson had pared down his approach, evolving into a consummate ensemble player. "I wanted to go in the opposite direction," said Robertson, "to do things that were so tasteful and discreet and subtle, like Curtis Mayfield and Steve Cropper… where it was all about the song."

The Acoustic Resonance control gives you the option of adding life back in to your sound. Where some pickups, Piezos in particular can sometimes sound “quacky” and hard, due to the fact they only pick up the sound of the bridge area, the AD-10 analyses your pickup signal and recreates the missing body and string resonances accurately to ensure the subtle tonalities of your playing qualities of your guitar are intact.

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Here we have a well preserved vintage Hohner HW600n HW for Hohner Western Acoustic Dreadnought Martin D35 Style acoustic guitar. with a gorgeously grained THREE Piece Mahogany back and sides WoW its really a beauty. Workmanship Fit and finish quality is excellent this guitar is stunning, previously set up and is Great sounding in near mint like condition its from the late 80’s early 90’s D35 Look alike, Spruce top with Mahogany Neck and some of the absolutely highest grade Mahogany your going to see its flamed and figured and has fire and looks as if it could be Koa but listed as Mahogany at any rate this is one of the nicest models Hohner in this era truly a stunner,,, its in top structural shape as well its neck angle is excellent at 1-11/16ths at the nut its medium profile neck is very easily played and is a convertible c shape… We were impressed with her sound to with nice volume and a mature sounding tone. We think you’ll like this beautiful Vintage Hohner as well we believe this to be late 1980’s to early 90’s made in Korea and would fool any made in Japan fan for its fit and finish workmanship this is a good vintage guitar in its own right… no cracks no repairs no issues no excuses someone is going to have a smile on their face. any questions or to buy this guitar contact Joe at: JVGuitars@gmail.com .

If you want free and private, other than the basic version of Eagle, there is KiCad, which is an open source tool developed by GIPSA Lab, which is a research institute out of Grenoble in France. Like Eagle, there are Windows, Mac, and Linux versions, whereas Circuit Maker is Windows only. There are also tools now being offered for free by some of the big component dealers such as Mouser.
: : : Does anyone know for sure where these originated. I have been told Vox (the England years) made this flat bodied plank guitar in the skiffle days of early 60's/late 50's. Mine is painted white(by hand) with a large black pick guard that curves to envelope the two chrome "toaster" pickups ,bottom of neck, and three control knobs.The strings have a moveable maple bridge(not secured) and a small chrome hardtail heel.The neck has a zero fret at top and 19 more playing frets.There are dot inlays at the 3rd,5th,seventh,ninth,12th,and 17th frets.The headstock is of natural finish light maple with a top edge cut at a sloping angle like Hofner.It has brass tuning pegs,gears and gear plates and the keys are white plastic.The beautiful short neck is true ,natural maple.Along one of the tuning gear plates is the numbers: 35515 which are etched into the wood. Four bolts without any plate hold the neck base to the plain body and a green decal above the pegs at top face of headstock reads: Shadow. The fret board is rosewoodand is laid on neck without bindings.It has six strings and sounds like a short scale Baritone guitar. It also only has one strap peg at bottom since they used to put the other end of strap on a tuning key. No other holes are seen for any former peg at other end of body(where normally found). Please send any info on this small,early,simple but awesome sounding electric skiffle guitar from England(Vox?).Thanks!!!!!
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Gibson announced the new 2012 Les Paul Standard at Winter NAMM 2012. The new Standard features two Burstbucker Pro humbuckers with coil splitting, and Pure Bypass. Pure Bypass gives the option of bypassing the volume and tone potentiometers, sending the signal directly from the bridge pickup to the output jack. The 2012 Standard also features Gibson’s “modern weight relief” as opposed to the chambered body of previous Standards. Other changes include a phase switch and compound fretboard radius.
The strings fitted to the guitar also have an influence on tone. Rock musicians often[when?] prefer the lightest gauge of roundwound string, which is easier to bend, while jazz musicians go for heavier, flatwound strings, which have a rich, dark sound. Steel, nickel, and cobalt are common string materials, and each gives a slightly different tone color.
Practice makes perfect. While this might be a trite statement that your teacher used to say as you rolled your eyes in annoyance it could not be closer to the truth. Practice is especially vital with music. No matter what you plan on playing or already play unless you practice you’re not going to get anywhere even with the best guitar. So we have figured out so fat that practice is vital to reaching the level you want but that is not the end of it. A good guitar is just as important. And I don’t mean a great guitar that you will have to shell out your entire savings on. No, I mean a quality guitar that will help you out in your practice rather than hinder you. (If you still have not got a guitar but plan on doing so we have an entire catalog of the best guitars under $100, best guitars under $300 and so forth). You thought that’s where we would end the list of what you need to learn how to play? Nope. You need a good amplifier. As much as this equipment is often overlooked because it seems too had to choose, it is vital for practice.  Without further ado, let’s get into some of the best guitar practice amps.
For the hobbyist guitarist this is a great 'bang for the buck' investment. It has practice tools for the beginner but solid tones for the advanced guitarist. For home use, maybe even a garage band it's perfectly adequate. If I were a more serious musician doing gigs with high end audio going to the audience, I'd be investing more than a hundred bucks in my stage rig.
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I don’t think beginners should spend a ton of money on their very first electric guitar. However, around the $300 mark you have a lot of options for really great entry level electrics. So, if you’re a beginner with a little more cash available, I say skip the “starter packs” and buy some good, solid gear to begin your journey. Choose from this list and you won’t need to upgrade for many years.
Ibanez RG20061, also known as the RGT220A CAH, is an RG series Prestige limited edition guitar model specially created for the 2006 Winter NAMM Show. It based on the RGT220A, but stained brown, although claimed to be barbecued to a chocolaty brown color. Features include a neck through body construction, ash body wings, Dimarzio IBZ pickups and the Edge Pro tremolo. Only 153 Made 8/10 Condition
There are many excellent pedals out there, I especially like the ones that contain multiple reverbs like, plate, spring, hall, church, etc. Reverb can be a great subtle effect adding a slight bit of ambience to your guitar sound. This is especially nice when playing in small or dry rooms. Usually the larger the room, the less reverb you may want as the room produces its own reverb, which is exactly what we are trying to create with the effect! One of my favorite reverb tones is the old surf guitar sounds made famous by Dick Dale and the Ventures.
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In addition to building world-class custom basses and guitars, our luthiers also perform a wide variety of guitar repairs, restorations, modifications and upgrades. Whether you have an electric guitar, acoustic guitar or a bass, new or old, feel free to bring it by the shop for a free assessment. We have the experience, skill and equipment to provide maximum playability.
Then, one weekend his combo got the biggest gig of its career – opening for Tommy Dorsey and his orchestra. Charlie was hot that night, and Dorsey took notice. In one of those rare coincidences, Dorsey’s guitar player had just quit, and the next day Kaman was offered the job. Which path does the son of a construction foreman pursue? The uncertain, fleeting glory of the entertainment industry, or the unknown possibilities of putting craft in the air?
For our purposes, I’ll break pedals down into four overarching categories: 1) Boost, Compression, Distortion, and Fuzz; 2) Modulation; 3) Echo and Delay; and 4) Filtering and EQ-Based effects, and this series will focus on individual types that come within each of those larger categories (for example, Modulation includes many quite different effects, such as chorus, vibrato, phasing, and so on). This is not to say that some manufacturers or other writers couldn’t categorize things differently, and certainly a few examples below could be safely lifted out of the heading I have stuck them in and accurately described by another category. It doesn’t matter all that much. These headings are mainly a means of breaking down the sonic results of the enormously varied range of pedals that exists out there, and taking a brief look at what makes them tick.
Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 5 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Inlay: Custom - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Headstock: 6 In-Line - Bridge: Tremolo - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Black - Pickups: Ibanez - String Instrument Finish: Satin Oil, Transparent Black Sunburst
Edit: After reading everyone's comments I've decided to let the technician give my strat a first time setup and I'll try to absorb any information I can in order to be able to do it myself one day. I realize many of you have some pretty cool guitar shops that'll do a free setup so I'll try to negotiate something. I'll be sure to record the condition of the guitar itself before the setup in case the technician chips it or scratches it. I'll also check out Dan Erlewine's books like the guitarist below suggested. Thank you all for your advice, I really do appreciate it and I hope to be as wise as you all are when it comes to guitars someday.
Speaking of tiny little helpers that could fit anyone, let me introduce to another seemingly impossible amalgamation of great sound and great look. The Line 6 Micro Spider 6-Watt Battery Powered guitar amplifier has a whole lot of qualities that make it the favorite small amplifier of so many musicians who are constantly on the go or don’t have too much space. With its small form and light body it can be easily transported anywhere you go, while its battery negates the need to be constantly plugged into an outlet and hoping that you have some kind of source of energy. The best part of the amp is of course the sound of the guitar, which is quite outstanding for the price it is offered up at. One of the best options of small guitar amplifiers available for you that I want you to remember when you start attempting to make a decision on buying one. Great stuff to have, really.
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Next up, Tolerances. The tolerance refers to the accurate rating of the pots ohm, so if it's a 250k pot, then it will be accurately rated at a tight tolerance of around +/-5% to 250k, a true rating. Some low quality pots can creep wildly away from the ratings, you'd be surprised. I've removed CTS pots from US and MIM Fender guitars for example, that were incredibly inacurate. 250k stamped pots that were not even 200k, and also in other cases past 300k. So, why does that matter? Well if for example we're referring to a single coil equipped guitar like a Stratocaster, they recommended a pot ohm value of 250k in both volume and tone positions. If a lower quality pot states 250k but actually reads much lower, perhaps 200k, or even substantially higher, it could result it a darker or brighter tone respectively, than what would bring out the best in the guitars pickups. Quality pots like the CTS 450 series or TVT I have come to trust, have super tight tolerances, +/- 7% and most cases even tighter +/-5%. This accuracy is worth it, a pickup manufacturer sets out to design a certain model of pickup that will sound it's 'best' (obviously this is subjective), optimal is probably a better word, for a certain pot rating. If you're fitting a harness with tight tolerance, accurately rated pots then chances are you're going to be getting the best from your pickup set. That's the important bit for me.
The Epiphone LP Special II has a mahogany body and neck. The fretboard features dotted inlays and is made of traditional, unfinished rosewood – a standard choice that yields a sound consistent with the aesthetic standards of a Les Paul. If you want a Les Paul but you don't want to pay a fortune for it, this mahogany beauty is worth your consideration.
List of acoustic guitar brands that include the most reliable models available. Acoustic guitar brands include those from major manufacturers of musical instruments, including Yamaha, Gretsch, Gibson, and more. What are the best acoustic guitar companies? Users looking for a new guitar will want to research a variety of different brands to find the one that best suits their needs, based on function and features.

i just started using this book never having played before and am finding it totally easy to follow. the friendly narrative guides the reader through every step, explaining the most simple of terms and concepts clearly and concisely. and yes, the CD is funky and you can play along with it more or less straight away AND sound good, which keeps you motivated.
Playing an amp with an instrument you don’t own is like choosing a girlfriend by dating her mom. Bring your main guitar with you, even if you think the store stocks a similar model. An unfamiliar guitar may have a brighter sound than your personal ax, and an amp that sounded sparkly and lively in the store may actually be dull as Anne Heche on Quaaludes when you get it home.
In the 1950's company called Don Noble and Co, was founded in the 1950’s by Don Noble, a well-known accordion player and entrepreneur.  He began by importing Italian made musical instruments, mainly accordions, in an era when the "stomach Steinway" was very popular and accordions were being sold door-to-door, and accordion academies were common in most larger cities. But he also imported guitars under the Noble brand name.
Chosen by artists over 3 decades for use on stage and in studio, the Zager 80 Series is the “go to” guitar for the touring musician or veteran player wanting a professional grade lifetime instrument. Consistently rated in the top 5% of acoustics in national and international publications competing with guitars 2 and 3 times its price, yet costs 50% less since you’re buying direct from our workshop in Lincoln, Nebraska. If you enjoy the deep rich bass that’s common in rosewood guitars, a solid cedar top takes it to the next level providing a very mellow, sweet response.  Combined with legendary Zager playability and you have a guitar that will go head to head with any acoustic on the market today…regardless of price.
Next up in your signal path comes the trusty gain pedal, or two or three even.  These effects will pass your signal through a transistor or diode to produce the clipping sound of a tube amplifier cranked up loud.  They can go from subtle drive of a loud Fender to the high gain insanity of a Mesa Boogie Triple Rectifier.  Most players call these effects distortion pedals, but there are different varieties of distortion that produce distinctly unique tones, all driven by the amount of gain you push.
Flanging can be a subtle effect, thickening the sound and imparting a spacey feeling. Or it can be extremely dramatic when cranked up, to the point of making the original signal unrecognizable. This broad range makes a flanger a fun stomp box to experiment with. Jimmy Page used a flanger to good effect on Led Zeppelin’s “Nobody’s Fault But Mine” and “Kashmir, ” as did Jimi Hendrix on “Bold as Love.”
The word distortion refers to any modification of wave form of a signal, but in music it is used to refer to nonlinear distortion (excluding filters) and particularly to the introduction of new frequencies by memoryless nonlinearities.[32] In music the different forms of linear distortion have specific names describing them. The simplest of these is a distortion process known as "volume adjustment", which involves distorting the amplitude of a sound wave in a proportional (or ‘linear’) way in order to increase or decrease the volume of the sound without affecting the tone quality. In the context of music, the most common source of (nonlinear) distortion is clipping in amplifier circuits and is most commonly known as overdrive.[33]
Rotating speakers are specially constructed amplifier/loudspeakers used to create special audio effects using the Doppler effect by rotating the speakers or a sound-directing duct. The rotating speaker creates a chorus-type effect. Named after its inventor, Donald Leslie, it is particularly associated with the Hammond organ but is used with a variety of instruments as well as vocals. The Hammond/Leslie combination has become an element in many genres of music. The Leslie Speaker and the Hammond Organ brands are currently owned by Suzuki Musical Instrument Corporation. The stompbox that simulates this effect is the Uni-Vibe pedal.

One glance at an El Dorado strap and you'll understand why so many musicians choose leather as their go-to pick for stage, studio or practice play. By combining sleek designer style with rugged, durable materials, these straps offer everything you need in a reliable accessory. And when you can keep your guitar secure while rocking out onstage, you'll be free to concentrate on the more important matter of dazzling your fans.

The Seagull S6 is another very popular choice for those looking for an affordable but great sounding acoustic. Owners claim it sounds as good as guitars in the $800-$1500 range. The S6 has a cedar top with cherry back and sides. It features a wider nut, which means this guitar will be a great choice for those playing finger style or that have larger hands. Owners of this guitar are singing it’s praises, saying that they have no regrets. The sound of this guitar is big, yet soft. Described as being “alive” with tone. Seagull has been making quality guitars at an affordable price for many years, so the S6 will not disappoint. See more on this guitar here.
We considered more than 20 amps for this guide and gave the 10 most promising models a hands-on test. Our testing panel agreed that any of these amps would at least be good enough to get a beginner started, and that for reasons of personal taste, some players might prefer one of the ones we didn’t pick. Here are the others we tried, with a couple of notes about our panelists’ impressions.

The central idea behind Vintage® is to offer accessibly priced, vintage-looking guitars with great finishes, quality parts, and features that are typically found on guitars costing upward of a thousand dollars. So, to design an industry-leading line of professional but affordable guitars, Trev Wilkinson joined forces with JHS over a decade ago. These instruments now include class-leading Wilkinson®-designed hardware.


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Description: Guitar Type: Acoustic/Electric - Body Size: AEG - Top Wood: Cedar - Back: Mahogany - Sides: Mahogany - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Nut Width: 43mm - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Binding: Ivoroid - Frets: 21 - # of Strings: 6 - String Type: Bronze - Scale Length: 25.4" (64cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Rosette: Abalone - Hardware: Chrome, Diecast Tuners - Pickups: Fishman Sonicore - EQ/Preamp: Ibanez AEQ-SP1 - String Instrument Finish: Low Gloss natural
I just built this kit, which I ordered directly from Mod DIY. Its the first pedal kit that I have built, although I do have a fair amount of electronics experience. Overall, I was impressed with the kit. All the parts were included, and functioned just fine. The instructions were outstanding, particularly if you use the high-res picture of the inside of a finished model for reference. There was ONE step omitted in the direction, which was to solder a short wire between terminal 3 of the toggle switch to connection 12 on the junction rail. But that was easy to spot.
The GT-70 was a re-styled two-pickup, single-cutaway recalling the F-55s. The cutaway retained the wide horizontal angle of before, however the upper bass bout received a more graceful treatment, with a slight inward curve as it met the neck at the 16th fret. The controls were the same as before; the elevated pickguard had become a large white affair, the tailpiece was the V-notched Bigsby. Pickups remained our familiar DeArmond humbuckers. Gone were the plastic bridges in favor of metal adjustable finetune variety. Finishes were either burgundy or black. The first prototype serial number was 203803. Around 1,450 of these were made between January of 1966 and October of 1968.
Bring up the topic of electrics, and Martin is hardly the first name of recall. The term “electrics” is not meant to include the company’s many fine acoustic-electric guitars, many sporting top-notch electronics (which ultimately remain acoustic beasts), but rather electric guitars meant for country chicken pickin’ or raunchy rock and roll. However, beginning in the early ’60s, Martin has launched periodic forays into the electric guitar marketplace with some very interesting, if commercially unsuccessful, results (which explains why the Martin name doesn’t come immediately to mind). Most coverage of the Martin brand is focused, quite rightly, on their substantial acoustic achievements. For this essay, however, let’s take an alternative view and look at the company’s various electric guitars, its thinline hollowbodies and later solidbodies.
The MESA Bigblock 750 has a built-in overdrive channel. The Mesa M2000 has a high gain switch which can be engaged with a footswitch. The Marshall MB450 head and combo bass amplifiers have a tube pre-amp on the "Classic" channel which can be overdriven. The Ashdown ABM 500 EVO III 575W Bass amp head has a built-in overdrive effect. Overdrive is also available on many Crate bass amplifiers. The Yamaha BBT500H has three types of built-in drive effects: overdrive, distortion and fuzz. The Ampeg B5R Bass Amplifier has two channels: clean and overdrive, with the ability to combine the two. Verellen, a boutique amp company, produces a bass amplifier with a built in overdrive channel.

Does anyone have one of either of these that they can comment on? I dig the looks of the silverburst (though I also dig the cream/ivory colored ones), and kinda want to have an SG in my posession (thanks to Zappa!). I have read all the positive reviews of Agiles on here, but few mention the Valkyrie...I'm a little worried that it is in the lower end of their price range, so I'm wondering how the hardware/electronics/fit and finish are....I'm aware it's not going to be crazy high end, but I'd like it to be useable (even though I may swap out some parts). Any opinions? Also, what parts would you recommend swapping out? Would an Epiphone be a better deal in terms of fit and finish and stock parts?
A DPDT (2PDT or 2P2T) on/on switch has two channels (poles), each having three lugs. This is like having two SPDT switches in one. It’s the standard configuration for most push/ pull or push/push pots, and you can use it for almost all mods, including the seven-sound mod (if you leave one pole unconnected), coil-splitting a humbucker, out-of-phase mods (by adding some jumper wires from pole 1 to pole 2), a direct-through mod, and countless others. Let’s see what’s going on here.
to heat up the tubes in certain amplifiers , when the tubes are heated up you get a better sound and the tubes last longer is what I've been told. remember to change your tubes and have them adjusted on a yearly bases to keep the amp sounding great if you're an experienced player this really comes in handy. Get a pro to do it the first time so nothing bad happens.
Pitch correction/vocal effects: Pitch correction effects use signal-processing algorithms to re-tune faulty intonation in a vocalist's performance [96] or create unusual vocoder-type vocal effects. One of the best known examples of this is Autotune, a software program and effect unit which can be used to both correct pitch (it moves a pitch to the nearest semitone), and add vocal effects. Some stompbox-style vocal pedals contain multiple effects, such as reverb and pitch correction.
While most collectors aren’t necessarily going to boast that they own a number of Harmony guitars, we shouldn’t forget the important “first axe” role Harmony played for many guitarists. This company took mass production of guitars to the next level. And though you may have to sort through a few to find one that is completely intact and doesn’t allow a car to drive under the strings, they were quality-made instruments for the most part. For those of you who first learned on a Harmony Archtone, this is certainly a childhood treasure!

There are, by the way, a number of discrepancies between Japanese Teisco and American Teisco Del Rey literature from 1966. Many of the older models continued to be promoted in Japan, but not in the U.S. Virtually all guitars in U.S. literature are also seen in Japanese catalogs. This does not mean that just because W.M.I. did not promote certain models, they were not still available in America. Many may have gone to Sears as Silvertones, and it’s possible that W.M.I. still brought in guitars other than those in its catalog.
If you are familiar with - a special kind of - programming, you can use something like Pure Data or Max MSP. Pure Data (PD), for example, is an open source, visual programming environment for manipulating streams of data like audio (or video). With PD you are able to build your own individual FX chains or use community contributed patches (In PD speech "programs" are called patches). But I think it's not as trivial to use as out of the box products.
For the younger children in the 4-8-year-old range, a scale length of about 22.7 inches is a good fit. Although some electrics come in scale lengths down to 22.2 inches, the extra length will keep your child from outgrowing the guitar too soon. For comparison, adult full-size guitars such as the Fender Stratocaster have a scale length of 25.75 inches while Gibson Guitars are an inch shorter. So if you are confused that what to buy for your new learner or the little one, you can go with the product that fits perfectly in your requirements.
I'm going to break the electric guitar setup guide into five parts, which are all in the links below. It's important to note that the five parts be done in the order in which they're presented. If you have a truss rod that's out of whack, it makes no sense to move on and adjust the bridge. I realize this may be painfully obvious, but for the one person who may not get it, I'm talking to you. Good luck
Variable 1: Speaker size. In Clip 1 you hear similar phrases played through models of four common speaker types. First comes the sort of 10" speaker you’d find in a small Fender Champ-style combo. Next is the 12" speaker of a midsized Fender-style combo, then a 12" Celestion Greenback you might encounter in a vintage Marshall cabinet, and finally the Celestion Alnico Blue from a vintage Vox combo.
Most guitars have at least one tone control installed. They can be either assigned to a particular pickup (Strat or Les Paul) or work as master tone control (Ibanez and others). Electronically, it’s a variable low-pass filter. Lower the resistance, more treble gets cut which means that higher pot values will sound a bit brighter (typically 500K vs 250K). Capacitor values usually traditionally range from 0.022uF (22nF) to 0.047uF (47nF) but many people find these values too large and install much smaller caps instead. Values of 10nF, 6.8nF or even smaller are reported to work quite well (I used 10nF in my latest mod). To help you decide between cap values and composition, check out this site. It hosts a couple of useful videos with cap value and composition analysis.
The best choice for ambient miking is most likely to be a good condenser – probably a large-diaphragm type, though a small-diaphragm type will work. Plenty of ribbon mics give good service as ambient mics also, if you have a clean, high-gain mic pre-amp to track them through. And where do you put it? Well, three or four feet back from the speaker will start to get a significant amount of room sound into the mic, but for more-ambient placements, try six feet or more, and experiment with different heights from the floor, far corners, and so on. One nifty way to find a cool ambient placement is to use your own ear like a mic, and stick the mic at the position in the room where the guitar tone sounds the best to you. This is ideally done with another person playing the guitar; cover one ear and walk around the room listening to the sound in different positions. When you hear a sound that really nails what you’re trying to capture, set up the mic right there. Done.

I’m going to be doing a pickup upgrade in the next few months on a Strat-style HSS. I have an idea, maybe a crazy idea, about how I’d like to wire it but so far I have been unable to find any indication that it is even possible. This site seems like the best place to get an answer. The single coils in my guitar will be replaced with another set of single coils (Seymour Duncan SLS-1 lipsticks). The humbucker I plan on installing (DiMarzio Tone Zone) is capable of being coil-split, which I want to take advantage of BUT I would rather not install a push/pull pot. My wiring idea… Toggle Position: 1) Full Humbucker, 2) North coil only of humbucker for single coil performance, 3) middle coil only, 4) middle and neck, and 5) neck only. Is this even possible using the 5-position toggle switch I already have, or is there no way to do it besides using a push/pull pot or installing an additional mini-toggle?
Now you might not have heard of Beauchamp or the company he founded to capitalize on his neat idea, which was initially called Ro-Pat-In Corporation, then Electro String. Eventually, the company took the name of its president and cofounder, George's friend Adolph Rickenbacker—and the rest, as they say, is history. Many others have built on Beauchamp's work since then, constantly trying to refine and improve the sound. Here's an improved pickup design by another guitar great, (Clarence) Leo Fender, from about a decade later:
Distortion pedals is responsible for many of the sounds that you think of when you think ‘electric guitar.’ It’s absolutely classic, and you’ll find that the majority of effects are some flavor of distortion pedal. The results you can get from these stompboxes vary from overdrive-like breakup to smooth melodic power, so it’s important before you take one home that you check for the type of sounds that specific distortion pedal is designed to create. Doing your homework really pays off when it comes to distortion pedals.

DESIGN AND PLANNING It is best to pre-plan your design concept so you can correct any mistakes on paper before you get to the wood and can't go back. Sketch out some design concepts on paper then, once you have decided on something,lay out a couple of pieces of poster board to draw the body shape out on. You can let you imagination go wild or if you perfer stay with a more traditional design. For this particular guitar I built, I chose to go with a PRS style body design. To get the measurment correct, I pulled a picture of the guitar I was modeling it after from a guitar catalog that was taken straight on and not from the side. I then scaled up the guitar by marking out a grid on the picture and transposed it to some poster board that I had drew a larger grid on. I knew that the pickup rings measured 3 1/2" by 1 1/2" and thats what I used to scale the picture up and get the proportions correct. Another method is to project the image on a wall and trace it to the poster board if you happen to have a projector but I like to draw my template out freehand. You don't have to use this method for the design if you want to come up with you own unique style. Just make sure that take all the parts that will go on to your guitar into consideration first like the neck postition, pick ups and knobs.
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Stripped holes: small holes without much tension on them (i.e. pickguard screws) can be repaired with super glue (gel stuff). Put some glue in the hole and screw the screw in about 1/2 way. The glue will not stick to the plated screw, and will form threads. More severely stripped holes or holes w/ more tension on them (i.e. strap button screws) require pieces of toothpick be glued in w/ wood glue. Larger holes w/ alot of tension (i.e. neck mounting screws) require the hole be drilled out and a hardwood dowel glued in place.
The tuner goes first. This one is pretty easy. It doesn’t want to hear an effected signal; it wants to see the direct input from the guitar. Another reason for putting the tuner first is that if you’re using any true-bypass pedals, the TU-3 will give them a buffered signal, which will protect your tone from loss of signal in the cables when other pedals are off. This is another one of the reasons there as so many TU tuners in pedalboards worldwide, even ones using nothing else but boutique true-bypass stompers.
Thanks for the list. Michael Gurian was a luthier in NYC who began as a classical guitar maker then began making steel string instuments in the 1960’s , I remember seeing his instruments shortly after i bought My first Martin in the dog years of the 70’s along wi Don Gallaghers instruments. Recently acquired one of his jumbos in Brazilian rosewood made in 1971 still in remarkable condition. He was among the first to compete as luthier with the big boys at Martin and gibson , even before Bob taylor jumped in.

Some bridges allow players to introduce vibrato into their performance by means of moving a vibrato arm (aka a whammy bar) that moves the bridge up or down. Bridges with this function are often called tremolos. (Note that this is musically incorrect since tremolo means a repeating variation in volume, not pitch, but has been used so long it is accepted terminology.) A tremolo system allows the player to rock the bridge back and forth to adjust the pitch of the notes being played. This is called a floating bridge, and is popular on many guitars. For beginners, it may be better to avoid a locking tuning system for their first guitar. They can be tricky to adjust properly, and can make even a simple string change frustrating for the inexperienced. However, if your budding Steve Vai has his heart set, don’t let that stand in the way.
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I have relied on the Sonic Port as a backup rig in case I do have an amp failure. At one point, I kept a Tech 21 PowerEngine 60 on hand to plug my Sonic Port into. Works great for studio and stage work. Again, so much cheaper than AXE-FX which unfortunately, this article plays heavy into spending over $2,000 for the rack mount unit. Don’t forget a decent PA, Monitors, and a Rack to mount it in (another $1000 if not more?). Yea, AXE-FX is sounding worse and worse than bringing a small combo amp..
Coming to its making, it has full-size dreadnaught body for big sound. The top is made up of laminate spruce whereas sides and back are nicely finished with basswood. This Fender Guitar is the reason it lacks a little bit of sounding because solid wood guitars can provide high-end sounding. As far as handling is concerned, kids might find it difficult due to its full size. Teenagers with right heights will find it quite comfortable. Just make sure that your fingers go down to fretboard pretty easily.
A while back I bought a GuitarPort, a product from Line6 that was one of the earliest guitar-to-PC interfaces. It cost me $99. It connects through USB and I could plug the guitar into it. I could play amp models and effects through my PC and the sound would come out of the computer speakers. (Headphones are of course an option through the PC speakers)
It is a popular technique in which the player's thumb or index finger on the picking hand slightly catches the string after it is picked, canceling the fundamental of the string, and letting one of the overtones dominate. It is used by popular guitarists such as Eddie Van Halen, Steve Vai and Joe Satriani who utilize the tremolo arm and high gain amps together with the pinch harmonic to produce horse-like wails from the instrument. - winner333
[Fausto] It's calculated by the sound coming from the amp. When you stop the note, it stops the magnetic disturbance and in turn the signal created and sent. The instant it is plucked or strummed above and vibrates above the pickup, the magnetic field is disturbed, not before, not after. Harmonic resonance does occur, obviously, but doesn't affect the magnetic field disturbed between the struck metal string and the electromagnet in any meaningful way, nor does it affect the tone.
Also apparently still in the line in early ’64 was the SD-4L, which had adopted four of the two-tone, metal-covered pickups found on the SS-4L guitar. This still had the old, elongated Strat head. It also had the platform vibrato system found on the previous SS guitars. The SD-4L probably didn’t make it into ’65, but the shape was taken over by the more conventional TG-64.
Some more advanced models, like the Wampler Latitude Tremolo Deluxe, bring a much more complex set of features, which include choosing the waveform and more. Whether you are looking for a good way to spice up your tone without impacting the nature of your signal, or you are just in need of a great vintage style effect, tremolo is the one to go for.
Hook isn’t worried the current challenging economic pressures will jeopardize the guitarist’s iconic status. “The guitar hero will never go away,” he said. “People adore this image of the guitarist almost being like a cowboy. You will always see the odd-looking kid walking down the street holding a guitar — there just might not be as many of them.”
1946 to present: Sitka spruce (darker than Adirondack). The change to Sitka happened on the larger "D" models first (in very early 1946). It took Martin a little while to use up all the smaller pieces of older Adirondack red spruce, hence the change to Sitka happend slower on the smaller body models. This is also the reason multiple piece Adi red spruce tops are sometimes seen on 0,00,000 bodies in 1946.
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