Basically, Power Soaks are in-line devices that attenuate the signal from a full-out, saturated tube amplifier, preserving the tone and sustain while vastly reducing the bone-crushing volume. That signal flows from the attenuator to a speaker cabinet, which is then miked, reproducing the sound at a very manageable volume level. A Power Soak is like a second master volume control, absorbing the full power of the amp and converting that power into heat (these units get very hot!) while passing only a small portion of that power to the speaker. While there is an inherent loss of the natural non-linear speaker distortion associated with screaming guitar amps, and the pleasing sizzle and cabinet "thump" that results, the trade-off is obvious.

• Wrap around: On wrap around tailpieces, what’s wrapping around is the string. Strings are slid into the tailpiece from the front and then pass over the back and top of the bridge before making their journey up the neck. This system creates less string tension. Some players report tuning and intonation issues with these tailpieces. Others swear by them.


Schecter is one of the more recent brands to start building serious trust and authority on the guitar market. They started out as a parts company, only to cross into making their own guitars later on. It is no secret that Schecter guitars are first and foremost built with heavier genres in mind. Almost every model they offer packs so much range, though, that you can easily play anything you want without compromise.

SSO Strings (Sonatina Symphonic Orchestra) is a creative commons licensed library. For violin, chamber strings and flute I have taken several of the instrument samples and layered them together to allow for expressive playing over the velocity range. Flute SSO for example contains soft, hard and overblown samples from SSO. To create chamber strings I have used bass strings, cello, expressive violin and viola over certain ranges of the keyboard.


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Being the go-to instrument of popular guitarists like Hank Williams Sr. Neil Young and Jimmy Page (just to name a few), the current production model D-28 continues the Martin Legacy in terms of build and sound quality. Finally, all these features are provided without the inherent maintenance issues and crazy price tags of actual vintage models. If you're looking for a true traditional acoustic then your best bet is to go for the Martin D-28. The MSRP is $3299 but you can get it online for around $2,629.
Higher strings can potentially induce some drawbacks that you will need to minimize. Before settling on your new action, you want to determine that strings don’t go out of tune in any fretting positions up and down the neck. You also need to ensure that using a capo, if you ever play with one, doesn’t throw all strings out of pitch too badly. Also note that if this experimentation results in raising your strings considerably from their previous position — and your guitar remains playable after doing so — you might also need to adjust your pickup height slightly. But, note that lowering the pickups further from the strings can often also help the strings to vibrate more freely (as discussed way back in Gibson Tone Tips #1), so leaving the pickups lower might be adding a double bonus to your new playing set up. Play with the options and see what works for you, and that will yield the “best right answer” for each individual player — and once you have achieved it for you, be sure to check and change your intonation, as necessary. If low action floats your boat, great, but it’s worth knowing that there’s a wealth of tone hiding in that thin slice of air between string and fingerboard.
Swank spent more than 25 years perfecting his skills at various guitar shops across the DFW area, including Charley's Guitar Shop in Dallas, before striking out on his own. He's repaired Andy Timmons' guitar, Ray Wylie Hubbard's and Eric Clapton's. But Clapton's repair made a significant impact. "It's kind of funny story," he says. "His technician wanted to go shoot guns -- they're English and don't get to shoot guns in their country -- so they dumped these two guitars off on me." It didn't take him long, and he soon found himself carrying them back to Clapton's rehearsal. "It was kind of weird seeing all of these pale English guys sitting around eating barbecue and passing around Colt .45s." But Clapton allowed him to stay and watch him rehearse. It's a blessing few guitar masters receive.
In 1952, Alfred Dronge – co-owner of small New York City music shop Sagman & Dronge – registered the Guild Guitar Company. The following year, they began producing deep hollow body guitars, a reflection of Dronge’s love for jazz music. The brand grew steadily through to the 70s – when Alfred Dronge died unexpectedly in a plane crash – getting their instruments in the hands of musicians such as Buddy Guy, Muddy Waters, and Bonnie Raitt. In the 80s, Guild began producing signature guitars for musicians Hank Williams Jr. and Brian May of Queen. The brand moved around frequently and it wasn’t until 2014 that they settled in their present headquarters in Oxnard, California – where all of their line of USA made guitars are now produced. To this day, they still produce a wide variety of hollow, semi-hollow, and solid body guitars that look as beautiful as they sound.
I am a beginner and based on your recommendation, I bought the Dummies book, and signed up for Guitartricks.com as well. This combo is turning out to be really effective for me, I haven’t been playing long but I can feel the progress with each passing day. The videos at Guitartricks are my main guide through this maze of learning, and the Guitar for Dummies is my go-to resource for reading about anything I want to find out. I’m sure doing a search on the internet would get me the same result, but the Dummies book is easier to hit up I think, and at least I’m sure it’s accurate.
The Blue Midnight was released in 2011 with a limit to the key of C, also on the less expensive side of the market. It features stainless steel cover plates with a wider back gap for enhanced volume while playing. The unique feature of this harp is the comb, which is made out of translucent blue plastic. The comb allows for brighter tone than the black combed models. It also has a special just intonation (JI) "Chicago tuning". It is also now available in other keys.[23]

Straight out of the box you have over 68 on-board digital effects, 75 custom designed factory patches for iconic sounds, 5 amp emulations and 5 cabinet emulators, so you’re not going to run out of choices on stage or in the studio. In addition, you have access to the Guitar Lab software app that allows you to download new stomp boxes and patches regularly.
Note that the competition for our pick in this “simple beginner’s amp” category was much more hotly contested than our other picks in this guide. The Crush 12 just barely edged out two other amps that our panelists liked. One is the Stage Right 611800, a very loud, 40-watt amp with built-in reverb that’s a great choice for those who need a powerful amp on the cheap (although that person probably isn’t a beginner). The other is the Vox Pathfinder 10, an amp with a simple control setup that our panelists loved, but a rather bright and blaring sound that some liked and some didn’t. Both are mentioned in the competition section below.

The offset waist guitar was a later development in guitar history.  Getting away from the straight-laced and semi-symmetrical “T” and “S,” the Jazz Style was a whole new animal. A complicated electrical circuit provides much more variance and tone that its straight-waisted brethren.  This style of guitar is one of the most unique and complex guitar designs out there and has graced the shoulders of artists such as Elvis Costello, J. Mascis, Thurston Moore, and many more.
Orville Gibson founded the company in Michigan and stayed a family business until the early 50's. Ted Mcarty ran the company from 1951 or so, and is the "father" of most successful Gibson electric guitars, the Les Paul, the SG, Explorer, Flying V, ES-335 and so on.. In the late 60's Gibson was bought by the Norlin Corp, who mainly were known for making refrigerators. Most feel Gibson adopted a quanity over quality approach to guitar making during this period and 1970's to 1980's Gibson electrics are considered less desireable by most guitar collectors, and considered outright junk by many others.. Cosmetic changes to Gibson models during that period apparently reflect the poor taste of the buying public during that era... and while a 1974 Gibson SG may look ugly compared to the classic 1961 or 1968 models, please remember this was the era of ployester liesure suits and Chrysler Cordobas.. In 1986 Gibson was bought by a group who understood guitar making, and is a privately held company to this day. Gibson quality has appeared to improve steadily from 1987 to present day, but it seems to be unanimous that todays models do not approach the craftsmanship of the late 1950's when Gibson apparently peaked.
The combination of Slash’s rough-edged pyrotechnic solos and Izzy’s raw power chords and off-kilter rhythms resulted in an unusual mish-mash with massive crossover appeal that metalheads, punks, glam poseurs, pop fans and classic rockers loved alike. Slash and Izzy also made vintage guitars cool again, strapping on Gibson Les Pauls, Telecasters and ES-175 hollowbodies when most guitarists were playing DayGlo superstrats, pointy metal weapons or minimalist headstock-less Stein-bortions.

By 1966 Daniel sold Danelectro to MCA, but remained with the company. In 1967 the Coral line of guitars is introduced. At the time, Danelectro sold about 85% of it's products to Sears. So MCA started the Coral line to sell to other distributors. The difference was the Coral hollow bodies (only) were manufactured in Japan. All other Coral parts were made in the New Jersey Danelectro plant. Also all Silvertones and Danelectro instruments were made entirely in the U.S.
 The world-wide reputation of the company is not based on design data and performance alone. The real key to success of SWING is "Outstanding People". Every staff member at Swing has a background as a professional musician. Moreover, we were all career veterans in guitar engineering with decades of combined experience, well before founding our new vision; Swing Guitar Technology. If you are familiar with musical instruments companies or have seen their ads or brochures, you may notice their catch phrase like "It's about Music." Nothing could be closer to the truth, based on Swing's pedigree. From the selection of materials to their treatment and hand fitting. From mechanics to electronics. Each stage of each final product is mastered by SWINGers.

Since 1977, Dean Guitars has been a leading guitar company manufacturing the highest quality electric guitars, acoustics, and bass guitars for musicians of all ages and at all price ranges. From guitar legends to beginners, we offer a choice for any music genre or style. Browse guitars and more all packed with a limited life-time warranty. Get Your Wings today!

Takamine GS330S: Like Yamaha, Takamine is a Japanese guitar company. They also have low price Jasmine series for beginners. I don’t recommend you buy Jasmine series if you have enough budgets because Jasmine has a laminate top. Go for the GS330s, it has a solid Cedar top, cedar is a kind wood that make better sound when aged. So if you buy Takamine GS330S and keep it for a long time, the guitar will sound better and better. For more details features and price, check out here.
Potentiometers (Pots) for audio are used to adjust tone and volume. Pots are resistors with three terminals and a sliding contact (the wiper) that creates an adjustable voltage divider. If only two terminals are used (one side and the wiper), it acts as a variable resistor or rheostat. Potentiometers are most commonly used as control devices, such as volume control on audio equipment. A potentiometer for Audio applications would feature very low to no introduced noise.

Frets are positioned proportionally to scale length—the shorter the scale length, the closer the fret spacing. Opinions vary regarding the effect of scale length on tone and feel. Popular opinion holds that longer scale length contributes to greater amplitude. Reports of playing feel are greatly complicated by the many factors involved in this perception. String gauge and design, neck construction and relief, guitar setup, playing style and other factors contribute to the subjective impression of playability or feel.
In 1933, Dobro released an electric guitar and amp package. The combo amp had "two 8″ Lansing speakers and a five-tube chassis. Dobro made a two speaker combo amp that was on the market over 12 years before Fender launched its two-speaker "Dual Professional/Super" combo amp. In 1933, Audio-Vox was founded by Paul Tutmarc, the inventor of the first electric bass (Tutmarc's instrument did not achieve market success until Leo Fender's launched the Precision Bass). In 1933, Vega sold a "pickup and amplifier set" which a musician could use with her/his existing guitar. In that same year, the Los Angeles-based Volu-Tone company also sold a pickup/amplifier set. Volu-Tone used "high voltage current" to sense the string vibration, a potentially dangerous approach that did not become popular. In 1934 Dobro released a guitar amp with a vacuum tube rectifier and two power tubes. By 1935, Dobro and National began selling combo amps for Hawaiian guitar. In 1934, Gibson developed prototype combo amps, but these never got produced and sold. By 1935, Electro/Rickenbacher sold "more amps and electric guitars than all the amps and electrified/electric guitars made from ’[19]28 through the end of ’[19]34, combined".[1]
To repair your guitar’s body, glue in any broken wings. Also, repair strap buttons that have come out and bridge holes that have been stripped by putting glue on a toothpick and applying it to the holes. When the glue is dry, you can re-insert the strap buttons or re-thread the bridge holes. You can use the same technique to repair bolt-on holes if the screw holes are stripped or are larger than the threads. If the holes are too large, just leave enough toothpicks glued into the hole to take up the extra space before you re-thread the screw.
Previously, Epiphone guitars were considered to be the biggest competitor of Gibson. However, they were later acquired by Gibson who has retained the name of this brand to distinguish them from their pricey brothers. You can certainly consider it a budget-friendly production from the high-end guitar makers. Epiphone, just like the Gibson’s Les Paul, shares the same design but is available at a much lesser price. When it comes to craftsmanship, then we must say that Gibson is much better than this one. Unfortunately, Epiphone utilizes low-quality products such as mahogany and other electronic components.

The paper presents the results of the modal analysis of six types of structures made from plates. Firstly, was done geometrical modeling of structures, after which they were numerical modeled using shell and solid finite elements. The next step consisted in simulating the structures behavior to free vibration for different thicknesses and materials. The results were processed and compared in... [Show full abstract]


The guitar is an instrument capable of truly heavenly tones but capturing this sound in a recording is never as straight-forward as you'd think. Here at Prime Loops we've been changing strings, tweaking amps and adjusting mics to deliver only the finest tone imaginable to your DAW! We used a 1985 Gibson Les Paul electric and a Martin DC-16RGTE acoustic with Fishman, Marshall and Orange amps, recorded through an AKG C214 microphone, so STUDIO GUITARS guarantees to make the hairs on the back of your neck stand on end!


Most players will immediately think of the Jazz guitarist Charlie Christian, who brought the Gibson ES-150 to fame with the Benny Goodman Quartet.  Many top notch players realized that the tone these instruments could offer was unparalleled, and began to use them in their own illustrious careers, such as George Benson and Pat Metheny, alongside the other countless masters that wield these masterfully crafted instruments.
Take a guitar playing friend with you, decide on a price range and try out all the guitars you can afford. Then go to another shop and do the same. Include used instruments too, and don't worry too much about the appearance. The important thing is how it sounds and how well it plays. A guitar with a nice low action which sounds reasonably good will help a great deal toward helping you stick with it. A guitar with a high action that sounds horrible will make you give up before your fingertips have time to harden!

The guitar offers a carved mahogany top with a set neck and a slim-tapered profile (a shape normally reserved for more premium guitars). The rosewood fingerboard sports premium trapezoid inlays for a really pro look. The Alnico classic humbuckers are true, high-output gems that, paired with the set neck, will offer a rich, long sustain. There are two tone knobs and two volume knobs, as well as a three-way selector switch for all of those classic Les Paul sounds. The stop bar tailpiece and the LockTone Tune-O-Matic bridge give you rock-solid tuning stability, so you won’t have more frustrating retunes than you absolutely need.
The following effects are a step up from your basic overdrive, distortion and fuzz, with more specialized sounds. In this category, you’ll find pedals that include effects such as time delays or frequency modifications – things that go beyond changing the shape of a sound by also changing the pitch, rhythm or both. Others are simpler, but still offer enough tone-altering potential to set them apart from the basic pedals.
4.  Cracked end block because customer used a drill bit meant for steel to enlarge hole for the jack used on an acoustic.  Fix:  This can be tricky.  First you have to assess the damage and that can be challenging.  Some of these miniature cameras work great.  I’ve had success using a point and shoot on a timer to take a snap.  If the crack is small you might be able to use cyano to repair it.  If the end block is cracked all the way through, the back may need to come off and the block replaced… Again, not something you’re going to do on a cheap guitar.   The proper way is to use a step reamer to get the correct sized hole.
Another strong point of this guitar is its African mahogany neck that has a close to standard scale length of 25.3", making this instrument very easy to transition to when coming from regular sized guitars. Also noteworthy is its innovative split bone saddle, which allows for better intonation. Finally, the CT4B preamp gives you 3-band EQ, a volume control and a nifty built-in tuner Artists that play Takamine guitars include John Scofield, Bruce Springsteen and Bruno Mars! This is a great buy if you are looking for a premium couch & travel friendly acoustic guitar that does not cost an arm and a leg.
Judging by many of my last few years guitar purchases (on Ebay and elsewhere), I’m the kind of a person who seems to think he’s the kind of a person who likes guitars with a lot of knobs and switches. I’ve bought several multi-pickup guitars. Old ones, new ones, new ones made to look like old ones (not those stupid “relic-ed” ones, though…I’m an idiot, but I’m not stupid). Yet, as I look at the keepers in my collection, I’ve only kept one guitar with more than four knobs, and none with more than two pickups. Odd.
Searching 'guitar' on YouTube, Google, etc can be overwhelming. Ten billion results come up. I wish we could just be nice to kids with questions. I noticed this answer mentioned "pickups" several times. Kid probably has no idea what a pickup is. My brother showed me the switches, pickups, and explained them to me in five minutes, in person on a real guitar. It was like being taught magic.
Check the action and clearance of the guitar strings by playing it before you begin setup. There should be 3/64-inch between the fret and the string on the treble side, and 5/64-inch on the bass side. Check that there is no buzzing when you play high up on the neck, and that the strings are not too difficult to push. If you hear buzzing, the neck must be corrected for underbow; if the strings are too far from the frets, the neck must be corrected for overbow.
Description: Body: Maple - Body Construction: Semi-Hollow (Chambered) - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25" (64cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Adjustable - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Chrome, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch, Kluson Tuners - Pickups: Harmony - String Instrument Finish: Goldburst, Redburst
No matter your vision, SparkFun's products and resources are designed to make the world of electronics more accessible. In addition to over 2,000 open source components and widgets, SparkFun offers curriculum, training and online tutorials designed to help demystify the wonderful world of embedded electronics. We're here to help you start something.
The brand boasts of a remarkable following. The famous Fender Stratocaster is deservedly regarded as the guitarist’s electric; it has a long lineup of musicians who used and still use it for studio recordings or live performances. A few names: Jimi Hendrix, Eric Clapton, George Harrison of the Beatles, The Edge of U2, and Jeff Beck of the Yardbirds. The enduring popularity of this model is largely due to its incredible versatility; it bridges styles and genres with ease.
Invented in 1931, the amplified electric guitar was adopted by jazz guitar players, who wanted to play single-note guitar solos in large big band ensembles. Early proponents of the electric guitar on record include Les Paul, Lonnie Johnson, Sister Rosetta Tharpe, T-Bone Walker, and Charlie Christian. During the 1950s and 1960s, the electric guitar became the most important instrument in popular music.[1] It has evolved into an instrument that is capable of a multitude of sounds and styles in genres ranging from pop and rock to country music, blues and jazz. It served as a major component in the development of electric blues, rock and roll, rock music, heavy metal music and many other genres of music.
Body:  Soundboard:  two-piece spruce: medium grain broadening toward the flanks. Back: two-piece spruce: fine grain on bass side broadening to medium at the flank, wide grain on treble side; slightly arched; two f-holes; recessed 11 mm from edge of ribs. Ribs: 7-ply plywood, the outer layer birch, the inner layers mahogany, the outer veneer layer grain running perpendicular to plane of top and back; panel on bass side with nickel-plated steel plug; slides out for access to pickup unit. Head: mahogany veneered with white celluloid on both faces. Neck: mahogany; integral with head; rosewood stripe.
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If it helps, Schaller have very accurate drawings of all their hardware on their website. You can also get very good drawings of all Gotoh parts as well, but theirs are harder to find (hidden in the parent company's site and I can't recall the full details). It is worth having a look at those, and pay attention to the way the tuning posts are shaped. That radiused section turned into the post is important , it really helps lock the strings firmly.

The book provides examples of simple mathematical models for the complete signal chain consisting of the electric guitar and related accessories. Several do-it-yourself books have been written with the emphasis only on building a pre-specified circuit according to step-by-step instructions. This book takes one step further and brings up the designer perspective on guitar electronics. The importance of mathematics as a tool for design and analysis is emphasised throughout the text. Often in similar publications the use of mathematics is avoided as much as possible, but the fact is that mathematics provides ways to analyse circuits before spending time and money on random prototype builds. For more information on the contents of the book, check out the table of contents and the Google Books preview 

Market sentiment is overwhelmingly positive, with many reviewers describing how the Seagull S6 Classic M-450T exceeds their expectations. Build quality and playability gets the bulk of commendations, along with its clear sound and good acoustic projection. Some even dare to compare the Seagull S6 Classic with super expensive guitars from major brands.
For any venue, it's important to bring along the right amp. A huge amp in a tiny club is not only overkill; it's also extra setup work that you can avoid altogether with a smaller combo amp. On the flipside, a little amp in a big theatre could mean that some of the audience won't even hear you. Take your time deciding what the best option is for you.
The Fender Squier Bullet Stratocaster is one of the most popular low budget electric guitars on the market. For what money can buy around this price, it’s good value. The quality of the hardware, tuners and pickups can’t go up against the original Fender Stratocaster, but it still sounds really nice and feels good for playing, practicing and some first gigs. A perfect entry-level guitar that is worth the investment.
In my opinion, I don't think this guitar is quite worthy of all of the rave reviews here, based on the thin sound. I bought this because my Zager needs to go in for new frets and I have to wait until May to get it worked on, and wanted to get something inexpensive to use in the meantime. This is a beautiful instrument, no doubt. The finish is stunning, it's very nicely made and ready to play out of the box, so on that level I would give it 5 stars. But soundwise, for me I'd say 2 and half stars. The bottom end is nowhere to be found. I tried to switch to the same strings I am using on my other guitar and it's no different. This guitar has about the same dimensions as my Zager, but nowhere near the same bass response. It'll do fine as
I have had very little time to play with the settings and effects, but so far it's pretty awesome! The only downsides I can find are that there is about 5ms of scilence when changing effects, but you might be able to play around that. Also, I haven't found a way to make the expression pedal affect only one effect in the chain instead of changing the overall volume, but this might just be me not understanding simple instructions.

MY kid brother has been playing drums since he was a kid , until I snuck him into a bar at 15 one night and he set in with the house band , he played all my music. He was good so he & the lead guitarist clicked & they released a CD that took off & then the guitarist was killed , my brother got a doctorate in music and has played on several good CD's , MTB being but one. he can now play nearly everything and has released two more CD,s ,and owns his own studio , me I'm only an electrician but I understand Harmonic heating in electronics . its right that a watt is a watt,& it's a way to measure power & its sold in kilowatt hours, but even though a watts is a watt when measured, its a measurement of energy , it still depends on how it's used as to how far it goes or what you get from it ,it has a lot to do with how clean or distorted it is as to how loud it seems , people will perceive it differently , the only way to find to find how loud ? a decibel meter, another measurement .
I started to learn how to play guitar about 1.5- 2 years ago. My instruments are on the cheap/ lower cost side. I am disabled with a long life expectancy. I wanted a hobby that I can/ learn to do for the long run. I have five different guitars now ( all on the lower cost side ), They all sound good to my ear. One of them a Squire strat sounded horrible when I purchased it. I pretty much over a little time change just about everything but the wood. The Squire is a very light electric guitar as compared to my Epiphone Les Paul ( which actually strains my disabled spine ). So, It has to sound good to your own ear, and as equally important you have to be able to hold it for a period of time while playing to get the full enjoyment of the skill known as a "guitar player". Enjoy and be Proud. God Bless.
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The free GUITAR RIG 5 PLAYER is ready to rock right from the start: It offers a supreme selection of modular, high-class components, effects and routing tools, bundled as the free FACTORY SELECTION. For classic power and gain the Tube Compressor and Skreamer really come into their own, while a range of high-end effects such as the Studio Reverb and Delay Man can add that special touch. Choose from many Amp and Envelope modifiers as well as Routing Tools to further shape your sound to perfection.

While tone and volume should be your foremost considerations, you should also determine what extra features you really need. Built-in effects are great if you want a no-hassle, all-in-one package, but they may not be as flexible as external effects pedals and processors. An effect loop is useful for effects like digital reverb and delay, but it’s not essential if your effects consists of a few stomp boxes. Line outputs with speaker emulation are helpful for home recording, and external speaker outputs are great for expanding your live rig.


This Japanese company produces a wide range of musical instruments, but the real draw for guitarists will be with beginners and intermediate players. Yamaha offers a solid selection of products at a price that is more budget friendly than some of the other entries on this guide, making it a good place to start for players getting their first guitar.

My rule of thumb, whenever possible, is drive the input and route the modulation. I.E. - I put compression, over drive, distortion, fuzz, and wah/filter effect on the input; and then I route flange, phase, chorus, and delay through an effects loop. I do this for a couple of reasons - 1.) I don't have 15 effects ganged together hitting my input which can effect tone, clarity, and volume; and 2.) I can shape the tone and dynamics of my guitar going the amp's input while maintaining definition, tone, and volume to my modulated effects through the buffering provided by an effects loop.


Bottom Line: The biggest downside of the Line 6 M5 is that you can’t use more than one effect at the same time, and that it’s missing a looper function. But then again, you’re asking it to be more than what it’s trying to be. This is a Swiss Army Knife of a pedal that can morph and change shapes to whatever effect you need (we should also mention it’s true bypass when switched off). Sure, the drives/distortions are a weak area, but most effects are nearly indistinguishable from the classic pedals they are trying to emulate. We love this quote from a user:

Chorus is the sound at the beginning of the Guns ‘n’ Roses song Paradise City. It is a gentle, shimmering effect that is good for arpeggiated chords and adding that little extra to a lead tone (such as in the solo for Smells like Teen Spirit by Nirvana). However, we recommend using it sparingly as it can sound dated and old fashioned if over used (unless, of course, old-school is what you’re going for). Common controls include level (the volume of the effect), tone (affects the EQ of the chorus effect), rate (how quickly the note shimmers) and depth (how large and prominent the shimmering is).


One difference today is the number of big-name guitar brands that make affordable acoustic and electric guitars, which are often versions of their pro-level instruments. These days, you can own a Les Paul or a Stratocaster as a beginner or intermediate player. Of course, they aren’t the same as the Gibson or Fender flagship models, but they are still darned good guitars based on those designs.


There’s always been something special about playing a great guitar riff. Riffs that are memorable, get stuck in your head, and that everyone knows are actually in many cases are relatively easy to play. That’s because most people remember simple melodies that they can hum along to. I don’t think many people would be able to hum along to “Through the fire and flames”.
I have a almost identical one in front of me, but mine has 3 pickups. It has the same color white guard and sunburst pattern. The back of the guitar has the redish sunburst pattern on the neck like yours but also has the red on the main body, unlike yours that has a colored neck and solid color back. I can’t find a picture of a 3 pickup that is like this. Any info would be nice to know.
The Jeff Beck Oxblood is available in limited numbers. The first 50 of these historic guitars were aged at Gibson Custom to look like Beck’s original, then signed, numbered and played by Beck himself. The next 100 guitars were prepared with Gibson Custom’s V.O.S. finish, bringing the total run to 150 instruments. Each one also comes with a standard Gibson Custom case.
If you use amplifier overdrive, want to use delay and reverb but still crave simplicity—I’d suggest designing a “hybrid” pedalboard. Just run your gain and filter effects in front of the amp, and use a pedal like the TC Electronic Nova System in your amp effects loop for time-based effects. This will require more cabling between your pedalboard and amp, but will sound much better than running your delay and reverb effects into a distorted amp. Pedals like the Nova System or the Eventide units boast specs rivaling studio quality rack gear.
Any experienced professional guitarist will tell you there’s usually a big difference between what works on the live stage and what works in the studio. Most discovered early on that the carefully honed live tone they were so proud of just didn’t work on the recorded track, for any of several reasons, or not without a lot of tweaking and readjustment, at least. The first thing you’re likely to discover is that it’s a lot harder to record satisfactory overdriven and distorted guitar sounds than it is to record clean or mildly crunchy sounds, a revelation that often goes hand-in-hand with the fact that big amps tend to be more difficult to record satisfactorily in general.
I have 2 Kent guitars. One like a Strat and one 12 string hollow body. I know they were made in the 60s and were distributed by Kent Musical Products. Address:5 Union Square, New York. 10003. And they were a subsidiary of Buegeleisen & Jacobson, Inc. Any further info on these would be appreciated. Most sold in the price range of 100 dollars and up.
The type of potentiometer you should use will depend on the type of circuit you are designing for. Typically, for audio circuits the audio taper potentiometer is used. This is because the audio taper potentiometer functions on a logarithmic scale, which is the scale in which the human ear percieves sound. Even though the taper chart appears to have a sudden increase in volume as the rotation increases, in fact the perception of the sound increase will occur on a gradual scale. The linear scale will actually (counterintuitively) have a more significant sudden volume swell effect because of how the human ear perceives the scale. However, linear potentiometers are often used for other functions in audio circuits which do not directly affect audio output. In the end, both types of potentiometers will give you the same range of output (from 0 to full), but the rate at which that range changes varies between the two.
Beyond specific favoured mics, a number of engineers also mention more general principles when choosing pairs of mics for guitar recording. Jim Scott and Stephen Street both mention using a 'cheap' or 'bad' mic with a good mic (both give the SM57+U87 combination as an example). "Between the two you can find the ideal sound," remarks Jim, "and you can get brightness and fullness."

Effects Pedals are electronic devices that modify the tone, pitch, or sound of an electric guitar. Effects can be housed in effects pedals, guitar amplifiers, guitar amplifier simulation software, and rackmount preamplifiers or processors. Electronic effects and signal processing form an important part of the electric guitar tone used in many genres, such as rock, pop, blues, and metal. All these are inserted into the signal path between an electric instrument and the amplifier. They modify the signal coming from the instrument, adding "effects" that change the way it sounds in order to add interest, create more impact or create aural soundscapes.
Music man make the best regular production (i.E. non custom shop) guitars on the planet. Nobody else comes close. This is the quality that everybody else should be reaching for. The fit and finish and playing comfort are second to none. And the oil finish on the necks is to die for! These guys don't just churn out minor variations on the same 60-year old theme, they actually innovate, they challenge, they dare. Wonderful new designs, made for real players. The results are outstanding. Roasted maple and all-rosewood necks, new chambering and tonewood construction ideas. They are so far ahead of the game it makes you wonder why the rest of the industry stays so stagnant. Music Man are the only guitars I will buy now. I'm so proud to support them!

In addition to the 1/4" input for your guitar, you may want to consider amps with better connectivity features like those with built-in USB output for direct recording, footswitch input, aux input for jamming with tracks, and headphone output. Speaking of headphone out, there are some amps that come with built-in speaker cabinet simulated outputs, this subtly changes the resulting sound much like the amp cabinet would without having to actually use the speaker. There are also a number of newer guitar amplifiers that come with Bluetooth connectivity for streaming audio and for software control.
• How wear alters playability: Fret wear – grooves worn in the frets from pressing down on the strings, depressions created by bending, lowered overall fret height from usage – can all cause buzzing noises to occur at points where frets are located along the neck. Luckily, these problems can typically be addressed by having the frets leveled and dressed several times before a fret replacement job is necessary, since fret replacements are costly.
Gibson also tops the list of best electric guitar brands that retain a consistent design. Among the popular models, the Les Paul is a favorite guitar that has been ruling the music world for several decades. It is a high-end, USA-made instrument that comes in a variety of variations. Other famous Gibson guitars include the SG, Explorer, Flying V, ES-335, and Firebird.

Figuring they know what they want in an amp far better than I do, I gave our panelists no instructions, other than to keep in mind that these amps were primarily for beginners and secondarily for more experienced players looking for a cheap portable amp. After each panelist tried all the amps, I asked their opinions of them. We didn’t discuss the prices since they were all so similar, but we did discuss some other practical considerations such as weight and size.
Maton was founded in 1946 as the Maton Musical Instruments Company by Bill May and his brother Reg. Reg was a wood machinist, and Bill a jazz musician, woodwork teacher andluthier who had for some years operated a custom guitar building and repair business under the name Maton Stringed Instruments and Repairs. The name “Maton” came from the words “May Tone” and is pronounced May Tonne.

If, like me, you're a complete and utter sucker for watching musicians strip their songs down to the barest essentials and perform them with minimal accompaniment, then you're going to lose your mind over the stripped down, guitar version of "Wildest Dreams" that Taylor Swift has just dropped from her acoustic session at the Grammy Museum Sessions last year. Performing the hopelessly dreamy song with just her voice and her electric guitar, the performance is jaw droppingly good and the song honestly sounds even better than it does on the studio track from 1989.


Ovation’s first solidbody bass guitars were the 1261 Magnum I and 1262 Magnum II, introduced in 1977, as well. While not as exotic as the Breadwinner/Deacon, the mahogany Magnums had an elongated offset double cutaway design that basically had nothing to do with Fender. Surprised? The upper horn was a bit more extended than a Breadwinner and the upper edge had a slight waist. The lower bout cutout was not as dramatic as the guitar equivalent. Both basses had bolt-on mahogany necks reinforced by three strips of carbon graphite to eliminate warping, a wide strip in the center of the back and two more underneath the fingerboard. Fingerboards were unbound ebony with 20 frets and dot inlays. Both basses had a cast metal housing with two pickups, a small split double-coil unit at the bridge and a large square four-coil unit at the neck, this latter with little screw-adjusted trim pots for micro adjusting volume. The bridge/tailpiece was a heavy-duty plastic housing with heavy adjustable saddles. In front of the bridge was a lever-triggered mute. The primary difference between the I and II was in the electronics. The Magnum I had a three-way select with two volume and two tone controls. It also had two jacks allowing either mono or stereo output. The Magnum II had the three-way plus a master volume and an active three-band graphic equalizer, mono output only.
It's like saying the wood handle of a hammer effects the tone generated by hitting a nail. The nails been hit, vibrations through the wood afterward are pointless. Unless the guitar itself is metal and hollow, you would hear sound generated acoustically, as you would with any acoustic instrument. An electric guitar is not an acoustic instrument in a classical sense.
Clarence White helped shape two genres: His acoustic flatpicking, first displayed as a teenager when he and his brother formed the Kentucky Colonels band, was key in making the guitar a lead instrument in bluegrass. Later, he set the stage for country rock and transferred that dynamic precision and melodic symmetry to the electric guitar. A top session man in the Sixties, he played on the Byrds' 1968 landmark, Sweetheart of the Rodeo. After he joined the band later that year, White brought a full-bodied rock elation to his California-inflected Nashville chops. "He never played anything that sounded vaguely weak," said the Byrds' leader, Roger McGuinn. "He was always driving… into the music." White had returned to bluegrass with the acclaimed Muleskinner album when he was killed by a drunk driver in 1973. He was 29. "Clarence was immersed in hard country and bluegrass," said Dan Auerbach of the Black Keys. "He incorporated those elements into rock & roll, and it totally blew people's minds."
The separation between Briefel and Unicord must not have been entirely unamicable, probably more a matter of direction than anything else. In any case, in 1978, following the demise of the Univox brand (when the Westbury brand was debuted) three Westbury Baroque acoustics were offered, all made by Giannini. These included one “folk” dreadnought with a tapered Westbury head, the stylized “W” Westbury logo, block inlays and a very Martin-esque pickguard. The “classic” was our old friend, the CraViola, with a new head shape. The 12-string was another CraViola. These probably only lasted a year or so; in any case, the Westbury name was dead by 1981.
Every decision, action, employee hiring, design of new models, etc.-comes from the C.E.O.-Henry J. He dictates every single decision that happens within the company. His power and control over the company is unimaginable. Nothing will change until he leaves or sells the company. First of all the C.E.O. hires every worker- (which is why you wait an eternity to get hired). He doesn't delegate hiring to other departments like other "normal" companies do. That is why you apply, take tons of tests, wait 3 to 5 months (not weeks!), take a drug screen test, if you pass that, then you are finally hired- for a factory job- not a job at the White house! Managers demean workers- most managers don't even have a high school level of education- while most of the workers have some college experience or a 4 yr. degree (including me). Why do the young (20 to 40 yrs. old) educated guys take the job? (1st)- it looks good on the resume, (2nd)- you get to work on guitars, which seems cool at first, until you realize it's a place you do not want to be -most guys leave after a year on average. There is no chance for advancement or a raise. The attitude from Mngt. is intimidation- to rule by fear. They actually get a thrill from firing people, they actually want you to fail, I have never seen anything like it. Everything is about hitting your daily numbers at any cost. Pay raises have been non-existent for years without explanation of why. H.R. is the worst I have ever seen. The women in H.R. dress extremely inappropriate and unprofessional. When you go to H.R. to ask questions, they literally sigh and roll their eyes like you are bothering them -instead of them actually doing their jobs. Nobody knows anything-when you ask for help, you get annoyed responses because they just want to hit their personal number to get out and go home. Managers do as little as possible to not get noticed, but do just enough to keep their jobs- while the workers do all the work to make them look good. Turnover is constant. Stress levels are off the charts. 2012 was my 1st yr. of 2 yrs. working there. We were doing from 650 to 800 guitars a day- (Massman Dr. plant). In comparison the Custom Shop makes about 50 a day. The Memphis Plant- 50 a day. The Montana plant- 50 a day- us =650 to 800 a day! We made the most guitars in 2012 ever -but for the first time nobody received a yearly bonus?!? Which makes no sense -until you figure out everything is about cutting costs-all ordered from the C.E.O. People will skip all their breaks and even lunch to hit their number to get out on time. Countless times we had no lacquer because Mngt. hadn't ordered on time?!? We would have no parts for the guitars (bridges, tuners, etc.)-because they forgot to order on time?!? Yet no one from Mngt. would take accountability for it. One day, 5 people in my dept. (20-30 in the whole plant overall) were fired with no warning (one lady had been there 18 yrs., one guy-8 yrs., etc.)-yet Gibson's attendance policy in their own handbook states you have to be given a oral warning, then a 1st written warning, then a 2nd written warning- yet all the workers were not given any warning. And the reason why is that it had been a slow Christmas season in sales, so they were all let go (ordered by Henry J. -the dictator) to cut payroll-but didn't follow their very own attendance policy-because they don't have to. There is no union, no protection for your job. They tell you you are fired, and to just deal with it, while the powers-that-be don't have to be accountable for anything. It is a dictatorship. A guy I worked there with has been there 20 yrs. And one day he counted up all the workers he remembered being fired or had quit in the 20 yrs. he had been there - it was 350 to 400! If you fail a drug test, you can keep your job?!? So you take 2 weeks off and go to drug rehab- but if you break the attendance policy - you are gone?!?- It's because the company doesn't have to pay you for 2 weeks, and it's something of a tax write off as well (that's what I was told). So basically you can break the law and do drugs- and still have a job. All in the name of saving money. The back break room refrigerator has not been cleaned in 2 yrs! No clock in the main break room for over 5 yrs. and counting! Gibson charged their own employees and their children to attend the company's (workers!) halloween party!?!? Gibson owns Tobias basses-made them 2 yrs. then stopped. Owns Slingerland drums, but hasn't made them in over 12 yrs (pics of them on the website are from late 1990's)! Baldwin pianos (makes on a on-order basis only, and only in Japan, not America anymore). Valley Arts guitars-stopped making them in 2002-12 yrs. ago. Etc,etc.etc! The point being is they buy up all these brand names- and have them on their website as if they are still being sold - but they are not! But they don't say that on their website. The C.E.O. has them to just build value for the Gibson/Epiphone name - to make it more valuable- to sell the company one day at maximum profit. I know this because managers told me this who had first hand knowledge. Guys have been punched in the face during arguments. One guy took a screwdriver and smashed it through the top of a hollow body guitar out of frustration! Arguments are a daily occurrence. My friend would come into work to start his shift, and be so nervous, he would throw up in the bathroom- because of the stress levels and negative atmosphere. Every day literally felt like you were going to prison! I really wanted to make this job work out for me. I am a musician (as are many who work there, many of us play gigs on weekends or nights). My long-term plan was to use my degree, and move up to a corporate position-until I found out what a nightmare the company is. I found out through everyone that I asked that corporate is run the same way! Many might be surprised by this review, because Gibson guitars are really revered by musicians. And outwardly the company has a reputation of the highest quality. But working there was the exact opposite, you would almost rather dig ditches! I have pretty much done it all- I owned my own business, waited tables, worked out in the heat-landscaping, worked in sales, marketing, management, etc. And I have never had such a negative work experience- ever! It affected my health mentally and physically (standing everyday for 10 hrs. or more). And let me tell you for those of you reading this -no job is worth that!
Usually considered the big brother to the phaser, the flanger is indeed related in a sense, but achieves its heavier, some would say more oppressive sonic results by imposing more control over its placement of the notches created by the phase relationship, rather than spacing them evenly as the phaser’s sweep does. Much of the basic circuitry behind flanging, very simply put, follows the template as given above, but requires far more complex engineering to take it where it’s going. Pedal-sized units designed to replicate the sound of two big reel-to-reel tape machines sliding in and out of sync weren’t made possible until larger, more complex ICs became available to help do the job. This extra technology is needed to harmonically tune the out-of-phase notches, and therefore, relative to these, the peaks, and it’s this harmonic spacing of the spread that can make a genuine flanger pedal sound almost like it’s actively participating in the note selection of a sequence you are playing. Whereas phasers have from four to ten stages, the individual chips within proper flangers may carry hundreds of stages in themselves. Dizzying stuff.
Multi-effects units are exactly what the name implies—single units that offer many different effects and allow those effects to be used singly or in combinations simultaneously. Most will offer just about all the effect types discussed in this guide and many more. Typically they include dozens if not hundreds of effects presets—combinations of effects and effect parameters designed to achieve specific sounds with the touch of button or footswitch. Most also allow you to also save your presets for instant recall.
The Applause line is relevant because the technology used to make the aluminum and foam necks was subsequently applied to Ovation’s final American-made solidbodies, the Ultra Kaman or UK II, which was introduced in 1979. The UK II featured an aluminum frame with a urethane foam (Urelite) body, featuring the usual Ovation shape but with a little Tele-style curve on the upper shoulder and a sharp single cutaway. The top featured a contour like a carved top, although it was molded, of course. The neck was typically Ovation, with a bound 24-fret ebony fingerboard. Pickups had changed to twin-blade humbuckers, still in the smaller Ovation size. Electronics were fairly conventional, with a three-way select, two volume and two tone controls. No reference materials are available to me, but it appears that the earliest UK IIs had a little Les-Paul-style elevated pickguard and hollow bow-tie inlays. Also, the early UK IIs seem to have the plastic and metal bridge assemblies seen on earlier Preachers and Vipers. Later versions have the notched abalone block inlays, no pickguard and all-metal bridge assemblies. This is what makes me think the switch to metal bridges occurred in around 1980. As far as I know, the model name never appeared on the pickguard!

Consideration of this takes us back again to Kink Dave Davies: “The blues players were the first to crank it up, and the music had that spirit, that anguish. We used to listen to all those guys. Like John Lee Hooker—he had that buzz, that drive. I used to listen to him and think, ‘What’s he doing there? That’s amazing—how do you get that sound?’ I think all those elements led to me messing around with amplifiers, because all the amplifiers were clean, soulless.”
This is another classic in Fender's guitar roster. The Squier by Fender, Vintage Modified '51 is another example of how phenomenal Fender is as a company. This guitar is capable of producing versatile tones because of the SH pickup configuration and rotary pickup selector. The neck of this guitar is C-shaped which makes string bending easy as you like. This guitar has a strat body shape which adds to its cool, classic look.
Blend potentiometers (essentially two potentiometers ganged on the same shaft) allow blending together two pickups in varying degrees. The operation is the same as in a balance control found in stereo equipment – in the middle position (often marked with a detent) both pickups supply their full output, and turning the pot in either direction gradually attenuates one of the pickups while leaving the other at full output.[13][29]

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What started as an aftermarket parts company has grown into a real giant. ESP is a brand that is currently building some of the best guitars in the mid range segment of the market. Even though they are often associated with metal scene, ESP offers a wide variety of models. In all honesty, you will rarely find the same bang for the buck that ESP is capable of delivering. On top of that, their guitars are good looking as well.
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Here is one electric guitar that has all the incredible features expected from an electric guitar. In terms of vibe and clarity of sound, this guitar is a jewel to have. The Gretsch G5422TDCG Electromatic Hollow Body Electric Guitar is a snow crest white guitar which features a laminated top, including at the neck, back and sides of the instrument.
There is a legitimate physical aspect to the gauge of your strings that will affect how well you play.  Bending and fretting becomes much easier and faster with a lighter set, but in my own experience you will have a “tinnier” tone that must be compensated for with your guitar and amp tone controls.  Speaking of tone, lets look at how string gauge affects the sound you produce.
With smaller combos, it is worthwhile experimenting with their position within the room, especially when a distance mic is being used. For example, raising the combo further from the ground will result in a different reflected signal path length for ground reflections. Placing a reflective material such as hardboard or linoleum on the floor between the amp and mic will emphasise any coloration this produces. Where a small combo or practice amp lacks bass end, you can try to exploit the boundary effect by placing a mic in the corner of the room, then facing the amplifier into the corner. If the added bass is too much, move the mic and amplifier away from the corner until the tonal balance seems right.
Synonymous in the electric guitar industry, the Gibson brand continues to produce some of the best electric guitars on the market, including the Les Paul Studio. Designed with a classic look that maintains the appearance of a vintage quality, this electric guitar comes with a neck that is slimmer than most traditional models, allowing for ease and smooth transitions when switching between notes. The guitar utilizes an upgraded version of humbucker PAF to cancel out any outside interference that detracts from the quality of the sound, while maple and mahogany wood are combined to deliver both definition and sustainability. Other features include traditional tuners that can be manually altered, a Graph Tech Nut for precise spacing between strings, and a neck heel with the class Les Paul design. Well reviewed and great for the price, the Les Paul Studio is one of the best electric guitars available if your cash flow allows.
Dr Doug Clark-"I stumbled onto your site while looking for an entry-level classical guitar for my grandson in Denver, Colorado. Regrettably, I'm not resident in England (though I've been there many times), otherwise I'd be on your doorstep tomorrow morning. That said, might you have any acquaintances in America (firms similar to yours) whom you could recommend? We're limited at this point (8th form next year, at Denver School of the Arts), to around $300 US. Any advice or recommendation you can offer will be greatly appreciated. Watched Harry and Meghan's wedding twice! Wish them both, and England itself, a wonderful decade ahead. PS: I took up steel string acoustic guitar at about age 60. Hence my email "handle". Still working on my skills and loving it."

The first step is to remove all the electronics from your guitar. This includes the potentiometers (volume and tone knobs), the switch, the pickups, and the jack. For most Fender style guitars, most of the electronics listed are mounted on the pick guard with the exception of the jack which usually has its own plate it resides on. For Gibson style guitars, the pickups are removed from the front and the rest of the electronics through the back. 
The goal is to find the body shape and configuration that appeals the most to your eyes and ears. The most straightforward choice for beginners will be the solidbody for its durability. Players who are looking to expand their sonic palette are usually the ones who will take interest in semi-hollow and hollow body guitars. For more information on this topic read The Different Types of Electric Guitars Explained.
On top of that, the Champion 20 offers built-in effects, including reverb, chorus, flanging, delay, auto wah, vibrato, and tremolo. All of these effects can be chosen using a single knob, with an additional FX Level knob to control the mix of the unprocessed sound with the effect. These effects can’t match the flexibility and adjustability of separate effects pedals—for example, with the exceptions of reverb+delay and reverb+chorus, effects can’t be combined—but they can at the very least give beginners an idea of how these effects work. Many guitarists may find the Champion 20’s built-in effects to be all they need.

It is a German company that manufactures bass guitars. Making a really good bass guitar is a difficult task. However, Warwick bass guitars have really mastered this daunting task. The growl of the bass, and its hollow and beautiful resonating tone is a striking feature of the bass. The company employs stringent quality control methods in wood seasoning, cutting, and resonance engineering. It is highly regarded among bassists and has attracted many notable artists like Robert Trujillo (Metallica) and Adam Clayton (U2). One of the greatest things about Warwick is that they manufacture guitars for everyone, from amateur hobbyists to professional players. If you are new into electric bass guitars, then Rockbass Corvette Basic and Streamer Standard Electric Bass guitars are great options for a rocking start.


Cool guitar! You really don’t see many of these anymore. You are correct that it’s similar to the Washburn Wing series, specifically the Washburn Eagle from the late ’70s and early ’80s. In fact, aside from different fretboard inlays and brand names on the headstocks, when you compare the two they’re nearly identical. If this connection seems odd, the occurrence of very similar guitars with different brand names is more common that many of us would think.
Echo (also sometimes called long delay) is a natural effect as well, but it is only encountered in large open spaces such as canyons or stadiums. It sounds like when you emit a loud, sharp yelp and a second later you hear the yelp come bouncing faintly back to you from a far wall. This is a particularly fun effect to play around with by yourself. If you set the delay of the echo long enough, you can play against the notes you just played and harmonize with yourself while the rate sets up a kind of beat.

Bottom Line: The Line 6 HD500X is incredibly in-depth in the amount of options and editability it gives you. Doing all of it from the small screen on the actual unit is headache-inducing, but if you have a computer you can hook it up via USB and edit your sounds from there much more easily. There’s more of a learning curve with the HD500X than there is with the Zoom G3X, but the presets are decent enough and allow you to audition it if you’re the impatient type. Where the HD500X lacks is that it’s less of an immediate-gratification pedal, and it’s hard to tweak on-the-fly and come up with potentially inspirational sounds. Because of how the interface is, this is definitely more of a “sit down with headphones and tinker with it to get your perfect sound” type unit. If the effects quality of the Zoom G3X is a 7/10, the Line 6 HD500X is an 8.5/10. This is the one to get if you’re the type that likes to dig in and have control over every little thing. The price tag is a little on the high side, but considering what a powerhouse this unit is, it’s definitely not unreasonable.
Since a guitar’s sound is primarily determined by the interaction of the strings vibrating and the magnets in the pickup, you might wonder why wood makes a difference. In fact, the wood has a significant effect on the way a guitar sounds. The resonance from the wood determines how long the strings vibrate and the shape of their motion. Wood also allows the pickup itself to move. This combination makes wood an important factor in the overall tone of the guitar.
These guitars use very cheap materials. I bought a washburn WM24v PROE for $300 and it come with Mahogany body & neck, phenolic fretboard, emg81/85 and original floyd rose... Ibanez RG costs $400 and comes with basswood body, bolt on maple neck, rosewood fingerboard, shoddy pickups and a licensed floyd that WILL NOT stay in tune. Poor quality for money, if you get a Ibanez go for a fixed bridge/string-thru because their trems are HORRIBLE! Original floyd is the only way to go!
The Orange Crush PiX CR12L is another fairly standard style beginner amp. It has the same standard features as most beginner amps. The Crush PiX CR12L is a little more expensive than some similar featured amps, like the Velocity V10, but it makes up for the extra cost with a better build quality, better tone, and a well designed control layout. The Crush PiX CR12L gives a lot of control over the tone, but manages to do so in a clear, easily understood control panel.
In 1964, The Rolling Stones‘ Keith Richards obtained a 1959 sunburst Les Paul.[19] The guitar, outfitted with a Bigsby tailpiece, was the first “star-owned” Les Paul in Britain and served as one of the guitarist’s prominent instruments through 1966. Because he switched guitars often enough in that period (using models ranging from the Epiphone semi-hollow to various other guitars made by Guild and Gibson), Richards is sometimes forgotten as an early post-1960 Les Paul player.[20][21] In 1965, Eric Clapton also recognized the rock potential of the late 1950s Les Paul guitars (particularly the 1958–1960 Standard sunburst models), and gave them wide exposure. He began using Les Pauls because of the influence of Freddie King and Hubert Sumlin, and played a 1960 Standard on his groundbreaking album Blues Breakers – John Mayall – With Eric Clapton. At the same time, Mike Bloomfield began using a 1954 Les Paul goldtop he apparently purchased in Boston while touring with the Paul Butterfield Blues Band, and recorded most of his work on the band’s East-West album with that guitar. A year later, he traded it to guitarist/luthier Dan Erlewine for the 1959 Standard with which he became most identified. Concurrently, such artists such as Peter Green, Mick Taylor, Jeff Beck andJimmy Page began using the late-1950s Les Paul Standards.
Early proponents of the electric guitar on record include Alvino Rey (Phil Spitalney Orchestra), Les Paul (Fred Waring Orchestra), Danny Stewart (Andy Iona Orchestra), George Barnes (under many aliases), Eddie Durham, Lonnie Johnson, Floyd Smith, Big Bill Broonzy, T-Bone Walker, George Van Eps, Charlie Christian (Benny Goodman Orchestra), Tampa Red, Memphis Minnie, and Arthur Crudup. According to jazz historian James Lincoln Collier, Floyd Smith can be credited as the first person to rig up an amplified guitar. According to Collier, "Floyd's Guitar Blues" may be the first important use of the electric guitar on record.[17]
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