A significant cosmetic change occurred in Japan in ’65, which can help determine dates. Previously, almost all models had plastic pickguards. In ’65, most models switched to striped metal guards, with the alternating matte stripes etched into the metal. Thus, if you find a guitar Teisco with a plastic guard, it’s probably from ’64 or early ’65. If it has a striped metal guard, it’s probably from ’65 or later.
Chorus: Since this is still a repeating effect that has a tempo component, the chorus of a song tends to be a tough fit.Verse: The lower intensity and high emotion of most verses in Christian worship leaves room for some tremolo effect, depending on what the guitar is doing.Bridge: Short solos during the bridge are an ideal place for the tremolo effect, particularly if it hasn’t been used in other parts of the song.
Even though pickups are the main component tasked with interpreting string vibrations and indirectly turning them into sound, your choice of wood still matters. Although the effect is subtle, certain woods will give you better sustain, more definition, and so on.  And in the end it's the accumulation of all of these choices that determine your ultimate sound.
{ "thumbImageID": "Les-Paul-Custom-PRO-Electric-Guitar-Alpine-White/H79039000002000", "defaultDisplayName": "Epiphone Les Paul Custom PRO Electric Guitar", "styleThumbWidth": "60", "styleThumbHeight": "60", "styleOptions": [ { "name": "Alpine White", "sku": "sku:site51321473136588", "price": "679.00", "regularPrice": "679.00", "msrpPrice": "1,132.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Epiphone/Les-Paul-Custom-PRO-Electric-Guitar-Alpine-White-1321473136588.gc", "skuImageId": "Les-Paul-Custom-PRO-Electric-Guitar-Alpine-White/H79039000002000", "brandName": "Epiphone", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Les-Paul-Custom-PRO-Electric-Guitar-Alpine-White/H79039000002000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Ebony", "sku": "sku:site51321473136458", "price": "679.00", "regularPrice": "679.00", "msrpPrice": "1,132.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Epiphone/Les-Paul-Custom-PRO-Electric-Guitar-Ebony-1321473136458.gc", "skuImageId": "Les-Paul-Custom-PRO-Electric-Guitar-Ebony/H79039000001000", "brandName": "Epiphone", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Les-Paul-Custom-PRO-Electric-Guitar-Ebony/H79039000001000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } ] }
Some bridges allow players to introduce vibrato into their performance by means of moving a vibrato arm (aka a whammy bar) that moves the bridge up or down. Bridges with this function are often called tremolos. (Note that this is musically incorrect since tremolo means a repeating variation in volume, not pitch, but has been used so long it is accepted terminology.) A tremolo system allows the player to rock the bridge back and forth to adjust the pitch of the notes being played. This is called a floating bridge, and is popular on many guitars. For beginners, it may be better to avoid a locking tuning system for their first guitar. They can be tricky to adjust properly, and can make even a simple string change frustrating for the inexperienced. However, if your budding Steve Vai has his heart set, don’t let that stand in the way.

{"pageName":"[gc] vintage: ovation","reportSuiteIds":"guitarcenterprod","eVar3":"vintage","prop2":"[gc] vintage","prop1":"[gc] vintage","evar51":"default: united states","prop10":"brands","prop11":"marshall","prop5":"[gc] vintage","prop6":"[gc] vintage","prop3":"[gc] vintage","prop4":"[gc] vintage","channel":"[gc] vintage","linkInternalFilters":"javascript:,guitarcenter.com","prop7":"[gc] vintage"}
The AF75 also has an ART-1 bridge and a VT60 tailpiece for increased resonance, improved tuning stability, greater sustain and an enhanced tone. It is also equipped with Classic Elite humbucking pickups at the neck and bridge, producing a rich and nuanced tone with just the right low-end heft. Tone shaping is an easy affair with the Sure Grip III control knobs, which are designed for non-slip, precise control.

For those who like that 1950s style Gretsch sound, you’ll appreciate the Gretsch Dual-Coil humbuckers which can go from glass like cleans to smooth low growls to all out riff worthy dirt when you add some distortion to your amp. The single cutaway design and maple neck with gloss polyester finish make it extremely comfortable to play too. A guitar beginners and professional musicians alike, can enjoy.
Both Brian May from Queen and Ritchie Blackmore did use treble boosters for sure in their rigs to get more gain out of their amps. Germanium transistors are very inconsistent and are subject to temperature changes so they can be finicky. They also certainly color your tone to a large extent, which is something you may want. Clean boosts that use silicon transistors are much more common and reliable, they can also boost your signal without effecting your tone too much. For a general clean boost I would go for a modern one. If you want an old school sound, I’d check out a germanium based unit. Or like me, I’d get both.
Yowza, here’s another excellent guitar for rock and metal beginners. It’s similar in some ways to the Ibanez RG (a fast, thin neck, jumbo frets, 2 humbuckers, and a 3-way switch), but has some important differences. This guitar sports a compound radius fretboard, carved quilted maple veneer top, Les Paul-style bridge, and a bound fingerboard. Very classy appointments that aren’t often found in a beginner guitar. Jackson makes amazing guitars, and this one’s a beauty.
If you’ve never listened to Chet Atkins, you should do it right now. The rockabilly player was a skilled instrumental guitar player, playing most of his songs without any backing from other musicians. For a great sample of his talent, give a listen to his version of “Mr. Sandman.” His alternating thumb rhythm and syncopated melodies are marvels of beauty and precision on the instrument.

Little Martin: Designed around a modified O-14 fret body, the Little Martin series is built at a smaller 23″ scale length. With the exception of the LX1 and LX1E, which both have solid Sitka spruce tops, Little Martin series guitars are constructed with HPL top, back, and sides. Recent models incorporate a greater amount of synthetic materials, such as Stratabondnecks and Micarta (as opposed to rosewood or morado) fretboards and bridges. The guitars employ Modified X-Series “X” bracing, reinforced by a bowtie plate made of graphite. Little Martin series guitars do not havepickguards or fretboard inlays.

700-Series, which are all solid-bodies are probably worth $250-$350, maybe a little more for the 4-pickup 742 model. I’m pretty sure that they were on the market at the same time as the 800s but not as many are being seen. Since the 800s were a step-up in quality compared to previous Kents and the 700s used similar design features, they should be pretty decent instruments. Although collectors haven't shown a lot of interest in them, rarity has to be considered an influence on the price at this point.Recently a 742 sold on Ebay for over $1000 and a 740 recently sold for $999. Previously most of the 700s had been selling for $200-400.
Includes hand cutting and shaping new fingerboard nut from scratch, and fitting it specifically for each instrument. Some variation in pricing is due to the unexpected difficulty in removing some nuts. It is highly recommended each instrument be set up to ensure optimal playability. Restringing is NOT included. Price excludes cost of blank ($6 for bone/synthetic)

OK, when the list started it was hard to tell if the author was knowledgeable on the subject because of the automatic “Go To” names. Unfortunately, by the time I got to the end I realized this was the author’s favorites list versus the Top 10 Greatest Guitar Players. Kirk Hammett, Slash, Jack White, Chuck Berry??? You can’t put them on any list and not mention the guy who influenced so many, and who Eric Clapton called the best guitarist in the world, SRV. Richards biggest claim to fame it the amount of drugs he’s done that haven’t killed him,… Read more »
In 1961, Grady Martin scored a hit with a fuzzy tone caused by a faulty preamplifier that distorted his guitar playing on the Marty Robbins song "Don't Worry". Later that year Martin recorded an instrumental tune under his own name, using the same faulty preamp. The song, on the Decca label, was called "The Fuzz." Martin is generally credited as the discoverer of the "fuzz effect." [18]
Phaser: A phaser or "phase shifter" creates a slight rippling effect—amplifying some aspects of the tone while diminishing others—by splitting an audio signal in two and altering the phase of one portion. Three well-known examples of phaser are the two handed tapping part on the Van Halen instrumental "Eruption" and the keyboard parts on Billy Joel's "Just the Way You Are" and Paul Simon's "Slip Slidin' Away".[77]

A difficult effect to explain, the compressor’s value is in it subtle and careful use. A compressor acts like bumpers on your signal's amplitude, preventing the volume from spiking too loud while also preventing the volume from decaying too quickly. Because of this, it increases sustain - which is great for solos - while evening out playing dynamics. Country and funk players use compression heavily to achieve spanky and crisp punctuation within their playing. Compressors will add noise to the signal, so many higher end boxes will have a noise gate feature. Other than making cleans sparkle, you can also front-load your distortion or overdrive to get great clear sustain.

Materials for necks are selected for dimensional stability and rigidity, and some allege that they influence tone. Hardwoods are preferred, with maple, mahogany, and ash topping the list. The neck and fingerboard can be made from different materials; for example, a guitar may have a maple neck with a rosewood or ebony fingerboard. In the 1970s, designers began to use exotic man-made materials such as aircraft-grade aluminum, carbon fiber, and ebonol. Makers known for these unusual materials include John Veleno, Travis Bean, Geoff Gould, and Alembic.

The K-4L (Teisco Del Rey ET-460 Super Deluxe) had four of the large, chunky, single-coil pickups with chrome sides and black center insert revealing six square poles. These were controlled by four sliding on/off switches, plus a 3-position switch for solo, rhythm and super bass sounds, as well as volume and tone. The roller bridge had a spring-loaded muffler/mute.
Overall quality is Great! Great intonation and holds tune once the strings are "broke in", as with any guitar ! Everything you would expect from a quality instrument. Action could be a little lower, but that can be a fairly inexpensive modification. The "extras" are decent except for the gig bag. The bag is about the equivalent to a thin travel bag for clothing, but the quality of the guitar alone is worth the price.! Amp is decent for it's size and does the job. My only complaint is the finish on the guitar itself is a little lacking. On the one I received, the rossett around the sound hole was not lined up before the final clear coat was applied(refer to photo). For a Chinese knock off you can't be the price though! This is still a quality instrument! I've been playing for over 27 years and I would recommend this guitar for beginners and seasoned musicians alike. $123 for the guitar itself is well worth the price!
When two sine waves with frequencies A and B are ring-modulated, the output will also contain the frequencies A+B and B-A. If frequency B is not a multiple of A, these additional frequencies are inharmonic; e.g. ring-modulating sine waves at 1000Hz and 1250Hz will add the frequency 2250Hz, which is neither a multiple of 1000Hz, nor of 1250Hz. When more complex sounds are ring-modulated, sums and differences of all the harmonic frequencies are added.
   These prices reflect the opinion/perception of the editor of guitarrepairshop.com. while these are prices one could expect from a quality repair shop, repair rates can vary. A full time repairman can have as much training time and investment in tools as any mechanic. Shop overhead costs are on par with those of any other profession, so if you take your instrument to a professional shop, expect to pay professional rates. And expect professional work. While this list reflects prices one would expect to pay at a professional shop, rates will vary. Expect to pay by the hour for some extensive restoration jobs. Rates based on an hourly charge of $60.00 p/hour. Shop minimum labor charge - $60.00 Prices updated January 2014

The Epiphone Thunderbird IV Reverse Bass is Epiphone’s most distinctive bass guitar to date. The Thunderbird features the classic reverse body styling and dual humbuckers just like the Gibson originals! The Thunderbird IV features an alder body and a 34 inch scale bolt-on maple neck with a rosewood fretboard and dot inlays, and warm and phat dual humbucking pickups.

The Ibanez AFC95 extends the Japanese manufacturer’s reach well into the future whilst remaining true to its roots. The elegantly styled single-cutaway hollowbody is equipped with forward-thinking appointments that extends the tonal versatility of the hollowbody further than ever before. Sublime hardware includes a delightfully nimble ebony fingerboard, whilst the ebony bridge and AFC tailpiece optimise intonation and sustain superbly.


Replace or upgrade your guitars volume and tone controls with the best quality pots available from CTS, Bourns, Fender, Alpha, Alps and more. From full size to mini pots, long shaft and short shaft pots, blend pots and stacked concentric pots, push/pull pots and more, we have the pot you need! Not sure which pot is right for your project? Then check out the Guitar Electronics FAQ Page for more info on pot values, pot tapers and more.
For the uninitiated, effect pedals usually take the form of small-ish metal boxes which sit on the floor in front of you. These can be switched on and off using your feet. Hence, pedals. The technology contained within these pedals is designed to alter your tone in any number of ways. For example, cleaning it up and making it louder through to adding layers of shimmer, fuzz, whammy or ‘verb. Don’t worry, we’ll refer back to these terms later because they are genuine terms in the wacky world of pedals.
Ever since Christmas Day 1967,I have been trying to find out who made my MIJ guitar I got as a gift that year.Today I found out who made my little Dover when your excellent book came in the mail.I was always puzzled I’ve never seen another Dover and despite many inquiries to guitar mags-nobody else had heard of the brand either.Back in 2009 I sent several pix of my whole collection to Vintage Guitar Mag-they only printed on pic,and that was the one with the Dover-even though there were several others that I thought were more historically significant.The guitar looks like a 3/4 size attempt of making a Jazzmaster copy as it had the strange Meito plastic pickups with the 6 little chrome triangles where the pole pieces usually go.I noticed that Sakai Mokko also made Sears guitars and that really clicked with me as my mother worked at Sears in Toronto at the time and that’s where she bought my Dover.I will try to send some pix your way.
The dynamic mic’s strengths for close-miking constitute some of its weaknesses in distant-miking, and you’ll more likely want to use a ribbon or condenser mic for this job, if you have one. Distant miking really begins at 10″ to 12″ out, where many condenser and ribbon mics start to bloom. As a rough guide, start 12″ to 18″ from the speaker in order to record an electric guitar sound that is still pretty solid and direct, but captures some sense of air and space and natural room reverberation. You can aim the mic straight at the center of the speaker for a bright and detailed tone, as described in our close-miking techniques above, or move it around in the field, trying different direct and off-axis placements. Any position that achieves a desirable tone is valid, and you don’t have to remain on the same plane as the speaker itself. Moving the mic out adds more space to the sound (while potentially compounding phasing issues – see below). Raising the mic above the speaker and aiming it down slightly to fire toward the upper edge of the cone can let the sound bloom as it reaches the mic. In a room with a carpeted floor, you can position the mic lower to the ground (even below the speaker itself) to cut out some of the reflected sound. Positioned as such, an end-fire mic can be shooting either toward the amp on a plane that hovers above the floor or at an angle toward the speaker, while a side-fire mic can be aimed either way or fire straight at the ceiling with the amp sound washing over its capsule.

Kent 545 Polaris ll- Yes the 60's are back. Here's a Fab solid body Kent in sunburst. Check the features on this baby. First off the selector switch is super. It's made in Japan, and the good part is, it looks it! This unit has a great 60's feel and tone. Guitar is is in great condition, neck straight, and action just right. It comes with that vintage chipboard case also in wonderful condition. Sold
Sune, you should know that there is no "right" or "wrong" string gauge for any guitar - it's all based on what you prefer in terms of feel and tone. It's good to try different gauges at first to find out what fits you the best. All my guitars are tuned to a drop-C tuning with 11-50 gauge strings, and I've only come to that perfect balance for me after a bunch of experimentation.
Lastly, if you fancy yourself the next Slash, Jimmy Page, or Pete Townshend… you’ll want to pick up a Les Paul style guitar. It’ll get you that classic rock sound that you’re looking for. Les Pauls are equipped with “humbuckers” which produce a fat, meaty sound that’s rounder and less sharp than the single-coil pickups of a strat. The signal is also stronger so you’ll get more sustain.
The Police were a new kind of power trio, and Andy Summers was the main reason. Quickly moving away from punk, he recast jazz chords and reggae rhythms as headlong rock & roll. Summers played as sparely as possible, constructing clipped twitches or dubby washes of sound – leaving ample room for Sting and Stewart Copeland. "His tone and style were just absolutely perfect – he left space around everything," Rush's Alex Lifeson said. "And he can handle anything from beautiful acoustic playing to jazz to hybrid kinds of stuff."

For example, if you plug into a .7V power amp and you get good sound – great! However, if you plug into a 1.25V power amp and find the signals are weak, it’s not the tonal lack of the power amp that’s the problem. The preamp signals are too weak to be driven to the powerful 1.25V power amp. The issue is the sensitivity input of the power amp is too high for the preamp to be driven well.


Now that you know a little bit of history behind the electric guitar, let’s dive into some of the different types of electric guitars that you can find at Sam Ash. You may be thinking to yourself, “Why are there so many different types of electric guitars?” The reason is this: each and every type of electric guitar serves a unique purpose and will cater to various types of playing styles and musical genres.
×