The H9 is a pedal that can actually run all of Eventide's stompbox effects (apart from the TimeFactor's Looper). All of the effect algorithms (including their associated presets) are available for purchase, but several come already built in - you get Chorus and Tremolo/Pan from the ModFactor, H910/H949 and Crystals from the PitchFactor, Tape Echo and Vintage Delay from the TimeFactor, and Shimmer and Hall from Space. In addition, there's a new UltraTap Delay that's exclusive to the H9, plus a voucher for a free algorithm of your choice. The complex effects algorithms feature loads of editable parameters. The H9 has both wireless (Bluetooth) and wired (USB) connections for the free H9 Control editor and librarian software (iOS app, Mac, Windows) for editing, creating and managing presets, changing system settings and purchasing algorithms. This pedal has been designed to take full advantage of this and it works brilliantly, especially so on an iPad where a few finger swipes zap the pedal through thin air to produce instant results. Other one-effect-at-a-time 'chameleon' pedals exist out there, but the H9 pushes the genre's envelope.
The Tune-o-matic bridge was the brainchild of legendary Gibson president Ted McCarty in 1954, setting the standard for simplicity and functionality that has never been bettered. The 2008 Les Paul Standard features TonePros locking Nashville Tune-o-matic in a chrome finish, which has saddle adjustment screws on the pickup side, and pre-notched saddles for quick installation. The chrome locking stopbar tailpiece is also from TonePros. These parts come with locking studs designed to secure both components firmly to the body so that there is no lean, yielding a great union between the strings and body which results in excellent tone and sustain.
One trait of most ribbon mics is the figure-of-eight polar response, and this is often exceptionally consistent across the frequency range. This polar pattern means, of course, that ribbons tend to pick up a little more room ambience than cardioids, given that the polar pattern is as sensitive behind the diaphragm as it is in front. Ribbon mics are also often characterised as sounding 'smoother' compared with typical condenser microphones, partly because their construction avoids the high-frequency diaphragm resonances normally inherent in condenser designs.

If you're in the Boston area and need a repair on your stringed instrument look no further!  I've… If you're in the Boston area and need a repair on your stringed instrument look no further!  I've had Steve repair numerous guitars (4 acoustic, 1 electric) and have had each one repaired better than I could have imagined. Rest assure...if you choose Steve, it is in good hands. His prices are very fair especially for the time and care he puts into his work. As long as he's open for business-go with Steve for all repairs please!!  Great guy, great service!! Read more
If anybody needs a Bridge, I have a Teisco Roller Bridge for sale, it is a a copy of a Gretsch Roller bridge but includes a solid steel Base like a Rickenbacker Bridge Base. The string saddles are rollers which are adjustable side-to-side for proper string spacing, and each side of the bridge is adjustable for Height. It is in excellent condition, probably from 1965 thru 1968. On a scale of 0 to 10, it is a 8.

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Most players don’t use more than one modulation effect at once, so it doesn’t matter all that much if you place the phaser before the chorus or the flanger in front of the phaser. However, the one exception is tremolo, which should be placed behind other modulation pedals, as this placement will produce the most dramatic and desirable rhythmic on/off effects. Placing a tremolo pedal in an effects loop is also closer to the signal path of an amp with built-in tremolo, but my personal preference is to plug a tremolo pedal into an amp’s front end and save the effects loop for other effects.
The book discusses both tabs and notation which makes it easier to transition if you’ve been using the former. It covers a wide range of topics including scales and arpeggios. The approach the author takes is logically and accessible with plenty of examples and exercises to make it stick. The only downside is that there are no songs included in it.

The free GUITAR RIG 5 PLAYER is ready to rock right from the start: It offers a supreme selection of modular, high-class components, effects and routing tools, bundled as the free FACTORY SELECTION. For classic power and gain the Tube Compressor and Skreamer really come into their own, while a range of high-end effects such as the Studio Reverb and Delay Man can add that special touch. Choose from many Amp and Envelope modifiers as well as Routing Tools to further shape your sound to perfection.
Albert Lee‘s extensive use of the Telecaster earned him the nickname of “Mr. Telecaster”. His acolyte Ronnie Earl (then still Ronnie Earl Horvath) favored a Telecaster during his tenure with Roomful of Blues. Both John Tichy and Bill Kirchen of Commander Cody and his Lost Planet Airmen wielded Teles, as did Chris Hillman and Gram Parsons with the Flying Burrito Brothers. Hugh Cornwell of The Stranglers has used Telecasters throughout his career. Joe Strummer (frontman of the punk band The Clash) used his worn and battered 1966 Telecaster (originally Sunburst but spray painted black) with its distinctive “Ignore Alien Orders” sticker from the beginning of his musical career until the day he died. In January 2007, Fender issued the G. E. Smith signature Telecaster in honor of Smith’s reputation as a modern master of the Telecaster. G.E. Smith was the lead guitarist in the Hall & Oates band and the musical director of Saturday Night Live. Tom Morello of “Rage Against The Machine” plays a black American Telecaster called “Sendero Luminoso” (Shining Path) for songs in drop-D tuning. Jim Root from Slipknot had a signature Telecaster released in 2009. Prince plays a Telecaster in the opening scene of his film, Purple Rain. Singer and Songwriter Jeff Buckley (Son of musician Tim Buckley) played an American Telecaster throughout his career. Lynval Golding, one of the guitarists for 2-Tone band The Specials, used a yellow telecaster throughout his time as a Special. Jonny Greenwood, lead guitarist of Radiohead uses a Telecaster Plus model with lace sensor pickups as his main guitar. British singer and guitar player Anna Calviexclusively plays a Telecaster through a Vox AC30. Danny Jones, of McFly, uses a Telecaster Vintage ’52. Deryck Whibley (frontman and guitarist of the band Sum 41) uses his own signature Telecaster Deluxe, issued in 2005. It features one knob for volume and tone, a single humbucker pickup near the synchronized six-saddle bridge and without the traditional pickup selector switch.

While many electric guitar amp cabs have "open back" designs (actually partially open back, as part of the back is usually enclosed in panels), open back cabinets are rarely seen in bass amp cabs, except in the smallest, least expensive practice bass amps. The reason that open back designs are not used with bass amp cabs is that open back designs make it hard to reproduce low-frequency sounds, which are crucial for bass cabinets. On electric guitar amp cabs, the reduction of some very low-frequency sounds may be desirable, as it makes the cabinet less "boomy"; however, for a bass cabinet, this loss of bass frequencies is generally seen as undesirable.
What style of music do you play? While there are many versatile guitar amps that can be used for many styles of music, if you play a particular style of music a majority of the time, then you should get an amplifier that best suits it. Do you play acoustic or electric? Certain guitar amplifiers are designed specifically for acoustic guitars although it is possible to play an acoustic through any amp. In terms of styles, jazz players typically do not need an overdrive option as clean tones are best suited for that style of music. Blues aficionados will be happiest with a clean channel plus an overdrive channel with plenty of sustain, such as one finds on many vintage Fender models. Shredders will require an amp that will accept distortion pedals without losing signal quality. Do your research regarding which guitar amps are best suited for the type of music you play.
Kadence guitar has soothing sound quality with a bright tone, which indicates you have to go for higher gauge strings if you need bass-heavy sound output. This guitar is manufactured in our home nation – yes in India! was established in -2006. They produce an acoustic range of guitars that are available at a starting price of 5000 INR. approximately. Guitars in this brand that have a superior quality of sound start from 10,000 INR.
Fender vs. Gibson is really not the issue. It has more to do with the weight factor as well as hard-tail vs. vibrato bar. A Telecaster will probably give you the same tuning stability and basic tonal range as an SG, but you might just as well consider an Ibanez or Charvel and get the result you want. A good guitarist can play ANY guitar and get a good result. A bad guitar, conversely, will sound awful no matter how well it’s played if the intonation, electronics, and tuning stability are bad. A Telecaster can be a large guitar. A Les Paul will generally seem lighter, maybe be more comfortable with a shorter scale length, but cost more. A Stratocaster will sound lovely to Strat fans, but then you have a lot of tuning and quirky pickup issues you won’t get with a hard-tail. You may find the Ibanez with a Floyd Rose vibrato bar may give you the best of both worlds, stability and dive bombs. The guitar I recommend for beginners is the Gibson SG, because it is comfortable in size and scale length, achieves both bright and thick tones, and is generally affordable. For prospective Whammy-bar shredders, I would lean towards a Charvel or Jackson at first, and maybe consider a MusicMan. The premium Strat or Les Paul is very desirable and very playable for anyone who has the fingers to bring out the sounds, but if you don’t have the fingers, imo, wait until you do.
Phase Shifter pedals found their way into the guitar community in the 70’s with pedals like the MXR Phase 90, Mutron Phase Shifter, EH Small Stone, Foxx and others. The sweeping sound it produces is unmistakable and a legendary trademark of many guitarists sound. The MXR Phase 90 can be heard all over Van Halen 1 and II. Brian May used the Foxx phase on “Sheer Heart Attack,” The Eagles “Life In The Fast Lane”, and Led Zeppelin’s “The Rover” to name but a few.
Another consideration, and something you’ll read a lot about, is the pickups, which give the guitar its voice. There are two kinds of pickup in this price range: the single-coil (which gives a bright, sparkly sound) and the humbucker (which is fuller, meatier and perfect for rock and metal). Both are as common as each other in this budget range, and a guitar with a mix of both will offer you the best versatility.

To find which Ernie Ball strings are right for you, the key is experimentation. Figure out which strings sound best to your ear, feel best on your fingers, and most importantly enable you to create the music you want. When you are ready to buy, head over to one of the 5,500 music stores that carry Ernie Ball products. You can discover these stores by visiting our Store Locator.


A continuation of the 7-string, adding another string a perfect fourth lower than the seven strings low B. The eight string guitars additional low F♯ string is just a whole step up from a bass guitars low E string. While luthiers have been building these instruments previously, mass-produced Eight-string electric guitars are a relatively recent innovation. Ibanez was first to offer a production eight-string guitar in March 2007.[46] Many other companies now produce mass-market eight-string models, yet these guitars remain relatively uncommon.
Gibson, like many guitar manufacturers, had long offered semi-acoustic guitars with pickups, and previously rejected Les Paul and his "log" electric in the 1940s. In apparent response to the Telecaster, Gibson introduced the first Gibson Les Paul solid body guitar in 1952 (although Les Paul was actually brought in only towards the end of the design process for expert fine tuning of the nearly complete design and for marketing endorsement [2]). Features of the Les Paul include a solid mahogany body with a carved maple top (much like a violin and earlier Gibson archtop hollow body electric guitars) and contrasting edge binding, two single-coil "soapbar" pickups, a 24¾" scale mahogany neck with a more traditional glued-in "set" neck joint, binding on the edges of the fretboard, and a tilt-back headstock with three machine heads (tuners) to a side. The earliest models had a combination bridge and trapeze-tailpiece design that was in fact designed by Les Paul himself, but was largely disliked and discontinued after the first year. Gibson then developed the Tune-o-matic bridge and separate stop tailpiece, an adjustable non-vibrato design that has endured. By 1957, Gibson had made the final major change to the Les Paul as we know it today - the humbucking pickup, or humbucker. The humbucker, invented by Seth Lover, was a dual-coil pickup which featured two windings connected out of phase and reverse-wound, in order to cancel the 60-cycle hum associated with single-coil pickups; as a byproduct, however, it also produces a distinctive, more "mellow" tone which appeals to many guitarists. The more traditionally designed and styled Gibson solid-body instruments were a contrast to Leo Fender's modular designs, with the most notable differentiator being the method of neck attachment and the scale of the neck (Gibson-24.75", Fender-25.5"). Each design has its own merits. To this day, the basic design of many solid-body electric guitar available today are derived from the original designs - the Telecaster, Stratocaster and the Les Paul.
Lee Ranaldo of Sonic Youth used a Kent Polaris I solid body (with lots of duct tape on it) and several Kent 800-series guitars - a white 820 and a sunburst 821 12-string with 10 strings on it, shown at left. Since the B and high-E strings on a 12-string set are normally tuned to the same note, he left the duplicate strings off. He uses several alternate tunings with his guitars.
Paul Reed Smith Guitars (better known as PRS) is a Maryland-based manufacturer, and relatively new in the world of guitars – founded in 1980, when they began making a series of hand-built guitars. Today they have a wide range of models, which are built in both Asia and America, as well as a full roster of artists playing their guitars; including Mike Oldfield, Dave Navarro, Carlos Santana, and Mark Tremonti.

Masacre takes a great deal of my time, but in normal days I am also a guitar teacher in my hometown, Medellin. I counsel young rock bands as well, with the purpose of sharing my knowledge and experience with those who start in this road. I've been part of the selecting jury at several local rock festivals and when I am available and things work out, I join some of my friends and put together tribute bands to play at local clubs, paying homage to those bands that inspired us since childhood, such as Black Sabbath, Kiss, Ozzy Osbourne, Dio, and others.

For the last tip/technique, I’m going to shift gears and talk about recording acoustic—upright—bass. This may seem more daunting, but many of the same techniques apply—I’ll mention a few quick items that would be specific to the big box. While the dynamic mics I mentioned above might work fine (especially on stage), a good large-diaphragm condenser would be appropriate in the studio, to capture the high end and air of the acoustic instrument as well as the lows. On stage, the relatively low acoustic volume of the instrument may preclude more distant mic positioning, but you can wedge a small (pencil-type) mic into the bridge, with appropriate foam padding, and this, surprisingly, can often provide excellent sound and much better isolation. 
i bought one in 1966, my first guitar, i paid 38.99 for it at a gibson dept. store in ft. worth, tx. it was mij under the same name and was marketed in canada as regent guitars and in the u.s. later as kent guitars. it is in the same catagory (some say better) as teisco its competator, some say there was some interfacing between the 2 companies. i really enjoyed it and wish i still had it, it played great and sounded great. i found this while surfing 4 another!!!
Grover Jackson became a partner with Wayne Charvel in the Charvel's Guitar Repair shop in California in the 1970s then Grover Jackson took over the entire business in 1978 and at that time they were making guitars under the name Charvel. Their guitars were tailored to the heavy metal and hard rock genre's of the day. Then a relatively unknown Randy Rhoads, who had just joined Ozzy Osbourne’s new band, contacted them in 1980 with the idea to create a highly customized guitar. That guitar, a new take on the Flying V called 'Concorde' became the first guitar to carry the Jackson brand and the company has been popular with shredders ever since.
This affordable signature model for Iron Maiden guitarist Adrian Smith is an exemplary classic metal guitar for the money. It features a Jackson slim D profile neck with immaculately finished frets, while the oiled maple neck a joy to motor around on. Allied to the surprisingly good build quality, this imparts a premium feel to the SDX. Tonally, the body might not quite enjoy the snap and sparkle of Smith's alder-bodied American original, but basswood is a great tonewood anyway, particularly once you're piling on the gain. The bridge humbucker is plenty powerful, with just enough detail to prevent it sliding into the woolly morass suffered by many lower-end units, and the single coils give you more than a sniff of Strat flavour, making the SDX a versatile guitar indeed considering its heavy metal association. The Floyd Rose Special bridge also does a solid job of keeping you in tune, no matter how crazy you get. A versatile guitar capable of covering many bases, and perfect for nailing your favourite Maiden tunes? What more could you need, bar the white high tops and tight strides?
We started finding that this type of construction leads to the neck bending (or bowing) after about 6 months. Unfortunately with the traditional method there is not an easy way to adjust it back to normal - once it is bent it's time to get a new guitar! This lead us to re design our classical guitars to use a truss rod. A truss rod is a much stronger example of the bar used in traditional manufacturing, but its main advantage is that it is adjustable. So if in the future you neck begins to bend it can easily be adjusted back into correct shape.
The original flanger effect was produced back in the 1960’s by recording to two tape deck simultaneously and mixing the result. As they were recording, an audio engineer would lightly touching the flange of one the reels of tape. When it played back, it created a swooshing effect similar to what you hear when a jet airplane takes off. Stomp boxes use a delay effect to create a similar sound.
My live rig for years has been a multi FX floor pedal (currently, and for the past seven years, using a BOSS GT-8) running the left and right outputs into the effects RETURN of a small amp on stage and through a speaker cab simulator (lately, a “CABTONE” by Digital music Corp, at other times a Hughes & Kettner “RED BOX”) We often play as a ten piece band, with trumpet, trombone, three saxes… and here am I with a 30 watt Behringer amp with an 8 inch speaker, my BOSS GT-8 and a CABTONE direct box/speaker simulator going to the PA. Sounds great. (I’ve substituted bigger amps at times… a Tech21 Power Station… but to my ears, the Behringer sounds better.) You’re probably thinking… a 30 watt Behringer? That’s a “toy,” right? It’s enough. Well, that and the fact that the other “direct” channel is in our monitors, making for a rich 3D stereo sound on stage between the amp and the monitors. I am looking to upgrade to a multi effect processor that allows different cab simulations per patch – maybe the Eleven Rack… (I would have a hard time justifying the expense of the Fractal system) but honestly, I’ve been very happy with the setup I just described. Been happy with it the past seven years, and before that, it was different amps (actually bypassing everything but the power amp and speaker) and different floor processors (Digitech, Rocktron, BOSS…) but the same idea… one output to the board, the other to a small amp.
Finally, their taper. Taper refers to the gradual increase or decrease of the pots ohm as you adjust it. There are two types of pot taper, Logarithmic (Audio) and Linear (Lin). The human ear hears in a logarithmic manner, so in a gradual increase or decrease, whereas linear, to our ear sounds almost more like an on/off. Which you use is completely up to you, many players prefer a linear volume pot for example, but I find that a quality logarithmic pot in both volume and tone positions offers more scope for adjustment, if using a quality pot that is! Low quality audio taper pots, in my experience, offer unreliable tapers, often not providing a even, gradual adjustment as you roll off or on. A guitar's volume and tone pot can bring out so many great sounds from your rig, it offers versatility to your sound, and I love pushing an amp hard and finding those sweet spots on the guitar's controls to really capture a great tone. So I feel that's why a quality logarithmic pot with a perfectly gradual taper is an incredibly important component in the electric guitar. 
Guitar FX BOX is acting just like a good collection of analog effect pedals. Just plug your guitar into the sound card input and your guitar will sing and scream. You can apply a wide range of high quality effects to guitar, voice, and other inputs real-time - I/O delay is really low, almost undetectable. This is achieved using DirectSound, WDM streaming or ASIO for fast access to the sound card hardware and special DSP algorithms optimized for real-time processing. Besides high sound quality, Guitar FX BOX features intuitive user interface, supports presets and hot keys for quick presets changing, MIDI/Game controllers pedals, configurable tuner, metronome, file input/output. Currently included effects: Overdrive/distortion, Amp&Speaker cabinet simulator, Echo, Pitch shifter, Reverb, Wah-Wah, Chorus, Tremolo, I/O Equalizers, Dynamic compressor, Phaser and Volume swell.
4) Aside from enough publishing errors that, to my sensibilities, mean that the book is not ready to be published, instructions are shown on how to add a Varistor switch to a guitar, and a Les Paul is used for the example. The drilled hole given as the example is nothing less than a hack job, I hate to say it, but it is. I would faint if I saw a tech do that to my guitar. Besides its being really bad advice in the first place, if you are going to do it, DONT follow this example!

On a Strat, you can also replace one of your tone pots with a “blender” pot. This allows you to “blend” in the neck pickup when your selector is in the bridge or bridge/middle positions, and allows you to blend in the bridge pickup when in the neck or neck/middle positions. You can have the neck/bridge on, or all three on at once. There are slight, but noticeable, tonal changes from one end to the other, as the blend pot does have some attenuation. You do have to buy a specific blender pot to do it right; otherwise when turned down it won’t shut the third pickup off all the way. Super cool mod, and doesn’t change the look of your Strat.
When speaking of electric guitars and pickups we are usually talking about magnetic pickups, as they use magnets to convert the vibration of the string into an electric signal, and these can be divided into 2 main types: The Humbucker (Double-coil) and the single coil pickup. Double-coil pickups are basically single coil pickups mounted side by side and the sound they pick up is "integrated" through to the output.
5.  Customer installed strap button on heel of acoustic.  This was a simple job that went horribly wrong because a pilot hole wasn’t drilled.  Result:  Cracked heal.  Fix:  Careful application of cyanoacrylate glue and touch up refinish.  I’ve also seen strap button installations on guitars with bolt on necks where the pilot hole has hit the threaded insert in the heel.  Make sure you know where the insert is placed on that particular guitar before you drill.

Ovation, Roundback, Adamas, Legend, Custom Legend, Elite, Applause, Celebrity, Balladeer, Ultra, Thunderbolt and Lyrachord , The Roundback body shape, Roundback design and Roundback Technology, Guitar Bowl Shape, Fingerboard Inlay Design, Sound hole Rosette Design, Adamas Peghead Shape, Bridge Design, Epaulet Design, Soundboard and Sound hole designs, Guitar Tuning Head are protected by one or more US and Foreign Trademarks and Patents.
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Lutherie has been my life's work since the beginning. After graduating from Roberto-Venn School of Lutherie in 1992, I set up my first shop in a rental garage, and began designing, building, repairing, and restoring fretted stringed instruments. Aided and abetted by 13 years of employment as a staff guitar repairman at Seattle's Trading Musician, I gained an extensive knowledge of the inner and outer workings of a vast array of instruments.
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List of acoustic guitar brands that include the most reliable models available. Acoustic guitar brands include those from major manufacturers of musical instruments, including Yamaha, Gretsch, Gibson, and more. What are the best acoustic guitar companies? Users looking for a new guitar will want to research a variety of different brands to find the one that best suits their needs, based on function and features.
This is not a cheap Chinese manufactured kit of questionable quality where the parts simply don’t work together (like most of the other kits that you will find on Ebay, Etsy and Amazon). We proudly manufacture these kits in our shop in Portland, Oregon. We are a family-owned company building products and traditions that we expect to last for a long, long time. We produce instrument kits with exacting specifications, high quality production, and domestic, sustainably-cultivated sources of materials whenever possible.
Just SOLD OUT sorry.... Another FRESH Release from the JVG Vintage Vault: Hey Mandolin lovers here we are proud to present a wonderful vintage 40 year old beautiful sounding and is absolutely gorgeous !!! She has chop too well preserved and well taken care of this is the more rare of the Japanese mando's you do see a lot more Aria's & Alvarez but less Ibanez lawsuit version of the famously popular Gibson F5 mando. Excellent workmanship and it's the solid spruce carved example she's in very good - excellent vintage condition with just a few blemishes and yet nothing to detract from its undeniable beauty. This beauty comes with its original hard shell case it's rectangular black tolex with brilliant plugs marigold lining, open its cas and wow she's really striking .... This Iis a rare one folks a must for the ibanez mando fan... Contact Joe: jvguitars@gmail.com.
Nice 60's, Japanese Hollow-Body. Really cool, "Barney Kessel" style hollow body / Arch top, double cutaway Electric Guitar by Univox. 2-Pick-up. Fabulous Sunburst finish. Bound, Rosewood fingerboard. "Trapeze" tailpiece. Separate Volume and Tone for each pickup and adjustable truss rod. White "Mother-of-Toilet seat" headstock overlay. Finish and wood in great shape. Plays and sounds great. Missing Logo, Pick guard and whammy bar. Not many finish chips. Very shiny. Some chips on plastic pick-up bezel (see photos). Really cool "Emerald" cap on pick-up selector switch. Frets in great shape with minor, normal wear. We have completely done a "Pro" set up on the guitar, including cleaning all the electronics, Re-soldered the output jack, tightening and lubing the machines, oiling the fingerboard, adjusting the neck and action for great playability (clearance at the 9th fret = .012 when fretted at the first and the body), adjusting / checking the intonation (adjusted perfectly!),  and cleaning and polishing. Plays and sounds great. We also installed a new set of .011 "Flat-wound" strings. Dilapidated, but functional gig bag included.
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Gibson is the brand that made the epic Les Paul model. It was made by a man named Les Paul. He is the man behind the company and the brand has made some of the finest guitars of all time. It has modeled for entry-level to expert level players. This is one of the best among popular brands of electric guitars. Mr. Orville Gibson founded this company in 1902.
No information beyond this debut is available. It’s also probable the Merson “Tempo” name was applied to other acoustic guitars. Merson instruments from this period do not appear to have been widely distributed, so they are probably a regional phenomenon, although they did get notice in The Music Trades, a major trade publication. Other instruments distributed by Merson in 1948 included Harmony, Kamico, Favilla, Temp and Supro electric guitars and stringed instruments; Covella, Fontanella and Galanti accordions; Tempo Bandmaster, Merson, Merson Ultratone, and Rudy Muck brass instruments; and Kohlert Thibouville, Freres, Penzel-Mueller, Barklee and Merson woodwinds.

James Marshall "Jimi" Hendrix was an American guitarist, singer, and songwriter. Although his mainstream career spanned only four years, he is widely regarded as one of the most influential electric guitarists in the history of popular music, and one of the most celebrated musicians of the 20th century. The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame describes him as "arguably the greatest instrumentalist in the history of rock music". Born in Seattle, Washington, Hendrix began playing guitar at the age of 15. In 1961, he enlisted in the US Army; he was granted an honorable discharge the following year. Soon afterward, he moved to Clarksville, Tennessee, and began playing gigs on the chitlin' circuit, ...more on Wikipedia
Typically, guitar amplifiers have two amplifying circuit stages and in addition frequently have tone-shaping electric circuits, which usually include at least bass and treble controls, which function similarly to the equivalent controls on a home hi-fi system. More expensive amplifiers typically have more controls for other frequency ranges, such as one or two "midrange" controls and a "presence" control for high frequencies. Some guitar amplifiers have a graphic equalizer, which uses vertical faders to control multiple frequency bands. Some more expensive bass amps have a parametric equalizer, which enables precise control of tone.

Pedals that fit this description usually end up being more of a problem than anything else, but that’s not the case with Behringer. We get rudimentary but functional controls, which allow you to dial in a decent variety of reverb effects. Same goes for shaping said reverb. You have a certain amount of maneuvering space to work with, which might not seem like a lite when you put this thing next to a boutique model.
Here we have a very nice example of the Yamaha Red Label fg230-12... This example is in very good - excellent original condition. The woods used on this guitar are of a very high grade ... spruce top, Honduran Mahogany back, sides and neck please see pics for the details but very nicely grained woods!... workmanship is impeccable... the guitar plays like a real with very good action and the intonation is set dead on... The neck is solid Mahogany and is slightly beefy..I love the feel of this guitar and when you hear is you will be in 12 string heaven... no cracks or repairs ... the condition is vintage used its about 40+ years old you know ...with several minimal scratches but still overall a very beautiful vintage guitar. The wood has aged and mellowed with time to yield a wonderful rich tone only a 30+ year old quality instrument can offer. This one has that quaity rich sound along with the playability with the right aging now and with its beauty ...its a no brainier... Also available is a cool $100 vintage hard shell case see pics Thanks for your interest!.
In Part 4 of Gibson’s Effects Explained series we’re going to look at modulation effects. This group includes phasing, flanging, chorus, vibrato and tremolo, rotary speaker effects, and octave dividers, the latter of which I have loosely grouped in here because … well, they don’t fit in overdrive or delay, do they? Later analog versions of the first three of these—phasing, flanging, and chorus—do, as a matter of fact, use much of the same technology as echo and delay units, although with chips having shorter delay times, but it makes sense to include them here because their obvious sonic characteristics are of a type with other units made from very different kinds of circuits. Most such effects were developed in an effort to add depth, dimension and movement to the guitar’s natural sound without necessarily distorting it, strictly speaking. A few noteworthy types also developed from effects that were in use on the electronic organ. This is another big category, so we’ll split it into two chunks.
There's no denying the popularity of the Stratocaster, thanks to it being the weapon of choice for a long list of iconic players that include Jimi Hendrix, Eric Clapton and Jeff Beck to name a few. The American Professional Stratocaster is the latest iteration of this classic, carrying over much of the look and feel of the original, but more reliable and road worthy.
AJL: It’s a brand that specialises in making Gypsy acoustic guitars and archtop jazz box guitars. Each guitar is handmade by master luthier Ari-Jukka Luomaranta from Finland, and when I say he makes it, I literally mean he makes it all alone without any employees. I’m not exactly a classical guitar or jazz box fan but I understand why people love his guitars. He puts extreme attention to even the most minute details while making each of his guitar. Each AJL guitar is like a testimony of his art and dedication. He chooses the best quality woods to work with and by his undying passion for making guitars he creates masterpieces.

A tabletop unit is a type of multi-effects device that sits on a desk and is controlled manually. One such example is the Pod guitar amplifier modeler. Digital effects designed for DJs are often sold in tabletop models, so that the units can be placed alongside a DJ mixer, turntables and CD scratching gear.[17] For a DJ, a pedal located on the floor would not be practical because she/he would find it hard to adjust the knobs.
Open Loop Gain: Feedback Solid-state amplifiers are inherently nonlinear. They have a very large ‘open loop gain’ approx 20,000. The amplifier output is (feedback) to the comparator input to reduce the gain to approx 50. Therefore 99.9% of this feedback corrects all instability and non-non-linearity of the amplifier, as explained in amplifiers. The speaker also acts as a large microphone. All non-linear movements and vibrations within the speaker cone, (caused by reflected nodes, chaotic resonances etc) of which there are many, are regenerated back into electricity by the voice coil. This re-generated signal from the voice coil is inadvertanetly fed-back to the solid-state amps comparator input, and re-amplified back to the speaker as recycled distortion.
The Ibanez DT-250 is a perfect guitar for shredding. The basswood is light so you can run all over the stage, jump off your stack, and still have energy to dive-bomb. Even do the splits. Notice that was a “you can.” These were outfitted with a pair of blade-pole V5 humbuckers, produced toward the end of Japanese-made pickups, before Ibanez started working with DiMarzio. They are smokin’ hot! This guitar almost leaps out of your hand when you plug it in. The Japanese improvements on the locking vibrato were also impressive, and this combines the precision of a Floyd Rose with the feather touch of a Kahler.

Some of the best pedals in this segment, like the TC Electronic Sentry, will allow you to set both the volume threshold where the noise gate kicks in, and the type of interference you want to filter out. The important thing to remember about noise gate pedals is that they only eliminate hissing when you don’t play. As soon as you do, the pedal disengages and the noise comes back. With that said, noise gate pedals are essential for a good tone.
While all of the brands featured in this guide produce wonderful instruments, the clear all around winner is Fender. Fender somehow manages to feature the best of both worlds in nearly every category. Guitar players have been turning to Fender for over seventy years, and for good reason. The company is renowned for its high quality craftsmanship and their beautifully constructed instruments have been inspiring guitarists for decades.
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Our very first impression of the American Special Telecaster was that it’s such a good guitar. There is just something about it that feels remarkable. It’s hard to point to one particular thing, what does it is the combination of design, sound and feeling. We love the alder body and the maple neck that makes your music sound great, and the Texas Special pickups make everything we play on this guitar sound amazing.
The Builder’s Edition V-Class K14ce - one of four new 2018 V-Class launches that also include a K24ce, 914ce and PS14c - is quite a statement of intent. It combines the new V bracing with a notably different, more comfortable, Grand Auditorium style. Of course, its build-quality is nothing short of exceptional as we’d expect, and not least at this price. We’re also reminded of the K14ce’s high-end lineage, however, by the paua ‘spring vine’ inlay that lies down the majority of the black/dark brown ebony ’board, while a lighter koa purfling stripe sits just inside the ebony edge-binding and continues around the headstock, which is again ebony-faced with a relatively demure paua inlay. The aged-gold Gotoh tuners perfectly fit the slightly worn-in vibe - hugely understated class, just like the green abalone dots in the ebony bridge-pins. While there’s plenty for those who love details to admire, the modern Taylor guitar is hugely sorted in terms of playing feel. V-Class, Builder’s Edition? Get used to those terms. Taylor has upped the ante. Considerably.
Hendrix was known for a lot of things.The beautiful chord embellishments on Little Wing, the grit of the solo in Voodoo Child screaming off of his strat pickups, his cover of the Dylan song All Along The Watchtower, and the backwards solo in Castles Made of Sand, but known as a great innovative guitar player over and over again. His short but explosive career influenced numerous artists for many years past his death and continues to influence musicians today. To make such a difference in such a short amount of time truly earns Jimi a spot as number two. But…then you may ask, “Who is deserving of number one?!”
Making their second appearance on our list, Mesa Boogie delivers with the Dual Rectifier Rackmount (appropriately nicknamed the “Racktifier”). This 3-U behemoth is simply a Dual Rectifier Head, and is one of the very few rackmounts to contain a pre-amp and power-amp all-in-one.  The Racktifier is made for those who simply want the dual rectifier sound, but have the “rack-gear bug”.
A tremolo effect simply alters the volume of a signal at a preset interval, within a preset range. Some amps have this effect built in, and in some cases it’s called vibrato (a misnomer that caught on long ago and has stuck around to this day). Tremolo sounds much like hitting a note and then turning your volume knob up and down rapidly. Most tremolo effects have two controls: speed and depth. Adjusting speed changes how rapidly your volume fluctuates. Adjusting the depth controls the range of volume from loud to soft as the tremolo fluctuates.

Whether you use it to move on to fingerstyle guitar or integrate it into a hybrid technique, mastering the right hand in this finite way will make you a better player. In addition to the progressive book, you can download the song samples, which are enriched with the ability to slow them down, change keys, and set looping points to help you master parts one at at time.


Sometimes referred to as a fret “dress” and setup, The Works includes precision level, re-crown and polish of your instrument’s frets along with complete set-up of truss rod, string height (action) and intonation. This work will minimize fret buzz, eliminate fret pitting and divots, and improve your overall tone! The whole instrument will be cleaned and polished and all hardware and electronics inspected, cleaned, and lubed.
The guitar itself features a resonant and solid American Alder body, maple neck and 2 x single-coil pickups with 1 x humbucker installed with a coil tap function for tonal variety. The guitar is comfortable to play and sounds great especially when you throw some distortion at it through an amplifier. The guitar is budget friendly and ideal for beginners and home recording enthusiasts thanks to its high build quality and comfortable playing experience.

This guitar is perfect no matter if you’re a beginner or have been playing for many years. The design is vintage at its best, with a lovely soft V-shaped neck and great colors, namely Surf Green, Daphne Blue and Fiesta Red. This guitar has a very traditional look that most people like. True, some people would feel that it’s a little bit too mainstream, but others would reason that hey, if it’s good enough for everybody else, it’s good enough for me!
This group contains two effects pedals, which are the noise gate and compressor (and most of the time a volume pedal). You don't want to change that ordering, because of the result of compression. It reduces the variance between the highest peaks of volume and the lowest. And if you haven't taken the noise out of your signal yet using the noise gate, your signal-to-noise ratio becomes lower, making it more difficult to take out the noise in a musical fashion (it'll have more abrupt and noticeable moments of silence).
Acoustic has never had much of a following amongst guitar players, but they made (original company out of business) some of the best bass amps that were ever made. Advanced solid state construction and creative speaker design finally gave bass players something besides Fenders lame sound and Ampegs wall of mud. To top it all, they are durable, ask my 30+ year old 360. Mosrite and Gibson basses and Acoustic amplifiers, life just doesn't get better.
Really loving this bit of kit. The thing that surprised me most wasn't the fourth position (which is great!) but the overall sound improvement I get from quality hardware. I have 2017 American Professional Tele and I'm amazed at the clarity that this upgrade has given me. TBH - I don't understand why Fender don't fit quality parts like this straight from the factory. Thanks guys!" - Max
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Fuzz Box World – We are dedicated to bringing the highest quality components to builders of guitar and bass effects. We want to be the number one source of parts for electronics diyers. Whether you are a professional boutique pedal builder or a weekend hobbyist, your business is very important to us. We will do everything we can to make sure you are happy with your experience at Fuzz Box World.

Let's begin by getting clear on what we mean by 'effect': an effect is a device that treats the audio in some way, then adds it back to a dry or untreated version of the sound. Echo and reverb are obvious cases, and you can use pitch-shift and pitch modulation in a similar way. 'Processors', by contrast, generally are those devices that change the entire signal and don't add in any of the dry signal. Things like compressors and equalisers fall into this category: as you'll see from the tips and tricks, processors can often be used as effects in their own right, or as part of an effect chain, but until you know exactly what you're doing and what the consequences are likely to be, it is a good idea to stick to these guideline definitions, as they dictate how you can connect the effects into your system.

The overall design of the JS11 Dinky is a streamlined and straightforward, it is basically a less contoured version of the Dinky with cost-effective parts, assembled and built overseas. But don't count it out yet because many found it to exceed their expectations in terms of looks and tone. The 25.5" scale maple neck, flat 12" radius fingerboard and 1.6875" wide nut also makes it a pleasure to play, and have made life easier for both students and experienced players alike. The high output Jackson designed humbuckers are also good enough for high gain playing, although most got great results by switching them out.
My Les Paul never did sound quite right. It was always off somehow. I discovered it had the same problem like yours with the intonation being off the scale. Once I followed your guide, I discovered the neck adjustment was far too loose, and gapped it properly. Shazaam, the intonation problem disappeared, and now it plays like butter with all the notes dead on! U R the MAN!
Finally, have you ever heard a definitive answer to the question “how long does it take to learn guitar?” Us neither! Learning your first chords can take a few hours, but the instrument can take a lifetime to master. But that’s the joy of playing guitar – you never stop learning. It’s down to you to practise and progress, because practise makes perfect!

With modern recording systems, track counts aren’t usually much of a limitation any more. In addition to a mic’ed up amp or a feed from pedals into your interface, try to also capture a clean feed of the guitar signal if your amp or pedal board allows a direct output to be routed. If you record this as well as the amp / fx feed, you have another option to re-process the guitar recording in software if you decide the original feed isn’t right.
By ’71, the Univox had expanded considerably with new copy guitars. Still around from earlier were the Hi Flyer Mosrite copy, the ‘Lectra violin bass, and the Mother or Rhythm and Blues Les Paul copy. Joining them were the Badazz guitar and bass, the Effie thinline, another Coily thinline guitar and bass, and the Naked and Precisely basses. Univox acoustics are also first sighted (as far as we know) in ’71.

The author is an excellent writer and explains everything slowly but doesn't treat you like an idiot. He starts from the very beginning with teaching string names, notation etc but you can start anywhere in the book according to your knowledge and experience. Each exercise/song teaches a new concept and there is a very good sound quality CD that is enjoyable to play along with and hear what the proper timing should be.


In all my years I have never seen filter cct's like this but as tleco tech the filters have never been variable, When I put my guitar together I had a 0.022uF and a 0.047uF and for reasons that I have long forgotten I put in a switching matrix that allows me to get 0.047, 0.022 and 0.015uF. After many revisions to the cct (it had coil taping and variable taping) I almost put in a 0.033uF and taking out the switching, well I ended up getting some single ended 9 Watt amp and all of a sudden this flexibility made scene I have one tone control that I can control the cut frequency a coil control pot and a volume control. Now the funny thing If I put in a single cap 0.015uF (as close as you can get) It doesn’t sound like the two 0.022 and 0.047uF in parallel, Its in the harmonics that get let through from what I can hear. But when all said and done could be something to give it a go.
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"Of course using effects pedals isn't cheating. I personally would define cheating as using corrective technology of some sort to falsify an artist's performance/musical ability, and I don't think that's what using pedals do. They're used for creative purposes, to manipulate sounds for artistic effect and suit personal tastes/whatever suits the mood of a song. They expand the range of timbres you can get from only using one instrument.
Volume pedals are volume potientiometers set into a rocking foot treadle, so that the volume of the bass guitar can be changed by the foot. Compression pedals affect the dynamics (volume levels) of a bass signal by subtly increasing the volume of quiet notes and reducing the volume of loud notes, which smooths out or "compresses" the overall sound. Limiters, which are similar to compressors, prevent the upper volume levels (peaks) of notes from getting too loud, which can damage speakers. Noise gates remove hums and hisses that occur with distortion pedals, vintage pedals, and some electric basses.
The classical guitar repertoire also includes modern contemporary works – sometimes termed "New Music" – such as Elliott Carter's Changes,[17] Cristóbal Halffter's Codex I,[18] Luciano Berio's Sequenza XI,[19] Maurizio Pisati's Sette Studi,[20] Maurice Ohana's Si Le Jour Paraît,[21] Sylvano Bussotti's Rara (eco sierologico),[22] Ernst Krenek's Suite für Guitarre allein, Op. 164,[23] Franco Donatoni's Algo: Due pezzi per chitarra,[24] etc.
Years of hard-earned success and fame have not changed his down-to-earth attitude. Even though he has become one of the world’s richest rock stars, he hasn’t married a supermodel or become a pompous art collector. Instead, he’s remained true to his working-class roots, spending his spare time building incredibly cool kustom cars and cruising the streets with his car club buddies, the Beatniks of Koolsville.
I'm seeking a guitar to elicit the rich fat heavy sound. So as I understand a guitar with the H humbucker (double coil) pickup is what I need for that. But there is a wide range of layouts for the guitars. Some of them have S single (single coil) pickup, for example H-S-H layout. Where single coil pickup is mostly used for blues, funk and jazz guitars. And these H-S-H guitars are also recommended for heavy rock (because of the humbuckers).
So far I’ve only tried this on breadboard, though I plan to deploy it in a new “parts” guitar I’m assembling. So far it sounds … really good. A lot like a ToneStyler, actually, but with fewer parts and handpicked values. The only tricky thing was finding a good pot value where all the action wasn’t bunched up at one end of the knob’s range. A reverse-log pot worked best for me—I got nice results with both a C500K and C1M.
Godin (pronounced Go-dan) was founded in 1972 by Robert Godin in Canada and now owns a number of highly respected acoustic guitar brands including Art & Lutherie, Simon and Patrick, La Patrie and Seagull. Their electric guitars, produced under the Godin brand, have been played by greats including Roger Waters, Elliott Sharp and John McLaughlin. Many of their high-end models come with 3 types of pickups - regular electric guitar pickups, piezo pickups for producing an acoustic-like sound, and Synth/MIDI pickups for making any kind of sound you want.

Thanks for popping in! Yeah, that g-string issue's a real pain. I also get it on acoustics for the same reason. I've found that, aside from sloping the slot DOWN on the peghead side, if you also try to provide a gentle (side) edge where it starts to head towards the g tuner, that helps too. What I'm trying to say is that you should try to give as clear a path as possible to the tuner to reduce interference/friction. I've tried to illustrate what I mean here: https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-_9c955WEOiM/UI8xvC_nvFI/AAAAAAAADAA/RQmXf_beWUc/s754/nut-slots.jpg but let me know if it's not clear. More on making a nut here, by the way: http://diystrat.blogspot.tw/2010/10/making-bone-nut-from-scratch.html
Larry Robinson Fine Custom Inlays - They produce one-of a kind shell inlays for all kinds of guitars. One of a handful of inlay practicioners in the country, Larry has done exquisite work for major guitar manufacturers (Fender, gi bson, Yamaha,...), small production shops (Santa Cruz, Collings, etc.), single luthier shops (Klein, Ryan, Olson, Megas, and more), collectors like Tsumura and people who just want something to personalize their guitar.

Jump up ^ The Guitar (From The Renaissance To The Present Day) by Harvey Turnbull (Third Impression 1978) - Publisher: Batsford (ISBN 0-7134-3251-9) - p112 (Chapter 3 - The Twentieth Century) - "In Spain Falla's lead was followed by Joaquin Turina (1882–1949) and Federico Moreno Torroba (b. 1891), who began to produce works in collaboration with Segovia."
Launch price: $499 / £445 | Body: Chambered basswood body with arched-maple top | Neck: Maple | Scale: 24.6" | Fingerboard: Rosewood | Frets: 22 | Pickups: 2x Black Top humbuckers | Controls: Neck volume, bridge volume, tone, master volume, 3-way pickup selector | Hardware: Anchored Adjusto-Matic bridge | Left-handed: No | Finish: Gold, Silver Sparkle, Black
Here we are proud to have in stock today is a Cool one she's pretty rare too its a real vintage guitar its actually 42year old in fact. This is a great old Vintage Goya Acoustic Dreadnought Guitar by CF Martin & company. This guitar was built in the early 1970s in Japan when Martin had thought that it was a good way to address the Japanese high quality lower priced Japanese guitars cutting into their bottom line so Martin commissioned Goya of Japan to build their competitive to the US line "import" line ( Japan because no other country at that time was building anything close to the high quality guitars like Japan was making " China , India, Twain was not even a consideration Japan was in another league obviously to those countries... so Goya was commissioned back in the day this pre dates Sigma Japan... This was built durring the time frame when the Japanes builders had some of the best quality woods available to them and were setting out to show the world what they could really do. This is a great example with both fine quality qoods used from the high grade mahogany to the solid spruce top to the rich dark Brazilian rosewood looking fingerboards they selected wow impressive work...Kept in great shape all these years 42 years see the pics it looks more like its 3 years old then 42... here today for a song we believe this example was built in Nagoya by the great Terada, that is pretty much the Custom shop builders in Japan they are responsible for the GB10 George Benson Ibanez line, They made the high end Ibanez Artists, The Gretch reissues, some other fine models as well as their own Tereda guitars. On to this baby The top is book matched SOLID AAA Spruce and the sides and back are mahogany, probably laminated but they seam to match?. either way *AWESOME* The SB model has a beautiful transparent cherry sunburst finish that is still so glossy looking it can pass for much newer but its 36 years old!. The Neck is also solid AAA mahogany with a beautiful rich looking rosewood fingerboard may be Brazilian Rosewood . The neck is RARE with a nicely v shaped which feels really good to me I think you'll be please with the feel as well. Setup done by our in house luthier & plays like butta now with a new set of acoustic Martin 11's, a $150 value. Now how ya gonna beat that! .
The Streamliner concept is simple: to create more affordable Gretsch guitars without losing their specific DNA. Two new Broad'Tron humbuckers are controlled in classic Gretsch style by a three-way toggle selector switch on the bass side shoulder, a master volume on the treble side horn, and then a trio of controls by the treble-side f-hole for individual-pickup volume and master tone. The G2622's construction gives a different response and resonance to other new releases from Gretsch and, with these pickups, moves further from the Gretsch sound. And while its construction gives it a more solid, or at least ES-335, character, it's a little more airy and less punchy with a softer, squashier tonality. The beefier pickups certainly don't nail a classic Gretsch tonality - although if that's what you want, the full-size pickups are easy to replace - but they do broaden the sonic potential, especially for more gained styles, while staying close to the classic iconography. If you want a great-value semi-hollow, this is among the best electric guitars for under $500.

Most Gibson guitars feature two humbucking pickups, giving them a very full, clean sound. They are very simple in design, and easy to use with a focus on quality. Maintenance is also easy with Gibsons. Their bridge style places the strings closer together than the likes of Fender or Ibanez guitars, making them slightly different to play. While there is slightly less room for error in finger placement, the strings’ proximity makes them a better fit for small hands and for instrumentalists who need to rapidly navigate the fretboard.


The theory of evolution says that the longer something has been evolving the more complex it tends to get, and this is certainly true of the electric guitar, which has been evolving for over half a century. Electric guitar sounds rely on the instrument itself, the amplifier through which it is played and also on the loudspeaker system used. Further variables are introduced when miking techniques are taken into consideration, though these days miking is only one of the ways of recording an electric guitar — we also have a number of effective DI techniques from which to choose.
Some people like to play the two notes on 5th and 4th strings with a small barre with the 3rd finger. It's O.K. to do that, but I think using two fingers gives you a better finger position on the notes; you'll get a better sound that way, it makes it easier to change chords most of the time and easier to get all the thin strings muted. I strongly advise to learn it this way, and then if you still prefer to use the little barre you have the option of choosing whichever one works best in any situation!

Chords are an essential component of playing the guitar. When you first start out, it’s best to make a habit of learning one or two new chords a week, and with each chord you learn, practice playing it with the previous chords you’ve learned. Not only does this help you commit the chords to memory, it helps you learn how to move from chord to chord smoothly, so you can start applying your new chord vocabulary to playing actual songs. After all, isn’t that why we all start playing in the first place?
This particular model is a cutaway acoustic-electric hybrid with European spruce top and Indian rosewood back and sides. The electric system is from Fishman-Presys with an onboard tuner. The GK comes with Savarez Cristal Corum high tension strings, and thanks to the low-relief neck, the action itself is easy to handle, making the guitar easier to play. The GK Studio Negra has a deeper, bassier sound than the usual sharp brightness of a “blanca” guitar. Watch the video on the Amazon listing to really get a good idea of what you’ll experience playing this instrument.
First, plug your guitar in and toggle all the switches and knobs. If your guitar still plays fine, the connection problem is internal. Second, for non-Stratocaster style guitars, remove the cavity covers on the back of the guitar. Strum the strings and move the wires that are soldered to the switches, pots, and output jack. You will probably find your loose connection when the guitar cuts out again. For Stratocaster style guitars, you will need to remove the pickguard and manually check each connection point to make sure the solders are solid. Third, re-solder the loose wire and screw the cavity covers or pickguard back on. For more information about how to solder wiring, see the soldering page.
Washburn Guitars have a history built by skilled luthiers and musicians who share a passion for guitar. There are plenty of new modern and traditional designs, like the Washburn Parallaxe Series which has futuristic and modern voicing, great for metal genres. The Washburn Jazz Series has mellow tones and more traditional construction and playability. View all information
The Cordoba C7 spruce-top has a natural finish, complete with rosewood back, sides, fretboard and bridge, and the traditional looking inlay that Cordoba is known for. Plus, there are the Savarez Cristal Corum high-tension strings that come with it, which give the guitar its clear, clean sound. Of course, you might want to change to another set of nylon strings, should you wish it, depending on the sound you truly want.
Have you ever looked at a hollow or semi-hollow guitar on the wall at your local music store and wondered how the heck they get the electronics in there? The short answer: it’s do-able, but not easy. In fact, it’s widely considered to be one of the most difficult jobs in the wide world of guitar maintenance. My tech charges extra for doing electronics work in a hollow-body, and he’s definitely not the only one.
Consider the MusicMan SR5 20th Anniversary basses, with a "mahogany tone block" channeled into an ash body, running from the neck, through the pickups, to the bridge. I've played several of these basses, and the best two of them were really outstanding (I own one of those). Could be any number of reasons they sound as good as they do, but there you have it.
Nice-4-Bass-V1.5 This is an sf2 simplified version of three different basses - all with 4 velocity layers.  It includes the 1958 Otto Rubner double bass played and mapped by Drogomir Smolken, recorded by Ludwik Zamenhof. The samples are exceptional and some percussive effects have been mapped to some high notes. Royalty-free for all commercial and non-commercial use. Copyright 2016 Karoryfer Lecolds (Karoryfer Samples). The original Meatbass sfz version for Sforzando has round-robin sampling and includes arco as well as pizzicato presets.  (http://www.karoryfer.com/karoryfer-samples).

The electric guitar was essentially born in 1929—long before the advent of rock and roll music. The first commercially advertised electric guitar was offered that year by the Stromberg-Voisinet company of Chicago, though it was not a smash hit. The first commercially successful electric, Rickenbacker’s “Frying Pan” guitar, didn’t kick off rock ’n’ roll yet either, but it did inspire competitors to jump into the electric guitar market. Invented in 1931, the Frying Pan had an electromagnetic pickup made out of a pair of horseshoe magnets placed end-to-end to create an oval around the guitar’s strings, with a coil placed underneath the strings. The pickup, a device that converts the strings’ vibrations into electrical signals that can be amplified, was bulky and unattractive, but it worked. The commercial version of the Frying Pan was a hollow cast-aluminum lap-steel guitar, and wasn’t an immediate hit beyond some Hawaiian, country, and blues musicians. It differs from the traditional Spanish-style guitar in that it is played horizontally, on a stand or in the player’s lap, and has a sliding steel bar that can be moved along the frets for a gliding effect.

In 1978, Michel Chavarria, guitarist, singer and songwriter for French band Madrigal, decided to create a guitar shop with his friend Daniel Delfour. The shop was on a street called "rue de Laganne," which inspired the name Lâg. Like in many other cases, the small business started as a repair, setting and customization shop before creating its own models. Due to the quality of their instruments, they sell custom-made guitars to French and international musicians like Jean-Jacques Goldman, Phil Campbell (Motörhead) and Keziah Jones. Among the best-known models we have the Arkane (a Super-Strat available with different pickup combinations) and the Roxane (with Gibson-like humbuckers).
First the lower line models were built for steel strings first. Like the style 17 in 1922, and the style 18 in 1924. Pretty much all models were built for steel by 1927-1929. But unfortunately there was no definative serial number or time line for any 1920s Martin style. This makes it difficult to determine if any particular 1920s Martin guitar is really built for steel strings. Martin didn't just implement steel string design at any one definative point. It was a transition, and apparently a very slow transition. And special orders for gut or steel complicated things.
It is entirely possible with most guitars. Very rarely will there be a time you will be unable to achieve that same sound with a decent amp. So make sure you do get a quality amp─it doesn't have to be extremely pricey, just good enough. Always make sure your guitar has multiple pickups if you are planning to play different styles of music; it allows for more perfect fine-tuning.
So, learn chords, along with their related chords, and many, many songs will be at your fingertips, even songs you don't know or haven't played yet. As a teacher, I've shied away from teaching songs for learning the particular song's sake. There are many guitarists out there who 'haven't learned the chords to that song,so I can't play it'. Usually they actually have, but don't understand how to put them together to make that song. Also, learning a song generally means putting the particular set of chords in one order. Change key, and the fumbling starts.
The flanging effect is created by mixing two identical signals together while delaying the second signal by a small and gradually changing period of time. This delay is often no longer than 20 milliseconds. A simple way of thinking about the differences between phasers and flangers is that phasers work by affecting the frequencies with a filter, while a flanger affects frequencies with a time-delay.
Which got me to thinking about the history of American guitar companies. Many famous brands of guitars which started production here in the USA now exist as a name being used by an unrelated company for importing guitars into this country. Other brands are still being made but ownership has passed to one of a few big guitar companies. It’s difficult to trace this history without a “score card”.

Accompanying the Tempo guitar was the Merson Tempo Guitar-Amp. This was a tube amp with two instrument and one microphone input, heavy-duty 8″ Alnico 5 speaker, volume and tone controls, and a pilot light. The cabinet was covered in two-tone leatherette. The picture is in black-and-white, but the look is remarkably like Premier amps of the time, so a tan and brown color would not be a bad guess. The speaker baffle featured a classical guitar design (!) with “Tempo” written in little circles on the bridge! Substitute a lyre for the classical guitar and you’d swear this was a Premier, made by Manhattan neighbor Multivox, so that might, indeed, be the story there.


Before you start thinking your pickups can kill you, bear in mind this is a very small signal (2 volts) that requires amplification (this is where your aptly named guitar ‘amplifier’ comes into play). To put things in perspective, the little rectangle shaped batteries (D) found in distortion pedals are 9 volts…as mentioned it’s a very small signal.
2.      Weight – a LOT less. This is important if you’re leaving the garage for the first time and don’t have roadies, if (like me) you’re trying to not injure your back anymore lugging equipment), if you’re a touring band trying to spend less on cartage and more on crew, or if you’re a worldwide act who needs to truck and fly your stage rig between continents.
Another advantage of an Apple Macintosh computer is that they come with a much better built-in sound card than those of almost any brand of Windows PC. You can actually use the headphone audio output of any model of Apple Macintosh without needing a professional audio internal or external audio interface and get acceptable results. Of course, if you do in fact want the highest-quality audio output, especially for multiple channels, you would want to purchase a third-party external audio interface.

You've bought most ANY new guitar that sells for less than about 700-bucks.  Seriously.  These days there are LOTS of really decent guitars out there in the $300-$500 price range.  Guitars designed well (and by that I mean ripped-off from Leo Fender), with bodies and necks that have been cut precisely by high-end CNC machines, decent hardware, and again a nice CNC-finish on the frets and good-looking automated paint jobs.  All in all, a guitar that plays well, intonates and stays in tune well, and looks great.  But ... sounds mediocre!  Yep, ALL manufacturers skimp on the pickups today, at least on any guitar less that about  $700-$1000.  Great guitar with midlin pickups?  Yea, fix that!
The design goal of these hybrid micro heads was to provide usable power from a compact digital power amp section combined with a real analogue preamplifier in a very small and light metal chassis. The amps each weigh about 1.1 lbs, and fit in one hand (Dimensions (W x D x H): 135mm x 100mm x 75mm/5.31” x 3.94” x 2.95”). These amps are advertised as 50 watt heads, so the power section is a special Class D design as might be expected. What is unexpected is the preamp design that includes a new type of vacuum tube (valve) called the Nutube 6P1, which is the result of Korg working with Japanese vacuum fluorescent display (VFD) company Noritake Itron Corp.(Ise Electronics Corp). As such, the Nutube is a dual-triode vacuum tube packaged similarly to a VFD "chip" which makes it mountable on a circuit board using holes and pads not unlike a DIP. The miniaturised flat package topography, low power consumption, and low heat, long life attributes of the Nutube are key contributors to deploying an analogue tube preamp in such a small, lightweight footprint. Power consumption is only 3.43 Amps which is provided by a DC19VAC adapter, but Vox rates the MV50 power output at 50 Watts. However, note the 50W rating is for a 4Ω load; power output specs are as follows: Max 50W RMS at 4 Ohms, 25W RMS at 8 Ohms, 12.5W RMS at 16 Ohms.
Enough with the American brands, haven’t the rest of the world got something to offer? Well, Japan has come up with a few! Ibanez for example offer amazing guitars, and when they first started out the original idea was actually to offer good copies of American electric guitars! Today they have moved on to doing their own thing, and produce excellent guitars.
I love them both, have a Strat and Les Paul. they are such different animals. Each has it’s place in my music, each has a special sound. Used to own a Tele which I just didn’t enjoy playing so much, so traded in for the Les Paul. I later bought a modified Tele with humbuckers (I know it’s a sin) but damn it sounds so good, for heavy power chords, more like a PRS sound. I’ve been playing 27 years now and am a composer / songwriter. Played in lots of bands, and during my live work I have to say I prefer my Strat. It’s lighter than the Gibson, and contours nicely to my body. With a good valve amp and the right strings I can get some lovely fat sounds out of it. I use the Gibson mostly in the studio. When I moved countries, I needed a cheap electric to tide me over until my stuff got sent over. I picked up a $100 Mitchel (Made in China). The setup was awful, totally unplayable, so set it up properly, and to be honest it plays like a dream. The neck is amazing for a $100 guitar, and with some new pickups the sound is great too. The upshot here is that it doesn’t really matter what guitar you use to make music on, as long as you enjoy the instrument, a cheap guitar can go a long way. I find the discussions about which is better kind of like guys comparing their crown jewels, it’s purely academic and what matters is how you use the thing 😉

If the Schecter wasn’t quite fast enough, this lower priced version of Steve Vai’s signature guitar should get the job done. The Wizard III neck is a direct copy from its more-expensive variation, and when combined with the 24 jumbo frets, creates a speed machine. Because Vai himself is a versatile guitarist, though, this guitar can pretty much do it all, though if you like a chunky neck for chords, you’ll have to look elsewhere. You even get the Tree of Life inlay at twice price, which looks great.

Though some sophisticated processors combine pitch detection with pitch-shifting, to generate musically correct harmonies in user-defined keys, simple pitch-shifters always change the pitch by the same number of cents or semitones. In musical terms, that means that only the octaves, parallel fourths and fifths are very useful. Other intervals tend to sound discordant, as they don't follow the intervals dictated by typical musical scales.
Three acoustic guitars were offered in 1971. These were glued-neck models with roughly Martin-shaped heads and pickguards slightly larger and squarer than a Martin. All had spruce tops (presumably plywood), mahogany bodies and necks, rosewood fingerboards and dot inlays. These appear to be Japanese, not Brazilian Gianninis. The bridges are glued on, with screw-adjustable saddles and pins. The U3012 Auditorium was a Spanish-shaped steel-string and cost $89.50 plus the cost of a case. The U3013 Grand Auditorium was a dreadnought costing $105. The U3014 Twelve String cost $120.
Reverb is a sound effect used both in music and audio engineering, which adds a spatial dimension to the original track. To put it into more simple terms, a reverb gives you an impression that the sound is originating in a large room. You are hearing the source sound but also its numerous iterations as it bounces off different surfaces. Reverb guitar effects pedals offer a simulation of this phenomenon.

Fuzz: A fuzz pedal or "fuzzbox" is a type of overdrive pedal that clips a sound-wave until it is nearly a squarewave, resulting in a heavily distorted or "fuzzy" sound.[53][56] Fuzzboxes may contain frequency multiplier circuitry to achieve a harsh timbre by adding complex harmonics.[57][58] The Rolling Stones' song "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction", with the main riff played by Keith Richards with fuzz guitar, greatly popularized the use of fuzz effects.[23] Fuzz bass (also called "bass overdrive") is a style of playing the electric bass that produces a buzzy, overdriven sound via a tube or transistor amp or by using a fuzz or overdrive pedal.
Daron Malakian (b. 1975) is the lead guitarist for System of a Down. During the System of a Down era, Daron played IC200's and IC300's on stage. During the Toxicity era, Malakian played a variation of the Ibanez Iceman ICX, with custom artwork designed by his father, then a special edition "DMM1" was released by Ibanez. The DMM1 featured more artwork by Malakian's father, Vartan Malakian (b. 1947). After using Gibson guitars for 5 years, Daron switched back to Ibanez and began using an Iceman again.
Scott Walker began tinkering with electronics at an early age. In his early teens he began playing guitar and experimenting with pickups. In the Spring of 2001 he attended the Roberto-Venn School of Luthiery.  Following graduation he accepted a job with luthier Richard Hoover, of Santa Cruz Guitar Company. At Santa Cruz Guitar Company his specialty became hand-carving necks, and he also began to take on other responsibilities, including the position of shop foreman. At this time he began developing an electric guitar for the ‘21st century.’ After meeting musician Barry Sless, he began to develop an instrument that had the broadest tonal range available. After five years of R&D he began offering his guitars to the public. During his pursuit to develop an electronic package to incorporate into these instruments, he began working with electronic wizards Peter Miller and John Cutler. This collaboration resulted in the current design now found on all ‘Walker Guitars.’  For more information please visit:  www.scottwalkerguitars.com
Any vibration we can hear as "sound" is composed of some distribution of overtones above the fundamental frequency. Overtones exist in a set fashion based on the physics of vibrating waves and the ratios between them. The only difference in tone between any instrument is caused by a different prominence and distribution of these overtones. When a string is plucked on an electric guitar the vibrations move into the body of the guitar as well. The resonant properties of the wood will cause some of these overtones to be "summed" and exaggerated while others will "cancel" to some degree. The vibrating string will be influenced, however slightly, by the vibration of the guitar, in turn changing the distribution of overtones on the vibrating string - essentially creating a feedback loop.
But the biggest difference between the American Special Strat and the Highway One model is in the pickup configuration. This guitar comes equipped with three Texas Special single-coils, which are overwound Alnico V pickups known for their tight bass, clear highs and pronounced mids. Famously, they’re also found on the Stevie Ray Vaughan signature Strat. And significantly, these pickups retail for about $200 for a set of three.
One trait of most ribbon mics is the figure-of-eight polar response, and this is often exceptionally consistent across the frequency range. This polar pattern means, of course, that ribbons tend to pick up a little more room ambience than cardioids, given that the polar pattern is as sensitive behind the diaphragm as it is in front. Ribbon mics are also often characterised as sounding 'smoother' compared with typical condenser microphones, partly because their construction avoids the high-frequency diaphragm resonances normally inherent in condenser designs.
Guitar Tricks is available 24/7, anytime and anywhere I want to use it. It is browser based and I can get to it from any computer, even when I am away on vacations.  There are different video resolutions that can help with adjusting to a slower internet connection or to watch the lesson on the go on a mobile phone. There is also an iPad app available for free, and no need for additional in-app purchases, that gives access to the core features of Guitar Tricks.
Guitar technicians need a high school diploma or equivalent, though some community colleges offer programs in guitar technology. Apprenticeships or on-the-job training may also be available. These professionals should have hearing acuity for tone and pitch and the ability to play guitar. They should know how to use electronic tuning devices, as well as hand and power tools. Guitar technicians should also be skilled at woodworking. According to 2015 data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, musical instrument repairs earn a median salary of $35,660.

Electric instruments have a big role to play in the world of music, but there's a catch: they need amplification to do it! For that matter, even acoustic instruments need to be boosted when they're playing big venues. And while an amp alone can handle those tasks, many of the sounds in modern music (the signature distortion of rock and metal, for instance) rely heavily on effects units to shape the basic tone into something even better. If you're new to your instrument, then consider this selection of amplifiers and effects the doorway to your future sound - and your instrument will be the key that opens it up, once you've got your hands on your brand new hardware!
Once again a British company. It isn't hard for this brand to attract attention thanks to the (would you believe it?!) orange color that envelops most of their products. The first models saw the light of day in the late 1960's with the OR series. Its first renowned users were Fleetwood Mac and later Jimmy Page... The crunch sound and the mid-frequency range are the brand's main attributes. Orange even managed to outclass Marshall in the 1970's thanks to its prestigious endorsers. In the 90's, Noel Gallagher from Oasis was the best-known Orange fan and he even collaborated in the development of the OTR head. At the start of 2011, the brand surprised everyone and launched the OPC, a workstation for musicians — actually a PC and a guitar amp in a single unit.
A 5 way selector is commonly found on guitars with 3 pickups , a humbucker in the bridge , single coil in the middle and a humbucker in the neck. So the 5 way selectors job is to select only one or more pickups at a time to offer different sounds on the guitar. The way the selector is pointed will tell you which pickup is selected and this is common on guitars from all brands. The bottom position is your bridge pickup which is closest to where the strings begin , the middle position is all 3 pickups and the top position closest to the neck is your ....you guessed it neck pickup. The bridge pickup will offer heavier sounds if you play the right notes and the neck for soloing as the output (intensity) of the neck pickup isn't as powerful as the neck for a reason. The more you play the more you'll see uses for switching pickups on the selector. The tone knob on the other hand it depends on how you use it I know a lot of guys who are endorsed and so forth who never touch the tone knob or have guitars built without it , but used properly it can do a lot of stuff from Eric Clapton to Carlos Santana type stuff. you will also see a 5 way selector on guitars with two humbuckers this feature is called a mega or super switch depending on brand. It makes the pickups do different stuff but this feature is usually found on expensive guitars and keep in mind a 3 way blade switch looks like one but only goes in three positions. Bridge , middle and neck.
If there is one body shape out there that everyone will recognize, it is this one. In terms of finish, Fender chose a lacquer clear coat to show off the natural wood instead of their usual choice, and it looks pretty awesome (of course there's a 3 tone sunburst and olympic white too). Made of ash, this particular Strat offers a U-shaped maple neck with a maple fretboard that is bolted onto the body. In terms of pickups, we have a set of three single coils belonging to their vintage line. These come with Alnico magnets, giving you that classic tone we all love so much. The hardware follows the canon as well. Here we have Fender's well known synchronized tremolo bridge paired with a set of F tuners on the headstock.
And again. the no-brainer: your guitar just plain sucks.  If your bought your guitar at Wall-Mart for $19.99, PLEASE don't put my pickups in it!!!  Here is EXACTLY what you should do with it: keep it around until you are playing your first big club gig and you need to do something extraordinary to get the crowds attention.  As you thrash away on the final chord of the last song pick up THIS guitar, douse it heavily with lighter-fluid and light that puppy up!  Now that's getting more that 20-bucks worth of wow-factor out of that pile of Chinese dog-dung!

On my bench today, a partscaster with a Hamer Slammer neck, Carvin Rail in the bridge, Ry Cooder Dearmond middle, and PRS P90 in the neck. Wasn’t quite right (throbby) with the usual 3 250K pots and an 022 orange drop (i know, i know, but they aren’t that expensive). So, i went with 500K master vol, 500K master tone (found an old ceramic PRS 022 cap too), and an acme blender pot (neck and bridge) in the last position. Now it’s fun. Lots of variety in positions 1, 2, 4, & 5. 3 knobs and a whammy and she’s done.
The focus has always been to start with sound and top it off with a bold, boutique-inspired appearance. When Michael Kelly launched, we, in fact, only offered mandolins and acoustic basses. These two markets had been under served and consumers could not buy a great sounding instrument without breaking the bank. The Michael Kelly Dragonfly collection of both acoustic basses and mandolins quickly became popular and hard to get. Musicians were drawn to their decidedly custom appearance and then fell in love with their sound and performance.
If you're a Zakk Wylde fan, take a look at his signature Les Paul or the exclusive Graveyard Disciple with its authentic Floyd Rose tremolo bridge. For the metalheads among us, there's the Brendon Small Thunderhorse Explorer, a mahogany axe based on the one Brendon plays in concert with Dethklok. To satisfy Beatlemaniacs, Epiphone also has a Casino guitar inspired by John Lennon’s famous six string.
Rickenbacker: From making world’s first electric guitar to making the most iconic guitars of Rock’n Roll, Rickenbacker has a history of innovations in guitar industry. Their guitars are still made in the old way. Owning a Rickenbacker is pretty much like owning a classic muscle car, yes there may be more modern guitars out there but no one’s got the mojo of a Rickenbacker.
One special effect I used quite a lot in analogue studios, but which is surprisingly tricky to implement in a lot of software sequencers, is where you feed the left and right outputs of an auto-pan effect to two different effects processors. With this setup, the outputs of the two effects can then be mixed together to create a variety of different modulation-style treatments. This patch always worked well in a send-return loop with a pair of phasers, especially if you also EQ'd the two returns wildly differently. The same setup used as an insert could do great things with distortion and ring-modulation processors, and if you were feeling really adventurous, you could fiddle with the panning rate in real time while mixing down. Mike Senior
Augustino Lo Prinzi Guitars - Augustine Lo Prinzi has made more than 10,000 guitars and just started his 49th year as a guitar maker! Renowned throughout the instrument making field, Augustino LoPrinzi's first instruments were classic guitars. As his career progressed he constructed many types of string instruments, numbering in the thousands : mandolins, lutes, violins, and steel string guitars, to list but a few. Now he is applying these years of wisdom to his first love, the classic guitar, which began his journey into instrument making. 

Guild is an American guitar company that makes some amazing semi-hollow electric guitars such as the Starfire and the Aristocrat. These are guitars that nail the retro-rock sound and have the looks to match. Many classic Guild models have been revived through the Newark Street collection. While these guitars are cool beyond words, where Guild really shines is in the acoustic arena.
Bridge pins prior to 1945 did not have string slots. There is a slight seam seen in the round head (hard to see but it's there). The bridge pin round head diameter from 1931 until mid-1939 was about 0.320". In mid-1939 the round head was reduced to about 0.300", and this size was used until the unslotted pins ended in 1945. The shaft size was slightly increased at this time too. The pre-1939 style pins have a more bulbous head, where the 1939-1945 style's head is more slender. The pin taper is about 5 degrees, and the diameter under the collar is about 0.225". The pins are made of hard celluloid. Several companies have reissued these old style pins.
Modelling effect – Many BOSS modelling effects use COSM or Composite Object Sound Modelling, which uses computer-processing power to digitally precisely model the electronic, mechanical, and magnetic characteristics inherent to an instrument, amplifier, or speaker, and also to create completely new sounds. Modelling effects can be dynamic or time-based – it can even make your guitar or amp sound like a completely different type of guitar or amp.
Sure, the Teach Yourself to Play Guitar: A Quick and Easy Introduction for Beginners book is for those brand new to the hobby. But experienced players will love the chord chart that comes with it. It includes the basic major and minor ones along with the more uncommon ones for a great reference. Some of the riffs are a bit obscure, but it doesn’t detract much from its value.
the top five in no certain order are…….. JIMI HENDRIX .NIO EXPLANATION NEEDED……..RICHIE BLACKMORE he broght the strat into metal and he led his leads perfectly back into the song ……… .EDWARD VAN HALEN he was the next innovater after hendrix…………DIME BAG DARRELL….he was just plain the baddast ass of them all…………..AND ENGWIE MALMSTIEN he did everything else……..there are lots of great guitar players . but .these five guys set the bar for everyone else
Much of this is probably thanks to an outdated a pedal with a two-function switch that is labeled “Chorus” and “Vibrato.” These words will trigger a sigh of awe and wonder from many a guitarist because, of course, they are the labels on the mode switch of the famous Univox Uni-Vibe. This pedal is a good place to start because it was one of the first of the transistorized effects of this type to become widely available, and it occupies a patch of ground all its own in the world of things that go “swoosh”. That said, and despite the name and switch labeling, the Uni-Vibe is more akin to a four-stage phaser than what we today consider to be a chorus pedal, even if that’s the label on its most-loved setting. The deception is forgivable when you remember that the Uni-Vibe’s intention was to reproduce the chorus-type sound—or “chorale” sound, as it was often labeled—produced by a Leslie rotating speaker cabinet used with a Hammond organ. Also, the unit existed before there was much categorization of such things: it was a guitar effects footpedal, it had its own sound… and that was all anyone needed to know. The Uni-Vibe—and the better clones that have followed it down the years—is based around a discrete transistorized circuit with four sets of light bulbs and light cells and a low frequency oscillator (LFO) which does the shifting work to move the peaks and notches. Unlike the drawing-board phaser discussed above, however, the frequencies of each stage of the Uni-Vibe are set differently, so it could be argued that there is indeed more of a chorusing of the sound.
Some effects, and the boxes that produced them, altered musical periods beyond recognition. The valve-driven Watkins Copicat, for example, will forever be associated with the sound of the late 1950s British music “beat” scene. Developed by Charlie Watkins in 1958, this odd machine supported a tape-recording mechanism that would record and play back any sound with varying lengths of delay in-between the replay heads. The device was critical to the rockabilly sound of the late 1950s, the “beat-group” sound of The Shadows, and the Liverpool Merseybeat scene of early 1960s (as well as the Birminghambeat, or Brumbeat scene). The sensation of hearing a guitar warble and wail to its own output encouraged guitarists to experiment with different styles of attack and vigor. For example, the noise that begins and ends the original 1962 recording of “Telstar” by the Tornados was made using the Copicat by creating a loop of echo and reverb effects. This produced what can best be described as some sort of space-echo/attack-helicopter noise.

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Combining Reverbs: You don't have to generate all of the reverb sound from a single plug-in, and using two different reverbs can also help you to save CPU power. For example, though a nice convolution reverb gives a good, believable sound, long impulse responses tend to eat up CPU. By using the convolution reverb for the early reflections, and then using something like Logic 's Platinumverb or Waves Trueverb to add the reverb tail — which is less critical to our perception of the sound — you should get a convincing but less processor-intensive result. Matt Houghton
Quality-wise, they range from complete and utter crap, to OMG! Acoustics, tend to fall into the former range. Electrics, mostly the hollow bodies, were somewhat, but not always better. Solid bodies, mostly made from plywood, BUT they do have their own feel and sound. I happen to love them, others despise that cheap feel and sound. Remember, they were built to fill the growing demand of guitars, that the kids saw on tv, with the Monkee's and the Beatles

Scratch and Dent - Demo Model full size electric guitar from Davison is the perfect way to start playing at an affordable price with features you'd normally expect on a much more expensive instrument. With a built-in humbucker pickup for that "rock" sound, you can plug this guitar into any amplifier or software system. It has a high gloss finished body and a contoured body for ultimate play-ability. Perfect for the aspiring guitar player of any age, this Davison is also Teacher Approved.
“A magnet doesn’t have a tone, per se – you can’t put it to your ear and hear anything. It’s really the engine that drives the coils in a pickup. In a humbucker you’ve got a bar magnet located under the coils; if it’s a Stratocaster or a Telecaster you’ve got magnetic rods that are in the centre. But essentially they’re all doing the same thing: throwing up a magnetic field that the guitar strings vibrate in when they’re plucked.
Amazing guitars, specially the Custom Series full solids. You can choose from variety of tonewoods and soundboard combination and 4 different shapes. Offering almost every player's preference. You can also choose options such as soundport off-the-rack. Great craftsmanship, amazing tone, and superb playabality at an amazing price. Great guitar, and definitely not an OEM brand. They only make their own guitars.
Electric guitars are capable of producing a multitude of different sounds, ranging from the purest cleans right through to saturated distortion and feedback. Many factors influence the final recorded sound; the type of guitar and amp, and any stompbox or rack-mounted effects used will shape the initial tone. The choice of microphone(s) and mic’ing techniques, too, along with any studio processing, will also contribute to the end result. Your playing style is also crucial; experiment by playing with fingers or a variety of plectrum gauges until you get the right attack. While most guitarists play with a pick, coins can also be used to produce interesting harmonic overtones – just ask Brian May or Billy Gibbons.
Compressors are often applied to electric guitar tracks to bring out the guitar’s natural sustain, as well as even out the overall dynamic range. Lead guitar parts usually benefit from a degree of compression treatment, while heavily overdriven rhythm parts often require very little or none at all, as the distortion naturally provides its own type of dynamic control. In the case of unnatural sounds, such as electric guitar, compression becomes a highly subjective topic, so experimentation is key to achieving the desired effect. As a starting point, therefore, try medium-fast attack and release times – an extremely fast attack time will blunt the transient response of the note. Remember that electric guitars can be inherently noisy and compression will generally exaggerate any hums and buzzes.
Williamson injected new life into the group, bringing an ideal balance of discipline and frenzy, best heard on the group’s 1973 disc Raw Power, the album that launched thousands of punk and post punk bands. “I’m his biggest fan,” the legendary Smiths guitarist Johnny Marr once said of Williamson. “He has the technical ability of Jimmy Page without being as studious and the swagger of Keith Richards without being sloppy. He’s both demonic and intellectual, almost how you would imagine Darth Vader to sound if he was in a band.”
The movement to all-transistor amplifiers probably followed hot on the heels of the hybrid amps of 1968. The 1971 Univox catalog features a new, updated line of tube amps, but also has a little offset-printed flyer showing the Univox A Group of solidstate amps, which probably debuted a year or two before. These had black tolex-covered cabinets with vinyl handles, black grillcloths surrounded by white beading, and, on some, corner protectors. On amps with front-mounted controls, the logo had changed to wide, block, all-caps lettering printed on a metal strip running across the top of the grillcloth just under the panel. Combo amps with this logo treatment included the U-150R and U-65RN. The U-150R ($177.50) offered 20 watts of power running through two 10″ speakers, with reverb and tremolo, three inputs, and six control knobs. The U-65RN ($110) had 15 watts, one 15″ speaker, reverb and tremolo, with three inputs and five knobs. Joining these was the UB-250 ($150), a piggyback bass amp with 20 watts, 15″ speaker cabinet, two inputs, volume and tone. The U-4100 Minimax ($299.50) was a bass combo amp with 100 watts pushed through a 15″ speaker. Controls were on the back, with two channels for bass and normal. This had a rectangular logo plate on the upper left corner of the grille, with block letters and a round bullet or target design.
Rack-mount gear has become somewhat of a lost art for guitar players since the late 90’s. Nonetheless, rack gear is great for people who want programmability of preset tones, the ability to interchange components, and those who love seeing bright lights flicker as all of your gear goes to work! So for the rack-gear heads that still exist on this earth, we’ve compiled what we think are the 10 best rackmount pre-amplifiers of all time.
The iconic Les Paul Standard is celebrated by the world’s greatest musicians as the standard for perfection in the world of electric guitars. The new Les Paul Standard features the popular asymmetrical SlimTaper neck profile with Ultra-Modern weight relief for increased comfort and playability. Impeccable looks are highlighted by the powerful tonewood combination of mahogany back and carved maple AAA figured top. BurstBucker Pro humbuckers provide modern and classic tones, while immense tonal variety from comes from 4 push-pull knobs. Includes hardshell case.
Half a step up from standard tuning. Used in most of Johnny Cash's music, for "Love Buzz" on Nirvana's Bleach album - apparently by mistake (according to Come As You Are - Michael Azerrad), 3 Doors Down on "Here Without You" (a capo was probably used), Vektor, Soundgarden's "Black Hole Sun" (The low E string was tuned to Eb/D# for a drop Eb/D# tuning), Nickelback on their song "When We Stand Together", Burzum on his first 3 albums, John Fedowitz in his solo project "Ceremony", and Joe Jackson on "Got the Time".
Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Maple - Quilted - Neck Attachment: Neck-through - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 5 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 24 - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Headstock: 6 In-Line - Bridge: Tune-O-Matic - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Black, Diecast, Nickel, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Black, Blue
Prince at #10 just shows me that whoever made this list hasn't seen him play that often. And really, KR doesn't even need to be on the top 10. JH is way overrated, yes on the list, but NOT #1. But anyways, cool to see Prince even on the list. Those stupid people writing those comments are probably the ones that say "Prince plays guitar?" They are so living in a box!
Although the G&L Legacy electric guitar was released one year after the passing of Leo Fender, it is designed to the specifications of the original Stratocaster but with a few modern features specific to G&L instruments. The Legacy included, for instance, G&L's Dual Fulcrum vibrato and Schaller tuners and was available in a combination of different tonewoods. Even if the G&L guitars from before Leo Fender's death are more collectable, the Legacy electric guitar is still considered a high-quality instrument.

One of the most versatile electric guitars we encountered when putting together our list is ESP’s LTD EC-1000 KOA. Koa is a Hawaiian wood that this guitars top is made from, and it has very special sound qualities. It makes the tone very bright, crisp and clear, but at the same time it’s full of life and depth. We immediately though that the sound reminded us of an ukulele or some other happy little stringed instrument, and the sound can easily bring us back to summer evenings around a camp fire.
i'll be 50 yrs old in a few days. i started playing guitar at 8. this is my 30th guitar. i started ordering various guitars from amazon a year and a half ago and have not been displeased at all with any of my orders. i get some for young people who cannot afford to get one for themselves and so have started exploring the guitars in the price range of 80 to 140 dollars. at first glance, it would seem pretty much impossible for any guitars in this price range to be of any worth, but the factories are set up to put out fine instruments now in this price range. i can't recommend this guitar highly enough to convince you what i think of it but i am astounded at the quality, playability and sound of this guitar. it has really good tuners and rings out like a

There are a couple different versions of the Woody acoustic pickup, both of which are highly affordable. This version, coming in at $60, is a passive and noiseless magnet that delivers a balanced tone and can be easily removed or installed at a moments notice. To do so, simply snap the pickup into the soundhole or snap it out as needed. This functionality is a big part of what makes the Woody design one of the most popular and widely used in the world of acoustic pickups.

The only reason the Yamaha Pacifica would have low action is if the string height was set low. Just making a broad statement like “if you want a low action guitar buy a Yamaha Pacifica” I know that is not your words but that is what you seem to be implying. Some beginning guitar player could buy a Yamaha Pacifica that has high action. All guitars can have low action if they are set-up to have low action. Some good info here regardless. Ben.
Every skilled worker needs to look after their tools and musicians are no exception. Sure, wear and tear is normal—especially when you play your instrument often—but a little T.L.C. will ensure your musical gear continues to look, play and sound amazing for years. At Guitar Center Repairs, you'll find a dedicated team of certified musicians who take pride in helping you reach your highest level of playing potential. Make no mistake, your music maker is in the best of hands at GC Repairs. When it comes to looking after your musical equipment, certain things should be left to professionals—pickup installation, wiring customization and structural repair, to name a few. Mind you, there are tasks that every guitarist can take care of at home, including regular polishing and restringing. Of course, not everyone has the time to continually look after their instrument and bringing it to Guitar Center is a great way to save yourself time and ensure that the job gets done right. With that being said, GC's services go well beyond cleaning and string changing. For those of you who own a stringed instrument and find the action is higher than it once was, a truss rod adjustment is definitely in order. Or, maybe you want to personalize the look and sound of your guitar—in which case, an expert will be more than happy to swipe out your pickups for a new set, replace the pickguard or perform any other task to give you an axe that’s entirely your own. Honestly, your best bet is to browse this entire section and see what else is offered in the way of repairs, maintenance and modifications. Who knows, maybe your local GC is having a free guitar setup day, so feel free to have a look around this page or take a swing by the store in your area. Our friendly and knowledgeable staff is always happy to speak with other local musicians and setting up a quick appointment for your instrument will do wonders for your musical enjoyment. From nut and bridge replacements to even amp electronic upgrades, Guitar Center Repairs has you covered.
Boutique quality instruments, available at prices that the masses can afford. Andrew strives to innovate with what he does with his instruments, from his unique bracing techniques, to the selection on soundboard woods to find the best wood grains for sound production. From his top-of-the-line custom made creations, all the way down to his Production series of guitars, you get so much bang for the buck.

What if you don’t have a music shop nearby and need to order a guitar online? Our recommendation is that when you have read through our list of the best guitars, select a few that you’re interested in, and look them up on YouTube. There you can watch (and listen to!) great reviews where you can hear the guitar be played and get someone else’s opinion on it. Try listening to the different guitars directly after each other so you can determine which one sounds the best.

I have played a ASAT Telecastor Bass for about thirteen years. I keep purchasing other bass guitars for many other reasons. But I have sold them all. I am down to just one bass that's all I need with my G&L, it very responsive, it has many opitions with pick ups and the action is good. It took along time for me to figure out how to use the pick ups because there is so many different ways you adjust it. They are built with better quality parts than a fender. They are numbered from the factory in america. But watch out for the Tribute series that is fake or cheap want to be G&L. A real G&L will be a little more expensive but the quality is excellent
Excellent article. I have found that is a complete waste of time trying to convince guitarist of anything contrary to what they already believe about instruments. The level of passion for the “wood doesn’t matter” camp is truly astounding. We are not testing a new drug or solving cold fusion. The question is simple, does wood make a difference in the tone of an electric guitar? Intuitively, it would seem strange if it didn’t; but, there are many factors that are going to affect the sound produced from a guitar; isolating them is as difficult as creating a study that will convince anyone of an idea they already are clinging to. I think this is a pretty good experiment, better than most I have seen. In the end though, who cares?…really. If someone would like a guitar made out of a Formica counter top…go for it, locking tuners, the pickups and strings of your choice…you’ll be ready to rock. And won’t you be the clever one? As for myself, my opinion, musical instruments have character, a soul if you will. That character comes from the material it is made out of and the craftsman that made it. There is no object more alive than a musical instrument. For arguments sake, lets grant the “wood doesn’t matter” their entire argument. I’d still buy the korina instrument over the countertop. And like most stubborn asses who play guitar, you won’t convince me otherwise.
i have played fender most of my life .Fast neck and comfortable .However when my musical interest changed to southern rock i decided to buy a gibson . The mahogony body sounds different as does the string thru design of my firebird .Now i play both .Out of the box i prefer gibson and dont need to change a thing .I see many fender players always looking for “that sound” changing pickups pots etc.and using many boxws to change the tone.All i use with my gibson is a wa wa and overdrive
Most players dream of having comfortable, smooth action on a guitar. With the PLEK, the most optimal string action possible for any instrument can be realized. This gives the individual musician an instrument that plays exactly the way he has dreamed of. Optimal playability on a guitar makes it sounds better with notes that ring true and clean. There is no fret buzz under normal playing conditions and the intonation problems that occur because of high string action, are eliminated. You can hear and feel the difference.
There is not one standard # of frets, but the three most common are 21, 22 and 24 frets. The extra frets simply mean you can play some additional high notes. If you are just starting out, you will probably be just fine choosing 21, 22 or 24 frets. But, you should probably avoid the fretless option unless you're specifically learning how to play fretless instruments.
My favorite guitar effect is Tremolo with a touch of echo. This works well on songs with slower melodic guitar leads and slower rhythms. Tremolo is an effect that has a speed adjustment and amplitude adjustment. The speed needs to be adjusted to the song tempo. This was popular for many songs written in the 1950’s. If you are a guitar shredder you will not be happy with this effect. I have a Boss Guitar Pedal and Line 6 Pod XT and use this effect from the pedal. I am not crazy about software generated effects as there is not enough space on stage for all the equipment and adding a MacBook and keeping it from getting knocked around would be too difficult. After recording I have used Garage Band and this software is easy to use. I probably have four or five software packages and they are too overwhelming at times. I have given up trying to figure out how to use the software with my expensive Presonus 24 track digital AI Board. It is almost impossible to use these recording software packages without having expensive school training.

Everybody doubles their rhythm parts, but I always thought, 'Why don't they double their lead solos, too?'. It's really hard to do, especially with any bends and faster sections, and it does take a very long time, but I've been doing it a different way to make things a little easier. For instance, as soon as I've just finished a song, I'll double the lead part right away, while it's still completely fresh in my mind.
Make sure it feels comfortable, especially the fretboard and body. Make sure there are no buzzing notes and that the frets are flat and even. Avoid electric guitars with whammy bars as they may be too difficult to tune for beginner guitar players and make the guitar more expensive (maybe one on the next electric guitar you buy). The tuning heads should be easy to tune and stay in place, and try playing the guitar through an amplifier to check for a good sound quality (hopefully no humming or buzzing).
A looper pedal or "phrase looper" allows a performer to record and later replay a phrase or passage from a song. Loops can be created on the spot during a performance or they can be pre-recorded. Some units allow a performer to layer multiple loops. The first loop effects were created with reel-to-reel tape using a tape loop. High-end boutique tape loop effects are still used by some studios who want a vintage sound. Digital loop effects recreate this effect using an electronic memory.
San Francisco-based Senior Contributing Editor Joe Gore has recorded with Tom Waits, PJ Harvey, Tracy Chapman, Courtney Love, Marianne Faithfull, Les Claypool, Flea, DJ Shadow, John Cale, and many other artists. His music appears in many films and TV shows, plus an incriminating number of jingles. Joe has written several thousand articles about music and musicians and has contributed to many musical products, including Apple’s Logic and GarageBand programs. In his spare time Joe produces the Joe Gore line of guitar effects and edits a geeky guitar blog (tonefiend.com).
Silvertones were guitars sold by Sears but manufactured by five main companies: Danelectro, Harmony, National-Dobro (Supro/Valco), Kay, and Teisco. These companies were called "jobbers" because they were contracted (jobbed out) to make guitars for Sears. They also produced guitars under their own brand names. In almost all cases the guitars manufactured for Sears were identical to models sold directly by the manufacturers with only a logo or color change.
This is a great DVD, and Keith's style is very laid back, and easy to listen to. You can't help but like the guy, and once you start watching the DVD, you don't want to stop. He is extremely knowledgable, and it is like having an instructor right there with you. The DVD begins with the very basics, and works up to some quite complicated playing, so there would be something in this for everyone, from complete beginners (like me) to those looking for more challenges with their playing. For the price, I don't think you can go wrong.
A. Many professional musicians invest thousands of dollars in high-end guitars made from expensive and rare tonewoods. A $100 student guitar made from spruce is not going to produce that level of tonality regardless of the player’s skill level. As a beginner, your main focus should be on skills such as chord formation, fretting techniques, and basic scales. Improving tonality and performance are long-term goals.
Flat tops from 1945 to 1969 are considered good quality and have good sound, although they are not as collectible as the 1920's to 1944 steel string models. This is largely due to the change in bracing and materials Martin started using in 1945. Rosewood models of Brazilian rosewood are most collectible from this era. This is because Brazilian rosewood was basically unavailable since 1970 due to export problems. Because of this, these models are considered more collectible.
While Taylor Guitars is most famous for our acoustic guitars, we are also proud of our line of unique electric guitars. We have the T5, our original hollowbody hybrid that bridges both worlds like no other guitar. Check out our T5z, the smaller hybrid with a compact body that electric players will love. And be sure to try the T3, our inspired take on the semi-hollowbody guitar with a sound that comes alive with amazing pickup flavors, plus coil-splitting and tone-shaping versatility.
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