Here we have a matching quad of late sixties Goodman speakers with green labels 25 Watts each @ 12 ohms Very rare in that EACH driver is fully functional, the cones are nice and stiff, no cone rub or any tears, just a killer set of vintage speakers. These came out of a wem cab and were also stock in laney cabinets(think sabbath tone, wem, Burman and Selmer gear Wem used odd impedances, these read 10.01 ohms on my multimeter so is treat them as 8ohms if they are wired up in a cab series parallel. Postage in the U.K. is £32 and they will be sent out in two separate parcels, you will have to arrange your own courier if your not U.K. based you can also collect in person! Any questions just ask
Volume Swell Normally guitar has a very fast attack. It is at its loudest just after a not has been picked and there is a definite picked sound. You can get a softer pad style sound be picking with the volume off or very low and then raising the volume as the note/chord plays. This can be done with the guitar's own volume knob, but sometimes it is more convenient to leave your picking hand free and use a rocker pedal. By adding delay and/or reverb you can soften the note's ending also so that it doesn't stop abruptly.
By 1966 Daniel sold Danelectro to MCA, but remained with the company. In 1967 the Coral line of guitars is introduced. At the time, Danelectro sold about 85% of it's products to Sears. So MCA started the Coral line to sell to other distributors. The difference was the Coral hollow bodies (only) were manufactured in Japan. All other Coral parts were made in the New Jersey Danelectro plant. Also all Silvertones and Danelectro instruments were made entirely in the U.S.

Although Ibanez’s S series is designed to be far more versatile than the RG guitars, its Iron Label collection is built for one, brutal purpose: heavy metal. The SIX6FDFM represents exactly what we consider a ‘value-for-money’ guitar: It sports many premium specs, is skewed towards a single use, and, at a little under $1,000, won’t hemorrhage your bank account.


^ “Pete Townshend: On Guitar-Smashing Regrets, Stylistic Evolution, and Becoming a Gear Aficionado”. “It’s interesting to think that the Marshall sound I helped Jim and his guys develop was built around the very low output and thin, surfy sound of the Rick. The sound I wanted was Steve Cropper, but very loud. The early Marshall with a Rick gave me that. The semi-acoustic body and a speaker stack feeding right into the guitar was what allowed me to refine tuneful feedback.”
The C-series archtops were long scale until mid-1934, same as the 000 models. Sometimes a C model is converted from an archtop to a 000 style flat top. A conversion of a short scale C-2 (mid-1934 and later) won't exactly be a 000 either. The neck must be shortened to get the shallower angle required for a flat top. This amounts to about 1/3 of a fret, so the guitar ends up having a 13 2/3 fret neck. This puts the bridge position a little lower on the top, closer to the OM bridge position (but not exactly the same). The other feature on the C models that is different from a 000 is the back arch and the back braces. The archtops have more arch in the back and taller #3 and #4 back braces. Note the 1939 and later C-2 models have no abalone, the neck inlays are pearloid.
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From rock to jazz or folk to metal, what separates the great guitarists from the rest is their mastery of the skills taught in this program. From basics like chords and scales to nuances like improvisation techniques, form, control, and inflexion, this certificate program will take your guitar playing to the next level. Few accomplished guitarists have reached their peak alone, and Berklee’s faculty is unparalleled when it comes to delivering the personalized instruction and feedback that will help you turn the fretboard into a playground packed with unlimited possibilities.
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Once you've mastered a few songs on the guitar, you may want to record what you can do so others can hear you shred a wicked solo. Or you may want to use your recording to help improve your skills. In either case, recording your electric guitar outside of a studio can result in poor sound quality that is less than desirable or noise complaints. Depending on your situation and equipment, there are many factors you'll likely have to tweak on your way to getting the best recording, but with a little effort, you'll soon be able to listen to an awesome recording of your musical ability.
Side Note: The above is a visual example of how the wrong pedal order screws up your tone. When you compress before using delay, you get a perfectly shaped note ringing out and decaying uniformly over time. If you delay before compressing and even normalize with your make-up gain, you still lose volume and power due to the attack sneaking through first. Then your delayed notes are all also compressed, ruining your fine-tuned echo decay so that all echoes are relatively too loud and don't decay equally over time.
12-string acoustic guitars have six string courses, each with two strings that are tuned to produce a chiming, chorus effect. Usually, the string pairs in the bass courses are tuned an octave apart while all treble strings are tuned in unison. Some guitarists prefer tuning the second string in the third course (G) in unison while others opt to tune it an octave higher for bell-like ringing tones.
Despite the numerous different analog devices, it is very rare for them to be able to duplicate all aspects of a Leslie speaker. Thus, Rotary Speaker Simulator are always going to be digital, utilizing modelling algorithms to model the relations between the rotating horns and bass baffle. And how the sound bounce around the cabinet. As Leslie also have an amplifier section, most of these typically have overdrives to simulate that aspect. Some of these pedals can even accept keyboard's input.

An amplifier stack consists of an amplifier head atop a speaker cabinet—a head on top of one cabinet is commonly called a half stack, a head atop two cabinets a full stack. The cabinet that the head sits on often has an angled top in front, while the lower cabinet of a full stack has a straight front. The first version of the Marshall stack was an amp head on an 8×12 cabinet, meaning a single speaker cabinet containing eight 12" guitar speakers. After six of these cabinets were made, the cabinet arrangement was changed to an amp head on two 4×12 (four 12" speakers) cabinets to make the cabinets more transportable. Some touring metal and rock bands have used a large array of guitar speaker cabinets for their impressive appearance. Some of these arrangements include only the fronts of speaker cabinets mounted on a large frame.[25]
Tonewood (basswood, mahogany, alder...) doesn't matter in an electric guitar unless you're getting ancient pickups for it. Older pickups used to act more like microphones and picked up sound resonating from the guitar body as well as from the strings. Modern technology has fixed that so the sound comes purely from the strings. Most guitar companies that market their guitars for tonewood are guitar brands that have been around since the times of these ancient pickups and based their marketing off of it. Most of them still haven't changed it. I recently read a scientific breakdown (experiment, analysis and all) that thoroughly proved the tonewood debate pointless once and for all. Every variable was accounted for-only tonewood was changed. So, don't worry about the basswood; it could be made from the least acoustic material on earth, and the pickups would give you the same sound as they would have on a different guitar material. I've spent months researching this in depth. (I play, too.)
After your design has been properly plotted out on the poster board you can cut it out with an exacto knife. Make sure you stay as true to your lines as possible so you have a nice clean line to trace once your ready to. Then lay out the template on body blank and trace away. I like to cut the piece of poster board the same size as the body blank I am using. It makes it a lot easier to line everything up that way. Now you're ready to move on to the next step.
Open the case and you will find over 689MB of rich guitar tones ranging from 70 to 130BPM. These sensational loops are neatly arranged into 3 categories comprising of 50+ Ballad Hooks, 50+ Steady Riffs and 50+ Upbeat Jams, all applicable to a vast range of genres! From the clean, delay-drenched chime of Ballad Hook 'Serene' to the upbeat overdrive of Steady Riff 'Perpetual' and the crunchy swagger of Upbeat Jam 'Loose', STUDIO GUITARS redefines quality guitar samples and delivers them in stunning 24-bit high definition.
I just want to say I completely agree with the assesment of getting a non-shit Fender strat vs a Squire to begin with. I was on one of these cheapos and a 15w marshall amp for way too long. I became decent at playing, but in the end I didn’t feel inspired to keep playing. I recently bought a Maton MS503 Classic and a Fender Blues Deville 410 and playing that setup was like my body was on fucking fire. I wish I’d had more of that feeling sooner in my life. Those $200 for a squire goes a couple of years, but a $600 strat or other great guitar can go a lifetime. Amp matters heaps too of course.
STORCH is a virtual instrument, designed with the participation of ambitious music producers and beat-makers. This dynamic software is influenced by the legendary brand sounds of Scott Storch and includes 300 presets, divided into 18 categories of instruments. Categories include: Stringed, Drums, Dirty Pianos, Reversed EPs, 808, Arps and more. Moreover, users can create their own original sound...
The version of the instrument that is best known today is the solid body electric guitar. Rickenbacher, later spelled Rickenbacker, did, however, offer a cast aluminum electric steel guitar, nicknamed The Frying Pan or The Pancake Guitar, beginning in 1931. This guitar is reported to have sounded quite modern. Audiovox built and may have offered an electric solid-body as early as the mid-1930s.
MY kid brother has been playing drums since he was a kid , until I snuck him into a bar at 15 one night and he set in with the house band , he played all my music. He was good so he & the lead guitarist clicked & they released a CD that took off & then the guitarist was killed , my brother got a doctorate in music and has played on several good CD's , MTB being but one. he can now play nearly everything and has released two more CD,s ,and owns his own studio , me I'm only an electrician but I understand Harmonic heating in electronics . its right that a watt is a watt,& it's a way to measure power & its sold in kilowatt hours, but even though a watts is a watt when measured, its a measurement of energy , it still depends on how it's used as to how far it goes or what you get from it ,it has a lot to do with how clean or distorted it is as to how loud it seems , people will perceive it differently , the only way to find to find how loud ? a decibel meter, another measurement .
I won't lie, I was VERY skeptical ordering this. But I figured that isfits not great, I could sell it. After getting it, this package is amazing for the money. I am definitely keeping it! I own/have owned $5,000+ models and some $100 "disposable" axes and I was shocked at this beautiful guitar. First off, the flamed top is gorgeous. It doesn't have a cheap look to it. The fret board is so so but you cant expect too much here. The frets don't have sharp edges and nicely done. The sealed tuners are smooth and after a minute of the inital tuning (with the included chromatic tuner), I played it for a few hours and it kept proper tune. The overall tone of the guitar is warm and projects well. I got absolutely no rattle or vibration. Then I plugged into the included amp. I will admit, the amp isn't great but but its a free practice amp. So I plugged into my Peavey and man....it sounds awesome. It also came with a so so gig bag, few picks, a strap, a truss rod key, sorta cheap guitar cord, an extra set of strings, and batteries for both the tuner and for the preamp on the guitar. Speaking of that, its a 3 band EQ with a gain control, volume and a battery checker. I paid $140 for all of this and I will say that this is one of the best deals I have gotten in almost 37 years of me playing. If you want a good practice guitar and can even play a show, don't pass this one up. The guitar alone is worth 3x of what the whole package costed me. I think I'll check out more Glen Burton guitars.

Gotta say a tele has to be the hardest but most rewarding to play. If you make a mistake, you will definitely hear it, but it just helps you're playing get more clean. Les pauls are a lot easier with the shorter scale length and forgiving pickups. Haven't played any metal guitars but I figure it has a lot to do with their setup that makes it sound so easy. You can do just about anything with the tremolo arm into a van halen kind of setup and it'll sound cool. Or you can whack one off with your guitar like steve vai
Now I'm talking to the owner of my local mom & pop shop who sold me my Affinty (which is great but the string spacing sucks). Guy is leaning toward making a deal for an Austin. Maybe I'm dead wrong, but I don't like Austins, they are crap IMO. I told him I have some extra cash and maybe we could work something out, but I just feel like this guy has a lousy inventory of cheap guitars and I will be hard pressed to escape with a decent instrument.
When jazz guitarists play chords underneath a song's melody or another musician's solo improvisations, it is called "comping", short for "accompanying" and for "complementing".[citation needed] The accompanying style in most jazz styles differs from the way chordal instruments accompany in many popular styles of music. In many popular styles of music, such as rock and pop, the rhythm guitarist usually performs the chords in rhythmic fashion which sets out the beat or groove of a tune. In contrast, in many modern jazz styles within smaller, the guitarist plays much more sparsely, intermingling periodic chords and delicate voicings into pauses in the melody or solo, and using periods of silence. Jazz guitarists commonly use a wide variety of inversions when comping, rather than only using standard voicings.[3]
Or course, you have a repulsive snobs on here that can't acknowledge the truth that the list above correctly consists of quality, popular choices. I'd never play a Dean, a Parker, or a Godin. I'm so glad you love them, but you're a minority. The Gibsons and Fenders are tried and true designs. That's why the majority play them. They're actually good guitars, at least the equal of the snobs-are-us suggestions above. Having limited funds to spend, and wanting to ensure that a quality guitar with quality tone is aquired, I would go with a Fender or a Gibson without hesitation. I'm not a snotty nosed rich brat like most of the above put-downs and belly achers; I'm a 50+ mature adult who knows how to play and I play good, thank you. Not because I say, but because that's what others say. Fender and Gibson are overall the best guitars on the market for the average person of means and talent, unless you're rich and can afford something above $5000.00. Otherwise, calm down, remove the pentangle from your rectum, and relax. Is it really that important to you? THEN OPEN YOUR OWN WEBSITE AND PREACH ABOUT IT. This has been a public service message...Billy

I’ll give your guitar a thorough inspection inside and out, letting you know what is correct and what may need attention now or in the near future. Frets, neck, action, bridge and bridge plate, truss rod, tuners, and internal bracing are some of the things that are assessed. This service is provided as a courtesy to my customers and there is no obligation or pressure to buy anything.
Best acoustic I've owned. It's an Oregon dreadnought, an all round stunning looking guitar. The sound is beautifully balanced, clear with nice defined bass, sits perfectly in the midrange and projects well without being too bright. It's light weight with meticulous craftsmanship and beautiful timber. When you look at these guitar it's obvious that they are built with a lot of care and attention to detail.

The Aston Sedona is an ES-335 inspired design that truly lives up to the standard. With solid maple construction, 23-3/4″ scale length, bound fretboard, body, and F-holes, 22 fret rosewood fretboard, classic toggle, tone, and volume controls, tune-o-matic style bridge, stop tailpiece, and smooth, strong humbucking pickups, this guitar can hold it’s own with the classic designs and shine!
Even though pickups are the main component tasked with interpreting string vibrations and indirectly turning them into sound, your choice of wood still matters. Although the effect is subtle, certain woods will give you better sustain, more definition, and so on.  And in the end it's the accumulation of all of these choices that determine your ultimate sound.

Lutherie has been my life's work since the beginning. After graduating from Roberto-Venn School of Lutherie in 1992, I set up my first shop in a rental garage, and began designing, building, repairing, and restoring fretted stringed instruments. Aided and abetted by 13 years of employment as a staff guitar repairman at Seattle's Trading Musician, I gained an extensive knowledge of the inner and outer workings of a vast array of instruments.
In the ’66 American Teisco Del Rey Catalog, the small, humble EP-9T was left over from before (formerly EP-9), with the quasi-Gibson style head and triangular control plate. The only thing new was the Bigsby (thus the T). In the ’66 Japanese catalog, the small thinlines were represented by the EP-2L and EP-1L. The EP-2L looks for all the world like the EP-9T, with the large rectangular pickups with black inserts, controls on the triangular lower bout plate, and a long-armed trapeze vibrato with a curved handle. The EP-1L was the same except for having a single metal-covered pickup at the neck.
700-Series, which are all solid-bodies are probably worth $250-$350, maybe a little more for the 4-pickup 742 model. I’m pretty sure that they were on the market at the same time as the 800s but not as many are being seen. Since the 800s were a step-up in quality compared to previous Kents and the 700s used similar design features, they should be pretty decent instruments. Although collectors haven't shown a lot of interest in them, rarity has to be considered an influence on the price at this point.Recently a 742 sold on Ebay for over $1000 and a 740 recently sold for $999. Previously most of the 700s had been selling for $200-400.

Due to distortion's critical function in modern guitar styles, by far the lion's share of stompboxes are distortion units of one kind or another. Most of these feature intensity and tone controls, but often vary wildly in terms of the sounds they create. You'll be amazed at the different types of distortions that can be produced, from rich, creamy, smooth, and melodic sustain to harsh, jagged, and piercing breakup tones. Many distortion units produce a broad range of textures.
For a slightly more distant, but fuller sound, bring up the fader on the mid- distance mic. Slowly add that signal to the close sound described in the previous paragraph. You'll have the detail of the close mic, but with the fullness that comes with adding some "room" sound to it (just like sitting in the tenth row). This is a pretty standard approach that will give you a pretty standard rock guitar sound.

The really important player on the scene today in the low end and intermediate price bracket is Mainland China. Whereas Yamaha and other makers have produced guitars in Taiwan for quite some time, Mainland Chinese guitars were always noted as being of extremely low quality. In the past few years, however, that situation has changed dramatically. In the past ten years, China has moved rapidly toward entrepreneurial private ownership of business. The new leadership has pushed this process quickly. China now permits foreign ownership of factories and businesses as well as encouraging Chinese citizens both from Mainland China and Taiwan to set up their own ventures. Just as the Koreans were able to progress from very low-end student models with crude workmanship to remarkably sophisticated guitars more quickly than the Japanese had, the Chinese now have all the advantages of the prior experience of Americans, Japanese, Korean and Indonesian ventures. In addition it should be noted that while Chinese labor is remarkably inexpensive, with an average annual income in China today of under $1,000, Chinese labor is by no means unskilled. China has a very high literacy rate and its workers are skilled and motivated. In the past the world has had areas with cheap labor and other areas with skilled labor. China is a major force to reckon with because it offers cheap skilled labor. The Chinese today are producing instruments in many different settings, ranging from small workshops specializing in handcrafted instruments on up to huge industrial complexes with the latest automated technology. Only ten years ago Chinese-made violins were viewed as almost a joke. They were violin-shaped objects but certainly did not play or sound like one. Today we at Gruhn Guitars are selling beautifully crafted Chinese violins made with excellent wood and superb craftsmanship at very reasonable prices. Some of these instruments compare very favorably with European and American violins costing thousands of dollars. Gibson has set up a factory in China to produce Epiphone guitars and numerous American makers, both large and small, are having guitars, banjos and mandolins made there. Whereas it would be prohibitively expensive to make guitars or other instruments in Japan today using techniques similar to those employed by Martin and Gibson in the 1930s with assembly line production but still featuring a high degree of hand craftsmanship and human judgment, in China today it is economically emminently feasible to do so. The violins we import are beautifully crafted and even feature genuine varnish finish for a very small fraction of the cost that companies such as Gibson charge simply for the option of a varnish finish on one of their standard models. The Chinese are very rapidly taking over the student- and intermediate-grade markets. Not only do they produce fretted instruments, but they have taken over a large segment of the piano market as well as producing wind instruments. I have seen and played prototype acoustic Chinese instruments which rival American-made guitars by some of the same American manufacturers bringing in these imports. It will be most interesting to see how this develops.
G&L, owned by Leo Fender, is yet another brand producing quality guitars. (Of course, when it is owned by the same owner as that of Fender, one can expect the extent of quality of these guitars.) Many of the G&L guitars seem to relive the Fender classic designs with some improvisations in style. Thus, this brand can indeed be considered an excellent alternative to Fender. Instead, in many instances, you will find G&L outnumbering Fender.

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