The Taylor Guitars factory tour takes guests through the steps of acoustic guitar construction. From wood selection to final assembly, guests will experience each process as a guitar evolves from raw wood into a finished instrument. You will also have an opportunity to visit the TaylorWare store. Here you will find everything for the Taylor fan, from apparel to gift items to replacement guitar parts. The tour lasts approximately one hour and 15 minutes and departs from the main building at 1980 Gillespie Way in El Cajon, California.

The flanging effect is created by mixing two identical signals together while delaying the second signal by a small and gradually changing period of time. This delay is often no longer than 20 milliseconds. A simple way of thinking about the differences between phasers and flangers is that phasers work by affecting the frequencies with a filter, while a flanger affects frequencies with a time-delay.
Boost effects are simple effects that increase overall volume. However, every boost pedal is very unique and often sounds different. It always comes down to the type of components the effects pedal manufacturer used to achieve the volume boost. Some boost pedals try to maintain the guitar tone while providing a volume boost, others can heavily affect the guitar tone while providing a volume boost. Oftentimes, guitarists will get a specific boost pedal and use it as an always-on effect because they like the way the boost pedal colors their tone.
Small guitars were often looked at as mere travel or couch alternatives, but times have changed and they are making a comeback on big stages. The LX1E Little Martin is at the forefront of this rekindled interest, with artists like Ed Sheeran impressing big crowds with just his humble and small LX1E. Thankfully, its price has remained stable despite the its current worldwide recognition.

I think that there is a lot more that goes into getting a rich sound than just the pickup layout. AYK different pickups also have very different sounds, so if you line up an HH next to an HSH, there are going to be so many different factors that it's impossible to just point to the pickup configuration as the difference, unless they are the same make and model. From my personal experience of wanting a nice HSH many years ago, it's not worthwhile to limit yourself to that configuration because there are so few models. IMHO. Also, I don't think you mention what style of music you play at all. – JFA Jun 25 '14 at 1:59


After you have the hang of mono and stereo miking, room miking, and air guitar, you may be ready for the final frontier of El Gtr exploration. The time-consuming technique that I call "multisourcing" combines all the aforementioned methods, multiplied by the infinite possibilities created by splitting the guitar output and sending it simultaneously to different amps (using, for example, a Whirlwind Selector splitter box).
But is the Fender Deluxe really as good as the name suggests? We certainly think it is! Even though it would be easy to just write it off as an electric guitar for country music, it’s actually really versatile and can be used for any other genre as far as we’re concerned. This is thanks to two vintage noiseless pickup configurations, one on the neck and one on the bridge, and a strat pickup in the middle.
For metal there are few better performers than this menacing guitar from Schecter; the signature model of Avenged Sevenfolds lead guitarist Synyster Gates. From the pinstripe double-cutaway mahogany body emerges a hugely-playable thin C-shaped mahogany set neck with ebony fretboard, 24 extra-jumbo frets, and Schecters Ultra-Access construction to allow unhindered access to the highest of frets.

Gibson's first production electric guitar, marketed in 1936, was the ES-150 model ("ES" for "Electric Spanish", and "150" reflecting the $150 price of the instrument, along with matching amplifier). The ES-150 guitar featured a single-coil, hexagonally shaped "bar" pickup, which was designed by Walt Fuller. It became known as the "Charlie Christian" pickup (named for the great jazz guitarist who was among the first to perform with the ES-150 guitar). The ES-150 achieved some popularity but suffered from unequal loudness across the six strings.
There's no wrong answer to which neck will work best for you. When people speak of rounder vs. flatter being better for chording/bending, they are referring to the radius of the fretboard, not necessarily overall neck shape. The fretboard on all guitars has a curvature across is, from the the treble to the bass side. Generally speaking, most people would agree that rounder fretboards facilitate better chording, while flatter ones facilitate better bending, but even that's not hard and fast.
Since King Crimson‘s first rehearsal in 1969, Robert Fripp has been its distinguishing instrumental voice, a singular blend of distorted complexity and magisterial sustain. That duality is best heard on the most progressive prog-rock album ever made, Crimson’s 1973 thorny-metal classic, Larks’ Tongues in Aspic. Fripp’s most famous guitar line is the fuzz-siren hook in the title track to David Bowie‘s Heroes. Fripp would “start up without even knowing the chord sequence,” said producer Brian Eno, adding that Fripp’s work
Here we have a beautiful player with great heritage.. This guitar was an Import from Japan back in 1978 its a very well built guitar and employs the same x bracing seen on Martins. Workmanship is very high as is materials the vintage tone woods are beautifully mellowen and the tone has opened up nicely on this and so the volume is good on this guitar with a new set of straings now sounds like quite big a Piano...clear and clean god volume and reasonible bass.. Very good sound from this one..t also plays quite nicely with good play action not to low not to high...it plays very wel.. structually no cracks or serious anything to speak up just the most minimap superficial nicks as this vintage guitar qualifies for the xcllent vintage condition catagory. The finsh is wonderful and glass like shine to it and has a beautiful warm patine to it you can't get without waiting the near 40 years for it to age this way... this guitar will make somon a wonderful D-18 /28 style instrumnt to enjoy for another 40 years... If your like us you love vintage instruments and this is a bargain of a great lttle player, for a song.. You will be pleased. Thanks for looking if interested contact Joe at : gr8bids@comcast.net .
Don't just slap an effect on a track: why not try using automation to apply effects (in this case delay) on single words or phrases to make them stand out? Modern audio sequencers make it very easy to play around with spot effects — that is, effects which are applied to single notes or phrases within a track, rather than to a pattern or track as a whole. Try using different reverb styles on the snare within drum patterns: a short decay on the '2' and a long decay on the '4' for example. Another idea is to apply spot chorus to individual words within a vocal line, as a way of adding emphasis to the lyrics. The 'freeze' or audio bounce-down function of a typical sequencer allows you to get around any problems your computer might have in running lots of instances of a particular effect. Stephen Bennett
There are two main types of pickups: single coil and humbuckers (also called double coil). Single coil pickups are comprised of a single wire coil and represent the simplest form of pickup technology. Single coils produce a bright, punchy sound, with the drawback that they tend to produce a lot of noise in form of a hum. (One way to combat this is the P90 pickup, which uses a single coil that is wider than the traditional single coil, increasing the amount of area of the strings that the pickup can hear. The result is a bigger, duller sound than the traditional single coil.) The other main type of pickup is the dual coil or humbucker, which is said to “buck the hum” common in single coil pickups. The design is essentially two single coil pickups grouped together, which creates a more powerful, richer tone that is free of extra noise. While it may seem like the humbuckers are the no-brainer option, plenty of players prefer single coils due to their brighter, punchier tone.
Categories: Guitar manufacturing companies of the United StatesGuitar amplifier manufacturersManufacturing companies based in ChicagoManufacturing companies established in 1890Companies disestablished in 19681890 establishments in Illinois1968 disestablishments in IllinoisDefunct companies based in IllinoisMusical instrument manufacturing companies of the United States
More expensive amplifiers may have a patch bay for multiple inputs and outputs, such as a pre-amp out (for sending to another guitar amplifier), a second low gain input, to use with active basses, an in jack to create an effects loop (when used with the pre-amp out jack), an external speaker output (for powering an additional speaker cabinet), and stereo RCA jacks or an 1/8" jack, for connecting a CD player or MP3 player so that a player can practice along with recorded music. Some amps have a 1/4" jack for connecting a pedal to turn the amp's onboard overdrive and reverb on and off or to switch between channels. Some amps have an XLR jack for a microphone, either for the guitar amp to be used for singing (in effect as a mini-PA system), or, for acoustic guitar, to mix a mic signal with a pickup signal.
If you love effects like we do, we hope you'll find this top-50 list a useful guide to discovering the classic effect boxes that have shaped the guitar sounds of rock, metal, blues, punk and many other styles. And if you're like us, it will undoubtedly compel you to plunk down a chunk of cash for a collectible pedal or two on eBay. Don't say you weren't warned.
While it can be a troubling task to find the perfect electric guitar to bring out your inner rock star, we hope that our electric guitar reviews & our comprehensive guide has helped you narrow down your choices. Our best piece of advice is to determine the type of genre you’re interested in playing. That will be a good basepoint for you to work from in order to determine the best electric guitar that fits your needs. Afterward, it is important to select the guitar that has the best components to give you the highest quality of sound. The color does not matter too much but the next most important factor to think about is certainly the wood type used to build the electric guitar. Picking the right type of wood is going to more or less, create better or worse sound.
Leslie West (real name: Leslie Weinstein) first made his mark in mid-Sixties garage rock, with the Vagrants' meaty cover of Otis Redding's "Respect." By 1969, West was the heavy vengeance in the Cream-like quartet Mountain. On songs like the 1970 hit "Mississippi Queen," West played roughened blues lines with deceiving facility and an R&B flair, through a black forest of stressed-amp distortion. "The riffs were incredible," says Dave Davies. "He could play flashy, intricate phrases. But he wasn't a look-at-me guy. He played with feel."

Joe Perry is the American distillation of the good-old Keith Richards/Jimmy Page recipe for sideman/lead guitarist cool. He’s got the look and the licks, and he’s maintained both over the course of three or four decades—despite all odds. Jagger and Richards are the Glimmer Twins, but Perry and Aerosmith singer Steven Tyler went down in history as the Toxic Twins.

I had a similar problem and went with a similar solution - the Vox Tonelab amp modeler and multi-effects unit. Has a headphone out that works fine for practice. Plus it is working well for gigging as well. I can practice tunes with the exact amp and effects that I'm going to use. When I get in front of the guitar amp, I just need to get a clean sound and give it a little color in the tone. It isn't perfect for gigs, but it is SO easy to practice with and can sound like a Fender, Marshall, Hiwatt, Mesa - whatever. This is starting to sound like an ad, so I'll stop. :-) – Anonymous Jan 18 '11 at 10:47
Gilmour was made famous by his haunting guitar scores in Pink Floyd. This “replacement” guitarist surpassed expectations and helped shape Pink Floyd’s unique sound. You can always expect hairs at the back of your neck to stand whenever you hear one of his solos – be it for the first or hundredth time you’re listening to it. All the emotion that Gilmour’s poured into his guitar work lives on in the music and is channeled through anyone who’s ever wanted to cover a Pink Floyd song. I know several guitar players (myself included) who whenever playing the Comfortably Numb solo – whether they are alone in their bedrooms or on stage – have always been unwillingly brought to tears, near the point of crying. How could you not expect things to get esoteric and mystical when it comes to music?

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Sometimes, your guitar may need more than a standard set-up. The frets need to be in reasonable shape in order to progress with the set-up. Often you will see that the frets are not level - this is crucial to the playability of the instrument. I have a precision technique for achieveing a perfectly true fret dress which I've been developing for 3 years.
The Kent 800-series hollow bodied guitars all had asymmetrical bodies and the pickup closest to the neck was tilted. There are several Kents that had symmetrical hollow bodies and no tilted pickups. The pickups are either humbuckers or wide single coils with covers. They resemble Gibson ES-style guitars. The necks and headstocks are very similar to the Kent 800s. They're probably newer than the 700s and 800s. I won’t be covering those here.
Epiphone currently produces several models of the Les Paul including the entry level “Les Paul Special II”, which is generally made of a basswood body and a veneered top, a bolt-on neck (with dot inlays instead of the usual trapezoid inlays), lacks a binding, and has simplified electronics.[25] The next model up is the “Les Paul 100”, which costs approximately $US300, has similar features but it has the standard Les Paul wiring, mahogany body and a higher-quality paint job. The Epiphone Les Paul Studio is the least expensive Les Paul model to have a carved top and a set neck (features considered central to the feel and sound of more expensive Les Paul models), and is between $350–$400 depending on features and finish. The standard models are the “Les Paul Standard Plain Top” and the “Les Paul Standard Plus Top”. They cost $US550 and $US650 respectively. They both feature a solid mahogany body with a maple veneer and carved top; the “Plus” model includes a “flamed” maple finish while the “Plain” top is unfigured.[26]

Laminate guitars are not made with solid pieces of wood. Instead, a laminate guitar is made with layered pieces of wood, like a veneer, to create the body of the guitar. Despite its reputation among music snobs, laminate guitars can be top-selling, high-performing instruments. Just check out the Fender CD-60CE Acoustic Electric Guitar for proof of a beautiful, all-laminate, highly-popular instrument!
When you’re just getting into the electric guitar, there are a lot of items you’ll need to get going. This includes the guitar itself, tuners, straps, an amp, a bag or protective case, a stand, etc. Buying it all piece by piece can be rather expensive. It’s much more practical in financial terms to opt into one of the many starter packs on the market. If you want to know which ones are worth your time, here are the 8 best guitar starter packs for beginners:
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Get a Luthier (or do it yourself if you have the knowledge) to change the tuners to the ones I specified, take the sharp edges off the neck, throw some extra light strings on, and do a set up and this guitar becomes a dream guitar for kids or adults for a lifetime. So while the Yamaha APXT2 may not be the best guitar for your purpose, in this price range you WILL NOT find the perfect guitar, period. At least Yamaha gave us a foundation off which to build (which you can't say for other brands) and with a little modification here and there, you will have the perfect little guitar. I bought this for my child and I find myself picking it up and playing it more than my more expensive full size guitars. It's just a pleasure having it around the house, but not so much so before I modified it. There's nothing worse than having a guitar that's just about not a toy as compared to a professional guitar. You want to make your guitar easy to tune and enjoyable to play so spend the extra bucks to make it perfect and you will have no regrets.
All of these soundfonts can be opened with most zip programs, but if you are not sure or you haven't got a zip program you can use 7zip in windows or xarchiver in linux. I chose the SF.tar.bz2 format as it compressed to almost half the size of the original. Let me know if you have any problems downloading or extracting the files. These samples have been tested in SFZ free player in windows (check this forum for download details) and Qsynth in linux.
I have been playing guitar for over 40 years and purchased Taylor's, Gibsons and Fenders as well as many others. This Godin company understands value and passes that along to its customers. Fine tone when played acoustic or threw an amp. The wood tone and workmanship are awesome for this or any price point. You will not be disappointed with this guitar, it is a great value.
On the way folks arriving soon stay tuned pics of this made in Japan hand crafted beautiful Exotic Vintage Martin copy will be uploaded soon ... in great players condition original and stock Takamine pickup installed you can plug in at the strap pin jack and go electric and sounds amazing or fully acoustic of course unpluged. You know theses are know for the ultimate beauty of them as well as the Rich complex tone they offer well seasoned instrument of this caliber Japan had to offer in the Lawsuit series days 70-85 or so that have been discontinued decades ago as they say they don't make um like this any more... Stay tuned for another exotic Brazilian Rosewood guitar at JVGuitars.com any questions for Joe email: jvguitars@gmail.com.
The Ring Resonator Deluxe is like having two all analog pedals in one. It contains the octave-up fuzz effect of the original Ring Resonator with added LED, push-push output pot and mini-toggle switch. With the push-push output pot down, the octave-up effect is removed and fuzz-only is achieved. In the fuzz-only mode of operation the toggle switch allows you to switch between dark fuzz and bright fuzz tones.

The amp and cabinet modeling is probably the weakest link of the Zoom G3X. Make no mistake - it’s nice to have customizable amp and cabinet pairings in a practice or headphones scenario, or if you simply don’t have a guitar amp yet. It’s just difficult to replicate the character and “oomph” of a vintage tube amp. This isn’t so much a knock on the G3X as it is of most amplifier modeling.
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Now, instead of just containing part of the sound completely, the tone knob is hooked up to a capacitor. The capacitor doesn't let everything through. Basically, it starts with the highest frequencies, letting them through to be contained rather than go to the amplifier. The more of the signal you send to the capacitor, though, the more of the spectrum it is forced to let through, meaning that more and more of the high end of the continuum is let through - the rest of the current is sent back and is let out through the line to the amp.
Be prepared for each practice session. That means, know what you learned in your previous session and whether you're satisfied you accomplished your goal for that session. If you still need time on your previous session's goal, spend another session on it. Don't move on until you have it nailed. So important. If you feel like you're not making progress with a particular technique or concept, I'm always here to help.
Capacitors (often referred to as "caps") have several uses in electric guitars, the most common of which is in the tone control, where it combines with the potentiometer to form a low-pass filter, shorting all frequencies above the adjustable cut-off frequency to ground.[12][13] Another common use is a small capacitor in parallel with the volume control, to prevent the loss of higher frequencies as the volume pot is turned down. This capacitor is commonly known as "treble bleed cap" and is sometimes accompanied by a series or parallel resistor to limit the amount of treble being retained and match it to the pot's taper.[14]
Guitar pickups are a vital component of your tone and replacing them is something that most guitarists can learn to do themselves. Using high quality pickups can go a long way to bringing new life and excitement to your playing experience. There are hundreds of pickup manufacturers and thousands of pickups to choose from. Whether you’re looking for a hotter pickup, trying to capture a beloved vintage tone or seeking single-coil sound in a noiseless package, brands like DiMarzio®, Seymour Duncan®, Lace®, Porter®, Fender®, Gibson® and many others offer a solution.
In a nutshell: Lowell Kiesel is the name of the guy who founded Carvin. He originally sold guitars under his own name, but later changed the company name to Carvin, a melding of the first names of his two sons. So, when Carvin changed the name on their guitars to Kiesel, they were actually reverting back to their roots. Kiesel is Carvin, and Carvin has always been Kiesel.
The new HT Club 40 looks familiar, but practically every detail has been worked on and sweated over. The control panel has separate channels for clean and overdrive, with two footswitchable voices on each channel. There’s also a new, low-power option, which reduces output from around 40 watts down to just four watts. Global controls include a master volume and level control for the Club’s built-in digital reverb. On the rear panel, you’ll find extension speaker outlets and an effects loop, with new features including a USB recording output together with speaker-emulated line outs on jack and XLR. The MkII’s clean channel has a completely reworked architecture with two tightly defined voices, best described as classic American and classic British, which can be pre-set on the control panel or footswitched. Although only one button is pressed, lots of changes happen inside, including preamp voicing, EQ and valve gain structure, as well as the power amplifier damping.  A similar thing happens on the overdrive channel, with a choice of two voices called ‘classic crunch’ and ‘super- saturated lead’, which can be infinitely tweaked between Brit and USA response using Blackstar’s patented ISF control. Like the clean channel, these voices have been reworked to be richer and more responsive. In use, the HT Club 40 MkII is jaw-droppingly good - while the MkI version was efficient if a little bland sometimes, the MkII is full of character and attitude, with astonishing tonal depth and response that will have many top-dollar boutique amps struggling to keep up.
The body of the instrument is a major determinant of the overall sound variety for acoustic guitars. The guitar top, or soundboard, is a finely crafted and engineered element often made of spruce, red cedar, redwood or mahogany. This thin (often 2 or 3 mm thick) piece of wood, strengthened by different types of internal bracing, is considered the most prominent factor in determining the sound quality of a guitar. The majority of the sound is caused by vibration of the guitar top as the energy of the vibrating strings is transferred to it. Different patterns of wood bracing have been used through the years by luthiers (Torres, Hauser, Ramírez, Fleta, and C.F. Martin being among the most influential designers of their times); to not only strengthen the top against collapsing under the tremendous stress exerted by the tensioned strings, but also to affect the resonation of the top. Some contemporary guitar makers have introduced new construction concepts such as "double-top" consisting of two extra-thin wooden plates separated by Nomex, or carbon-fiber reinforced lattice - pattern bracing. The back and sides are made out of a variety of woods such as mahogany, Indian rosewood and highly regarded Brazilian rosewood (Dalbergia nigra). Each one is chosen for its aesthetic effect and structural strength, and such choice can also play a significant role in determining the instrument's timbre. These are also strengthened with internal bracing, and decorated with inlays and purfling.
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Ihave a 12 string dorado. I found a guitar that was sold for $299. It's a 12 string acoustic, Gretsch, 1971. Seems like the right period. The problem is that it is called doraldo. One letter out. Rosewood fret board, dot inlays. Exactly the same as mine but different name. Maybe it could be the same? Go to http://www.rabbithillmusic.9cy.com/id2.htm
There are a lot of choices out there for the prospective buyer of a fine guitar. It's no secret; a handmade instrument can cost a lot. For that matter, any of the better guitars purchased from a quality manufacturer is going to command what most people would consider to be a lot of money. Are there compelling reasons to spend your money on a handmade guitar from a custom builder rather than from a brand name factory or custom shop? There certainly are! … [Read More...]
Is there any particular reason you're opposed to Kontakt libraries? All of the plugins you mentioned are sample-based themselves, with the notable weakness that you would not be able to change the mapping, grouping, programming (etc), unlike with Kontakt. As someone who uses a lot of virtual instruments, I'd say it's always preferable to have a sample-based instrument in an open sampler plugin since you can see what's going on under the hood and change things like envelopes as needed.
First off, it has three effects loops that let you control pedals (or groups of pedals) right from the MS-3. It can also be used as a foot controller for amplifiers, which allows you to change the channel on your favorite amps and employ effects in the comfort of a single compact box. This makes the MS-3 a very versatile unit, catering to vintage amp/pedal users while adding the comfort of modern digital effects processing and preset control. Since it has its own noise suppressor and global EQ, you can tame noisy pedals and shape their tone a bit more. All of these are on top of the many built-in effects that is already built into the unit, which are Boss quality good by themselves.

Another great practice amp in the running for best electric guitar amp for beginners is the Blackstar HT Series HT-1. It’s a 1W tube amp with a single 8″ speaker. It features 2 channels (clean and overdrive), stereo MP3 / line input and external speaker output. It’s use of dual-triode ECC82 tubes provides the crunch and break-up characteristics of a traditional 100w amp at a much lower volume. It also has EQ, Gain and Reverb settings.


Description: Body: Nato - Body Construction: Solid - Neck Attachment: Neck-through - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 3 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25" (64cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Chrome, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, Kluson Tuners - Pickups: Harmony - String Instrument Finish: Green
In Chicago in the sixties, "the rules had been laid down" for young, white blues bands, Mike Bloomfield told Rolling Stone in 1968. "You had to be as good as Otis Rush." That wasn't easy. A Mississippi native who moved to the Windy City in the late Forties, Rush was a fearsome electric guitarist – with a grittytreble tone and lacerating attack, like a gunslinging cross of Muddy Waters and B.B. King – as well as a knockout songwriter. Along with guitarists like Magic Sam and Buddy Guy, Rush helped create the more modernized, R&B-influenced approach to Chicago blues that came to be known as the West Side Sound. Rush's impact on later generations was enormous: His late-Fifties and early-Sixties singles were go-to covers for Led Zeppelin ("I Can't Quit You Baby"), John Mayall ("All Your Love [I Miss Loving]") and the J. Geils Band ("Homework"), while Stevie Ray Vaughan named his band after Rush's lethal '58 lament "Double Trouble."
Reverb is still the most commonly installed effect in amps, but there are some amplifiers that go overboard, to the point that they outdo even multi-effects units. Unfortunately, even those with the most number of effects allow for limited simultaneous use, so no, you can't put 10 virtual pedals together in your practice amp. Also don't expect the quality of built-in effects to match that of boutique pedals, but they can be a great addition to an amp if used sparingly and for appropriate songs.

The Effect: Wah pedals are primarily based on inductors, and later on Fasel inductors – serving as integral parts which play a big role in the outcome of the sound itself. They work on a basic principle, by adjusting a wah pedal’s footswitch your sound frequency’s behavior is modified, resulting in a “wah wah” tone – for further clarification take a listen to “Voodoo Child” by Jimi Hendrix. Naturally, effects may vary slightly or greatly depending on the model in question. Some of the most popular modern wah pedals are Dunlop’s numerous Cry Baby iterations and Vox’ marvelous classic enhanced remakes. The thing that sets wah pedals apart from other types in a unique way, is the fact that they rarely feature any controls, it’s just the footswitch and a dynamic range of impressive funky tones at your disposal.
The Fender Stratocaster may be the most widely recognizable electric guitar and the one most associated with the rise of rock and roll music. It featured a distinctive double-cutaway design that allowed musicians to play higher notes by reaching higher on the fingerboard, three pickups (which allowed for a greater range of sounds since previous guitars which had two pickups at most), and a patented tremolo system that allowed players to raise or lower the pitch of the strings. In the hands of guitarists like Buddy Holly, Eric Clapton, Bonnie Raitt, and many others, the Stratocaster became an icon of American rock and roll that took the world by storm. The Stratocaster, the Gibson Les Paul, and other solid-body electrics were nothing if not versatile, and rock guitarists were obsessed with versatility. Guitarists could not only change the tone, volume, and pitch, but they also could manipulate the sound by playing close to the amplifier, grinding the strings against things, and using special effects accessories like the wah-wah pedal. Jimi Hendrix was this instrument’s master of manipulation, influencing generations of guitarists to experiment creatively with their playing techniques and equipment.
I use an EBTECH HUM X. I plug my Fender ’62 Re-Issue Deluxe Reverb into the HUM X and then I plug the HUM X into the wall socket. It works great for me. For my pedals, I use a Visual Sound One Spot to power my large board with no issues and I have a Boss BCB-3 pedal board/case with OD-3, CH-1, DD-3, and a TU-2 next to the OD-3 on the floor since my BCB-3 is really old it came with a 4 pin daisy chain. I power that with a Boss PSA-120S AC Adapter also with no issues. I read about keeping your signal as clean as possible and cable lengths no longer than is necessary. I would try everything mentioned above and make sure you have good quality and proper length cables. BTW, if you research cables, you may find that more expensive doesn’t always mean better. Check out Pro-Co. They are also made in the USA. Good luck!
i bought one in 1966, my first guitar, i paid 38.99 for it at a gibson dept. store in ft. worth, tx. it was mij under the same name and was marketed in canada as regent guitars and in the u.s. later as kent guitars. it is in the same catagory (some say better) as teisco its competator, some say there was some interfacing between the 2 companies. i really enjoyed it and wish i still had it, it played great and sounded great. i found this while surfing 4 another!!!
JSL, I agree with you on the Mayer comment. Any one who is bashing him needs to listen to his latest live album. kid rips plain and simple. I have to disagree with you on the Van Halen comment, not that he isn't a great player, but to me his playing always lacked substance, no soul to it. Now, I can't stand Clapton, (I won't get into why), but he should definitely be on the list.
Steve Albini, on the other hand, finds it useful to think in terms of blending 'bright' and 'dark' mics. "Normally I'll have two microphones on each cabinet, a dark mic and a bright mic, say a ribbon microphone and a condenser, or two different condensers with different characters." Eddie Kramer's discussion of his Hendrix sessions reveals a similar preference: "Generally speaking, it was either a U67 or a Beyerdynamic M160, or a combination of both, which I still use today. It might be slightly different, of course, but the basic principle's the same — a ribbon and a condenser."
Virtually all headphone amps offer a full menu of distortion, EQ, reverb, and a host of other digital effects, many of them simultaneously. So a headphone amp can usually double as a multi-effects processor, which is quite cool. Headphone amps also provide numerous presets — sounds preprogrammed by the manufacturer — plus full stereo sound (especially effective over headphones).
Southpaw Guitars has over 900 Left Handed Guitars and Basses In Stock at any time. At Southpaw Guitars you will find a knowledgeable friendly sales staff to provide Service, Assistance, and Guidance as you purchase your Dream Guitar. Furthermore, You will not be greeted by hold music, transferred between departments, treated discourteously, or given the sell what we have routine. We are conveniently located in Southwest Houston. 713-667-5791

While it is well loved for its HD amp models, it also packs quite a lot of effects (over 100!), applying the same HD modeling technology on actual stompboxes to get them to sound as close to the real thing as possible. The amp modeling and effects section together allow for a wide variety of tones, while the deep controls that you have over each amp and effect parameter allows for even more in-between tones, so you can craft your very own sound. The LED rings add to the unit's overall eye candy and improve the already intuitive interface of the unit. It also houses extensive input and output options, including having its very own mic preamp, so you can use it for a variety of instruments and even vocals. Other features include built-in 48-second looping, tuning and compatibility with Line 6' modeling instrument (Variax) and amps.
Did I say WoW....your going to love this one...Here we have a VERY rare GREAT FIND and premium example at that this over 35 year old vintage mandolin has absolutely beautiful flamed AAA Fiddle grade Maple to both the back chevron 2 piece & sides .... this piece is simply gorgeous and has an aged & wonderfully grained figured Sitka spruce top this a VERY High Quality. This is a Japanese made Artist grade Mandolin from the prime Japanese Law-suit era ... the very talented Luthiers built this example... this one was made in the mid 1970's at the famous Ibanez factory in Japan this example is cleverly labeled with a beautiful mother of pearl logo then unheard of " CARLO ROBELLI "... This is a Gibson exact REPLICA of the " F Style " MANDOLIN this M-700 M700 ACOUSTIC Mandolin in excellent vintage condition WoW! its so nice dare I say Near Mint...its over 30 years old and has that aged and mellowed tone and has emerged as a great sounding professional quality constructed PRO level beauty that is available for a fraction of what the very same vintage Ibanez or Aria m-700 Logo'ed Mandolin will cost... ( same factory built those to ) same luthiers same materials... as seen with the great original golden plush lined hard shell case.. all & all one of the best sounding & playing mando's available under $1600.00 vintage F style and beautifully flamed & figured Maple ..looks like old school nitrocellulose lacquer but no visible checking cracks but just one short 3" finish check on back and is almost impossible to see... a few buckle mars on back but so faint not threw finish and again almost impossible to see... guard is also in top shape not all scratched up..this baby is in under the bed for 30 years condition it looks more like its one year old condition wise as it is actually 30+ years old...as you can tell the finish has that aged patina and warm appearance of a vintage Mando.. here is a great one w/ its original hard shell case ..WoW! Its being cleaned up now and is looking as new... the guard's glue just came loose so it will get cleaned prepped & re-glued and ready for another 30 years. I will also be restring her with a new set D'Addario strings we have in stock and set her up... she will ring like a sweet bell and be ready to record with or tour. Copy & paste this link to view many new pics of this beautiful Vintage Japanese crafted Mandolin... https://picasaweb.google.com/gr8bids/70sCarloRobelliFMandolin?authkey=Gv1sRgCNbp6p6_1cicsQE#slideshow/5588480984817011186.
Foden: In 1912 to 1917, Martin made guitars for concert guitarist William Foden. These are similar to the standard Martin models, but have simple soundhole rings and a 20 fret fingerboard (instead of 19). Made in sizes 0 and 00, the styles were similar to Martin's Style 18, 21, 28, and a pearl trim model. Only 27 of these guitars have been documented to date.

“Back in the fifties and sixties, you could tell what studio they had been recording in just by listening to the song,” Dr. Susan Horning Schmidt says. She is a professor at St. John’s University who has researched and written extensively about sounds and the recording process. During the period Dr. Horning Schmidt is referring to, the recording facilities were also physically bigger and bands often played together in a more live-type setting. Horning Schmidt states that “there’s a lot more space in the recording, a lot more acoustical space and dynamics.” Unfortunately, we’re losing that space with contemporary recording and production techniques.


A Volume pedal is a volume potentiometer that is tilted forward or back by foot. A volume pedal enables a musician to adjust the volume of their instrument while they are performing. Volume pedals can also be used to make the guitar's notes or chords fade in and out. This allows the percussive plucking of the strings to be softened or eliminated entirely, imparting a human-vocal sound. Volume pedals are also widely used with pedal steel guitars in country music. It has also been used to great effect in rock music; the Pat McGee Band's live version of "Can't Miss What You Never Had" on General Admission illustrates what the pedal is capable of. Some volume pedals are:
While fan-braced modern classical Torres and post-Torres style instruments coexisted with traditional ladder-braced guitars at the beginning of the 20th century, the traditional forms eventually fell away. Some attribute this to the popularity of Segovia, considering him "the catalyst for change toward the Spanish design and the so-called 'modern' school in the 1920s and beyond."[5] The styles of music performed on ladder-braced guitars were becoming more and more unfashionable; and, e.g. in Germany, musicians were in part turning towards folk music (Schrammel-music and the Contraguitar), but this only remained localized in Germany and Austria and became unfashionable again. On the other hand, Segovia was playing in concerts around the world, popularizing his modern classical guitar, as well as a new style of music in the 1920s: Spanish romantic-modern style with guitar works by Moreno Torroba, de Falla, etc. Some people consider it to have been this influence of Segovia which led to the domination of the Torres instrument. Factories all over the world began producing them in large numbers.

Some early Valco instruments continued to make it into the marketing pipeline – early on, at least. Probably as a sign of the increasing difficulty in getting product, the Spring/Summer 1942 Sears catalog sported a full complement of Supro guitars, essentially the ’41 line, all labeled with the newly-chosen Sears brand name, Silvertone. Shown in the ’42 Sears catalog were the Supro Capitan and Supro Rio, now renamed the Silvertone Crest (carved torch logo) and Silvertone Spanish (no logo), respectively. The Capitan had a standard trapeze tailpiece rather than the Dobro variety, with permanent cord coming out of the top of the lower bout!


I have a Kona Signature Acoustic with beautiful inlays in the wood. I believe the body is mahogany, decent resonant tone, and once I shimmed up the saddle bridge (which technically should have been replaced all together due to notching), sounds better than my Martin in many ways, where it better distributes the low, high, and mid-range tones. The Martin is too bassy sounding, but have ordered new bone bridge saddle, which hope it improves the cheap plastic one it came with...

Acoustic guitars vary by type. Some are designed for beginners, while others are customized for professional guitar players. Most of the major acoustic guitar brands are available in a variety of different styles, each designed to best suit a customers' specific playing needs. Ease and sound are certainly big factors to consider when choosing a new acoustic guitar.
In this modern world of in-ear monitors and digital consoles, both guitarists’ amps face the back wall of the stage rather than forward toward the audience. This allows them to crank their amps as loud as they need to achieve their signature Skynyrd-like drive without blowing out the Front of House engineer or the first three rows of the arena they’re performing in.
While it is possible to practice on a huge stack, it’s more convenient (and probably more sensible) to practice on a compact, low-powered, versatile practice amp. These little combo amps are one of the most important tools in a guitarist’s tool box, especially for beginners who should avoid ‘dry practice’ (i.e. without an amp) as it encourages bad habits. Many amps can be considered a practice amp, but one of our favorites is the Fender Frontman 10G – a very affordable practice amp that offers 10 watts of power, solid Fender tone and a headphone jack for quiet practice sessions.
That's what I'm hoping to address in this post along with clearing some common misconceptions too. The guitar world and community is very big on the vintage thing, and that has filtered down to replacement parts of course too. It is very easy to get lost in the world of 'vintage' style parts making an improvement in tone, so let's cast those notions aside here and look at the facts of why in some cases that's both correct and incorrect. Tim McNelly of McNelly Pickups put it really well in a recent social media post '..New electronics won’t necessarily make your guitar sound any different than it does now. New pots won't NECESSARILY change the tone if you don't know the exact value of the pots coming out..'. I think this is a really great way to put it and a great starting point for this post and discussion (feel free to comment too!).
"We are extremely excited about this next phase of growth that we believe will benefit both our employees, and the Memphis community. I remember when our property had abandoned buildings, and Beale Street was in decline. It is with great pride that I can see the development of this area with a basketball arena, hotels, and a resurgent pride in the musical heritage of the great city of Memphis. We continue to love the Memphis community and hope to be a key contributor to its future when we move nearby to a more appropriate location for our manufacturing based business, allowing the world the benefit of our great American craftsmen."[36]

If anyone has earned the right to two spots on this list, it’s Fender. Sitting squarely at the top of the guitar and amp game, this Southern California company might be at their peak at this very moment – and that’s a very good thing for you, if you want to get into playing guitar. This Super Champ X2 amp is a hell of a value, boasting the welcome bounce of Fender’s signature sound in a package that wont break the bank. And what’s even cooler about it is that it has 16 different amp modeling selections – meaning you still get the warmth of tube amplification with the right amount of modeling amp versatility. It also comes with two channels that can be controlled via an optional footswitch, and it’s equipped with a USB port for easy and quiet recording.

The most common way that bass players connect their instrument to their bass amp is by using a 1/4" patch cord, a standard signal cable used in music and audio applications. Some bassists plug their bass into a small wireless transmitter about the size of a pack of cards, which can be clipped to the strap or to their belt. The transmitter transmits the bass signal to a receiver that is plugged into the amp. Bassists playing in large venues with complex stage set-ups, or a stage design where there is a large distance between performers, or players who like to dance or go out into the audience during the performance, may use wireless transmitters to avoid the risk of having their cable become disconnected while they move about on stage and give themselves more freedom. Another reason that some bassists use wireless transmitters is if their stage setup requires a long cable run between their bass and their amp. Long cable runs can weaken the strength of the signal and can adversely affect tone and sound quality.


Have a Columbus series 3 superstrat. Jackson/charvel knockoff. It plays ok with a dimarrzio bucker and 2 single coils od unknown origin. It original had a locking trem which could only dive and I replaced with a FR that can only do same because I wouldn't risk routing the ply body. Anyway the interesting point (and I'd love to find out) is that under the "Columbus series 3" badge can clearly be see the faint etching of another badge in gothic script "Winchester". Any thoughts?
Some distortion effects provide an "overdrive" effect. Either by using a vacuum tube, or by using simulated tube modeling techniques, the top of the wave form is compressed, thus giving a smoother distorted signal than regular distortion effects. When an overdrive effect is used at a high setting, the sound's waveform can become clipped, which imparts a gritty or "dirty" tone, which sounds like a tube amplifier "driven" to its limit. Used in conjunction with an amplifier, especially a tube amplifier, driven to the point of mild tonal breakup, short of what would be generally considered distortion or overdrive, these pedals can produce extremely thick distortion sounds much like those used by Carlos Santana or Eddie Van Halen. Today there is a huge variety of overdrive pedals, and some of them are:
The Triple Crown TC-50 is a three-channel amp, with independent preamps covering clean, low-gain and high-gain ranges. The front panel packs three identical sets of controls including gain, master volume, bass, mid, treble and presence, together with a two-way toggle switch that changes the channel gain and voice. There’s a small toggle switch for manual channel changing, and a pair of master output level controls, one of which is footswitchable. The feature-rich rear panel includes Mesa’s exceptional CabClone speaker-emulated output, with a balanced XLR, headphones socket and line out. The TC-50 also benefits from a footswitchable effects loop, separate reverb level controls for each channel, and MIDI switching for all the major functions. The Triple Crown’s clean channel is highly versatile, going from butter-sweet clarity through to edgy blues soloing, with a lot of control over that ‘just on the edge’ sweet spot. The Lo Gain channel is where the TC-50’s crunch and classic rock tones live, with a multi-layered overdrive and harmonic overtones that shift with varying degrees of pick attack. Flipping the toggle switch into Drive mode adds a subtle midrange bump, invoking JCM800-approved snarl and a dose of extra gain. The Hi Gain channel adds more of the same - lots more, so much so that in the upper reaches we think this is probably the most gain ever from a Mesa amp. No doubt about it, the Triple Crown has three channels packed full of world-class tone that only a handful of amps can compete with.
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I use a coat hanger wire to hang the body and neck from when I paint. It keeps the guitar from touching any thing and makes it easier to move from one place to another. I like to dedicate one place for painting and another for drying to avoid any free floating particales from landing on the wet paint. I use a shed for painting and hang the guitar to dry in my garage.
The lotus had a plywood body and was pretty cheap, I wouldn't pay a 100 bucks for one today, if anything. But, back then, it was as good as any, we worked with what we could get. I know we played some excrutiating unison leads (ala Blackfoot, Molly Hatchet,etc) he with his souped up Lotus, me with my Memphis Strat copy, both plugged into my bitchin solid state Crate (looked like a real wooden crate!) amp.

Jazz guitarists are not limited to single note improvisation. When working with accompaniment, chord solos are created by improvising chords (harmony) and melody simultaneously, usually in the upper register on strings 1,2,3 and 4. Wes Montgomery was noted for playing successive choruses in single notes, then octaves and finally a chord solo - this can be heard in his improvisation on the standard Lover Man (Oh, Where Can You Be?). When playing without accompaniment, jazz guitarists may create chord solos by playing bass, melody and chords, individually or simultaneously, on any or all strings - such as the work of Lenny Breau, Joe Pass, Martin Taylor and others. This technique can be also be incorporated into unaccompanied soloing: for instance Django Reinhardt's "improvisations", as he called his solo pieces.
But it might be the ESP LTD Series that has really vaulted this company into contention as one of the top brands, and certainly one of the best for heavy metal. These are more affordable version of USA-made ESP guitars, along with some innovative designs. The EC-1000 in particular has earned a strong reputation as more wallet-friendly alternative to the Gibson Les Paul.
You can do this using a fairly slow tracking time in Auto-Tune so that the bend dynamics aren't changed in any obvious way — it's just that when you finish bending, the note will come to rest on a precise value. Not that I'm suggesting you need to do this, of course, but the day will come when a client plays a never to be repeated take that is perfect apart from a few bend intonation problems...
Ash is a common body material in solid body guitars. It is harder than mahogany and very resonant. This gives the guitar ringing sustain and bright tone with a well-defined mid-range. A light colored wood with attractive grain figuring, it is often given a transparent finish. Swamp ash is a particularly appealing, detailed wood used on higher-end guitars.

In other words, it will slather the tone with raw dirt without affecting the core of the signal. A lot of people mistake fuzz pedals for distortions due to their more aggressive nature, but these beasts of old are definitely unique. One of the best examples of what a fuzz box sounds like is the Electro-Harmonix Big Muff Pi – a fuzz pedal whose circuitry gave birth to countless other models.
• For the fifth insert (leave the fourth empty), go to Distortion/AmpSimulator and click on the plug‑in's edit button. For the Amplifier Model, select Crunch, and try the following parameter values: Drive at 8.7, Bass, Middle, and Treble all at 5.0, Presence at 6.2, and Volume set to 5.0. For the Cabinet, select Cabinet 2, with Lo Damping at 38 and Hi Damping at 35.
mid-1939 Popscicle bracing on D body sizes. See the above picture for what the popsicle or T-6 or upper transverse graft brace is. The popsicle brace was added to the underside of the top of the guitar, below the fingerboard. The brace was added to help prevent top cracks alongside the fingerboard. Since the first D body size was made in about 1934, problems obviously came about and Martin added the brace by 1939. The brace does not appear in pre-1939 Martin D-sizes, but transitioned in around 1939, and is present in all 1940 and later D models. Without the popsicle brace, the top is attached only by the strength of the spruce fibers and a 1/2" x 2" glue area where the top overlays the soundhole #1 brace. With the popsicle brace there is an additional 1" x 2" glue surface directly under the fingerboard. Unfortunately the popsicle brace can deaden the sound of the upper bout area of the soundboard, and the popsicle brace doesn't always prevent the top from cracking along the fingerboard either. As people search for why the old Martins sound so good, they examine every aspect of them and the popsicle brace usually enters the conversation. Here's some data on popsicle braces:

80/20 Bronze strings are a mixture of Bronze and Zinc.  They are also referred to as Bronze/Brass strings and are extremely common, much like Phosphor Bronze.  One of the main differences is this variety produces a very bright tone that enhances articulation and pick attack.   This effect can be lost very quickly depending on how much the player sweats and how often they clean their strings.  This choice can be a little more demanding on the wallet, due to having to change them more often.


One and a half steps down. Famously used by Black Sabbath's Tony Iommi in the 1970s, as well as Carrie Brownstein, Dimebag Darrell of Pantera, Eyehategod, Architects, Dying Fetus, Anata, Corin Tucker of Sleater-Kinney, Between the Buried and Me, Machine Head (tuned 40 cents sharp), Down, All That Remains, Bolt Thrower, Pete Loeffler of Chevelle (on Wonder What's Next), Billy Howerdel of A Perfect Circle and Ashes Divide, Wes Borland of Limp Bizkit, Guns N' Roses (on "Jumpin' Jack Flash" and "I Don't Care About You"), Slayer (on "Gemini" from Undisputed Attitude, Diabolus In Musica, the majority of God Hates Us All as well as "Cult" and "Black Serenade" from Christ Illusion), and Stone Sour, as well as former guitarist Jim Root's other band Slipknot on the song "Snuff". Also used by Kyuss on the Sons of Kyuss EP and on the songs "Isolation", "Big Bikes" and "Stage III" from Wretch. Used by Metallica on the song "Bad Seed" from the album Reload, by blink-182 in "Obvious". Also used on Considered Dead and The Erosion of Sanity by Canadian technical death metal band Gorguts.
After music fans heard his impressive blues rock playing on John Mayall’s ‘Beano’ album, they began to spray paint “Clapton is God” on London, England infrastructure. It’s safe to say that Clapton left quite an impression on people. His playing with Cream, Derek and the Dominos, and Blind Faith as well as in his solo work only helped to strengthen Clapton’s legend.

Featured specs include a solid sapele back and sides, solid Sitka spruce top, birch laminated (Stratabond) neck, Richlite fingerboard and bridge, white Corian nut and compensated white Tusq saddle. The neck shape is actually the same as that of the hugely popular Performing Artist Series. The neck also features Martin’s High Performance taper that makes it extremely ergonomic.
It is traditional to think that learning guitar initially involves learning lots of chord shapes. I agree that this can be a distraction, and for me, it made the guitar seem more complicated than it is. As well as (or instead of) learning lots of chords 'by rote', an alternative would be to learn a few scales, and learn how to construct chords from those scale shapes.
Our electric guitars deliver the same rewarding mix of playability, tone and craftsmanship that players love about our acoustics. Proprietary Taylor pickups fueled the design of our current electric family, featuring three series, each loaded with player-friendly features: the groundbreaking hollowbody hybrid T5, the electric-leaning T5z, and the semi-hollowbody T3.
Taylor Guitars was founded in 1974 by Bob Taylor and Kurt Listug, and has grown into the leading global builder of premium acoustic guitars. Renowned for blending modern, innovative manufacturing techniques with a master craftsman's attention to detail, Taylor acoustic guitars are widely considered among the best-sounding and easiest to play in the world. The company is a pioneer in the use of computer mills, lasers and other high-tech tools and proprietary machinery, and today, Bob Taylor is widely recognized throughout the musical instrument industry as the visionary acoustic guitar manufacturer.
I have a friend with a cool little music store here in St. Louis. I pop in from time to time since he always has a great selection of vintage lap steels, as well as an ever-changing assortment of oddball pieces to check out. As I was on my way out the door after one of my most recent visits, I spotted an early 80s Harmony “Flying V,” and immediately stopped in my tracks.
Guitar Center Fort Worth provides comprehensive guitar repair services for the Fort Worth area. Our repair technicians are as passionate about your guitars and basses as you are, and we have the experience needed to keep them performing at their best. Whether you need a quick adjustment to make your guitar easier to play, or a complete guitar rebuild, we have the tools and know-how to take care of your instrument. Guitar Center Fort Worth can also help build a maintenance plan that fits you and your guitar or bass needs, including custom setups, restrings and more. We also take care of fret repairs, hardware and pickup installations, upgrades and customizations, bone and graphite services and more.
I will Provide lessons to Beginner and intermediate Guitarists. I can also teach theory and show you how to apply it to your instrument. I am willing to travel but you must provide me with gas money and an extra expense for coming to you. you can come to my home for lessons and we can work in the dinning room. iv learned many genres and can teach you how to play in almost any band. please keep in mind I'm not here to teach you songs. i wanna make you into and all around good musician. I had a lot of success teaching children and adults.
One main reason for this is the “ambiance” of a live performance. It’s not just the acoustics of the hall where the concert is taking place but also the acoustic interaction of all instruments on stage, the pure power of having everything cranked to the max and even the response of the audience that often psychologically makes your guitar sound a lot better to you than when you try to re-create that sound in the recording studio.

The Streamliner concept is simple: to create more affordable Gretsch guitars without losing their specific DNA. Two new Broad'Tron humbuckers are controlled in classic Gretsch style by a three-way toggle selector switch on the bass side shoulder, a master volume on the treble side horn, and then a trio of controls by the treble-side f-hole for individual-pickup volume and master tone. The G2622's construction gives a different response and resonance to other new releases from Gretsch and, with these pickups, moves further from the Gretsch sound. And while its construction gives it a more solid, or at least ES-335, character, it's a little more airy and less punchy with a softer, squashier tonality. The beefier pickups certainly don't nail a classic Gretsch tonality - although if that's what you want, the full-size pickups are easy to replace - but they do broaden the sonic potential, especially for more gained styles, while staying close to the classic iconography. If you want a great-value semi-hollow, this is among the best electric guitars for under $500.
Some of the best guitar compositions come from simple experimentation; that's why jam sessions are so great. When you want to have your own personal jam session, using a headphone amp is a fantastic idea. That way, you can keep your genius to yourself until it's ready for its first audience. You'll have the freedom to experiment all you want without having to worry about unwanted ears listening in, and that'll give your new riff even more of an impact when you unveil it on your main amplifier.
I decided to release the book for public download, which was my initial plan anyways. In the future there will be no official 'second edition' of The Science of Electric Guitars and Guitar Electronics, as the material will live and float around here in the Internet. If time permits, I will add and edit the material on this pdf-version. This 'upgraded version' will be developed and published only here at this website. The revision date in the first page will updated accordingly on every 'new release' and the listing below will give more detailed information about the changes made to each chapter.

When Levon Helm of The Band sang "I pulled into Nazareth, was feelin' about half past dead" in "The Weight," he wasn’t alluding to a weary pilgrim’s desire for salvation. Rather, he was singing about a mythological trip to Nazareth, Pennsylvania, home of C. F. Martin & Co., makers of Martin flat top acoustic guitars. Founded in 1833 by a German immigrant named Christian Friedrich Martin, whose father was also an instrument maker, Martin...Continue Reading

DISCLAIMER: Hoshino owns the copyright to all of the catalogs scanned in here. This website has NO RELATIONSHIP with the Hoshino Gakki Group and makes no claims to ownership of the linked scans. These catalog scans are provided solely for personal academic/research purposes, so that collectors and others who own one or more of these fantastic guitars can properly identify the model and year of manufacture.
At that time European craftsmen operated under the guild system. The guitar (in its modern form) was a relatively new instrument, and most guitar makers were members of the Cabinet Makers’ Guild. The Violin Makers’ Guild claimed exclusive rights to manufacture musical instruments. The Violin Makers’ Guild filed appeals on three occasions – the first in 1806 – to prevent cabinet makers from producing guitars. Johann Martin is mentioned in a surviving submission dated 1832.
Hey Johnny, have just been reading your article which I found very interesting. My 11yr old daughter, a great ukelele player & an extremely quick learner, I am thinking of stepping her up to a guitar. The delimar is an acoustic or a bothie acoustic-electric, as she hasn’t established her style of music yet, thought a bothie would give her both options. Am hoping you could express some advise on what could be the best way of approaching this transition and a list of guitars to check out for her. I don’t want to be fooled and purchase a sh*t one so to speak! Greatly appreciate your time and advise. Thanks Jules
The lower portion is reserved for two footswitches – each for one of two available effects. It’s a busy stompbox, that’s for sure. However, the versatility it offers is hard to top, and the tone quality is definitely on a high level. Depending on how serious you are about your reverb, Mooer TVR1 Shimverb Pro (click for full review) can be a real force multiplier if used correctly.
I have been a bass player and still am however I started on guitar at 12 and went back to it about 12 years ago. There really isn’t too much difference of perfecting your craft on either instrument. The most important thing to realize is when to play and when not to. I spent years learning how not to be a busy bass player and now that I have such a passion for playing guitar, I’m learning how to sound busy without really being busy.

The Professionals, just like the Standards before them, are designed to appeal to a wide range of players with a wide range of styles. These are not for vintage obsessives. Most of the changes are relatively subtle: a new 'modern deep C' neck shape; new narrow/tall frets; and the Teles revert back to three (compensated) brass saddles over the previous six Strat-style saddles. Both single coils here use Alnico 5 rods on the bass side and Alnico 2 on the trebles and we have a treble bleed RC network on the volume. A basic trio of sounds shouts 'contemporary Tele' from the biting harmonically rich honk of the flat- pole bridge, through the wider, less quacky pickup mix, to the less hard-hitting but not soft neck voice. It's like someone has EQ'd the sound to balance and maximise its Tele-ness. There's a very lively ringing resonance, too: all the planets seem to align, the maple neck/alder body perhaps pulling down a little edgy spike, while those brass saddles - not to mention the through-body stringing and the more classically voiced pickups - combine to create what seems like a modern Tele in spec but one that has plenty of classic, vintage reference.The colour/wood choices are wide and the subtle improvements to the build - on an already very well proven chassis - make a noticeable change, not least the new neck shape and the taller fretwire. Yes, we've played thicker, beefier-sounding Teles, and thinner, brighter ones, too, but as a foundation tone, which also includes a very smart and practical, lightweight moulded case, it all becomes a bit of a no-brainer.


Lastly, if you fancy yourself the next Slash, Jimmy Page, or Pete Townshend… you’ll want to pick up a Les Paul style guitar. It’ll get you that classic rock sound that you’re looking for. Les Pauls are equipped with “humbuckers” which produce a fat, meaty sound that’s rounder and less sharp than the single-coil pickups of a strat. The signal is also stronger so you’ll get more sustain.
MOD® Kits are designed to give both novice and experienced musicians the opportunity to build their own amps and effects pedals. All kits come with easy to follow instructions and use point to point wiring. Pre-drilled enclosure and all parts are included. All you need to provide are hand tools, a soldering iron and solder. All effects pedals operate on a 9V battery.
For you, the 15W should be fine for a long time to come. It runs about $215.00 retail but I suspect, like me, you can make an offer on one for less than $200. Many dealers put these up on Reverb or Ebay as “open box” or make an offer. Mine was marked open box but was clearly brand new when I got it. I think I paid $189 for my 15W. By far this series was the best value I have ever seen in an amp. I’ve owned several Fender, Vox, Sundown (smaller 5W) and no name amps. This AV series is super nice.
The coolness in ’38, however, lay in two lap/amp combinations, the Supro 60 Electric Combination and the Portable Supro 70 Electric Combination. Both featured the little pearloid Supro Electric Hawaiian Guitar tucked into an amp-in-case! The Supro 60 featured a rectangular case with an 8-tube amp and 4″ speaker. This amp had to be plugged in, but was definitely boss. The combo cost $60. The Portable Supro 70 combination featured the same amp but operated with batteries (“…available at any radio supply house”). Most folks are conversant with Nat Daniel’s amp-in-cases from the early ’60s, but the idea was actually developed a good 25 years earlier. Actually, Daniel may have invented the first amp-in-case in 1936, with the amps he made for the first Epiphone Electar C steel guitars. These apparently had an amp built into the case, however, they were quickly replaced with a separate Model C amplifier. There’s no evidence that the Supro was a copy of the earlier Epiphone, but the idea was clearly around at the time.
zircon wrote:Is there any particular reason you're opposed to Kontakt libraries? All of the plugins you mentioned are sample-based themselves, with the notable weakness that you would not be able to change the mapping, grouping, programming (etc), unlike with Kontakt. As someone who uses a lot of virtual instruments, I'd say it's always preferable to have a sample-based instrument in an open sampler plugin since you can see what's going on under the hood and change things like envelopes as needed.
A looper allows you to record a musical passage or phrase then play that passage back repeatedly. You can then record more loops and layer them, one on top of the other. Most recording and playback functions are foot controlled, and once you’ve created suitable backing tracks, you can can then play over the repeated passages in real time, creating exciting one-man-band sounds never possible before. Many of the more advanced models include built-in rhythms, custom effects, inputs for vocal mics and other instruments, plus MIDI and USB capabilities so that you can use the looper as part of your digital song-creation and recording processes.

These acrobatic guitarists used humbucking pickups and the more aggressive Floyd Rose style tremolo bridge to create the hard rock edge that began to be defined in the late 70’s and 80’s more technical playing styles.  These instruments now include much higher output and even active electronic pickups, and their recessed cavities to allow the tremolo bridges to make the distinctive “dive bomb” effects that Van Halen made famous in his solo “Eruption.”  Other distinct features include thinner necks and larger frets with flatter fret boards that many technical players prefer for their flashier techniques.
The Step Ladder is a passive input attenuator using high quality components for excellent reliability. True-bypass mode provides the maximum signal level. The attenuator pot and two toggle switches allow for flexibility in the amount of signal attenuation when not in bypass mode. Treble bleed capacitors in the circuit retain crisp high frequencies even at maximum attenuation. The Step Ladder is ideal for anything from getting a slight boost while playing single-note acoustic guitar leads or for jumping from clean to overdrive in a high-gain electric guitar amp.
Though the guitar is played through an amplifier which is often miked and recorded, the engineer or producer may later decide to use a different amplifier tone that's better suited to the character and timbre of the song, while preserving all the nuance and inflection of the original performance embedded in the direct track. The re-amp device allows the dry track to be sent to an amplifier again and properly miked and re-recorded for use as the final track.
Our Most Recommended electric guitar is Yamaha Pacifica Series PAC012 Electric Guitar. Yamaha has been a power player in the music industry for many decades. The Pacific Yamaha Series is one of the best series for the last decade for its high quality tone and amazing play experience. The Yamaha Pacifica Series was designed for the focus of one thing: Yamaha’s customers.

There is one musical virtuoso whom I would added to this list, if for no other reason then the fact that the 2nd guitarist on the list thru his comment, seemed to hand the title as “greatest guitatist on earth” to this guy. This same individual has often been compared to the one who holds the crown- Jimi. And yet, arguably should not be in this list due to the fact that he was much more than a Master of the guitar, he mastered vurtually over 30 other instruments he played, sold almost Every concert he performed world wide, and… Read more »
The smallest Taylor guitar available. The Baby Taylor series has been hailed for its easy-to-transport size and affordability. Features include sapele laminate back and sides with an optional Sitka spruce (identified as a BT1) or mahogany top (identified as a BT2). A larger bodied option is also available called the “Big Baby” (BBT introduced in 2002), which is a 15/16-size dreadnought with a neck that is standard scale (25-1/2”) and narrow width (1-11/16”). The Big Baby however only comes with a Sitka spruce top.

There are two main types of controls on bass amps: switches and rotary knobs. The simplest, least expensive practice amps and combo amps may only have a few switches and knobs, such as an "on/off" switch, a volume knob, and a bass and treble control knob. Mid-priced models may add additional tone controls (e.g., one, two or three "midrange" controls and a "presence" knob for very high frequencies) and/or add a second type of volume knob called a "gain", "preamplifier" (or "preamp"/"pre"), or "drive" (short for "overdrive") control. A good selection of equalizer knobs and gain stages is standard on expensive amplifiers. If an amp has one or more preamp or gain knobs, the second volume knob may be called "master", "volume" or "post".


For more balanced tone and increased sound quality, the Agile AL-3010 comes with two tone and two volume controls, plus three-way pickup switch.The guitar comes with professionally installed strings sitting tight on an ebony fretboard with 22 jumbo frets and solid abalone trapezoid inlays. This gorgeous guitar is highly recommended for the beginner and even the professional alike.
You can simulate any sound of three pickup guitar with two pickup guitar and vice versa, the only problem is getting it with proper wiring or customizing it. Even they will not sound the same may be close enough for your application or even better. And don't forget about potentiometers problem. The 250K potentiometer will cut some frequencies from humbuckers while 500K make singles brighter than they are by default. It may be not a problem or critical to choosing favorite tone :D
So fun...I like...Let me start off by saying I'm not even a game person I bought this game for my son than watching him play it I took over and couldn't stop playing it I played it non stop until I beat it the content and visuals are great...The only downside was that I was so addicted to this game that I finished it in about one week, but I already am planning on playing it again on a higher difficulty and with a goal of finding more of the hidden treasures that are sprinkled throughout the game.
The aim of Audio Issues is to help interested newcomers get started in the world of audio production with easy to use practical audio production tips for beginners and advanced. If you are just starting out doing some home recording or have been engineering for a while, these quick and easy audio tips are guaranteed to be of interest and use to you.
We will use the remaining pole to switch tone pots. Typical strat wiring has two tone controls – one for middle and one for neck pickup. We want to switch neck/middle tone control on when neck/middle pickup is on. To do this, common terminal of the second pole is connected to the common terminal on the first pole (pickup output) and neck and middle terminals of the second pole are connected to their respective pots. When neck pickup is on, the second pole will switch the output to the neck tone control as intended. What happens in position 4 (both neck and middle pickups on)? Both pots will be switched on and will be in parallel. Moving any tone pot would change the overall resistance to the tone cap and change the tone. The result is below:

On the extreme end of things, adding a lot of reverb to your tone can create large, expansive soundscapes where the notes are less distinct and everything forms one carpet of background sound. Reverb pedals often have a number of controls, from the most basic knobs controlling the volume of the effect (known as “mix”, or how much reverb is mixed into your guitar signal) and the length each note reverberates for (known as “decay”), to more versatile pedals that have controls for different kinds of reverb such as “small room”, “plate” and “arena”.

Analyzing the notes you are playing plays an important role while you are performing. The built-in chromatic tuner in these pedals shows you the live feed of your notes whether they are sharp, flat or dead. Similarly, one can bypass the currently selected sound fx for maintaining a pure sound when tuning or completely mute the signal for a uniform silence.
Quality-wise, they range from complete and utter crap, to OMG! Acoustics, tend to fall into the former range. Electrics, mostly the hollow bodies, were somewhat, but not always better. Solid bodies, mostly made from plywood, BUT they do have their own feel and sound. I happen to love them, others despise that cheap feel and sound. Remember, they were built to fill the growing demand of guitars, that the kids saw on tv, with the Monkee's and the Beatles
New from Stewart-MacDonald are guitar wiring kits with the premium brand pots, switches, jacks, capacitors and cloth wiring used in original Gibson Les Paul and SG guitars. The kits make it easy to order top-quality components for wiring or re-wiring a 4-control / 2-pickup guitar with a 3-way switch. The kit components include Switchcraft toggle […]

i like ‘The Final Word’ statement, my first recording use Yamaha Shen-Shen FG-50 guitar (i don’t know that original production of Yamaha affiliate or not, but i feel the fingerboard bigger than standart), with electric guitar strings (9|42), etc, getting the course prior to learn more chord but jamming in the gig give more experiences….apologies me if there wrong word, best wishes
Mahogany is a very dense, strong wood used in all parts of guitar manufacture except fretboards and bridges, which require harder wood. A mahogany neck and back are often found on short-scale guitars with maple tops. Another common combination is an all-mahogany body and neck (excluding the fretboard). Because mahogany is not very hard, it emphasizes the midrange and bass frequencies for a mellower guitar tone. Mahogany is a very resonant wood which enhances a guitar's sustain. It is generally a uniform rich brown color.

The envelope filter is also known as an auto-wah.  It functions sonically like a wah-wah pedal but uses the strength of the signal to control the sweep of the frequency.  Typically, control knobs allows the player to set the amount of wah to interact with picking, so that the guitarist can dynamically control the effect without using a rocker to engage the filtering.
Originally this effect used 1/4″ tape going round a machine like the Echoplex. It then recorded whatever you were playing and played it back to you a set time later.Since its launch in the 1950’s tape based delay started to appear in more and more recordings. Its saturated sound and imperfect repeats gave it some stunning character that is still loved today.Now tape is dwindling so most people have moved on to emulated digital pedals. These get close to the sound of an original tape unit without any of the added maintenance.
A towering figure in the Japanese underground beginning in the early ’70s, Keiji Haino plays guitar — often distorted to the point of pure sound — with such a wild diversity that it’s misleading to call him merely a “noise guitarist.” But he is very, very, very noisy. With personas that include blues-sludge hero, noise-blast deployer, and big-eared post-psychedelic improviser, Haino’s renown (and collaborations) spread far beyond Japan, most notably with albums recorded by Fushitusha, his all-improv/nominally rock outfit.

Adding a minor seventh to a major triad creates a dominant seventh (denoted V7). In music theory, the "dominant seventh" described here is called a major-minor seventh, emphasizing the chord's construction rather than its usual function.[27] Dominant sevenths are often the dominant chords in three-chord progressions,[18] in which they increase the tension with the tonic "already inherent in the dominant triad".[28]


Bassists can put an incorrect (that is too low) impedance load on their amplifiers even if they connect multiple speakers that are at the correct impedance rating. For example, if a bassist has a combo amp in which the power amp is rated at 4 ohms, and she/he plugs in a second 4 ohm speaker cabinet in parallel, this will drop the impedance ("load") on the amplifier down to 2 ohms, which is too low for the amplifier. When speakers of different impedance are wired up together (e.g., an 8 ohm speaker cabinet and a 4 ohm speaker cab, the impedance is calculated differently). In most applications, when bass speakers are plugged into an amplifier, they are wired in parallel. The parallel "input/output" speaker jacks on the rear of most bass cabinets, when plugged into additional speakers in a "daisy chain" approach, will cause the speakers to be connected in parallel. More rarely, bass speaker cabs may be wired up in series, which means that the impedance is calculated differently. Series wiring is much more complicated and in cases where a bassist is using series wiring, a custom-made cabling system is typically used. Some bass manufacturers that build large speaker cabinets with multiple speakers may wire some of the speakers in series and some in parallel to achieve a certain impedance rating for the entire speaker cabinet (e.g., in 8x10" speaker cabinets, the speakers inside the cabinet may be all wired up in series, but the overall cabinet's "input/output" jacks are in parallel). Professional bass technicians and speaker designers setting up custom-made bass speaker systems for bass players from major bands may use an electronic meter to test the impedance of the speaker cabinets they design.
Yngwie Malmsteen released his Concerto Suite for Electric Guitar and Orchestra in 1998, and Steve Vai released a double-live CD entitled Sound Theories, of his work with the Netherlands Metropole Orchestra in June 2007. The American composers Rhys Chatham and Glenn Branca have written "symphonic" works for large ensembles of electric guitars, in some cases numbering up to 100 players, and the instrument is a core member of the Bang on a Can All-Stars (played by Mark Stewart). Still, like many electric and electronic instruments, the electric guitar remains primarily associated with rock and jazz music, rather than with classical compositions and performances.[37] R. Prasanna plays a style of Indian classical music (Carnatic music) on the electric guitar.
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