So, many engineers add a second mic at the other end of the room, to capture that room ambiance. Put it on a separate track and you can dial it into your overall sound at will. But remember, if you have an acoustically dead room covered with foam tiles, you do not really have a room sound to capture. Stick the amp into a tiled bathroom, that’s a whole different story.
You didn’t think we would forget bass amps, did you? Due to their inherent differences in design, bass guitars require a dedicated amplifier – using your old Fender Champion isn’t going to cut it. Bass amps offer more power, with some outputs reaching 1000 watts or more. Like guitar amps, bass amplifiers come in many shapes and sizes – including heads and combos – although the mid-range Hartke HD500 offers a stage-worthy 500 watts of power in a portable combo unit, with great controls and an excellent balanced tone.
Ideally, a steel string acoustic guitar or an electric guitar would be the best for you if you want to learn to play blues and classic rock. Classical guitar because of its nylon strings and its warm tone is best played by fingers. If you need help in what kind of guitar to buy, check out our article on different kinds of guitars available for beginners, this might help:

Some bridges have a lock position and at this point should be engaged. Other floating bridges will need to be stabilized by using pieces of wood fitted inside the cavity (accessed from the back of the body) to prevent the tremolo block from moving. Vintage Fender-style tremolo bridges can be stabilized by fully tightening the spring tension screws. Whatever method is used, the bridge must sit as we will want it to when we are done with the set-up procedure- parallel to and nearly flush with the top- so care must be taken at this stage to get the position of the bridge right.

Standard tuning but with the 6th string lowered two whole steps. Used by Alter Bridge on the song "My Champion" (tuned down a half-step) as well as Sevendust on the song "Mountain" (tuned down one and a half steps). Also used by John Mayer on the song “Neon”, and by Chino Moreno of Deftones on some songs such as "Swerve City" and "Hearts/Wires", tuned down a full step.

Her dad was Broadway star John Raitt, but Bonnie's artistic parents were blues giants like Howlin' Wolf and Mississippi Fred McDowell, whom she met and performed with early in her career. She learned fast: Starting with her acoustic slide workout on 1971's "Walking Blues," Raitt rolled out a fearsome repertoire of blues licks, fingerpicking with the best and wielding a slide like an old master. Most of all, she set a crucial precedent: When guitar was still considered a man's game by many, Raitt busted down that barrier through sheer verve and skill.
First of all, the staff are incredibly amazing, lovely, hilarious and helpful.  My bandmates and I are not the most knowledgable in terms of gear, and the first time we came in wanting to get our first our ever guitar petals, Blake actually drew a graph of sound to explain how guitar pedals worked. They are the absolute best. Helping us out and going above and beyond what staff should be expected to do.  Hands down my favorite guitar store in Seattle, great selection, prices and above all the attention to detail and friendly attitude of the staff.  Can't rave enough!  Definitely found my guitar store for life!  Would recommend for all your guitar needs :)
By contrast, tuning (or pitch) correction processors and plug-ins are normally considered processors rather than effects, but they do have creative uses. The idea behind these devices is to monitor the pitch of the incoming signal, then compare it to a user-defined scale, which can be a simple chromatic scale or any combination of notes. Pitch-shifting techniques are then used to nudge the audio to the nearest semitone in the user's scale but, because the amount of pitch-shift required is usually quite small, the result doesn't sound grainy or lumpy, as often happens when large amounts of pitch-shift are generated. Because pitch tracking is used to identify the original pitch, only monophonic signals can be treated.
click on the red highlighted portion of instrument that you want to download then click win 32 for 32 bit operating system..then copy the dll file and paste it into c:/program files 86 :/imageline /flstudio/plugins/vst and paste here refresh the fl studio by going add then channel and then more plugins and start scanning ..find that instrument by name and enjoy
As the name implies, RockJam is a guitar capable of giving you the best of rock sound and deep melody similar to the type you only get from the studio and stage. The RockJam RGEG02-BK ST Style Electric Guitar Super Packstands as the highest quality and most accessible full-size electric guitar kit of the modern era, a quality that still outstands many buyers till date.
Most overdrive/distortion pedals can be used in two ways: a pedal can be used as a "boost" with an already overdriven amplifier to drive it further into saturation and "color" the tone, or it can be used with a completely clean amplifier to generate the whole overdrive/distortion effect. With care - and with appropriately chosen pedals - it is possible to "stack" multiple overdrive/distortion pedals together, allowing one pedal to act as a 'boost' for another.[44]

Like many others, Reinhold Bogner (born in Ulm, Germany, like the EL84 tube!) started his career with Fender mods. He founded his company in 1989 in Los Angeles and succeeded in earning a reputation among guitar amp manufacturers. His brand became famous with models like the Ecstasy 100A and 100B, where "A" stands for American (with 6L6 tubes) and "B" for British (with EL34 tubes). Among its famous users, you'll find Steve Stevens and Steve Vai (apparently your name must be Steve to be Bogner's friend).


It should also be mentioned, that LX does not just stand for U.S. made. Originally LX was an indicator for an Ovation guitar that included several new features that were not available on previous guitar models. Back in 2007 Ovation explained on its website, that the new features included the new OP-Preamp, an advanced neck system (lightweight dual-action truss rod, carbon fibre stabilizers), a patented pick-up (made of 6 elements), inlaid epaulets, scalloped bracing as well as a new hard composite Lyrachord GS body.[25] Back then, no such thing as an AX model line existed (the first AX models appeared on the Ovation-website in 2010). Based on the website’s history the LX features must have been introduced in 2004.
As we’ve shown here, a lot of relatively small—and inexpensive (many are practically free)—tweaks can hot-rod your tone and maneuver it to an array of differing ports of call. In some ways, it’s like tossing a handful of dice instead of just two—because the way small tweaks interact can lead to exponential changes in sound. For that reason, my advice is to take it slow and only make a single change at a time to understand what it delivers. Besides, it’s more fun (and less stressful) that way, anyway!
Are you seeking reliable information and or the evaluation of your vintage guitar's actual real world value today?.... JVGuitars has a simple solution and that is a Joe's Vintage Guitars E-Guitar Appraisal and they are only $45.00 per instrument its fast and its painless and will be conducted by email with no need for damage risk or shipping to and from. Help support JVGuitars service today and go ahead and just order your E-Guitar Appraisal NOW!.. We can send a quick Paypal invoice to you for this E-Appraisal and get started.... ORDER YOUR JVG- E-Guitar Appraisal TODAY! email us your request NOW for your Appraisal at JVGuitars@gmail.com

Paul has been great to work with, he's flexible, and knowledgeable on what works best for our son. Plus our lessons are in the comfort of our home! He always communicates with us on how our son is doing and if he needs to practice more, so he can show improvement on learning notes. Paul also purchased a bass guitar so he can work with our son on learning the bass as well. I also asked if he can help us shop and pick out a reasonable amp and he agreed to help out and suggested a few places to shop at. Working with Paul has made this experience easy as I was worried of finding a good fit for our son. I would recommend Paul to anyone and you can't beat his rate!


Okay, choose from the best electric guitar brands to suit your needs and look great too with this helpful guide for guitarists of all levels! Would you rather get the proven model, or trust a relatively unknown brand? This is especially true for those who are looking to buy their first instrument. With that in mind, we have compiled a list of top 10 electric guitar brands which you can trust. We will talk about each, and explain why they are the best guitar brands. On top of that, we will mention some models which we have had the chance to handle in the past.

Its ok to put diffrent brand pickups in, i have a guitar with an iron gear hammer head at the bridge for heavy riffing and a slash signiture at the neck for sweet blues solos. I had it wired diffrent though, 1 master tone 2 volumes and a blend knob, with the 3 way switch in the middle i was getting too much hammer head due to its out put being higher, so the blend knob allows me to fine tune the mix of the pickups.
I wish I had a cool story to attach to this guitar, but really this one is a history lesson regarding the development of Japanese guitar manufacturing.  Plus, it’s an example of some rare component combinations (like the pickups) that make guitars like these worth buying.  THEY’RE SO CHEAP!!  Hell, buy one of these for $200, send it to Dano and sink another $100 into it, and you’ll have yourself one hell of a player!  It’s like recycling, dude.
Very well cared for electric guitar.  Very light with a good tone provided by the maple neck and mahogany body. The S520EX features a thin, sculpted mahogany body bolted to a maple Wizard II neck with a 22-fret rosewood fingerboard with binding and claw scratch inlays only at the twelfth fret. Components include a pair of Ibanez Infinity covered humbucking pickups and a ZR ball-bearing pivot double locking tremolo bridge with a ZPS2 tuning stabilizer.
About the only thing that all these producers have tended to agree on across the board is that you should try to get your guitar sound as good as you can before you even think about recording. "The stupidest thing that any musician can do," remarks Tony Platt, "is to just plug in and play and say 'make that sound good'. It doesn't work like that. I will always say to the guitar player, for instance, 'Is that sound coming out of your amplifier the sound you want to hear? If it isn't, show me what it is and we'll try to get somewhere close to that before we even put a microphone on.' It's a waste of everybody's time to sit there tweaking stuff until somebody says 'Oh that's good.'"

Here we SOLD OUT: a real nice vintage 1986 Japanese crafted Ibanez LS-300 this is a unique classic series of hand built quality guitars made for a short era in limited quantities is a wonderful example of very good Japanese quality workmanship that were built with good quality materials these have stood the test of time ... post lawsuit era. This full size Dred has a classic sound and has quite nice articulate tone notes ring true & clear. This Mahogany neck is quite nice it has good and low finger play Action and has room to go either way with truss rod not maxed out at all , room to adjust to taste either way...body back & sides are also mahogany with some slight buckle mars on back but not to bad....it came in with fingerboard grime and a broken nut and old rotten strings so we started from scratch & cleaned & re-hydrated the woods especially the rosewood fingerboard was soaked and cleaned with lemon oil I just polished the frets most are showing little to no where and a few lower frets were polished down further leaving only slight signs of past play not taking hardly any off vintage frets and left its original integrity in tact, NECK WIDTH IS its 1-11/16ths nut width medium slim profile neck is very good its easy to play set up nicely...I did replace its nut with a compensated Martin bone nut and installed new strings....while doing this observing closely its overall condition to be excellent ....its top is nice and flat its made of beautiful straight grained Sitka spruce with some nice visible bear claw figure to it the Spruce is Solid it is center seamed 2 - piece, bridge is flat too with no cracks...x bracing is also tight...no cracks or separations, neck is straight to this day this is a great player folks...this tone is great for recording. Its noticeably fast pro feeling neck makes this one a pleasure to play. These pics were before new strings and clean & set up with new martin bone nut its even more beautiful now. any questions let me know thanks for your interest Joe, You can email me at: jvguitars@gmail.com.

If you do have logic of GarageBand they come with a vast sample library including lots of different guitar sounds, now combine that with melodyne and you can get some pretty convincing custom guitar parts. It's a slow process but it will sound a lot better than most straight VI's, I've done the same with brass section stuff in the past to good effect.
With the Orange Terror series, you can have premium high-gain tube tone without having to lug around heavy equipment. The Orange Micro is among the smallest in the Terror series of amps, following the same streamlined design of its siblings, but with a different "dark" tonality. This lunchbox amp combines a 12AX7 preamp tube with a solid-state power amp, all packed in a compact and lightweight profile.

Two and a half steps down from standard tuning. Used in Swedish death metal by bands such as At The Gates, Dismember, Edge of Sanity, Entombed, Amon Amarth, and Arch Enemy (during the Johan Liiva era), as well as Fear Factory, Carcass, Type O Negative, Cathedral, Seventh Void, Fleshgod Apocalypse, Sepultura, Five Finger Death Punch, Soulfly, Within Temptation, Triptykon and guitarist Kirk Windstein of Crowbar and Kingdom of Sorrow.
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While these sum up the most significant Gibson tone woods, other species do occasionally contribute to the brew. Swamp ash lends the Les Paul Studio Swamp Ash a degree of twangy sweetness and a round, slightly scooped midrange, while the most common Gibson fingerboard woods, rosewood and ebony, even make their mark on the frequency spectrum. Rosewood generally helps to add a certain thickness and creaminess to the tone—warming up the voice of a maple neck, or adding depth and cohesiveness to that of a mahogany neck—while an ebony fingerboard, long considered an upmarket option, contributes tightness, brightness, and a quick attack.
Slash is a longtime fan of legend Seymour Duncan’s hand-wound pickups, and for his new Epiphone Firebird, Slash choose custom Seymour Duncan "Slash" open coil-humbuckers for the rhythm (APH-1) and the lead positions (APH-2). These were Slash’s first custom pickups made with Seymour Duncan and feature Alnico II magnets and are slightly overwound for a boosted output. Each pickup has a single conductor cable, a long-legged bottom plate, and a wooden spacer. Controls include individual Volume and Tone pots with traditional Black Top Hat knobs with metal inserts and pointers along with a Switchcraft 3-way Toggle switch. Tone controls for both pickups also feature Sprague "Orange Drop" capacitors (0.022uF, 600V, 5%), the same capacitors Slash uses on his custom designed Les Pauls.

The Supro aluminum Hawaiian lap steel was similar to Beauchamp/Electro’s “frying pan,” with a round body and guitar-like neck, very similar to the Rick, but with the top carved away to allow a little more access. Given the close nature of the L.A. guitar world, it’s entirely possible that all these aluminum guitars were cast at the same place. The head was three-and-three with a single cutout in the middle. The Supro had dot inlays on the fingerboard, with an alternating two/one pattern and four dots at the octave. A rectangular Supro logo plate sat between the pickup cover and the fingerboard. The pickup – the single-coil version of the Stimson design – was mounted under a raised cover (part of the casting) with a slit to reveal the bar polepieces. It had one volume knob on the treble side and was housed in small form-fit hardshell case. This was closest to Beauchamp’s patented electro guitar design, making the Supro brand a direct descendent of George Beauchamp. An important point to remember is that these cast aluminum guitars were made in Los Angeles.
Integrated MIDI Learn and automation tools streamline your workflow, while the dedicated Live View makes GUITAR RIG 5 PLAYER the perfect companion when performing. A range of versatile built-in tools assist you in the studio and on stage: A Metronome with different syncing options, two Tapedecks for easy recording and play-along, a Tuner and a Preset Volume tool with Dry/Wet settings are all at your disposal.
American Fenders and USA Gibsons are not NOT for beginners! They are for people like myself who have invested 15+ years into developing the skills required to defend a purchase of one. IF you want beginner guitars, go see Mexico Fenders or Epiphone Guitars. Better yet, worry more about your skill and not which brand in on your headstock. I played for 11 years before I upgraded my Epiphone to a Gibson.
The "tone block' or "sustain block" as it is better known is the idea that if you anchor the bridge to something different(Brass in Alembics case) you can effect the tone, or increase/decrease the sustain of an instrument. It rarely works, and is one reason why the idea never really caught on. Eventually they found you can influence the sound more through the headstock than the body.
Morning everyone, well it is here in UK anyway. Who can help with my find. It's a Dia Hummingbird labelled F 315 but no serial number. So from what I can find Dia was a brand used by Matsumoku but I can only see electrics under Dia brand when I search. However it looks identical to a Aria F315 Hummingbird on eBay USA at present, and identical to an Aria Pro II from the 1976 catalogue but labelled W 30 model I believe. I won't put a link on here in case I'm breaking rules. It has that weird aluminium compensated bridge and seriously, this one looks brand new with two tiny dings that would make it a second or an ex-demo if it was on sale. Action at low E 12th is about 2.7mm and about 1.8 at high e. It's in such good condition I began to question if in fact it is a 'knock off of a knock off' though why anyone would think that would work I can't guess. It is very very playable, and at first I wasn't keen on the tone though sustain is great (despite bridge) but I changed to heavier strings (13) with much improvement. I'm seeing a luthier friend next week who is finishing off work on a brilliant Terada FW 613 (D18 clone if you like), but I'm wondering whether to get him to replace the whole alloy bridge. I can do a couple of pics if anyone is interested. Any help in identification of maybe year (guessing 1976) and origin greatly appreciated. I think it's a keeper, but should I change that bridge ? Has anyone done similar on one of these compensated aluminium designs and what were results. Many thanks.
Another way to set up your pedals is by placing them within the effects loop of your amplifier.  An effects loop is an audio input and output loop that is placed after the preamp and before the power amp section of your amplifier, using the Effects Send and Effects Return jacks. On some amplifiers, these can be labels Preamp Out (Effects Send) and Power Amp In (Effects Return).  Not all amplifiers have effects loops, but those that do allow for you to place some of your effects within the loop.
If your volume and tone knobs start to make crackling or popping noises through your speaker whenever you’re plugged in, or if the signal is weak, inconsistent, or cuts out altogether in certain positions on your controls, some foreign matter (however minute) has probably lodged itself in your controls. Dust and rust pose the greatest potential threat to any electronic connection.
OK some people will know this already but let’s just be clear about switch terminology. A switch as you see it on the bench in front of you will often be a set of switches, mechanically connected within a single assembly. Wikipedia explains. The important thing to remember is the number of ‘poles’ is the number of switches that you have ganged together off a single lever in the component and the ‘throw’ or ‘way’ part describes how those switches operate.

Teisco produced guitars that were sold in the U.S. as Teisco del Rey as well as Silvertone, Beltone, Duke, Decca, Heit Deluxe, Jedson, Kimberly, Kingston, Lyle, Norma, Tulio and World Teisco, as well as some of the early Kents. At various times Teisco guitars were made for and sold under the now well-known Ibanez name. They have developed somewhat of a cult following in the U.S. which has resulted in some unrealistic prices for some models.
Consider how many transformations take place during the production of sound from an electric guitar. The guitarist picks a string with a plastic plectrum, which produces vibrations that are picked up by coiled magnets directly positioned behind the strings, inducing an alternating current (hence the name “pick-ups”). The current’s signal is then transmitted through a wire lead, after which it’s amplified by either a vacuum tube or solid-state amplifier, and then reshaped into audible sound by a loudspeaker. Depending on the sound that a guitarist is seeking, he or she may place guitar effect pedals, or stompboxes, in between the pick-ups and the amplifiers. These small, intermediary devices further manipulate the guitar signal to produce a multitude of effects.
Thirdly, yamaha has been known for musical instruments for a long long time and is the biggest producer of musical instruments. On its logo, it has got two tuning pegs meaning unlike any other musical brand, it is the most diverse. The only reason that people say fenders and gibsons are better is because they were the original makers of contempory electric guitars and the fact that they're well known. So basically, all you're paying for is the badge.

I'm not sure if the same applies to LPs, but on my BC Rich Mockingbird (which has the same tone/volume setup) if one volume knob is all the way off it'll only mute the guitar in the center position. Say the bridge volume is at 10 and the neck is at 0, I'll still get sound if the bridge pickup is selected but I won't get sound if both or just the neck are selected.
Along with Taylor, C.F. Martin and Co. sets the mark for top-level American-made acoustic guitars. They’ve been around since 1833, and today they make most of their guitars in Nazareth, Pennsylvania. They use premium materials to get the best look and sound out of their guitars, but they’re also a leader in understanding the environmental impact of over-harvesting tonewoods.

Nice ible. I JUST got a Squier Tele Custom ii (2) in the mail Friday after selling a keytar on ebay for $355. I bought it because it got great reviews for having 2 Duncan (designed, made in asia?) P90's and the price was right for a 1st guitar. the only thing i do not like is the ugly tele headstock. I bought a '68 Harmony Marquis last year for my 1st 1st guitar, not really knowing at the time how unrewarding/difficult it would be to learn on a P.O.S like that. So, even tho the pups are probably the last thing I would replace on it, it was cool to read a bit by someone else with a "less expensive" tele. Look up the Custom ii online, it has a great looking pickguard and the pup selector is up on the top horn like a les paul. Thanks for the tips!
Rarely have we come across a redesign of a classic instrument that is so thorough… yet still adheres so closely to the original! Neck shape, body contouring, hardware, pickups and electronics have all been under the microscope of Marr and his design cohorts in redesigning this short-scale offset classic. The new bridge design swaps the threaded rod saddles of the Jaguar for the bigger, solid, non-height adjustable Mustang saddles that sit flush on the bridge tray. The saddles just have a centre-placed string groove but this increased width means there's very little gap between the low E and the outer edge of the fingerboard the further up the neck you go. Marr has also ditched the traditional dual rhythm/lead concept. This Jag has just one circuit: standard volume and tone controls and a four-position lever switch mounted on the smaller of the three chromed plates. In position one, it offers just the bridge pickup; position two, bridge and neck pickups (in parallel); position three, neck pickup; and lastly position four, neck and bridge pickups (in series). We still have the slide-switch style of the original Jaguar to engage not one, but two, of the original's high-pass filters. The top switch is the master filter (up engages the cut); the lower switch, mounted at a right angle, only works on position four where forward is on (ie, it introduces the cut). Both these switches stick up less than the standard slide switches too, and are slightly more comfortable: typical of the thought and detail that has gone into this guitar. There's Fender-aplenty in the sounds but, as Marr says, Gretsch and Rickenbacker spring to mind, especially with a little tone roll-off. Above all though, the clarity, and the musical sweetness of the tones allow for complex chord voicings for jazzier rhythms or simpler soul and funk styles. The Johnny Marr Jaguar is a thorough redesign from the perspective of a very busy working guitarist. Aside from the low E being rather too close to the fingerboard edge in higher positions, it's faultlessly built for purpose, addresses five decades of 'Jaguar-ness' and puts a decidedly leftfield design squarely back in the mainstream.
Modulating Offset: The output of solid-state amplifiers is directly connected to 2 DC power supplies through the output transistors. The instantaneous non-symmetry within the music waveform (particularly from the bass notes) is averaged as a modulating DC offset. This modulating offset is small, but it varies the efficiency of the speaker, introducing inter-modulation distortion, amplitude modulating the music. This problem is mostly eliminated by the trend to use an active sub-bass. In valve amplifiers the output transformer isolates the speaker from the amplifier electronics. No modulating offset can be produced.

Pick-Ups – The pickup is preset underneath the strings, on the body of the electric guitar and it works as a magnetic field. When the metal strings are plucked they vibrate and generate a current that is transmitted by the pickup to the guitar cable and to the amplifier. These may is just a single pickup in a guitar or 3 to 4 pickups depending on the guitar.
By the time this Blink-182 hit was recorded, the majority of Enema of the State had already been written. Tom DeLonge wanted to add one more song to the album that was simple, and radio friendly so he got to work. The lyric “She left me roses by the stairs” came about when DeLonge’s girlfriend at the time left him roses on the stairs, and the singer found them late one night after recording. The “na na na” section was also inspired by the next band.
How is PRS 12? Most pro's have switched from Gibson to PRS, or from any brand to PRS for that matter. Go to any guitar store and put ANY PRS against any high end guitar and see for yourself. "Ibanhad" should be taken off this list, and all these 3rd rate walmart brands should be removed as well. How are there brands on the bottom of this list that don't even produce guitars?
That’s not an overstatement, as traces of T-Bone’s influence can be heard in the early recordings of Albert, B.B. and Freddie King, Muddy Waters, and especially Chuck Berry, who adopted many of Walker’s signature licks as his own. A sharp-dressed, flamboyant performer who played the guitar behind his head and did the splits without missing a note, Walker helped reposition the guitar player from the sidelines to center stage, inspiring Buddy Guy, Jimi Hendrix and Stevie Ray Vaughan to copy his impossible-to-ignore moves.
Here we have something quite beautiful and very sweet sounding that I picked up directly from the very talented luthier himself while in Hawaii ...I liked this one because it has some very beautiful intricate inlay hand work see the gorgeous inlaied rosette and fingerboard not overstated just classicly tasteful WoW.. this is a Gorgeous all SOLID WOOD Hawaiian figured Koa Tenor Ukelele. I love the tone of this beauty and so will you its classic Uke tone is rich and full and plays like butta... Top wood : Solid Koa Back & Sides Material Solid Koa Neck Material : Solid AAA flamed grade Mahogany, Headplate wood: Solid Koa Strings : Italian Aquila Strings Fingerboard wood : Solid Rosewood Bridge wood : Solid Rosewood Nut Material : Real Buffalo Bone Finish : Polished Satin nitrocellulose instrument lacquer Scale Length : 17" Overall Length : 26 1/2 "( 673 mm ) Fingerboard Width At Nut : 35 mm Fingerboard Width At 12th Fret: 43.8 mm # Of Frets Total : 20 Hand picked for its great solid construction and impecable workmanship fit & finish are top notch, excellent volume & tone -playability and beauty. You will be hard pressed for find one this sweet for twice the price... Just $329. Direct comes with a top shelf hard shell case / included .
Great sounding pedal reasonably easy to assemble. First, if you havent much experience, take the time to study up on PCB's, it's not step by step. If you have trouble reading the resistors there are apps that tell you the values by scrolling through the band colors. My only problem was wiring the jack outlets because the print isn't that great in that area. 2 or 3 components didn't match the PCB's labeling but I looked at the product's pic and figured it out. It took about 3 1/2 hrs with eating dinner in there somewhere. Now some friends want me to make them one also! 4 stars because of the jack outlet picture and no green wire
I own one of these that I found in the trash on the side of the road - I have to say it has a good bit of wear and looks like it might fall apart any second in blue with black and chrome hardware - you couldn't pay me to get rid of this thing. I love the way it sounds and plays - its the benchmark for me for all my other acoustics - I dig the sound of this beast. Been a total metal monster for an acoustic \m/>.<\m/
My sound is pretty clean with no overdrives or distortion. Besides a tuner and a volume pedal, I use a delay and a reverb pedal (TC Electronics) and I have a freeze pedal as well (EH Superego). I’m never sure if the freeze pedal should come before or after the delay and reverb. By trying both options I can’t really hear a difference in the overall sound which I guess is fine. Any thoughts or recommendations are welcome.
The movement to all-transistor amplifiers probably followed hot on the heels of the hybrid amps of 1968. The 1971 Univox catalog features a new, updated line of tube amps, but also has a little offset-printed flyer showing the Univox A Group of solidstate amps, which probably debuted a year or two before. These had black tolex-covered cabinets with vinyl handles, black grillcloths surrounded by white beading, and, on some, corner protectors. On amps with front-mounted controls, the logo had changed to wide, block, all-caps lettering printed on a metal strip running across the top of the grillcloth just under the panel. Combo amps with this logo treatment included the U-150R and U-65RN. The U-150R ($177.50) offered 20 watts of power running through two 10″ speakers, with reverb and tremolo, three inputs, and six control knobs. The U-65RN ($110) had 15 watts, one 15″ speaker, reverb and tremolo, with three inputs and five knobs. Joining these was the UB-250 ($150), a piggyback bass amp with 20 watts, 15″ speaker cabinet, two inputs, volume and tone. The U-4100 Minimax ($299.50) was a bass combo amp with 100 watts pushed through a 15″ speaker. Controls were on the back, with two channels for bass and normal. This had a rectangular logo plate on the upper left corner of the grille, with block letters and a round bullet or target design.
Pre-delay: No pre-delay? No problem! Some reverb plug-ins, from freeware favourites to tasty convolution types, don't offer pre-delay — a user-configurable gap before the onset of a reverb's early reflections and tail. It's useful to have, though, as it can contribute to the clarity and separation of individual voices and instruments in a mix when large amounts of reverb are used. Using most software DAWs it's straightforward to rig up a pre-delay for a reverb (or any other effect) that doesn't have one. All you do is set up your reverb on an aux track or channel, but place a simple delay plug-in in a slot above it. Set both plug-ins' wet/dry mix parameters to 100 percent wet, and feed them some audio using an aux send on your normal audio tracks. Now the delay plug-in operates as a pre-delay for the reverb: easy! This kind of 'modular' pre-delay actually opens up some interesting possibilities. By using a multi-tap delay, or a simple delay with some feedback, your dry signal can be fed to the reverb several times, making for longer, more complex — or plain weird — reverb tails. Robin Bigwood
The Viper came in two versions made of ash, maple, alder or mahogany, the 1271, with two single-coil pickups, and the 1273 Viper III with three single-coils. Vipers had two-octave unbound fingerboards of either rosewood with pearl dot inlays or maple with black dots. A laminated pickguard (with model name engraved) held the pickups and extended down the body for the controls, including master volume and tone knobs. The plastic-and-metal bridge/tailpiece assemblies were the same as on the early Preacher. The single-coil pickups were about the size of mini-humbuckers with metal sides, black inserts, and flat polepieces. Windings were different depending on the position. The bridge pickup had poles slanted diagonally that emulated the slant of a Strat. Early Vipers have a three-way toggle. As with the Preacher, later Vipers have no name engraving, the all-metal bridge assembly, and an extra toggle which is probably a series/parallel switch.
If there was any doubt left in the late 1950s that the guitar – not the saxophone – was rock & roll's essential lead instrument, Duane Eddy settled the argument: See his 1958 single "Rebel Rouser," curled with country twang and rippling with tremolo. "Chet Atkins used vibrato in a selective way – Duane Eddy used it to thrash the music," says the Kinks' Dave Davies. The impact of Eddy's hits, like "Forty Miles of Bad Road" and "Peter Gunn," would soon be heard in surf music and guitarists such as Jeff Beck and George Harrison.
I recently purchased this guitar,and was wondering if you had any insight of it? i.e.-the pick up selector switch has a reverse,mono,& off setting.Question is:I would like to know if their are certain settings that only work,because I'm just not hearing that much of a difference in sound with this thing? I am running through two amps with the "VOX" original stereo chord,it has 12 volume & 12 tone knobs.
Many Rickenbackers — both guitars and basses — are equipped to be compatible with a “Rick-O-Sound” unit via an extra “stereo” output socket that allows the two pickups (or neck and middle pickup combined/bridge pickup, in the case of three pickup instruments) to be connected to different effects units or amplifiers. Another idiosyncrasy of Rickenbackers is the use of two truss rods (rather than the usual one) to correct twists, as well as curvature, in the neck.
The guitar builder for the giants of jazz, Ibanez now introduces the Artstar AS153 Semi-Hollow Electric Guitar, to answer the needs of the working professional player. Crafted from specially selected tone woods, this guitar features a bone nut, ebony fingerboard, hand-rolled frets and Ibanez's famous Super 58 pickups-capable of tone magic any place...  Click To Read More About This Product
Complete information is not available, but guitars included the GC-2 with two humbuckers and GC-3 with a humbucker/single/single layout. It’s not known if there was a single-humbucker model, but there may have been if the Ultra Hard Body series pattern holds true. One twin-pickup BC-2 was offered, presumably Fender-style, with one P and one J-style pickup. Possibly a single-pickup bass was also offered. One source also lists a CG-21 with a humbucker/single/single pickup arrangement, but no other information is available.

Because each of these requires duplicating your signal once or several times, you want to do it after you've added all of the other dynamic, filter-based, and gain effects. There is no sense in trying to get a distortion or equalizer pedal to react to a series of recombined signals when you can take care of that before hand. You'll get much higher quality and accurate modulation out of it this way.
Locking vibrato: Often referred to as a Floyd Rose bridge after its inventor, like the two-point rocking tremolo, it provides individual intonation and height adjustments. It rocks on two bolts in the top of the guitar and is spring-loaded. The difference is that it clamps down on the strings at both the bridge and head nut. The result is rock-solid tuning, even when the vibrato arm is used radically.
At first the company produced high-quality acoustic instruments for students and working professionals, aiming at providing good value for money and experimenting with the use of Australian woods. In the 1960s they expanded into electric instruments and instrument amplifiers, at first under the nameMagnetone. The early catalogues noted that the warranties on amplifiers and loudspeakers were void if used in situations of “overload or distortion“, reflecting Bill’s jazz background but still incredible to modern electric guitarists of any style.
MY kid brother has been playing drums since he was a kid , until I snuck him into a bar at 15 one night and he set in with the house band , he played all my music. He was good so he & the lead guitarist clicked & they released a CD that took off & then the guitarist was killed , my brother got a doctorate in music and has played on several good CD's , MTB being but one. he can now play nearly everything and has released two more CD,s ,and owns his own studio , me I'm only an electrician but I understand Harmonic heating in electronics . its right that a watt is a watt,& it's a way to measure power & its sold in kilowatt hours, but even though a watts is a watt when measured, its a measurement of energy , it still depends on how it's used as to how far it goes or what you get from it ,it has a lot to do with how clean or distorted it is as to how loud it seems , people will perceive it differently , the only way to find to find how loud ? a decibel meter, another measurement .
Some early Valco instruments continued to make it into the marketing pipeline – early on, at least. Probably as a sign of the increasing difficulty in getting product, the Spring/Summer 1942 Sears catalog sported a full complement of Supro guitars, essentially the ’41 line, all labeled with the newly-chosen Sears brand name, Silvertone. Shown in the ’42 Sears catalog were the Supro Capitan and Supro Rio, now renamed the Silvertone Crest (carved torch logo) and Silvertone Spanish (no logo), respectively. The Capitan had a standard trapeze tailpiece rather than the Dobro variety, with permanent cord coming out of the top of the lower bout!
Unten ist die Standard-Lage des Stegs für AF-, AFS- und AG-Gitarren. Stellen Sie die Lage ein, um richtige Intonation zu erhalten. AF, AFS, AK TONABNEHMER (PICKUPS) Der Ausgangspegel des Instruments ebenso wie die Signalqualität kann durch die Tonabnehmer-Höhe beeinflusst werden. Die Höhe sollte so eingestellt werden, bis die Lautstärke von Hals- und Steg-Pickup bei voll aufgedrehtem Lautstärkeregler gleich...
 Great, low priced, vintage Japanese project guitar. May be Decca, Teisco or similar. Has "P90" style, Japanese pickup installed which is not original to the guitar. Solid Mahogany body and neck with Brazilian rosewood fingerboard. Body is perfectly flat and is a thin 1.25" thick. Back of neck profile is very "flat". Top of original bridge is missing and has a wooden one laying in it's place. The pickup is wired directly to the output jack as there are no pots. 3 of the original tuning machines have had their gears changed. All work fine. The headstock logo is missing. We have no additional parts with this one, nor a case or gig bag. Guitar as photo'd only. Would make a great vintage, Japanese, project / player guitar.
The first Touch Guitar Invention started in 1959 with the filing of patent #2,989,884 issued in 1961 as the first touch tapping instrument which could be played on two separated necks Simultaneously by muting the strings at the distal end of the neck along with numerous other claims. Until 1974 it was known as the DuoLectar and with a new patent "the "Electronic Mute" has been known as the "Touch Guitar. It is held in the normal way over the shoulder and design with the left hand playing the lower bass neck in a traditional way and the right hand playing over the top on a neck which has a wider string spacing allowing the hand to be used in both vertical and horizontal angels to the strings. It is absolutely off at all times, until Touched or picked.
A Squier strat is a killer starter instrument (it has the looks, playability, and classic style beginners are looking for). But the guitar itself is only part of the journey when learning an instrument. Especially with electric guitar, you’ll need things such as a small practice amp, a strap, a case, some picks and more. Thankfully, companies such as Fender now cater to the first-time buyers with all-inclusive packs that house a pretty solid guitar along with some great beginner gear to get you jamming. The Strat in this pack gives you three single coil pickups for that crisp, bright, clear sound, a five-way selector switch for all the classic Strat options, as well as a fulcrum-based tremolo to add nice depth to your playing. But the pack includes a lot more than just the guitar.
1950s: occasional Adirondack red spruce. In 1952 or 1953, rumor has it Martin bought a large supply of Engelmann spruce from government surplus. Though Martin preferred Adirondack Red Spruce, it was no longer available after the mid-1940s because all of the large trees had been decimated. Martin would have liked to switch from Sitka to Engelmann because he felt that Engelmann was closer to Adi Red Spruce than Sitka was. He could not however find anyone who was cutting Engelmann commercially, so they went back to Sitka.
Hook, who covered the economics of running a nightclub in his 2009 book, “The Hacienda: How Not To Run a Club”, predicted: “The guitar companies are going to restructure and get smaller. The true artist in the company — the guy who builds a guitar by carving it out of a piece of wood hopefully will be the one that will be celebrated, not the middle management.”
Guitar FX BOX is acting just like a good collection of analog effect pedals. Just plug your guitar into the sound card input and your guitar will sing and scream. You can apply a wide range of high quality effects to guitar, voice, and other inputs real-time - I/O delay is really low, almost undetectable. This is achieved using DirectSound, WDM streaming or ASIO for fast access to the sound card hardware and special DSP algorithms optimized for real-time processing. Besides high sound quality, Guitar FX BOX features intuitive user interface, supports presets and hot keys for quick presets changing, MIDI/Game controllers pedals, configurable tuner, metronome, file input/output. Currently included effects: Overdrive/distortion, Amp&Speaker cabinet simulator, Echo, Pitch shifter, Reverb, Wah-Wah, Chorus, Tremolo, I/O Equalizers, Dynamic compressor, Phaser and Volume swell.
Juszkiewicz, 64, is known for being temperamental, ultracompetitive and difficult to work for. A former Gibson staffer recalls a company retreat in Las Vegas punctuated by a trip to a shooting range, where executives shot up a Fender Stratocaster. In recent years, Juszkiewicz has made two major pushes, both seemingly aimed at expanding a company when a product itself — the guitar — has shown a limited ability to grow its market.
Festive music track with cheerful and happy mood, with “We Wish You A Merry Christmas” song melody. I’ve included in pack different logo and looped versions of this track, for your comfortable using. This celebratory track can be used for Winter Holyday projects, children arcade games, as New Year jingles, advertising and Youtube commercial video. Enjoy!
The free GUITAR RIG 5 PLAYER is ready to rock right from the start: It offers a supreme selection of modular, high-class components, effects and routing tools, bundled as the free FACTORY SELECTION. For classic power and gain the Tube Compressor and Skreamer really come into their own, while a range of high-end effects such as the Studio Reverb and Delay Man can add that special touch. Choose from many Amp and Envelope modifiers as well as Routing Tools to further shape your sound to perfection.
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For decades, the Les Paul Special has been one of Epiphone’s best selling electric guitars. And the new Les Paul Special VE—inspired by the Les Paul, the greatest electric guitar in rock—continues the tradition of giving new both players and pros a real Les Paul at a price anyone can afford.

Case sold separately.

Classic Les Paul profile
The Les Paul Special VE has a Poplar body with a sleek look thanks to the Vintage Worn finish and no binding on the neck or body. The Les Paul VE is cut to the same classic profile of all Les Pauls and has a comfortable and fast Mahogany bolt-on neck with a 1960's SlimTaper D profile. The Rosewood fingerboard has traditional Pearloid "Dot" inlays, a 24.75” scale, a 14” radius, 22 medium jumbo frets, and a standard 1-11/16” nut. Just below the headstock is the famed “bell” shaped truss rod cover found on every Les Paul since the early '50s with “Vintage Edition” in white. 

Epiphone Open Coil Humbuckers
The Les Paul Special VE features Epiphone’s world famous open-coil humbuckers with a warm 650R in the neck position and a slightly hotter 700T in the bridge or lead position.Controls include a 3-way pickup selector switch, a Master Volume, and a Master Tone control, each with traditional “Black Speed Knobs” pots with long lasting
500K Ω potentiometers.

All-Metal Hardware
Epiphone features all-metal rock solid hardware on all of its instruments. The Les Paul Special VE comes standard with the legendary Locktone Tune-o-matic bridge and Stopbar tailpiece for easy set up. Tuning is fast and reliable with Epiphone Premium Covered tuners with a 14:1 ratio.The higher the ratio, the more accurate your tuning. The tuners are mounted on an Epiphone Clipped Ear headstock with Les Paul Model in gold and the Epiphone log in silver. In addition, a "2016" Edition logo is on the back of the headstock. 

All Epiphones come with a Limited Lifetime Warranty and Gibson’s world famous 24/7/365 Customer Service.", "value":"131.12", "priceMin":"131.12", "priceMax":"149.00", "priceSavingsMaxPrice":"0.00", "priceSavingsMaxPercent":"40", "inventory":"57", "brand":"Epiphone", "reviewStarImageUrl": "https://static.musiciansfriend.com/img/brand/mf/cmn/Sprit-Sm-Stars.png", "reviewStarRating":"4.0", "reviewStarRatingInteger":"8", "reviewHowManyReviews":"17", "usedOrNew":"used", "discontinued":"0", "onOrder":"0", "clearance":"0", "canBeSold":"1", "accessoryCategories":"site1LFMIC,site1HBA,site1LAAA", "stickerText": "Best Seller", "checksum":"93895071200", "priceVisibility": "1"}

At the end of the day, Squier has come a long way in this pas decade. They upped their game in terms of build quality as well as selection. If you are just starting out, Squier is one brand you can trust to give you a perfect tool for the job. If I was starting all over again, I’d go with Squier by Fender Classic Vibe 60’s Stratocaster in a heartbeat.
• Guitar : ELECTRIC SUNBURST captures the sound of a classic guitar, chosen with its rich, warm and versatile sound. The continuous signal path has been retained throughout, including high-quality cables, vintage tube preamps and high-resolution transducers to ensure that every nuance of this legendary instrument was accurately fixed. Since the string holder and neck were recorded separately, you can fully control the balance of the mix. Moreover, a condenser microphone was installed above the strings to capture subtle sound nuances and add punch and realism.
In 1966 Vox introduced the revolutionary but problematic GuitarOrgan, a Phantom VI guitar with internal organ electronics. The instrument's trigger mechanism required a specially-wired plectrum that completed circuit connections to each fret, resulting in a very wide and unwieldy neck. John Lennon was given one in a bid to secure an endorsement, though this never panned out. According to Up-Tight: the Velvet Underground Story, Brian Jones of the Rolling Stones also tried one; when asked by the Velvets if it "worked", his answer was negative. The instrument never became popular, but it was a precursor to the modern guitar synthesizer.
Look, as far as we know, our asymmetrically coiffed party pal has never held a guitar in his life. But no contemporary musician has a more primal understanding of adrenaline-pumping, pulse-raising, chest-caving bulldozer riffs than dubstep mosh ambassador Skrillex. Somewhere between the unfiltered piston-pumps of nü-metal and the twinkling emocore melodies that weaned him is a gaping sarlacc of yawping melodies and buzzsaw edges. The bass drop to “Scary Monsters and Nice Sprites” might just be this generation’s “Smoke on the Water” — look no further than the obscene number of “Skrillex guitar cover” videos on YouTube!
What you need is some basic knowledge about the physics of audio (most of which you can learn by dropping a pebble in a puddle of water), and some pretty basic and inexpensive equipment. This is especially true for recording the electric guitar. Trust me--if it were brain surgery, I would have become a brain surgeon and made my mother a much happier woman. And while I have the opportunity . . . for all you kids who want to grow up to be recording engineers--don't do it. Become brain surgeons. They make a lot more money, drive nicer cars, and never have to worry about where their next gig is coming from.
It looks like there was no information about Lyle guitars on google back in the day.Now you can find some info, but very little. I purchased my first guitar of my life age 14 from a seller on ebay for $100. I baught an awesome looking black SG style guitar with the name Lyle on it. Years later now, I know a lot more... Lyle is one of the rarest brands of guitar manufactured in the world. This rarety however does not increase the value of the instrument. Lyle is not a brand that can even be found in the guitar Pricing Guide. I have looked. The value is determined usualy by the seller. If your selling one, hit me up. Lyle was never associated with Gibson. Lyle was never purchased and closed down by Gibson. However, Lyle started manufacturing Gibson style guitars at a cheaper rate but they failed to observe copyright laws. Lyle was created by the Motsimoku Company in Japan from 1965 to 1970. In 1970 the Motsimoku Company was slapped with such high lawsuits by the Gibson Corp of the US, that they bankrupted and closed. Making Lyle one of the rarest brands of guitar because of their extreamely limited production life of 5 years.
Not a bad article, but I’d go even cheaper. As a long time guitar and bass player (no longer gigging) and father, with guitars high and low cost in the house, I would advise parents to get a new Yamaha, Epi, or Squier (or a good used one of those) for a couple hundred $ or less and a decent Fender or Vox,, Spider, etc modeler amp for the same and see what happens. It has been hard to keep my kids interested, hurts the fingers, and my guitars have low action and play like butter. It isn’t like Rock Star! Reportedly 90% drop out in the first year, and by the time you are my age maybe 99% have quit! Lot of used stuff in the closets out there! So go to a decent store or a friend who plays and seek their help and advice. And get it set up by someone who knows what they are doing. My current favorite setting out and being played a lot is a 1996 Korean Squier Strat Deluxe, used for $99. So if they say spend over $400 total amp and guitar, ask someone else! They lose value real fast!
A combo amplifier is a unit in which both the amp and speaker is integrated. You plug a guitar into one of these, turn it on and you are ready to play. The obvious benefit of a combo is that you have everything you need in one standalone unit, while the sound tends to be optimized by the manufacturer to be the best it can be – there’s no worrying about matching it with a good speaker. Combo amps also tend to be cheaper than heads and, as such, are excellent for beginners. While some are very capable of small to medium-sized performance, the drawback is that combos are limited in power compared to a head. They also tend to be much heavier, which can be a pain when regularly transporting it.
We avoid providing inaccurate ratings and recommendations that can arise due to the tested product or method of testing being flawed by analyzing large numbers of user and expert reviews to produce our ratings. This has the effect of reducing the impact of single opinions, including potentially flawed ones, in our results. We only end up with a high rating for a brand or product if the majority of reviews are positive and in the case of Seagull the overwhelming majority of reviews of all types are indeed positive.
On a Gibson type (like the Les Paul, 335 or SG) there are four knobs, one set of volume and tone controls for each of two pickups. The top two are volume and tone for the neck (Rythm) pickup. The bottom two are for the bridge (Treble) pickup. In the middle switch position, both sets of controls are available. If you have a Gibson type with three pickups the control layout can vary from instrument to instrument. The Epiphone Les Paul SG with three pickups has three volumes (one for each pickup) and a single (or master) tone control just next to the output jack. The Ace Frehley Les Paul (3 pickups) layout is such where the neck (Rythm) pickup is controlled by the top pair, the bridge (Treble) pickup is controlled by the bottom pair and the middle switch position activates the bridge and middle pickups that are controlled by the bottom set (Treble) of knobs.
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If a love of flamenco and salsa music sung by the Gipsy Kings brought you to the best classical guitar, then you are going to want to read this review. The Cordoba company, as you can now see, has quite the reputation for quality guitars, and their GK Studio Negra left-handed model—a Gipsy Kings signature instrument—could easily be the right one for you (no pun intended).

Small guitars were often looked at as mere travel or couch alternatives, but times have changed and they are making a comeback on big stages. The LX1E Little Martin is at the forefront of this rekindled interest, with artists like Ed Sheeran impressing big crowds with just his humble and small LX1E. Thankfully, its price has remained stable despite the its current worldwide recognition.


Join the "Cigar Box Revolution"! This La Vox Cigar Box Electric Guitar is built from a decidedly uptown-looking round box. Neck-through construction means it is heavier than most cigar boxes, and it performs more like a standard electric guitar. Play some raw, smokin' blues, back-alley funk, or whatever else wells up from deep down inside.  More details...
To capture two speakers in a multi-speaker cab or record a bigger sound that delivers the response of two different microphones in similar positions on one speaker, you can try using two mics in a close or semi-close placement. If you’re using two different mics on a single speaker, place the capsules of each as close together as possible, without touching, in order to minimize phase cancellation. This technique might seem redundant, but can often yield outstanding results, allowing you to blend the characteristics of two different microphones to capture one amp sound – a bright, detailed condenser and a punchy, midrange-heavy dynamic, for example. On guitar cabs carrying two or more speakers, try miking each speaker separately, placing each of two mics – same type or different – at the same distance. Some amp makers use different types of speakers in cabs to enhance sonic complexity, and this miking technique will make the most of those. Even two speakers of exactly the same type, however, will often sound slightly different, and blending them might yield great results.
Quartal and quintal harmonies also appear in alternate tunings. It is easier to finger the chords that are based on perfect fifths in new standard tuning than in standard tuning. New standard tuning was invented by Robert Fripp, a guitarist for King Crimson. Preferring to base chords on perfect intervals—especially octaves, fifths, and fourths—Fripp often avoids minor thirds and especially major thirds,[102] which are sharp in equal temperament tuning (in comparison to thirds in just intonation).
Many guitars (even new guitars) need the frets leveled in order to play buzz-free with low action. Most electric guitars with bolt-on necks come from the factory with high tongue frets. Doing great fret work is a learned art, and I guarantee that you will be happy with mine. All my fret work jobs are performed with the guitar mounted in a neck jig that simulates string tension. This allows very accurate work. Re-fret jobs include leveling the fretboard if needed.

I taught myself how to play on a beat-up old acoustic decca my mom let me have. I couldnt begin to guess how old it is, but it must be just that; its serial number is 129! It has a pretty decent sound, but i really should replace the strings. it has 18 frets and marks at 5 7 9 and 11. Theres no pickgaurd, the body is orangish wood with thick finish and the neck is some sort of dark wood. The damn thing gave me headaches when i was learning because the strings were so far from the fretboard and all incredibly thick too. It came with extra strings and medium and heavy picks. I dont think it would be worth too much now, especially in its condition.
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In 1883, a german immigrant named Frederic Gretsch started a small instrument manufacturing company in Brooklyn, New York. On a trip to visit home in 1895, he died unexpectedly, leaving the company in the hands of his 15-year-old son, Fred. The company flourished for generations, especially due to the popularity of their hollow body guitars with rockabilly, blues, and jazz musicians. In 1967, however, the brand began to falter after the Gretsch family sold to then music industry giant Baldwin. In 1985, Fred W. Gretsch bought the company back from Baldwin and began restoring it to its former glory – coinciding with the rise of one of their most prolific artists, Brian Setzer of the Stray Cats. Today, their guitars, like the USA Custom Shop White Falcon pictured above, are used by a wide array of musicians from all walks of life, including Billy F. Gibbons of ZZ Top, Tim Armstrong of Rancid, Band of Skulls, and Portugal. the Man.
Daron Malakian (b. 1975) is the lead guitarist for System of a Down. During the System of a Down era, Daron played IC200's and IC300's on stage. During the Toxicity era, Malakian played a variation of the Ibanez Iceman ICX, with custom artwork designed by his father, then a special edition "DMM1" was released by Ibanez. The DMM1 featured more artwork by Malakian's father, Vartan Malakian (b. 1947). After using Gibson guitars for 5 years, Daron switched back to Ibanez and began using an Iceman again.

Samick is a South Korean based musical instrument manufacturer, which was founded in 1958 by Hyo Ick Lee, with the goal of "enriching human life through music, the universal language". By the mid-1990s, they were the single largest guitar manufacturer in the world! Because they build under contract for many famous brand names, more likely than not, you've already played one of their guitars.
People sometimes don't really know what they want and use other brands of amps. They haven't found their sound yet and kind of trying other stuff or heard someone or some artist talking of using it and try. But that is not good enough and then they try a Fender. With a Fender you can create your own sound whether you are using pedals or just using the amp and the guitar. A true wonder for every player. Fender's just the best
Up for auction is an approximately 1973 fender champ cabinet, grill, and Weber sig8 speaker. Chassis was removed and rehoused years ago and this cab has been collecting dust. Tolex was removed and the solid pine cabinet has a nice amber shellac finish. Good sounding cab With a great sounding Weber speaker perfect for a restoration or new build. Handle, Grill, and chassis mounting straps will also be included.
Kaman began producing guitars in 1966, and Charles went on the road to promote his new creation. His first stop was a visit to his old stomping grounds, Washington, D.C., where he showed his guitar to jazz guitar great Charlie Byrd. Byrd was impressed and felt the guitar – which was quite loud – had considerable potential. He later remarked that the guitar “deserved an ovation,” thus providing the guitars with a name.

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While relatively new compared to many established brands on the market, Seagull has managed to gain traction in the past few decades. Started in Canada in 1982, the company focuses on building high-quality acoustic and acoustic-electric guitars. These usually use solid tops rather than laminated tops, resulting in crystal-clear sounds and superior quality.

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The size of the acoustic guitar body also influences its voice. Larger instruments, with dreadnought or jumbo bodies, generally produce more volume. They also tend to have warmer, rounder tones that accentuate bass notes. Smaller guitars, such as parlor, concert and “000” models, usually have a brighter sound that accentuates their middle and treble ranges.
Taylors are okay as guitars go, but... I've owned three, sold them all in mint condition and lost considerable coin in doing so. I think they belong on this list because they charge hand made prices for MASS PRODUCED guitars. Don't believe me? Take the Taylor that you own and do a search for it on eBay. That's right, at this very moment there are hundreds of guitars just like yours for sale on eBay. And that's only checking this one sales venue! These guitars are worth half of what you paid because the market is saturated with them. Taylor cranks out hundreds of them per day and 100's of thousands per year. If you're shopping and seriously considering a Taylor, you can get comparable quality and far better value elsewhere. Choose carefully and you'll see your investment go up in value. Aside from some special, collectable models of Taylor, you will loose money on this brand.
The technique is often executed by the little finger of the guitarist which is wrapped around the volume pot of the guitar. When the note is struck the volume is increased from zero by a rolling motion of the little finger. Alternatively, the effect is achieved with a volume pedal. It is sometimes called "violining", because the sound is similar to a bowed violin. Allan Holdsworth pioneered the technique of the pedal swelling along with a delay unit to create a thicker sound that is more associated with the cello. - winner333
Mid-to high-priced amps may have other switches (which on some amps are switched on by pulling an existing rotary knob out) that boost or cut some part of the frequency range, such as "bright boost", "deep boost" or "mid scoop" switches. Amps with an onboard audio compressor or limiter, which is used to protect the speakers from sudden peaks in volume and from damage due to power amplifier clipping, may have only an on/off switch to turn on the effect (as with lower- to mid-priced amps), or they may have one or more knobs to control how much compression is applied to the bass tone (typically a ratio and threshold knob or just a single knob). Some 2000s-era amps may have an electronic tuner and a mute button, to mute the sound of tuning during a break between songs without having to change the volume settings. On some amps, vertical sliders may be provided to control a graphic equalizer, which gives the bassist control over a number of frequency bands.
Eventually, silicon transistors replaced germanium ones, helping to combat the inconsistent sounds of the germanium version (each circuit varies, and they were often affected by hot temperatures). Silicon completely changed the distortion, making it brighter, edgier, and more aggressive, as exemplified by the famous Electro-Harmonix Big Muff. The later introduction of the integrated circuit provided even more stability. Digital emulators can now universalize effects in a standalone unit. Materials don’t lie, however; when compared to their analog ancestors, the digital units lack the unique wildness of the germanium effect.
You want a guitar that isn't going to fight you - If you're a smaller person, you'll want a guitar with a smaller body. And if you have particularly small hands, it might be worth looking into a 3/4-size guitar to start out. The way the guitar looks is going to matter a fair bit as well. If it doesn't look good, you aren't going to be as inspired to pick it up and practice.
A more successful early electric was the Ro-Pat-In "Frying Pan" guitar. This was played lap-steel style, and was the earliest I know of that uses something close to the magnetic pickups as they exist in modern guitars. This was conceptualized by George Beauchamp in 1931... he played Hawaiian style, thus the lap steel design. He met Adolph Rickenbacker and together the two worked out the details of the pickup system, and put this into production in 1932... the company name was eventually changed to "Rickenbacher".
yeah, i used to play the vht straight up sometimes. that amp was tonal sweetness, and had a tank reverb. if i dime it, i can get away with playing alot of stuff on the ac4. but i like having a little chorus for certain things, and i do a couple of songs that i would like to have a rotary pedal for, and although i'm not big on reverb, i don't mind using a touch of delay in place of it. if i did have a wah, i'd use it as a tone knob. oh, and i want a harmonizer. specifically, the eventide pitchfactor.
Anyone who has a Tempest XII probably needs a pick guard. I have a 1966 which was in the case for much of the past forty years. The plastic apparently dried out and "shrunk," causing the two corners to pop off at the screws near the neck. Some guitar repair technicians are good at fabricating pick guards, but most are either woodcrafters or electronics geeks. Please advise how your search has gone. Maybe I'll replace mine, too. RED
Almost all bass amplifiers are designed for use with an electric bass, which has magnetic pickups. When a double bass player is plugging their instrument into a typical bass amp, the signal usually comes from a piezoelectric pickup mounted on the bridge or beneath the feet of the bridge. The direct signal from a piezoelectric pickup does not usually sound good when it is plugged into a standard electric bass amp. Many upright bass players who use piezoelectric pickups use a preamplifier or preamp-equipped DI box before the signal is sent to the bass amp. The preamplifier helps to ensure that the impedance of the pickup signal matches the impedance of the amplifier, which improves the tone. Some preamplifiers also have equalizers which can be used to modify the tone.

This multi-effects pedal lets you setup your virtual rig with up to five effects that include various modulation, distortion, compressor, delay, reverb and other effects. They can also run alongside the Zoom G1Xon's built-in amp modeling, which lets you choose between 22 different amps. Those are a lot of features in a small unit, thankfully Zoom implemented an interface that makes tweaking and configuring easier. As expected although you are still limited by two footswitches, it comes with an expression pedal, which adds even more to its value and usability.
I have a shecter omen extreme 7 and found that the factor strings they put on were nice for my small fingers. I had to replace because the factor set in general needed some tweaking and they changed all the strings. Now i don't really like the strings they put on. Too small. All they had listed for the strings were 24X jumbo strings. What string set should i buy since i play Ambient, soft, but also djent metal.
The author is an excellent writer and explains everything slowly but doesn't treat you like an idiot. He starts from the very beginning with teaching string names, notation etc but you can start anywhere in the book according to your knowledge and experience. Each exercise/song teaches a new concept and there is a very good sound quality CD that is enjoyable to play along with and hear what the proper timing should be.
On this clip you can hear more things. First of all, the size is defined by the separate recordings of the original riff and the delayed riff, thanks to some reamping! This allowed me to spread them across the stereo field so the sound develops across the horizontal axis, rather than the depth. I was also able to adjust the delay time so that it isn't behind the beat. Finally, I decreased the feedback level and I had always control over the dry/wet balance via the volume fader of the delayed signal track. Isn't that nice? And the cherry on the cake is that with this sort of manipulation you have much more flexibility! Listen to this example:
The cost: The original G&L scheme calls for alternate pot values, but the project here uses the 500K pots found in most humbucker guitars, so all you need are wire, solder, and a few capacitors. On a three-knob guitar, you wind up with one master volume control and two master tone controls, but you sacrifice individual volume controls for each pickup.On a four-knob guitar, you still have independent volume controls, but you lose the independent tone controls.
With this high availability I can immediately check back with the program if I am unsure whether I am getting it right when practicing. I can play along to the backing track while practicing and I can continue with new material if I feel that I am ready to do so. All of this is simply not possible with a local instructor on a 30 minute per week basis.
While the decision to choose between bridges can be an overwhelming one, to simplify things, it’s better to choose one that’s appropriate for your skill level and your personal taste in music.  One bridge for the heavy metal genre may be absolutely frustrating for a country player.  For those with numerous guitars, you might have a different bridge on each instrument to suit that situation or style of music.
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The amps have a simple control set on the front panel: all versions have Gain, Tone and Volume controls except for MV50 Clean, which has Treble, Bass, and Volume. Also on the front panel is a small "VU" meter, and a 1/4" input jack. On the rear panel are a 1/4" speaker output jack, and a 1/4" headphones/line out jack. The amp includes cabinet simulation at the line out jack, and can thus be used as a DI to go straight into a mixer or recorder. There is also an EQ switch to select between "Deep" and "Flat." The Deep setting is intended for use with smaller cabinets where mids and highs tend to overwhelm the low frequencies, and Flat is designed to allow the amp to work with larger cabinets where the lower frequencies are more naturally present. Also present on the rear panel is the DC19V in jack, and the ECO on-off, standby-on, and Impedance switches with the following two exceptions: MV50 Clean has no Impedance Switch but instead has an Attenuator switch allowing the choice of either full power out, 1/10th power out, or 1/100th power out, and MV50 High Gain, which has no Impedance Switch but instead has a Mid Ctrl "minus/Norm/plus" switch allowing boost or cut of the amp's mid range.
Obviously, what I've done is to give myself a choice of three different sounds--a close, ballsy sound, a mid-range room sound, and a more distant room sound. By setting all three mics up at the same time, putting them each in a different input, and assigning them all to the same track on tape, I've given myself the option of having any one of those sounds immediately available to me, or a combination of them.

So, what string gauge is standard for electric guitars? Most new guitars come strung with super-light or light-gauge strings. For beginning guitarists, that’s probably a good place to start. As you develop fretting and picking skills and your fingers gain calluses and strength, you may want to gradually move up to heavier strings, depending on the music you play and the tone you seek. Many guitar manufacturers make specific recommendations about what strings to use. Some produce their own strings or have them custom-manufactured to their specifications.
Keep focused on one goal at a time. For example, you could spend a week or two really getting to know 5 chords (why 5? Just pick a realistic number for that window of time and go with it!). Then, in the next week or two, practice changing between those chords using different combinations. In the next week, work on your strumming or picking, using the chords and chord change combinations you've learned.
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PLUG THE PORES What you use to prep the body for paint depends on the chosen finish that you will go with. For a solid color finish you will want to fill any of the pores with a wood filler or Bondo glazing putty. I prefer Bondo because it dries quickly and sands smooth. Use one of those plastic speaders that you can get for mud at a paint or hardware store and press the filler firmly into the pores and gaps in the wood. Cut diagonaly accross and against the grain to fill the pores and gaps better. Use a sanding block and a 220 grit paper and after the filler dries to ensure an even flat surface. Only use your hands to lightly sand on the rounded edges or hard to reah areas of the guitar. The roundness of your fingertips can cause depressions in the woods surface so stick with the sanding block on the flat areas. Inspect the surface to see if any pores or gaps remain and repeat the steps if needed. Then clean the surface with a tack cloth to remove any dust.
James Valentine of Maroon 5 has a strong idea of what he wants in a guitar and so, along with the craftsmen at Music Man, has created his dream machine. Valentine's desire was for a guitar that blends innovation and a modern vibe, with a reassuringly classic appeal - a bit Gibson semi, a bit Fender Tele perhaps. So, with that in mind, an ash body - in this instance finished in what Valentine calls 'Trans Buttermilk' ('Trans Maroon' is, of course, available, too) - has been mated to a nutty-looking roasted maple neck. This is delightfully figured and comes with Music Man's proprietary wax and oil finish for a tactile but drag-free experience. Build and finish are, as always, dead on. Pickups and controls are interesting: while both pickups are standard humbucking size, the bridge unit is actually single coil, its pole pieces slanted like a Tele or Strat across the chrome cover. Controls are simple, but with a couple of neat twists in the form of push-push pots on both controls - an active boost of up to 20dB on the volume, and a coil-split for the neck humbucker on the tone. We like the 'hidden' nature of these sonic extras, because it adds genuine usability but keeps things uncluttered and intuitive. The Valentine looks familiar but just different enough, feels great sitting or standing, boasts a real player's neck, and its palette of tones - delivered in a fuss-free manner by a clever control and switching setup - is simply superb. Of the hundreds of models that have sought to blend humbucking and single coil tones, this has to be one of the best electric guitars.
The Ace Frehley (KISS) signature model, released in 1997 and re-released in 2012, has three humbucking DiMarzio pick-ups, a cherry sunburst finish (AAAA), a color image of Frehley’s face in his Kiss make-up on the headstock, and mother-of-pearl lightning bolt inlays, and Ace’s simulated signature on the 12th fret. There was a limited edition, Gibson Custom Shop run of only 300 guitars that were built with DiMarzio PAF, Super Distortion, and Dual Sound pickups. The production run model was only built with DiMarzio Super Distortion pickups. This was one of Gibson’s best selling artist runs. These guitars are now valued at between $US4,000–12,000.[citation needed]The more recent 2012 “Budokan” model features mother-of-pearl block inlays (no signature at the 12th fret), a Richlite fingerboard, Grover machine heads with pearloid banjo buttons, and a grade A maple top.[44]
These pedals essentially do the same thing with overdrive being regarded as a milder effect, similar to turning a tube amp all the way up and distortion a more extreme version of the same effect. Although these are designed for electric guitar, I’ve seen acoustic players use them to great effect through an amp or PA. If done well it provides a dramatic lift to a song. The most important thing is to be familiar with the sound and volume your pedal will create before you try it live.

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You can divide these further into cabinets and combos. A cabinet is simply an amplifier without a head. The head is all the knobs and so on that can be tweaked to produce variations in tone and volume. Combos include the head, so they're often preferred as they're easier to port around. However, if you want a multi-speaker setup, you'll want to opt for cabinets with separate heads.
The stars of the show are inarguably the pickups: the EMG Retro Active Hot 70 set, which goes for $200 alone. This combines a ceramic humbucker at the bridge and Alnico V humbucker at the neck—both open-coil—to produce the hot tones of Van Halen and other ’70s hard rock acts. They’re active pickups, too, wired to a FET preamp that minimizes noise and levels outputs.
The Thunderhead guitars would be offered until June of ’72, with several model designation changes along the way. In ’70, the K-1360 became the K-1213, and in May of the following year changed again to the K-1233. At the same time, the vibrato-equipped models also changed, the K-1460 becoming the K-1214 and then the K-1234. The Tornado lasted until the end in January, ’73, but also went through the model number changes along with the Thunderheads, the K-1160 becoming the K-1211 and then the K-1231. The vibrato Tornados went from K-1260 to K-1212 and then K-1232.
Our first impression of this guitar was that something must be wrong. Surely this guitar is way more expensive than we thought? We doublechecked and the truth is that it’s just incredible value for money. Both the design and the sound are wonderfully good and we understand why Schecter describe their Schecter Hellraiser guitars as having “raised the bar on sight, sound, quality and affordability”- we totally agree!

A third product which does not fit into the "combo"/"head"/cabinet categorization are powered speaker cabinets designed for use with bass instruments. While these powered speakers share many features with a regular combo amp, a bassist cannot plug her bass directly into a powered speaker cab. The powered speaker system is designed to operate as a "slave" to another amplifier's unpowered signal (or another combo amp which has a pre-amp out jack). Some powered speaker cabs only accept a "link" XLR cable from the main amp. Some powered speaker cabinets are designed as part of a company's line of bass amps; as such, the colour of the cabinet and its grille match the combo amp which will be placed on top of the powered speaker. As well, the powered speaker may have interlocking corners to ensure that the main amp stays put on top of the powered speaker.
On the plus side, the years of experience Line 6 has with amp and effect modeling really shines through here, and in the end we (and many other guitarists) feel this is one of the best sounding multi-effects unit money can buy, and definitely the best sounding of the ones on our list. For the guitarist that wants to just pick up and play without worrying about editability, the presets cover an enormous range and really flex this unit’s muscle. From very classic and recognizable tones, to some absolutely wild modulated stuff that would make Muse’s Matthew Bellamy jealous. The presets can be a little too on the crazy side, and seem to be made more for a “WOW” factor than being usable in the studio or with your band. The Line 6 POD HD500X does suffer some of the issues common to other multi-effects units, in that the fuzz, distortion, and overdrive models don’t sound as good as the rest of the effects, and the amp models aren’t completely convincing. Luckily you can bypass the amp modeling and use the original tone of your amp, only relying on the HD500X for its effects. For what it’s worth, this is our preferred use of it.

The history of signal modification isn’t just one of pleasing the ear through unconventional methods. It works both ways: Guitar effects have modified their users, just as much as their users and engineers have modified their sound. New effects can change a guitarist’s playing ability completely, concealing their technique as well as embellishing it. U2’s The Edge, for example, is known for his restraint of technique by embedding different rhythms within delay settings.
In May 1965 Keith Richards used a Gibson Maestro FZ-1 Fuzz-Tone to record "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction".[24] The song's success greatly boosted sales of the device, and all available stock sold out by the end of 1965.[25] Other early fuzzboxes include the Mosrite FuzzRITE and Arbiter Group Fuzz Face used by Jimi Hendrix,[26] the Electro-Harmonix Big Muff Pi used by Hendrix and Carlos Santana,[27] and the Vox Tone Bender used by Paul McCartney to play fuzz bass on "Think for Yourself" and other Beatles recordings.[28]
Hollow: Although a bit more rare than the previous two, it may be exactly what you’re looking for if it fits your style. Hollow body electric guitars sound a lot like acoustic guitars, giving us that brighter sound but having trouble with higher volumes since feedback is likely to occur (especially in medium to higher volumes). It has a round and full tone with great bass response, giving jazz players a big grin when they hear it.

The chord below (an Am) is going to be used for demonstration. Firstly, you'll notice the name of the chord labeled up the top. Next you'll see a "grid" below it. This grid represents your guitar fretboard. The 6 lines running downwards represent the six strings on your guitar with the fattest and lowest sounding string on the left hand side. The horizontal lines represent the frets on your guitar neck. The top line is the top of the neck.
While Ujam has only been in business since 2010, their members aren’t new to VSTs or even guitar VSTs for that matter. In 2002, Steinberg released Virtual Guitarist, developed by Wizoo, and this was one of the first VSTs that brought credibility to guitar VIs. It just so happens that the man that founded Wizoo, Peter Gorgers, founded Ujam and brought along many of the members, ensuring the same level of detail.
Lets face it: when most folks first pick up the electric guitar, the only other gear they think they might need would be an amp, a pick, some cables and maybe some pedals if they are savvy. As these players become more experienced and move from their garage to live music venues and recording situations, they eventually run into some issues and realize there must be better ways to be heard than turning the amp to 11.

In the 2010s, virtually all of the sound reaching the audience in large venues comes from the PA system or sound reinforcement system, the huge speaker systems pointed at the audience. As well, in the 2010s on-stage instrument amplifiers are more likely to be kept at a low volume, because when band members have their onstage amps "cranked" to high volume levels on stage, this makes it harder for the audio engineer to control the sound mix and blend. For example, if a heavy metal bassist had two 8x10" cabinets and several 1x18" subwoofer cabinets and several thousand watts of bass amplifier heads, and these amps are set to a very high volume level, this bass player will be creating very significant onstage bass volume. If the sound engineer wished to turn down the bass in the PA/sound reinforcement system, this bassist's loud onstage volume would make it hard for this engineer to control and/or reduce the volume of bass in the FOH (Front of House) sound mix. Another issue that can develop with bass players who have very high onstage volume is that it can be hard for the audio engineer to produce a clean sound through the PA/sound reinforcement system. For example, if a bassist was driving her bass amp speaker stacks into clipping to create a fuzz bass tone, if the audio engineer wished to have a "clean" bass sound, this could pose a challenge.
A companion to the Spectrum 5 guitar was a solidbody bass version with the Spectrum 5 body shape. This was the Teisco EBX-200/Teisco Del Rey EBX-200 Super Deluxe Bass. It had two small pickups with two center half-slots and two sliding on/off switches, with volume and tone and was described in the U.S. catalog as having the 5-ply ebony neck. The neck had the three-and-one hooked head and an ebony board with dots, not the picks.
This guitar master is actually a custom guitar builder. He started building guitars in 1993. "I've been doing this a long time," Paul says. "It's just really natural to me. I'm weird. I just look at stuff and know how to fix it." When he younger, Paul was good at woodworking, and besides picking up the guitar at 14, he needed another hobby. But learning the craft of guitar repair didn't require a master, simply a book. "Imagine that, great book." He then converted his garage into a shop, and in two years, his custom guitars became commercially viable. "It's the real deal, all high-end neck set stuff." Today, Brian Paul's Guitars are some of the finest guitars on the market. Some of his clients include Susan Tedeschi, Derek Trucks, Jim Suhler, Warren Haynes and Texas Slim. Even Dallas blues legend Bugs Henderson owned one of his guitars.

That's what I was thinking. Have you seen what those things go for when one does pop up for sale? It's nothing for those to go for close to $10k. That's insane for something non-vintage, but that's just my opinion. It's a bit excessive for what's essentially a two humbucker shredder, even if it is handmade over the course of nine years and the body is a piece of a 12th century Viking ship that's been soaked in mead for six centuries and aged to exquisiteness or whatever the fuck. I blame Misha Mansoor. He's got a bunch of guitar nerds all fucked up in the head now.
Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Size: Baritone - Neck Attachment: Bolt - Neck Wood: Canadian Hard Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 24, Jumbo - Inlay: Custom - # of Strings: 7 - Headstock: 4+3 - Bridge: Tone Pros - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Black, Diecast, Nickel, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: EMG HX-7 - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Black

In 2013, Gibson introduced the Government Series of Les Paul, SG, Flying V, Explorer and ES-335 guitars which were constructed solely of tonewood the US government seized but later returned to Gibson after the resolution of the company's Lacey Act violation in 2011. The guitars were finished in "government grey" and also featured decorations which intended to draw attention to the issue of government. A year later in 2014, Gibson released the Government Series II[77] of guitars, which were essentially the same as the first series, only finished in a new color: "government tan".
Since there is little difference outside of the individual guitars featured in this series, I will nitpick a bit and say that RealLPC has the worst GUI of the four.  Where there was never any difficult-to-read text on RealStrat, there is some here, and the weird navy green parameter boxes along with a black Les Paul with gold trim doesn’t sit well for me.  

"Our expertise is to customize guitars according to the specifications of our clients and we have our own factory that recreates all major guitar brands, boutique brands and collectible guitars. Owning the latest state of the art equipment, craftsmanship and skilled technicians. We take great pride in the quality and designs of our electric guitars and basses. From traditional to unique styles a U.S. Masters instrument rates with the finest in detail, woods, finish, feel, components and consistency. Our designs incorporate some advanced high performance features, some patented, to improve on aspects of sonic response and feel, upper fret access, the ease of playing, comfort and all designed to provide you with one of the finest responding instruments available. These guitars are of the finest, and yet it is only fraction of the cost that you would normally pay. You may be wondering how such an amazing product could be so cheap, It is possible because it has been manufactured in China, where labor is cheap. Cheap labor does not mean that has been compromised; all parts are of the highest and have been imported from overseas. When purchasing this guitar you can only stand to win. If you are satisfied, you have just saved yourself hundreds of dollars! So go on, treat yourself to the guitar you have always wanted. Our 100% satisfaction guarantee allows you to buy with confidence!"

If you stick to a simple chromatic scale (all the semitones), you also run the risk of the pitch correction moving the audio to the wrong note if the singer is more than half a semitone off pitch. A user scale, containing only the desired notes, generally works much better. Some systems also allow you to dictate the correct notes via MIDI. If the song contains sections in different keys or that use different scales, it is often simplest to split the vocal part across several tracks and then use a different pitch-corrector on every track, each one set to the appropriate scale for the section being processed.

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