Most bass amps have only one rated wattage. A small number of amps, such as the Mesa/Boogie Strategy 88 amp head, have switchable wattage. A selector switch on the 88 enables the bassist to choose its full 465 watt power; half power (250 watts); or low power (125 watts). A bassist playing an arena on one night, then a club gig, and then recording in a studio could use full, half and low power for the different volume requirements. The Quilter 800 Bass Block has a "master control" knob which switches between various watt outputs for a similar approach.
Analyzing the notes you are playing plays an important role while you are performing. The built-in chromatic tuner in these pedals shows you the live feed of your notes whether they are sharp, flat or dead. Similarly, one can bypass the currently selected sound fx for maintaining a pure sound when tuning or completely mute the signal for a uniform silence.
The Telecaster was important in the evolution of country, electric blues, funk, rock and roll, and other forms of popular music. Its solid construction let guitarists play loudly as a lead instrument, with long sustain if desired. It produced less of the uncontrolled, whistling, ‘hard’ feedback (‘microphonic feedback’) that hollowbodied instruments tend to produce at volume (different from the controllable feedback later explored by Pete Townshend and countless other players). Even though the Telecaster is more than half a century old, and more sophisticated designs have appeared since the early 1950s (including Fender’s own Stratocaster), the Telecaster remains in production. There have been numerous variations and modifications, but a model with something close to the original features has always been available.
Nice 60's, Japanese Hollow-Body. Really cool, "Barney Kessel" style hollow body / Arch top, double cutaway Electric Guitar by Univox. 2-Pick-up. Fabulous Sunburst finish. Bound, Rosewood fingerboard. "Trapeze" tailpiece. Separate Volume and Tone for each pickup and adjustable truss rod. White "Mother-of-Toilet seat" headstock overlay. Finish and wood in great shape. Plays and sounds great. Missing Logo, Pick guard and whammy bar. Not many finish chips. Very shiny. Some chips on plastic pick-up bezel (see photos). Really cool "Emerald" cap on pick-up selector switch. Frets in great shape with minor, normal wear. We have completely done a "Pro" set up on the guitar, including cleaning all the electronics, Re-soldered the output jack, tightening and lubing the machines, oiling the fingerboard, adjusting the neck and action for great playability (clearance at the 9th fret = .012 when fretted at the first and the body), adjusting / checking the intonation (adjusted perfectly!),  and cleaning and polishing. Plays and sounds great. We also installed a new set of .011 "Flat-wound" strings. Dilapidated, but functional gig bag included.
Classic 000 Martin copy by the great Yamaha Nippon Gakki factory in Japan, Here is a fine example , no structural issues no cracks and neck is excellent and plays with ease because it has great action, intonation is 100%, beautiful patina of a true vintage 40+ year old with great workmanship and materials this example has stood the test of time like few have its not new or mint of course it has been played but not abused and taken care of and maintained and sounds better than new with its well aged TONE WOODS these are 40+ years old but when made the woods were known to have been aged over 20 years then so this doesn't compare to a new Yamaha all of those factors make this a rare survivor. Fun to play because it sounds so good and is easy to play. Pics soon to come. Questions for Joe or ready to buy email me at: jvguitars@gmail.com .

One of these was the 14-fret neck, which allowed easier access to higher notes. Martin intended it to appeal to plectrum banjo players interested in switching to guitar for increased work opportunities[citation needed]. Martin altered the shape of its 0-size guitar body to allow a 14-frets-clear tenor neck. This was in response to specific requests from tenor players including Al Esposito, the manager of the Carl Fischer store in New York City. The “Carl Fischer Model” tenors were soon renamed 0-18T[citation needed]. This was the first time Martin altered one of their original body shapes to accommodate a longer neck with more frets clear of the body. A 1955 version of the 0-15 is the favorite guitar of artist Leroy Powell. He tells American Songwriter “It’s my main axe that I play with around the house…I even took it out when I toured with Kid Rock … it’s held up pretty good for how old it is.”[4]
The Deluxe was among the “new” 1968 Les Pauls. This model featured “mini-humbuckers”, also known as “New York” humbuckers, and did not initially prove popular. The mini-humbucker pickup fit into the pre-carved P-90 pickup cavity using an adaptor ring developed by Gibson (actually just a cut-out P90 pickup cover) in order to use a supply ofEpiphone mini-humbuckers left over from when Gibson moved Epiphone production to Japan. The DeLuxe was introduced in late 1968 and helped to standardize production among Gibson’s US-built Les Pauls. The first incarnation of the Deluxe featured a one-piece body and slim three-piece neck in late 1968. The “pancake” body (thin layer of maple on top of two layers of Honduran mahogany) came later in 1969. In late 1969, a small “volute” was added. 1969 Deluxes feature the Gibson logo devoid of the dot over the “i” in Gibson. By late 1969/early 1970, the dot over the “i” had returned, plus a “Made In USA” stamp on the back of the headstock. The Deluxe could be special ordered with full-size Humbucker T-Top pickups, these full size versions of the Deluxe were “Standard” spec. They were also available with “Gibson” embossed pickups in 1972 only and considered rare, as only 9 were produced. David Bowie Can be seen playing one of the 1972 “Standards” in his 1972 release Jean Genie video. By 1975, the neck construction was changed from mahogany to maple, until the early 1980s, when the construction was returned to mahogany. The body changed back to solid mahogany from the pancake design in late 1976 or early 1977. Inte reintroduced rest in this particular Les Paul model was so low that in 1985, Gibson canceled the line. However, in 2005, the Deluxe was with more popularity due to its association with Pete Townshend [1] and Thin Lizzy.

Australia’s best known guitarist, Tommy Emmanuel, owns many Matons and almost exclusively uses the BG808 acoustic model on his latest albums. Maton has even constructed a Tommy Emmanuel “TE series” according to Tommy’s specifications. His understudy Kieran Murphy also uses Matons. Joe Robinsonplays Maton guitars and was the company’s featured performer at the Frankfurt Musikmesse in 2009.[3]
A real household name, Yamaha make everything from motorcycles to grand pianos! But the Japanese company also produce a great range of affordable electric guitars, which they have done since the early sixties. Their very successful Pacifica range was launched in 1990, and includes their entry-level PAC012 to their premium PAC611, and everything in between.
It has great quality hardware and amazing sound because of the pickups. There are no flaws or nicks in the finish of the body. It needs to be set up though which can be difficult initially. Once you set up, you will be able to see its performance in action. The great thing about this guitar is that even though it is the cheapest electric guitar, it looks quite expensive to an observer.
Description: Guitar Type: Acoustic/Electric - Body Size: Dreadnought - Top Wood: Spruce - Back: Mahogany - Sides: Mahogany - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Neck Attachment: Set - Nut Width: 43mm - Fingerboard: Rosewood - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 26" (66cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Rosette: Pearloid - Hardware: 1/4" Output, Chrome Tuners, XLR Output - EQ/Preamp: Ibanez AEQ200T - String Instrument Finish: High Gloss Natural
POWER – amps are created for amplifying the sound (duh) in the first place. Of course, nowadays amps are these versatile things that can do pretty much anything but cook you a scrambled egg (maybe SOON?). But power is expensive. This might sound like some deep statement I make as I look into the sunset but what I mean is wattage is not a cheap thing to come by. That is why most inexpensive models or practice models (which are often the same) do not have a lot of wattages. While this might be disheartening, trust me, as a beginner you won’t need a lot of watts. I mean unless you are a prodigy you will be spending a lot of time practicing on your own whether it be in your room, basement or wherever. You won’t be needing the wattage that much unless you are playing with other instruments or on stage. AND if you are going on stage, then you should be great enough not to need a practice amp, in the first place.
When Eric Clapton plugged his 1960 Les Paul into a Marshall Bluesbreaker in the mid 60’s (the set-up used to record Blues Breakers with Eric Clapton, the “Beano album”) he created a new rock tone that immediately became a standard.[15] Clapton played a 1960 Standard as a member of John Mayall & the Bluesbreakers and in the early days of Cream. The guitar was said to have been stolen while Clapton was preparing for the first Cream tour in 1966, following the recording of Fresh Cream, and was long considered an iconic instrument by Clapton’s fans and Les Paul guitar admirers. Gibson announced production of the Clapton 1960 Standard, also nicknamed the “Beano Burst”, in 2010. Gibson says the instrument “accurately represents what Eric Clapton personally feels his 1960 Les Paul should be”, with Clapton consulting on the design of the guitar. Production is limited to 55 hand-aged instruments signed by Clapton (who was allowed to keep the first five of these instruments), another 95 hand-aged instruments, and 350 Vintage Original Spec instruments, but all five hundred instruments feature period-correct hardware, two Gibson reproduction PAF humbucking pickups, and subtly figured “antiquity burst” maple tops.

In terms of tone, a smaller dreadnought body will be slightly lacking in projecting the low-end frequencies. That doesn't matter here thanks to being an acoustic electric. With that said, the trebles and mids give away its origin, tone-wise. Play a few chords and you'll immediately hear that classic 'Taylor sound' even from a lower mid-range guitar like this one.
The Vox Show Room shows the classic amps behind the British Explosion of sound in the 60's. VOX, at one time was one of the largest musical instrument producers in the world and their products were utilized by almost every major music group during the nineteen sixties. From The Shadows to The Beatles to U2, VOX is the "voice" of generations of musicians worldwide.
Finding spare parts for vintage guitars is not always easy. Manufacturers come and go, very often changing specifications throughout the course of a guitar's production; identifying exactly the right specification part can be very difficult indeed - but we aim to help you find the correct part for your instrument. We have many years experience in restoring vintage musical instruments: if you need help, please do get in contact.

So I was all, "oh no...I want this one." So I did leave with it, and without even asking they sold it to me at less than the price on the thing because it was the demo and had a tiny belt buckle type scuff or two on the back. I think I actually wound up saving a few hundred dollars. I don't know if they figured a percentage of the total should be knocked off, or what.

Arch top body 16" wide across the top, carved spruce top, back not carved by arched by braces, rosewood back and sides, f-holes, style 45 backstripe, bound ebony fingerboard, 2 white/black/while lines inlaid down length of fingerboard at the edges, abalone hexagonal fingerboard inlays on 8 frets (a few make with pearloid), vertical "Martin" pearl peghead logo, gold plated parts, sunburst top finish.
The role of a pickup is simple. They pick up the sound produced by the guitar and create an electric signal which then travels via an amplifier. For instance, pickups do not relate to getting a partner with your music, but they are actually a characteristic of the electric guitar. They serve the same purpose that frets do on an acoustic instrument, but the pickups will determine the vibrations before sending them to an amplifier.
Fender has shown the spec sheets of its popular Mexican-built Deluxe Series Roadhouse Stratocaster model some love to create a reboot that comes seriously well appointed. The upgraded model features an alder body and bolt-on maple neck, with the option of maple and rosewood fingerboard, finished with satin polyurethane. Keep sniffing around and you'll find other features like the 'Modern C' neck profile, 22 narrow/tall frets, a contoured neck heel, synthetic bone top nut and a set of locking tuners with vintage-look buttons. While the previous editions of the Roadhouse and came with a 241mm (9.5-inch) fingerboard radius, the new model packs a flatter 305mm (12-inch) camber. Yes, the same radius as a Gibson Les Paul, making for easier string bends and lower action. The new Roadhouse features three Vintage Noiseless (1st generation) single coil-sized humbuckers wired to a five-way pickup selector blade switch, and master volume and tone controls. Lurking between the volume and tone knobs is the V6 preamp control, a six-position rotary switch that gives you access to a series of tweaked single-coil tones. Plugging in the Roadhouse reveals a slew of classic Strat tones. The pickups exploit the natural tone and woodiness of the guitar, while the Noiseless aspect lives up to their vow of silence, making them indispensable in a recording situation. As a result, bar metal, this is the best Fender electric guitar for just about all scenarios.

Hoshino Gakki also had semi acoustic, nylon and steel stringed acoustic guitars manufactured under the Ibanez name. Most Ibanez guitars were made for Hoshino Gakki by the FujiGen guitar factory in Japan up until the mid to late 1980s and from then on Ibanez guitars have also been made in other Asian countries such as Korea, China and Indonesia. During the early 1980s the FujiGen guitar factory also produced most of the Roland guitar synthesizers, including the Stratocaster-style Roland G-505, the twin-humbucker Roland G-202 and the Ibanez X-ING IMG-2010.
You’d be hard-pressed to find a more distinctive guitar tandem in modern metal than Zacky Vengeance (Zachary Baker) and Synyster Gates (Brian Haner, Jr.). From their sound, to their look, even to their names, the duo routinely go down guitar paths other metal axmen don’t dare travel, spicing up Avenged Sevenfold’s otherwise dark and aggressive attack with, among other things, hooky, major-key melodies, laid-back acoustic picking, buoyant, carnival-esque rhythms and a whole lot of style.
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Basic Guitar chords and signatures. Find and save list of chords. Basic guitar chords A sheet of the most used rock chords. Suitable for beginners. Empty chord sheet All about how to play guitar chords and guitar chord charts. Once you finished the free online guitar lessons you know all there is to know about guitar. Music guitar tabs archive with over guitar chords for guitar, keyboard, banjo and viola, tabs for guitar, bass, drums, guitar note
The earliest boost pedals used a germanium transistor and was often in the form of a treble booster. The most famous treble booster is the Dallas Rangemaster which is rumored to have been used by Eric Clapton on the Bluesbreakers record, often referred to as the Beano record or Beano tone. (This is because Clapton is reading a Beano comic on the record cover). At the time Eric was using a Marshall JTM45 2×12 combo (commonly referred to as the Bluesbreaker because of this recording) and a Les Paul and man does it sound good. Allegedly he was using the Rangemaster to push the front end of the amp into more distortion. This has never been confirmed to my knowledge but is the source of much Internet speculation. But I have played an old Bluesbreaker amp with a Les Paul and it sounded pretty darn close.

The idea behind this site is to share my experience with Do It Yourself approach to guitars, amplifiers and pedals. Whether you want to save a couple of bucks by performing a mod or upgrade yourself instead of paying a tech, or want to build your own piece of gear from scratch, I'm sure you will find something interesting here. Also, this is the home of DIY Layout Creator, a free piece of software for drawing circuit layouts and schematics, written with DIY enthusiasts in mind.


When the Fender company invented the first widely produced electric bass guitar (the Fender Precision Bass) they also developed a bass amplifier, the Fender Bassman, first produced in 1952. This was a 26-watt tube amplifier with a single 15" speaker. In 1954, the Bassman was redesigned to use four 10" speakers. This speaker cabinet was an open-back design; as such, it had poor low-frequency efficiency and was prone to blowing speakers when used for bass because of the lack of damping. Somewhat ironically, it became very popular as an electric guitar amplifier. The circuit design also underwent repeated modifications. The "5F6A" circuit introduced in 1958 is regarded as a classic amplifier design and was copied by many other manufacturers, such as Marshall.
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The other switches you might find on a guitar can change the wiring of the pickups from being in series or parallel , or to switch the phase so the pickups are in phase, or out of phase. All the switches are there to allow you to change the tone of the guitar.  Those switches can be toggle switches, or push-pull switches built into the volume or tone control knobs.
“Well, the legends didn’t use pedals.” Whenever somebody says something like this, and you ask them to whom they are referring, they’re often misinformed and factually wrong. “Jimmy Page”. Uh, ever see him use a Tone Bender Mk II? “Jimi Hendrix.” Please feel free to complete a Harry Potter novel while I finish laughing. “Stevie Ray Vaughan.” Ibanez and Maxon should retire a green Tube Screamer colored banner with his name hanging from their company rafters. This list goes on and on. Yes, there are lots of cool dudes back in the old times who didn’t use pedals to help them create some classic tones, but once they had the chance, they chose to.
This list is called "best guitar techniques" not hardest guitar techniques, people are looking at some of more shreddy elements first, but many other things are far more important. I think alternate picking is one of the most important because it is the technique that truly gives you control over individual notes (not chords). It is commonly used in both rhythm and lead guitar unlike sweep picking which is only used by shreddicus maximus/l0rd 5hr3dd0rz. All these techniques are important but think of some more basic techniques first.
Washburn is known for producing great value guitars, and they take their reputation seriously. While other guitar builders tend to compromise cosmetics, this company does not hold back on visual details even in the entry-level market. The WD7S shows the company's design philosophy in action, featuring elegant body binding and custom wood inlaid rosette that makes the guitar look far more expensive than its actual price.
1939: The #1 brace inside near the neck block changes from 5/16" wide to 1/2" wide, making it roughly twice as wide. This happened at the same time as the popscicle brace addition. The neck block thickness was also reduced by 1/4". About the same time neck width reduced from 1 3/4" to 1 11/16" at the nut, and the bridge spacing reduced from 2 5/16" to 2 1/8".
Nice 60's, Japanese Hollow-Body. Really cool, "Barney Kessel" style hollow body / Arch top, double cutaway Electric Guitar by Univox. 2-Pick-up. Fabulous Sunburst finish. Bound, Rosewood fingerboard. "Trapeze" tailpiece. Separate Volume and Tone for each pickup and adjustable truss rod. White "Mother-of-Toilet seat" headstock overlay. Finish and wood in great shape. Plays and sounds great. Missing Logo, Pick guard and whammy bar. Not many finish chips. Very shiny. Some chips on plastic pick-up bezel (see photos). Really cool "Emerald" cap on pick-up selector switch. Frets in great shape with minor, normal wear. We have completely done a "Pro" set up on the guitar, including cleaning all the electronics, Re-soldered the output jack, tightening and lubing the machines, oiling the fingerboard, adjusting the neck and action for great playability (clearance at the 9th fret = .012 when fretted at the first and the body), adjusting / checking the intonation (adjusted perfectly!),  and cleaning and polishing. Plays and sounds great. We also installed a new set of .011 "Flat-wound" strings. Dilapidated, but functional gig bag included.

mid-1939 Popscicle bracing on D body sizes. See the above picture for what the popsicle or T-6 or upper transverse graft brace is. The popsicle brace was added to the underside of the top of the guitar, below the fingerboard. The brace was added to help prevent top cracks alongside the fingerboard. Since the first D body size was made in about 1934, problems obviously came about and Martin added the brace by 1939. The brace does not appear in pre-1939 Martin D-sizes, but transitioned in around 1939, and is present in all 1940 and later D models. Without the popsicle brace, the top is attached only by the strength of the spruce fibers and a 1/2" x 2" glue area where the top overlays the soundhole #1 brace. With the popsicle brace there is an additional 1" x 2" glue surface directly under the fingerboard. Unfortunately the popsicle brace can deaden the sound of the upper bout area of the soundboard, and the popsicle brace doesn't always prevent the top from cracking along the fingerboard either. As people search for why the old Martins sound so good, they examine every aspect of them and the popsicle brace usually enters the conversation. Here's some data on popsicle braces:


As Tom Wheeler writes in The Soul of Tone: Celebrating 60 Years of Fender Amps, "It’s powerful, it’s loud and it’s sensitive to the player’s touch. It sounds great, responding beautifully across the frequency spectrum. It exhibits a sparkling, harmonically rich tone at low and moderate volumes. At louder volumes it thickens with a sweet distortion that only seems to get creamier the more it’s cranked. It is particularly well matched to certain popular guitars, especially the Stratocaster."
Electrical impedance is like two different sizes of hose. High impedance is like a garden hose, Low impedance is like a fire hose. The amount of water pressure coming through a garden hose is great for reaching your garden but if you need to run a long length of hose up the street, the pressure from a garden hose will give out after a certain distance. You definitely need that high pressure fire hose.

Bass amps come with a range of different input and output jacks, depending on the cost of the amplifier and its intended purpose. The least expensive practice amps may only have a single 1/4" input jack and no output jacks. Some practice amps and small combo amps have RCA or 1/8" inputs for plugging an MP3 player or CD player into the bass amp, to facilitate practicing with a recording. Some amps have a high-gain input, for basses which have internal preamplifiers one the instrument. The high-gain input is routed through a pad (attenuator). An amp may also have a low-gain input, which is unattenuated, for regular basses. Some combo amps have a 1/4" auxiliary input, which could be used to plug in a keyboard, drum machine or second bass.

The process of setting up an acoustic guitar is not exactly the same as it is for an electric. New strings are usually added, and the amount of relief in the neck is adjusted as required, but the bridge adjustments are very different from the setup of an electric guitar. At the bridge of an acoustic, the strings are raised by a piece of plastic or bone that is known as a saddle, and are then anchored by individual pegs that are made of a similar material. When the intonation needs adjustment it usually means that you need to replace the entire saddle. Luckily this is a cheap and easy endeavor that isn’t likely to add to acoustic guitar setup cost. The saddle can sometimes be shaved at the bottom in order to lower the strings’ height (or “action”). Only someone with experience should perform saddle shaving, as it is very important that the saddle bottom remains even and flat. The cost of guitar setup for an acoustic is similar to that of an electric setup, though it may be cheaper at times due to the less complicated bridge.
Firstly, we advise sticking with a brand name you can trust. We’ve established that there’s nothing particularly premium about the guitars on offer at $200, but by sticking with Fender, Ibanez, Yamaha, Epiphone, Oscar Schmidt and the others on this list, you at least guarantee a guitar from a renown guitar manufacturer with some history, instead of something thrown together by a company who don’t specialise in instruments.
Of course, for the guitar string vibrations to have an effect on the magnetic field of the pickups, they too need to contain a ferromagnetic metal; this can be either iron, cobalt, or nickel. There are a large number of different string compositions, but often they will consist of steel, a combination of iron, carbon, and sometimes chromium. The chromium can help prevent corrosion, as it forms a layer of chromium oxide which prevents the string from further attack by oxygen in the air. Additionally, the strings can sometimes be coated with various polymer additives to help inhibit corrosion. However, these additives can sometimes have a negative effect on the tone of the guitar.
You may love only one style of music. And that’s fine. But try playing some other styles. Funk maestro Carlos Alomar went through hell on David Bowie’s Scary Monsters (and Super Creeps) album, being asked to play more “grinding” guitar alongside Robert Fripp. “It was very interesting,” says Alomar. “I learned a lot and when I came back to my more natural style, I felt really fresh about it.”
In 1959, the Special was given the same new double-cutaway body shape as the Junior and the TV received in 1958. However, when the new design was applied to the two-pickup Special, the cavity for the neck pickup overlapped the neck-to-body joint. This weakened the joint to the point that the neck could break after only moderate handling. The problem was soon resolved when Gibson designers moved the neck pickup farther down the body, producing a stronger joint and eliminating the breakage problem.
Since you're a beginner, lighter strings are probably going to be easier for you to play until you get your fretting hand built up with permanent callouses and finger strength. I would advise buying 9-42 gauge strings even if that's not what your guitar came with originally - if it had 10's on it from the factory, the 9's will feel slinkier and more forgiving on your hands.
B.C. Rich has been scorching stages all around the world with their monstrous guitars for nearly 50 years. With bodies like a battle axe and tones that are just as brutal, B.C. Rich guitars have become staples in the heavy metal community. Inspired by the look of classic motorcycles, B.C. Rich guitars are as unmistakable as they are undeniable. If you're a fan of seriously heavy music, you've already seen these beautiful guitars around the necks of some of the biggest names around. Slayer's Kerry King, Matt Tuck of Bullet For My Valentine, Lita Ford, Ginger Wildheart of the Wildhearts, and Pat O'Brien of Cannibal Corpse are just some of the metal messiahs who crank out riff after riff on B.C. Rich guitars. If you're after a B.C. Rich of your own, you've come to the right place. You'll find guitars for all skill levels in the section, it's just a matter of taking a look around and finding the axe that's right for you. For example, if you're a beginner looking for their first killer electric guitar, you'll want to take a look at the Bronze Series Warlock. If there is one word to perfectly describe this guitar, it would be "wicked." It has a wicked look, a wicked sound, and is offered up at a wicked price. With BDSM humbucking pickups for a broad dynamic range and a beveled top, this is the kind of six string that any young rocker will want to learn on. Of course, if you're already a serious player who is looking for a truly intimidating beast of a guitar, you'll want to get your hands on the Rich Bich 10 Supreme Electric Guitar. This 10-string guitar has a look you'll have to see to believe, and a sound quality to match. With Seymour Duncan humbucker pickups and the ability to completely revolutionize your playing style, this versatile guitar is an absolute knockout. A B.C. Rich guitar is exactly what you need to get you through the rock and roll trenches. With bone shaking volume and bodies to match, B.C. Rich guitars are sure to get you noticed when you're on the stage.
the top five in no certain order are…….. JIMI HENDRIX .NIO EXPLANATION NEEDED……..RICHIE BLACKMORE he broght the strat into metal and he led his leads perfectly back into the song ……… .EDWARD VAN HALEN he was the next innovater after hendrix…………DIME BAG DARRELL….he was just plain the baddast ass of them all…………..AND ENGWIE MALMSTIEN he did everything else……..there are lots of great guitar players . but .these five guys set the bar for everyone else
What you need is some basic knowledge about the physics of audio (most of which you can learn by dropping a pebble in a puddle of water), and some pretty basic and inexpensive equipment. This is especially true for recording the electric guitar. Trust me--if it were brain surgery, I would have become a brain surgeon and made my mother a much happier woman. And while I have the opportunity . . . for all you kids who want to grow up to be recording engineers--don't do it. Become brain surgeons. They make a lot more money, drive nicer cars, and never have to worry about where their next gig is coming from.
In many studios, the guitarist can play in the control room while the amp is mic’d up in the live room. It feels less natural at first, but this way, you can more accurately monitor how your guitar sits in the mix through the studio monitors while you track. Some players prefer to be in the same room as their amp for reasons of feel and response, but if you are using a hollowbody or pickups that are succeptible to microphony, separating the guitar and amp can help. Of course, if feedback is desirable, you are better off in the room with the amp.
This can all get a little tricky and can become overwhelming especially if you have never tackled this type of job before. If this is the case, I strongly suggest starting with one of the easier models in regards to wiring e.g. Telecasters are significantly easier to work on as the scratchplate will often be pre-loaded with pickups. However, if you purchase a kit guitar such as an LP or you want to upgrade your electrical components (which is often the case with an entry level kit) understanding some basics about guitar electronics is useful.
Spanish-style electrics, which you could sling in front of you while standing and singing, proved to be much more versatile for many different musical genres. Gibson’s 1936 ES-150 (E for Electric and S for Spanish) had a sleek bar-shaped electronic pickup that was mounted into the guitar’s hollow body for a more streamlined look. The pickup earned the nickname “the Charlie Christian” thanks to the jazz virtuoso who is generally credited with introducing the electric guitar solo. In 1939, Christian stepped out in front of Benny Goodman’s band and performed long, complicated passages imitating the style of horn playing. He explained, “Guitar players have long needed a champion, someone to explain to the world that a guitarist is something more than a robot pluckin’ on a gadget to keep the rhythm going.”

So, here’s the deal: the M5 is NOT an amplifier modeler (no Marshall or Vox recreations here), nor is it meant to replace your entire pedalboard. This is ONLY an effect modeling pedal, and contains over 100 effects, of which you can have active one at a time. In terms of “extras” it has a tuner and tap tempo. The Line 6 M5 is a perfect first pedal to buy, since with 100+ built-in effects you can play with all of them and find out what types of effects you really like. It’s also a perfect pedal to simply just have on your pedalboard, for situations where you need a certain effect and don’t have a pedal for it. Need a reverb in a pinch? It’s a reverb. Need a compressor? You got it. Need a phaser? Yep, it’s that too. It’s also really inexpensive for what it is, making it a great starting point that you can build upon.


The AS is a semi-acoustic guitar built to tackle just about any genre of music you throw at it. The pickups are mounted into a sustain block for increased sustain and feedback elimination. The 17th fret joint features comfortable access to higher notes. Super 58 Custom Pickups The Super 58 Custom pickups deliver the smooth, nuanced tones and the biting growl of blues. Ebony Fret board w/ Art star Fret Edge Treatment The Ebony fret board with Art star fret edge treatment provides tight response and smooth left-hand fingering. Bone Nut The Bone nut provides richer tone from low to high. Specifications: neck type: Art star 3pc Mahogany/Maple set-in neck body: Flamed Maple top/back/sides fret board: Bound Ebony fret board w/Pearl & Abalone block inlay frets: Medium frets w/Art star fret edge treatment bridge: ART-1 bridge tailpiece: Quick Change III tailpiece neck pu: Super 58 custom (H) neck pu bridge pu: Super 58 custom (H) bridge pu Neck Dimensions: Scale: 628mm/24.7" a: Width at Nut - 43mm b: Width at Last Fret - 57mm c: Thickness at 1st - 20mm d: Thickness at 12th - 22mm Radius 305mmR Body Dimensions: a: Length - 19 1/4" b: Width - 15 3/4" c: Depth - 2 5/8".

Additionally, Gibson’s president Ted McCarty states that the Gibson Guitar Corporation merely approached Les Paul for the right to imprint the musician’s name on the headstock to increase model sales, and that in 1951, Gibson showed Paul a nearly finished instrument. McCarty also claims that design discussions with Les Paul were limited to the tailpiece and the fitting of a maple cap over the mahogany body for increased density and sustain, which Les Paul had requested reversed. However, according to Gibson Guitar, this reversal would have caused the guitar to become too heavy, and Paul’s request was refused.[12] Another switch: the original Custom was to be all mahogany and the Goldtop was to have the maple cap/mahogany body. Beyond these requests, Les Paul’s contributions to the guitar line bearing his name were stated to be cosmetic. For example, ever the showman, Paul had specified that the guitar be offered in a gold finish, not only for flashiness, but to emphasize the high quality of the Les Paul instrument, as well.[12] The later-issue Les Paul models included flame maple (tiger stripe) and “quilted” maple finishes, again in contrast to the competing Fender line’s range of car-like color finishes. Gibson was notably inconsistent with its wood choices, and some goldtops have had their finish stripped to reveal beautifully figured wood hidden underneath.[citation needed]
I'm having a few buddies over to jam this coming Sunday. I don't have a full drum kit setup at my house, so our drummer will be using djembes, bongos, etc. To make things a little more manageable I'm telling folks to bring their electric guitars and NO effects. I have a small arsenal of 15-watt tube amps, so the idea is that we'll all just play into low-wattage tube amps at low volume and see what we come up with.

That's what I was thinking. Have you seen what those things go for when one does pop up for sale? It's nothing for those to go for close to $10k. That's insane for something non-vintage, but that's just my opinion. It's a bit excessive for what's essentially a two humbucker shredder, even if it is handmade over the course of nine years and the body is a piece of a 12th century Viking ship that's been soaked in mead for six centuries and aged to exquisiteness or whatever the fuck. I blame Misha Mansoor. He's got a bunch of guitar nerds all fucked up in the head now.
Serious quality, 20 foot Guitar / Instrument connection cable. I have sold these for years. They come with a lifetime warranty, that is very rarely needed! Double  (redundant) 20 gauge, center conductors almost makes impossible ever having one go "dead" in the middle of a show! 100% Braided copper shield (not spiral wrapped like most cheaper cables) for silent / noise free operation (means less chance of picking up a radio station or wireless mic during your performance). Super-quality, Neutrik, all metal 280, 1/4" ends / plugs that are shrink wrapped for extra strain relief. The internals are hot-glued between to reduce internal flexion for even greater longevity. Built by the largest manufactured cable company in the US. Very rugged and durable, yet flexible jacket. These are not the cheap cables, nor are they built like most cables. Cheaply!
Bass effects are electronic effects units that are designed for use with the low pitches created by an electric bass or for an upright bass used with a bass amp or PA system. Two examples of bass effects are fuzz bass and bass chorus. Some bass amplifiers have built-in effects, such as overdrive or chorus. Upright bassists in jazz, folk, blues and similar genres may use a bass preamplifier, a small electronic device that matches the impedance between the piezoelectric pickup and the amp or PA system. Bass preamps also allow for the gain of the signal to be boosted or cut. Some models also offer equalization controls, a compressor, and a DI box connection.
I know that you are used to seeing things like “the number 1, the number 2” etc. When it comes to stomp boxes I believe that I do not have to be that strict. If I am recommending 8 different pedals to you, then there is no 1st and 8th position. All of the pedals that we will review are worth checking out. If it is bad, we will just skip it. Never forget that you can combine your pedal with a good guitar amp with some built-in effects. Also if you do not see a specific model or brand, it does not necessarily mean it is bad, the market is just huge and very competitive, updating will take time!
This list is called "best guitar techniques" not hardest guitar techniques, people are looking at some of more shreddy elements first, but many other things are far more important. I think alternate picking is one of the most important because it is the technique that truly gives you control over individual notes (not chords). It is commonly used in both rhythm and lead guitar unlike sweep picking which is only used by shreddicus maximus/l0rd 5hr3dd0rz. All these techniques are important but think of some more basic techniques first.
Very large cabinets, such as 8x10" cabinets, may have both wheels and a long "towel bar"-style handle to facilitate moving the equipment. Some 8x10" cabinets have handles on the top and bottom to facilitate two-person carrying of the cab. Some combo amplifiers have wheels and a retractable carry handle, to enable bassists to walk while pulling their bass amp; this can enable bassists to walk onstage with their bass and amp or walk to a venue with their gear.

Peavey - Hartley Peavey started Peavey electronics in 1965, it went on to one of the largest musical instrument and audio equipment manufacturer in the world. They offer a multitude of guitars, amps and related gear, and the price point they use are comparatively very reasonable. One of their latest guitars, the Peavey AT-200, has the guitar world talking about its innovative auto-tune feature.


Every guitarist seeks to produce an expressive and distinctive tone. Unfortunately, figuring out what kind of gear you need can be a baffling proposition. Here are the three main equipment categories that comprise your music-making rig: your electric guitar, guitar amps, and effects pedals and units. These components all work together to create your sound. And because you can swap out equipment and change settings, the creative possibilities are virtually limitless.
All Gibson-brand guitars are currently made at three facilities, depending on the type of guitar. Solid body electric guitars such as the Gibson Les Paul and the Gibson SG are made in Nashville, Tennessee. Semi-acoustic guitars such as the Gibson ES Series are made in Memphis, Tennessee. Full acoustic guitars such as the Gibson J Series are made in Bozeman, Montana. The Nashville and Bozeman facilities are off-limits to visitors, but the Memphis facility gives regularly scheduled factory tours.
Visit “mom and pop shops,” big-name musical instrument retailers, Craigslist, eBay & Amazon to compare the reviews and prices of various models. The ability to make an educated decision based on the feel, sound quality and playability is important. Consider renting a guitar for the first month of lessons. A good teacher will serve as a guide throughout the buying process and will teach you to play well enough to “test drive” your options.

The original run of Marshall Silver Jubilee amps were designed to celebrate Jim Marshall's 50th anniversary in music as well as 25 years of Marshall amps. These beautiful sounding (and highly sought after) amps have been brought back from extinction with the Marshall 2525H Mini Silver Jubilee Head, matching cab and combo and have been constructed using the original 2525 diagrams. This means you have all that vintage sounding goodness with modern reliability. You can even switch it from 20 Watt to 5 Watt power so you can go from live sound to home practice easily without ever losing your tone. A great amp for stage, home and studio recording.
MusicMan is the story of two former Fender employees who decided to create their own company in 1971. In the beginning it was called Tri-Sonix, before they changed the name to MusicMan in 1974. While the first product of the brand was a tube/solid-state hybrid amp ─ the Sixty Five, developed with the help of a certain Leo Fender ─ the company became famous for its guitars and basses. The introduction of the mythical StingRay guitars and basses in 1976 is a milestone in the company's history. The guitar is an average seller (rock players find it too "clean"), but the bass and its active Tom Walker preamp that allows to boost certain frequencies is a huge success. After severe conflicts within the team, MusicMan was sold to Ernie Ball in 1984. The brand then started to endorse famous artists like Albert Lee, Steve Lukather (Toto), John Petrucci (Dream Theater), and Eddie Van Halen (Axis), and developed signature models for every one of them.
Jackson is regarded as a manufacturer of electric guitars and electric bass guitars, which was founded in 1980 by Grover Jackson. Their headquarters located in Scottsdale, Arizona, USA. They manufacture trendy and stylish guitars. Most of the music players choose a Jackson’s guitar for good performance. It is very apt for sharp and clear music. The price range starts from Rs. 13,380/- onwards (approx). For further details, visit jacksonguitars.com.

Gilmour was made famous by his haunting guitar scores in Pink Floyd. This “replacement” guitarist surpassed expectations and helped shape Pink Floyd’s unique sound. You can always expect hairs at the back of your neck to stand whenever you hear one of his solos – be it for the first or hundredth time you’re listening to it. All the emotion that Gilmour’s poured into his guitar work lives on in the music and is channeled through anyone who’s ever wanted to cover a Pink Floyd song. I know several guitar players (myself included) who whenever playing the Comfortably Numb solo – whether they are alone in their bedrooms or on stage – have always been unwillingly brought to tears, near the point of crying. How could you not expect things to get esoteric and mystical when it comes to music?
“I like it because it’s light and simple,” Alana said, reflecting on its 5.1-pound weight. “It’s easier to get my hand around the neck on this one,” Charles noted. Both found the Les Paul Express’s rounded top shoulder to be more comfortable than the horn-shaped cutaways on most of the other short-scale models, and they felt the smooth finish on the back of the neck made it easier to play. The adults agreed. “I’m surprised—for a small guitar, it’s fun to play,” Ken Rosser said.
Depending on how you count them, there are 23 types of guitar pedals out there that can take you from "just another guitar player" to being that guy with the definitive tone and stage presence that everyone knows of around town. The only problem is it's a lot to wade through. But we've got you covered with quick summaries of what each pedal does, examples you can hear, and some visual examples for each of the guitar pedal types...

Firstly, they are cheaper than their tube counterparts, which is why most beginners will end up starting on a solid-state amp. They are also much more efficient, easier to maintain (no need to change tubes), lighter to carry, and less fragile. While the tone of modern-day solid-state amps can be incredible, they don’t tend to be as fluid or responsive as tube amps. For more on solid-state amps, check out our dedicated solid-state amp page.
Valve Amp or Solid State Amp? There's no right or wrong here, but, for tone alone, valve amps are way better. If you can afford a valve amp, just go ahead and buy one! They're the amps all the great bands ever used - from Beatles and Rolling Stones to Arctic Monkeys and Radiohead, 99% of all professional musicians simply prefer valve amps, like the Vox AC30 or Fender Hot Rod Deluxe III. But there's nothing wrong with solid state amps - the audience at a gig wouldn't be able to tell the difference.
Phase Shifter pedals found their way into the guitar community in the 70’s with pedals like the MXR Phase 90, Mutron Phase Shifter, EH Small Stone, Foxx and others. The sweeping sound it produces is unmistakable and a legendary trademark of many guitarists sound. The MXR Phase 90 can be heard all over Van Halen 1 and II. Brian May used the Foxx phase on “Sheer Heart Attack,” The Eagles “Life In The Fast Lane”, and Led Zeppelin’s “The Rover” to name but a few.
A note on right versus left when referring to the hands. Traditionally all guitarists, regardless of right or left hand dominance, were made to play a right handed guitar, most likely due to the lack of left handed instruments. To this day left handed guitarists and guitars are still fairly rare. When guitarists refer to the right hand, it can be assumed to mean the plucking hand, while the left hand is used to fret the strings.
This deal leapt out of the page at me straight away. The Fender Squier series has been around a while and even though it’s a budget guitar, you can always rely on Fender for great quality. But what I like the most about this package is that everything you need is included (apart from a guitar stand) and the Frontman 10G amplifier has some extra features that are excellent. The amp has an input for a playback device to jam along to (like your iPad or Smart phone, or even a CD player) plus a headphone output for when the neighbours get too annoyed. A Gain control and Overdrive switch let you grunge everything up, or you can dial it back to a classic, clean Fender sound.
The taper of a potentiometer indicates how the output to input voltage ratio will change with respect to the shaft rotation. The two taper curves below are examples of the two most common guitar pot tapers as they would be seen on a manufacturer data sheet. The rotational travel refers to turning the potentiometer shaft clockwise from 0° to 300° as in the previous visual representation drawing.
Guitar pickups are quite heavily affected by the impedance of whatever they're plugged into. If it's a low impedance input, you'll end up with a muddier, flatter sound going into your amp sims. Ideally you want a high impedance input, and if the 6i6 isn't doing it a cheap-ish D.I. box will be the thing to go for. Behringer's got some that get the job done.
This guitar has an interesting makeup of tone wood. First, the body is Mahogany just like the Iron Label model. The top of the guitar is Poplar Burl, where a burl is actually a type of growth on a tree in which the grain has become somewhat deformed. It sounds bizarre but, Burl is highly prized for its rarity and beauty and is often sought after by wood sculptors and luthiers alike.
This extremely limited Marshall 1936V 2x12 Silver Jubilee Guitar Speaker Cabinet has been created to get the best sound out of your Silver Jubilee heads, most notably the 2555X and 2525H Mini Silver Jubilee tube amp heads. The Silver Jubilee styling looks great on stage and the 2 x 12” Celestion G12 Vintage 30 speakers provide you with all that gorgeous amp tone – perfect for 1980s/1990s hard rock.
Here’s an interesting (they’re all interesting to me!!!) guitar that shows the evolution of Matsumoku made guitars.  Even the earliest solid body electrics that came out of the Matsumoku plant were made of solid wood and displayed really good wood craftsmanship!  Lots of start up companies went to Matsumoku in the early days because the plant had proper wood drying facilities (if the wood wasn’t dried properly, the guitars often became seriously messed up during the import trip across the ocean).
There were also a number of guitars that featured the same headstock style as the 700-800 models that featured symetrical hollow or semi-hollow bodies similar to some of the Gibsons. Gibson aficionados refer to the bodies as having "Mickey Mouse ears". One model had a deep jazz guitar-style body. They all had what appear to be humbucker pickups, some black and some plated. The Kent name only appeared on the headstocks.
An electric guitar can last many lifetimes; however, they have a variety of electrical parts and connections that, over time, can wear out. When that happens, you need to know how to fix or replace those electronics. The following are the parts that are most likely to wear out or break and need replacing. You can perform any of these fixes yourself without doing damage to the electric guitar — even if you screw up.

The moral of this story is simple, if you have an old Terada, Yamaha, Ibanez, Suzuki, Yairi, Tokai, Takamine, Emperador, Morris, Pearl or Tama (yes! they made guitars to) just to name a few, you probably have a guitar that given the right bit of TLC will wipe the floor with most of its modern competitors, including those beautiful guitars that cost $2000.00 plus. Ok Then, enough of my yacking, enjoy the pictures.
Here I'm going to look at all of the different kinds of pedal available on the market. Hopefully this will help act as an effects pedal guide to beginners who are looking to buy their first pedal, and just don't know where to start. We'll look at the name of the effect, what it does, and an example of the pedal (mostly Boss and MXR pedals as they're probably the best known). Oh, and I won't be looking at any of the niche boutique pedals; that would take ages!
Some guitarists design or modify their own pedals. Others use a combination of off-the-shelf effects. Kurt Cobain stomped on Electro-Harmonix Big Muff and ProCo Rat pedals to create his classic loud-soft-loud, "Nevermind"-era sounds. John Mayer kicked off his 2003 hit, "Bigger Than My Body," with see-sawing, arpeggiated sounds from his Roger Linn AdrenaLinn III pedal. There are hundreds, if not thousands, of different stomp boxes. Although there's a certain amount of gray area and overlap, pedal effects can all be divided into four general categories:
The STRATosphere is not affiliated with Fender Musical Instruments. Strat®, Stratocaster®, Esquire®, Telecaster®, Tele®, Jazzmaster®, Jaguar®, Mustang®, P Bass®, J Bass®, Fender® and the distinctive headstock design of Fender guitars are registered trademarks of Fender® Musical Instruments. All applicable Fender products are covered under warranty by The STRATosphere.
A lot of users described the Line 6 Helix Floor as something amazing and too good to be true. Commendations for it's incredible versatility and sound quality are common place, with many describing it as the best guitar multi-effects processor in the market today. There's simply no denying its continued success in the market, along with the high review scores that it continuous to attain. Premiere Guitar properly summed up what most people feel about the Line 6 Helix Floor: "Great sounds. Cool design. Solid construction. Extraordinary connectivity. Good price."
We took another detailed look at all acoustic-electric guitars priced under $500 available from major American online retailers, and for this update, we shortlisted 78 of them for closer analysis. We then collated over 7700 ratings and reviews from forums, videos, retailers, blogs and major music gear publications and processed those data with the Gearank Algorithm to produce a Gearank score of out 100 for each guitar. Finally we selected the highest rated guitars in two of the most popular price brackets, sub $300 and sub $500. For more information about this process see How Gearank Works.

We've watched Dan Erlewine repair this 1930s Kay over the previous 3 Trade Secrets. It's time to finish it up. Elliot John-Conry of EJC Guitars ages Dan's patch of new plastic binding so it blends in with the old binding around it. About the guitar in this video: This 1930s Kay Deluxe is a fixer-upper that Dan Erlewine repaired in order to sell. Now that it's in great shape again, maybe Dan'll keep it!
Even cheaper (abour $40) is the Behringer Guitar Link (review: Behringer Guitar Link UCG102 USB Interface Review). One nice thing is the long cord.. you can sit a ways away from your PC without needing an extender, and like the line 6, it’s also got a headphone output. They offer some guitar effects software as well, via download, and a basic DAW program. Worth checking out, as this does check every basic box for forty bucks. I have not used this, but I have used other Behringer audio interfaces. Cheap, basic, but they do include ASIO drivers (read ahead).
To create a fairly live, in-your-face sound, a short reverb or ambience program with a fairly bright character is ideal. A hint of slapback echo or a little pre-delay before the first reflection can enhance the sense of power and intimacy, as when a guitar is played in a small club. More generous reverb can be combined with repeat echo effects to create a lush, spacious sound, but you need to leave space in the instrumentation and arrangements for these sounds to work, otherwise they just sound confused and messy. Feeding the effects send through a chorus or flanger before the reverb gives a nicely complex twist to the sound without being too obvious.
Guitar Center added a replica of the “Black Beauty” Les Paul Custom, with three pickups, that Peter Frampton used as his main guitar from his days in Humble Pie through his early solo career, photographed playing the instrument on the front jackets of his albums Frampton and Frampton Comes Alive. It has all the same qualities such as the three uncovered humbucking pickups and missing pickguard. The Black Beauty was not issued until 1957; however, the one given to Frampton by a fan named Mark Mariana was a 1954 model that had been routed out for a middle pickup.
Effects built into guitar amplifiers were the first effects that musicians used regularly outside the studio. From the late 1940s onward, the Gibson Guitar Corp. began including vibrato circuits in combo amplifiers. The 1950 Ray Butts EchoSonic amp was the first to feature the spring reverb "echo" sound,[citation needed] which quickly became popular with guitarists such as Chet Atkins, Carl Perkins, Scotty Moore, Luther Perkins, and Roy Orbison.[citation needed] By the 1950s, tremolo, vibrato and reverb were available as built-in effects on many guitar amplifiers.[citation needed] Both Premier and Gibson built tube-powered amps with spring reverb. Fender began manufacturing the tremolo amps Tremolux in 1955 and Vibrolux in 1956.[28]
I recently bought my first tube amp, the Marshall DSL40C, which has amazing sound for the money, but the reverb that came on it is virtually non-existent. So I started looking at reverb pedals.....who in their right mind would pay over $100 for an effects pedal that does one thing like a (Fender reverb or Hall of Fame or Holy Grail)? Then I cam across the Zoom Chorus/Delay/Reverb and almost bought it for $119 but then this popped up. With the nearly 5 star average review, I thought I would spend the extra $80 and try it out. WOW am I glad I did. Not only do I now have a great sounding reverb, but I have every other effect you can ever imagine (phaser, tremolo, chorus, delay, overdrive, distortion, filters, etc....the list goes on and on and on.
I nearly returned this guitar when it first arrived. I'm very glad I changed my mind. When I first unboxed it I was not a fan of the sound at all, and I didn't think it could improve significantly, but I was wrong. I put my trusty Tone Rite on it and left it there for several days. It opened the sound up and made it project much better. The finish is great, and I love the dark sound of sapele. It just takes some time and playing to get it to open up. When I first picked it up, I much preferred the sound of my Seagull, but now the Martin is really speaking to me and the Seagull has been relegated to backup status. I've even picked up a couple of bluegrass tunes, just because I'm playing a Martin now. I've only plugged it in a couple of
“Music is ineffable,” says Scott Waara, product manager at Line 6. His company has built a business around providing the widest range of tones possible to guitar players. But even for a firm dedicated to dissecting tone, it’s not easy to reduce things to a simple recipe. “Everybody hears differently,” Waara says, “and the frequency response of everyone’s brain is different, so some things that are cool to some guys are not going to be cool to other guys. You can put it on a scope and see what’s happening on a frequency graph and you’ll see some tendencies and trends and so on.” The trends seen by the Line 6 staff seem to indicate that warmer, fuller tones are more generally accepted and considered “good.”
Harmonizers blend the note from your original guitar signal with a note shifted to a preset interval. For example, you may set it to a Major 3rd interval and it will create a similar sound as if you played a root-plus-Maj-3rd diad. Harmonizers are pretty diverse effects, but using one correctly obviously means understanding a little about music theory and how scales and intervals work.

The more solid wood there is, the better the overall resonance, sustain and tone of the acoustic guitar. Solid wood, specially those used on the tops of acoustics, also resonate better as it ages. The downside to solid wood is mainly its more premium cost, and not to mention it uses more wood resources than laminate wood. Solid wood is also more prone to damage, so they require extra care especially from changing weather and humidity. Laminate woods are more affordable, and they are also more sturdy and resistant to damage. On the flip side, they will lack the resonance and sustain of solid wood, but this can be a good thing if you're looking for vintage mid-range focused tone.
Guitar pickups are a vital component of your tone and replacing them is something that most guitarists can learn to do themselves. Using high quality pickups can go a long way to bringing new life and excitement to your playing experience. There are hundreds of pickup manufacturers and thousands of pickups to choose from. Whether you’re looking for a hotter pickup, trying to capture a beloved vintage tone or seeking single-coil sound in a noiseless package, brands like DiMarzio®, Seymour Duncan®, Lace®, Porter®, Fender®, Gibson® and many others offer a solution.
Then there's the issue of valves. Serious guitar players invariably prefer the sound of valve amplifiers to any form of solid-state circuitry, but the technical reasons are not as obvious as you might imagine. We all know that valves distort nicely when driven hard, but the use of output transformers also affects the sound. Then there's the choice of Class-A or Class-B (sometimes referred to as AB) power stages — Class-A stages clip asymmetrically whereas Class-B power stages tend to clip symmetrically. Even the make of valve has an effect, as do technical issues such as the choice of triode or pentode output valves, or even the types of capacitor used in the circuit. Because there are so many variables, not including the most important one (playing technique), the electric guitar is capable of a vast tonal range.
In the 2010s, virtually all of the sound reaching the audience in large venues comes from the PA system or sound reinforcement system, the huge speaker systems pointed at the audience. As well, in the 2010s on-stage instrument amplifiers are more likely to be kept at a low volume, because when band members have their onstage amps "cranked" to high volume levels on stage, this makes it harder for the audio engineer to control the sound mix and blend. For example, if a heavy metal bassist had two 8x10" cabinets and several 1x18" subwoofer cabinets and several thousand watts of bass amplifier heads, and these amps are set to a very high volume level, this bass player will be creating very significant onstage bass volume. If the sound engineer wished to turn down the bass in the PA/sound reinforcement system, this bassist's loud onstage volume would make it hard for this engineer to control and/or reduce the volume of bass in the FOH (Front of House) sound mix. Another issue that can develop with bass players who have very high onstage volume is that it can be hard for the audio engineer to produce a clean sound through the PA/sound reinforcement system. For example, if a bassist was driving her bass amp speaker stacks into clipping to create a fuzz bass tone, if the audio engineer wished to have a "clean" bass sound, this could pose a challenge.
The interface does get the job done well, it’s just that I’ve seen better looking free VSTs. But for me, this is completely fine because while flashy interfaces are nice, problems like software issues and hard to see text occur.  None of that is here, and within a few hours, most users will feel fairly comfortable creating moderately difficult, but realistic sounding guitar parts.
At first it sounds kind of like a buzzsaw, but after listening to the song, people usually have a hard time getting the catchy riff out of their heads. The best part? It's one of the most fun beginner guitar songs and anyone can play it! The riff is played entirely on one string, the A string and consists of only three notes. Fun fact, the riff was supposed to be a placeholder for a horns section, but they loved the fuzzy guitar tone so much they never got around to the horns.
If you’re shopping for an electric guitar as a gift, find out what kind of music and artists the budding guitarist wants to emulate. It’s better to let them know you’re shopping by soliciting their input rather than “surprising” them with a guitar that’s out of sync with the music they love. For example, giving a traditionally-styled guitar designed to produce super-clean, undistorted tone to a heavy metal fan is unlikely be a hit.
Jackson is USA based guitar company founded by Grover Jackson. The company is the manufacturer of electric guitars or electric bass guitars. These electric guitars have a pointed headstock and are a typical rock style guitar popular amongst rock and metal band members. This is the style of electric and acoustic guitar that has a sleek layout and style. Not only do they provide great style but also deliver a higher sound quality. The starting price of a Jackson electric guitar is 12,500 INR approximately.
In 1972, Ovation introduced one of the first production solid-body electric-guitars with active electronics, the Ovation Breadwinner. The model failed to gain widespread popularity, however, and production of the Breadwinner and the Ovation Deacon ceased in 1980. Ovation made several other solid-body models up until the mid 1980s.[28] Since that time the company’s main focus has been acoustic and acoustic-electric guitars.
In low-end instruments laminated or plywood soundboards are often used. Although these materials often impart great strength and stability to the instrument, via layers of perpendicular grains, they do not vibrate the same way that natural wood does, generally producing an inferior tone with less amplification. Instruments with laminated or plywood soundboards should be avoided if possible.
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The Stratocaster’s sleek, contoured body shape (officially referred to by Fender as the “Comfort Contour Body”[5][6] ) differed from the flat, slab-like design of the Telecaster. The Strat’s double cutaways allowed players easier access to higher positions on the neck.[7] The body’s recessed “beer gut” curve on the upper back, and a gradual chamfer at the front, where the player’s right arm rests, aided player’s comfort. The one-piece maple neck’s wider “dogleg”-style headstock contrasted with the very narrow Fender Telecaster’s headstock shape. The strings are anchored on a through-body pivot bridge attached with springs to a ‘claw’ in the tremolo cavity on the back of the guitar.
Jump up ^ Miller, Jim (1980). The Rolling Stone illustrated history of rock & roll. New York: Rolling Stone. ISBN 0394513223. Retrieved 5 July 2012. Black country bluesmen made raw, heavily amplified boogie records of their own, especially in Memphis, where guitarists like Joe Hill Louis, Willie Johnson (with the early Howlin' Wolf band) and Pat Hare (with Little Junior Parker) played driving rhythms and scorching, distorted solos that might be counted the distant ancestors of heavy metal.
In 2008 Squier released its Classic Vibe series, a series of electric guitars and basses mirroring classic Fender designs of the 1950s and 1960s—each roughly reflecting the hardware, woods, color variations, finishes, body contours, and tonal characteristics of their respective era; Squier states that they didn’t intend the series as completely era correct, but wanted to impart the ‘vibe’ of a classic Fender design—the vintage-quality feel, look, and sound of their first series of guitars in 1982.
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Whoever first got the sound down on tape, vinyl, acetate or whatever, it’s hard to imagine that adventurous, pioneering electric guitarists like Charlie Christian, Lonnie Johnson, T-Bone Walker and others didn’t crank up that brown electric suitcase to see just what it could do. Even if they were banned from such sonic mayhem on the bandstand or in the recording studio, you can bet a few juke joints and basement jams rang with the sound of distorted guitar right back into the 1940s and even the ’30s. Do you doubt it? Plug a fat-sounding Gibson ES-150—with its beefy ‘blade’ pickup—into an EH-150 or BR-1 amp wound up to max. Dirty? Damn straight. As for distortion, there are no more ‘firsts’ to be claimed. For sheer variety of sounds, however, the modern guitarist has it all over his predecessors.

Transistors are related to crystals. Their individual function is non linear and have to be arranged in compound groups to behave as a linear circuit. Solid-state amps operate at low voltages (10 - 100V). Valves amps operate at high voltages (200 - 600V). Speakers operate at approx (0 - 40V). The Output Transformer converts the high operating voltages of valves to the lower operating voltage of speakers. A transformer has 2 separate coils of wire (primary and secondary) wound around an iron core. Electricity flowing through wire causes a magnetic field around the wire and visa versa, a changing magnetic field causes electricity to flow through wire.


The output transistors of solid state amplifiers can be passively cooled by using metal fins called heat sinks to radiate away the heat. For high-wattage amplifiers, a fan is often used to move air across internal heatsinks.[14] Since transistor bass amplifiers used for large venues need to produce a high output, this usually means that bass amplifiers are very heavy. Most powerful transistorized bass amplifiers use class AB or so-called "push-pull" topology, in no small part because this output circuit scheme can be physically lighter and cooler than an equivalent Class A amplifier. These need heavy transformers and require large metal heat sinks for cooling.
Modelling effect – Many BOSS modelling effects use COSM or Composite Object Sound Modelling, which uses computer-processing power to digitally precisely model the electronic, mechanical, and magnetic characteristics inherent to an instrument, amplifier, or speaker, and also to create completely new sounds. Modelling effects can be dynamic or time-based – it can even make your guitar or amp sound like a completely different type of guitar or amp.
Compressor sometimes sounds good after distortion too, it helps with noise (compressors can be noisy and if put before overdrive then the distortion pedal makes the noise louder). Placing the compressor after distortion also increases your sustain (depending on the type and amount of distortion used!). It can sound darker if placed after as well - so it really is down to your ears and what you think sounds best! But I have mine first in the chain, before Fuzz as I don't often (ever?) use them together
The tremolo effect is a fluctuation in the guitar signal’s volume. By lowering and then raising the volume of the guitar you get a very cool effect. As you adjust the rate of the volume change you get faster fluctuations in volume. Tremolo is one of the early effects found on some  guitar amplifiers, though it was often mislabelled "vibrato." Vibrato is a variation in pitch, not volume. 
The Salamander Grand made by Alexander Holm (details above) who sampled his Yamaha C5 Grand and is quite well known for having a great sound. Most sf2/sfz versions seem to be lacking the proper dynamics, have latency problems or have been oversimplified. This sf2 version has addressed these issues yet retains its essential character including optional resonance but removes other non-essential sounds such as pedal noises.
I purchased my Dove in 1989 in a mom and pop kind of music store in North GA , actually Cumming GA. I have played it ever since and I have owned many other guitars in my 52 Years in the music business but it has always been my come back acoustic for the sound and playability of the neck slim D stile ,but the sound quality is very much as good as any lots more expensive guitars,the way it holds the overtone of the note long after you play the note in the body is just unbelievable ,my hat's off to which either company wants to claim they built it I am just glad they did!! Damn fine Guitar.Thanks,Victor

Players and rock historians alike will talk endlessly about who either created or discovered or recorded the first distorted guitar tone. They argue, pontificate, debate, and even break it down into categories of type and of geographical location. “So, do we mean distortion, overdrive, or fuzz tone?” or “Do you distinguish between North American and European ‘firsts’?” Dave Davies of the Kinks is often credited with the first appearance of a heavily distorted electric guitar sound in the British charts for ‘You Really Got Me’ in August 1964.
I don't think its objective that sweep picking is better than tapping. I mean all of these techniques are great. One could say that vibrato is the best technique. But for me both tapping and sweep picking are great. Tapping kinda sounds like emotional/crying to me. While sweep picking kinda sounds like some fighting/running, I mean fast paced. - zxm
"Mangoré, por Amor al Arte" is the title of the 2015 movie, the real life story of Agustín Barrios, an influential and important composer and classical guitarist from Paraguay. Born in Paraguay in 1885 talented Agustín was persuaded in his young adult age to move to Buenos Aires, the cultural hub of South America. In Argentina he began an affair with the beautiful Isabel but,...
We’ll talk more about the sound quality shortly. To give you a gentle introduction, Line 6 has been in the amp and effects modeling game for a long time. Their POD line of guitar effects processors has been around for a while, and you might be familiar with their Pocket POD. Some of you might also know them for their extremely popular digital delay pedal and looper, the DL4 (an absolute mainstay on pedalboards everywhere). Line 6 makes several multi-effects units, and according to the research we did the POD HD500X (from their POD HD X series) is the one mentioned and recommended most often. They make a rack-mountable version of it, but we’re more interested in the floor pedal unit. This is a multi-effects pedal, amp simulator, incorporates an expression pedal, tuner and looper, and doubles as a USB audio interface, just to name the basics.

R.E.M.'s guitarist was a less-is-more master who never needed much more than swarming melodies and spangled riffs. From the laser-guided arpeggios on "Radio Free Europe" to the supersize power chords of "The One I Love," his sound was both gorgeous and matter-of-factly aggressive – a DIY style that helped Eighties underground rockers push beyond punk rock. "They created 50,000 guitar bands after them," noted Billy Corgan, "America was inundated with jangly R.E.M. type bands."
He embodies the stylish sideman identity forged by guitar greats like George Harrison and Keith Richards: a neatly trimmed pudding-basin haircut, and a stage presence that never upstages the frontman. Yet, he is intriguing in his own right. Marr’s post-Smiths career has been stellar. He’s worked with everyone from New Order’s Bernard Sumner (in Electronic) to Oasis to John Frusciante, and has been quite active recently with both Modest Mouse and the Cribs. He has an uncanny knack for being around whenever cool music is happening.
The 110ce features a dreadnought body with modern cutaway that produces Taylor's signature open midrange and clear treble tone, it works really well with various styles of music. And since it comes with their ES2 under-saddle transducer system, this guitar is ready for the stage or for recording. While it may not be as affordable as we want it to be, the Taylor 110ce more than makes up with its quality and reliability. Mark your entry into the real world with this highly recommended acoustic-electric.
This legendary thinline electric guitar has been in continuous production since 1958 and has been updated for 2019. The new Gibson ES-335 Figured has the classic semi-hollow body construction with a chambered maple center block with a three-ply AAA-grade figured maple/poplar/maple top and back. Its bracing is made of quarter-sawn Adirondack spruce. The center block and bracing are both thermally engineered.
Chorus pedals actually make your guitar sound like there are a variety of different guitarists playing the same thing that you are playing, but with a different guitar and slightly out of time with you. This effect makes everything you play sound a little bit ‘warbly’ and thickens up your guitar or bass lines. We recommend experimenting with these as you can use them subtly to add weight to your sound or as a full-blown effect that completely takes over your signal.
Amps. When I first plug into an unfamiliar amp, I’ll start by setting all the tone controls to noon, and slowly raise the volume to a comfortable level. If the amp has a master volume, I set it for a good listening level and sweep the gain knob to explore the amp’s overdrive capabilities. I then make small tone tweaks by sweeping each pot up and down and listen to the range they work in, and how they affect the sound from different points in front of the amp.
Hello. This is a great article. Does strymon have a user fourm group anywhere. I own the g system, i love it for its effects, but it cant do everything i want. I found strymon, and instantly bought a timeline. I have also ordered big sky and mobius. Is there a way to connect the strymon up to the gsystem, and haveva patch on the g pull up a bank on the strymon, and also be able to choose one or multiple strymons.
About 30 years ago, a fellow co-worker began teaching me how to play electric guitar. I believe it was an Aria Pro Strat. He had been playing for 20 plus years at this time and was a very good teacher, he owned a 1958 Les Paul. I have not played since he was in a car wreck in 1990 as he could not return to work. He was however able to continue to play, its just our schedules never allowed the time to take lessons. He passed away in 2011, and since I retired last year, I’d like to take up lessons. I found your article very helpful in selecting an electric guitar. It mentions a lot of things most people do not consider when buying.

Welcome to OvationGallery.com.  This is my personal website for displaying photos of my various Ovation guitars.  I have been a player and collector of these fine instruments for over 30 years.  Although I don't profess to be an expert on all things Ovation, I do have a passion for their artistic and sonic beauty which I hope you will share.  My collection is always evolving, at one point  numbering over 50 guitars.  At one time or another I've been lucky enough to own almost every type of Ovation and Adamas guitar as well as some one-of-a-kind and truly collectable specimens.  All of these guitars are wonderful and it is my pleasure to share them with you on this website.     Dave   
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Gibson announced a new interactive computerized Les Paul that produces more sounds, named the Dark Fire. It was released on December 15, 2007. The guitar has a computer integrated into the body and controlled by the “Master Control Knob” (MCK). The MCK allows players to change the pickups and coils, adjust each tone and tunings automatically and simultaneously, even during a song being played. Like the Robot, the Dark Fire features the ability to tune the guitar; however, in an improvement over the Robot, the player can tune it up to 500 times per battery charge, allowing the tuning pegs to adjust themselves to different tuning styles. Using the “Chameleon Tone Technology” Gibson claims this guitar will produce every imaginable guitar sound. In addition to the improved and advanced tuning features, the guitar has three types of pickups which include Burstbucker (humbucker), a P-90 single-coil and a bridge-mounted piezo acoustic, all of which contribute to organic blends of original sounds.

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The question here is how high to make the bridge. Well, this is personal choice. Find somewhere were the string doesn’t buzz on any fret from being too low, but low enough that you can play up and down the neck easily. There’s usually a sweet spot where you can just start to detect some buzzing and you can leave it just a tiny bit higher than that. Now do the exact same procedure for the high (thin) E string end of the bridge. Play the guitar a little bit to see if any of the other strings are buzzing. If, say, the A string is still buzzing, then raise up the end of the bridge nearest to that string a little bit ( a small amount of buzzing is often OK as long as it doesn't bother you too much and isn't heard through the amplifier - this a bit of a personal choice thing). OK, that’s step 2 finished. Your guitar should be nice and playable now. However, it may not seem to stay in tune very well. That’s because the intonation might be off.  
Larry Robinson Fine Custom Inlays - They produce one-of a kind shell inlays for all kinds of guitars. One of a handful of inlay practicioners in the country, Larry has done exquisite work for major guitar manufacturers (Fender, gi bson, Yamaha,...), small production shops (Santa Cruz, Collings, etc.), single luthier shops (Klein, Ryan, Olson, Megas, and more), collectors like Tsumura and people who just want something to personalize their guitar.
Being a PODHD user for many years now, I am but one of the many who commend its balance of versatility and sound quality. Like many reviewers, it allows me to gig and record conveniently, often times plugging straight to PA with great results. I've also seen a number of professionals using PODHD500X's in their concerts, so it's not surprising that even experts at Music Radar were convinced, saying: "The modelling is excellent throughout, with authentic-sounding amps and quality effects".
Yes and he lost the finger tips on his left hand and attached makeshift fingers out of thimbles but managed to play some of the greatest evil licks ever. I love Eddie but he screwed up Van Halen terribly by getting rid of Dave and turning it into a girl band. Duane was awesome and highly skilled and a sought after studio musician. Clapton is the master.
Finally, amidst all the considerations about tops and shapes and tones, don't underestimate the importance of choosing a guitar that you like. Choose one that feels comfortable, whether you are sitting or standing. Make sure you pick a guitar that responds to the way that you play, and don't settle on a "good" guitar if you don't like the way it sounds to your ears.
UPDATE 10/21: The good news first - I'm still absolutely loving the game and steadily improving. I'm only able to play about one to two hours a day, but even though that's all the time I'm able to put in, I'm already to the point of being able to play along with a song. But (here comes the downside), with my improvement audio lag has become a real issue. Before I was so horrible that I couldn't hit the right notes at all, let alone on time, so it didn't make much difference. But now that I've improved, it's a problem. To be fair, they warn you about this in the form of a pamphlet inside the game box, so it wasn't out of nowhere. I was just hoping that since I wasn't using HDMI, the lag wouldn't be too horrible. Wrong.
So, I've done what any self-respecting woman with a rather obsessive personality could do and trawled YouTube for all the best videos of Swift performing stripped down versions of her songs where it's just her singing against a minimal melody. I'm sure you'll agree that as much fun as queen of the squad, awkward dancing hero era Swift is, that these videos are all the proof you need that she doesn't need dance moves or supermodel friends on stage in order to rule.
From an appearance perspective, at least, the most important aspect of the guitar is the body’s finish. The finish of most electric guitars is either a nitrocellulose lacquer, a polyester, or a polyurethane. Nitrocellulose, for the unfamiliar, is highly flammable and also known as gun cotton. It is obtained by the nitration of cellulose, an important structural component of plants. In guitar coatings, nitrocellulose is blended with other compounds and organic solvents to create a lacquer. The solvents evaporate as the lacquer dries.
My guitar is in excellent condition and is all mostly original. The tuners are replicas of the original Klusons, and it came with non-original wooden legs. The legs were originally `sold separately, so it’s possible that the original owner opted for cheaper off-brand legs instead. I prefer to use a table-type keyboard stand anyway, mainly because it frees up more space for my feet underneath. This is my primary gigging steel; it’s reliable and versatile, and it usually turns a few heads as well due to its unique appearance. Aside from a broken name badge, it’s in excellent condition; it came with the cleanest original Valco case I’ve ever seen. There is some slight deterioration of the chrome plating, but otherwise there is little wear to be found. I previously owned a Supro Console Eight, and liked it so much that I traded it for the double-neck version. The Console Sixteen is a rare bird because it was produced only briefly; it first appeared in the 1958 Supro catalog and last appeared in 1959.
I own some 13 or so, high end American, Canadian and/or Japanese 6 strings 7 basses and a full studip of gear and if my opinion means FA then I can't help but not mention my Washburn Custom Shop WV548! It has Parker guitars (famous for the FLY) patented composite glass carbon fiber fretboard, EMG active PU's (81, 85) and a real Floyd with the Buzz Feiten system and it is bar none, the fastest, smoothest, and by far the nicest playing (and sounding for that matter) guitar I own or have played in my some 30 odd years plus, playing electrics.
Generally, guitarists with an array of pedals like to put their drive pedals first. This includes your overdrive, distortion, fuzz, or boost pedals. Some guitarists have more than one of these, and they usually go at the beginning of your chain. The reason for putting them first in your pedalboard order is because you will be distorting or boosting the purest version of your guitar tone. Putting a delay pedal before distortion means that the echoes from the delay pedal would themselves become distorted, resulting in an unnatural and messy sound. If you’re using an overdrive and a boost, it’s wise to put the boost first – that sends a stronger signal into the overdrive to get the most out of it.
Most guitars will benefit from an annual setup, and instruments that are kept in less than ideal climate conditions (or that are on the road a lot) may need two per year. I’ll evaluate your guitar and make a recommendation. Setups may include truss rod lubrication and adjustment, saddle lowering to adjust action, nut slot adjustments, cleaning of grimy frets and fretboard, lubricating and tightening of tuners, and checking electronics and batteries. Price is based on what your guitar needs. The price range is for labor and does not include parts costs such as strings and bone nut and saddle blanks.
Look for lyrics or chord changes. Many songs have guitar parts made up solely (or mostly) of chords. This is especially true for rhythm guitar parts. In this case, the tab may forgo typical tab notation in favor of a simplified list of chord changes. These chords are almost always written in standard chord notation (Amin = A minor, E7 = E dominant 7, etc.) Simply play the chords in the order that they're listed - if it's not noted otherwise, try playing one chord per measure, but if the changes don't sound right, listen to the song for the strumming pattern.
BAJAAO brings to you the best top notch Electric Guitars from across the world, with the lowest price guarantee. We have a huge range of electric guitars to help you find the one that fits your requirement and budget too. We are dedicated to make sure that we have an instrument that suits you whether you are looking for a beginner’s electric guitar or a seasoned professional’s axe, from the best brands worldwide such as Ibanez, Cort, Fender, Gibson, Aria, Epiphone, Washburn, Walden, Cort, ESP, PRS, Jackson, BC Rich, Dean, Pluto, Squier, Schecter, Greg Bennett, Taylor, and a long list of other brands to buy from. Buy the best Electric Guitars online with BAJAAO.com with the best and affordable price in India. Make your shopping experience a wonderful one with us.
I start at zero and work the bridge, stopbar, neck and pickups from there until I all feels and sounds right, takes some time but not too much. I only do this with new guitars and when I total strip one down maybe once a year. Living in the North East and having 4 season you have to adjust all the time, unless you live in a climate controled home and never go out. If you can do all these adjustments yourself and become one with your guitars I think your way ahead of the game. 

Since King Crimson‘s first rehearsal in 1969, Robert Fripp has been its distinguishing instrumental voice, a singular blend of distorted complexity and magisterial sustain. That duality is best heard on the most progressive prog-rock album ever made, Crimson’s 1973 thorny-metal classic, Larks’ Tongues in Aspic. Fripp’s most famous guitar line is the fuzz-siren hook in the title track to David Bowie‘s Heroes. Fripp would “start up without even knowing the chord sequence,” said producer Brian Eno, adding that Fripp’s work

Two-point rocking tremolo or fulcrum vibrato: Features individual string saddles that are adjustable for intonation and height. These are mounted on a bridge that rocks on two bolts mounted on the guitar top. The bridge has a broad perpendicular plate that extends through the body of the guitar. This free-floating plate is attached to the inside of the guitar by springs that match the tension of the strings. Locking tuners, which clamp down on the strings, help keep tuning more stable.

Hi, my cousin gave me a bass guitar, the brand is called Cyclone by EKS Technology Inc. I looked it up and I could find barely anything. the bass has been in his garage since the early '90s and he told he that Fender bought the brand sometime around then, but I still can't find anything about the brand, apart from that they also produce electric guitars. almost as if the brand has been wiped from history. Any information regarding this brand would be gratefully accepted!

Late 1944 to about 1949: the bracing was tapered. This stopped in the late 1940s, and was a progressive thing. So unlike scaloped bracing that had a definate endpoint, tapered braces evoloved into "straight" braces by 1949. This is why 1945-1949 Martins are still highly regarded as "better" than their 1950s counterparts, but not as good as the 1944 and prior scalloped braced guitars.
Much like ESP, Schecter started out as a parts company which decided to start building their own guitars. Right from day one it was apparent that their mission was to deliver ultimate metal guitars. Everything from their design, to the choice of electronics pointed in this direction. It didn’t take long for Schecter to become one of the go to brands that has reached the elite level.
The above might sound like a trivial thing to mention, but achieving a loyal following of knowledgeable fans is not something that any brand can boast with. Judging by the rave reviews this product received it’s easy to understand why, and the 45 mm aperture drivers it operates with are proprietary to Audio-Technica, so you won’t get them anywhere else. Most headphones struggle with bass given their law diameter aperture, but the ATH-M50x renders sound accurately throughout the range.
Description: Body Construction: Solid - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 1 Piece - Fingerboard: Maple - Frets: 21 - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Headstock: 6 In-Line - Bridge: Fixed - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Brass, Chrome, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 5-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - Guitar Features: Pickguard - String Instrument Finish: Traditional Violin
Up for sale is an Ibanez RGA7QM guitar equipped with EMG 707/81-7 pickups and Sperzel locking tuners. This guitar is in great condition, has never been gigged and has been kept in my smoke free music studio. Guitar Specs: Mahogany body with quilted maple top 5-Piece maple/walnut Wizard II-7 neck Bound rosewood fretboard with 24 jumbo frets Gibraltar Standard 7 bridge Pearl dot inlay
In a way, guitars are a lot like cars — spending more money can get you more performance through different specs and trims. The extra money usually goes into paying for better parts rather than more options; there aren’t a whole lot of places to add to a guitar (unless you want the ZZ Top spinner installed). Big bucks can get you better quality wood, a nicer finish, higher-end hardware, and fancier inlays. Some of these upgrades can alter the sound or simply make help playability. For example, the same guitar cut from poplar won’t sound as good as one cut from alder wood. Better tuners mean your axe will go out of tune less often. That said, some guitars will offer features that others don’t, such as tremolos and automatic tuning. Do your research and, as always, know what you need versus what you simply want.

I've been to Steve about a dozen times with my guitars, families and friends instruments and have sent several people there and have nothing but great things to say. He is reasonably priced and likely one of the most talented and experienced Luthier's in Boston. It's rare to see any establishment get 5 stars from so many people and Steve deserves it! Only thing is, if you're in a rush to get your instrument back, go somewhere else where they do it quickly and without much thought/TLC. Steve takes his time to do it right and has a lot of customers because he's the guy to go to in the greater Boston area. Highly recommend!
Ok I know Hondo? .... But this is a good one folks its got a lot going for it really have a closer look, its actually built well it is a beautiful vintage guitar in its own right its condition and patina good looks good sound and easy playability make it an excellent entry or back up choice into vintage guitars, The Top appears to be solid 2 piece center seam spruce top you see grain going from top to bottom with really beautiful straight grain with flame type figuring that is surprising on a Hondo it's unique in that feature and it has that patina I love it caught my eye big time as I got close I couldn't believe it was a Hondo, it's logo has that same font as old Martin & Takamine used this one has the look and feel, but it's action was a little off spec , so I fixed all that it has great action now it's neck set and angle was excellent and I ended up changing its nut & saddle out for Martin born nut & saddle set and a new set of 80/20 strings, this guitar has good volume and sweet tone it rings clear and true with good intonation. It's in very good to excellent vintage condition, it's body & neck has no cracks , no finish checking and still shines like glass it's beautiful just have a look, it's not new or mint it has a couple drinks on its top and a couple on its back too but besides those it's exceptional vintage and plays easy with good low action with plenty of saddle left to lower more down the line of ever needed it's set up to meet or exceed Martin specs for playability. This is a lot of vintage guitar for this kind of price WOW! .
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Secondly, I have an Epi Les Paul 1960 Tribute that i had PLEKD, which made a big difference to how it plays. However; i have an ongoing issue with it since, the G string always plays muted - i have changed the strings several times since but to no avail, other than that it plays really well in my opinion albeit i am only a learner with little experience. I have gone through the steps in your article but again all to no avail - have you any ideas as to what may be causing the muted tone (that's how i'd describe it anyway) and any thoughts on a possible solution you may have would be welcomed.
Due to the great sensitivity of some advanced vibrato systems like the Kahler, the Steinberger and the Floyd Rose, a light touch is required. Simply placing one’s hand on the bridge can cause notes to drift in and out of tune. So players — especially the heavy handed— would be wise to try a variety of vibrato-equipped guitars out before making an instrument purchase or modifying a valued six-string friend.
I have a Samick Avion AV7 that I've been having trouble with a buzzing low E string when strumming with the first four frets. The bow is .013" and I set the 12th fret E string height to 2.5mm which helped, but not cured. I used a depth gauge to measure my frets, most measure at .043-.045" but the last two frets (21,22) measure at .052". At this point, would it be best to loosen the truss rod a 1/4 turn, or should I address the high frets, or could it be something else altogether? Thanks for the information.
Sometimes a guitar needs more than a setup, and actual repairs are required. Guitar setup price is minimal when compared to the price of most repairs, so be sure that the problem is not something that can be easily adjusted before making any patch-ups. The cost of repairs can be virtually any price depending on the damage. Refinishing might be over $100, and if a neck needs replacement due to warping, then the price may be several hundreds of dollars. A cracked neck can be glued and clamped for under $100, but the quality of the guitar is unlikely to be regained with this process.
The Smiths' guitarist was a guitar genius for the post-punk era: not a showboating soloist, but a technician who could sound like a whole band. As a kid studying Motown records, Johnny Marr would try to replicate not just guitar riffs but piano and strings too, all with his right hand. His voluptuous arpeggios – often played on a chiming Rickenbacker with incredible flow and detailing – were every bit as essential to the Smiths' signature sound as Morrissey's baritone. And he was a tireless explorer: For 1983's "This Charming Man," Marr dropped knives onto a '54 Telecaster, a revelatory incident that Radiohead may have been alluding to in their Smiths-inspired "Knives Out." "He was a brilliant rhythm player, rarely played solos, so full of sounds," said Radiohead's Ed O'Brien – part of an entire generation of British guitarists who took their cues from Marr. "I've been in the studio with him, and there's nothing he cannot do on guitar," said Oasis' Noel Gallagher. "The man's a fuckin' wizard."
The newly designed Les Paul Recording guitar was released in 1971, in many ways as an updated version of the Les Paul Professional that had debuted two years earlier in 1969. The new guitar came with a new owners manual explaining the (somewhat complicated) controls, their operation, and giving other specifications, including recommended strings, action and control settings. Compare with the broadly similar owners manual for the Les Paul Personal / Professional
Another Martin creation, the 000 shape guitar is almost the perfect halfway house between a dreadnought and a parlour. Its classic hourglass figure meant it sat comfortably on the knee, endearing it to players of folk and other fingerpicking-heavy styles of music. The shape ensured it had the perfect balance between playing and comfort, and was often seen on the lap of no less a player than Eric Clapton. However it wasn’t averse to a bit of heavy strumming when the occasion called, and it’s large bottom end ensured it could keep pace when playing with others.
Once you have a board design complete, you can send it out for manufacture. Years ago this used to be the major challenge for the home or small builder, but these days a large number of board manufacturers have a web presence and will quickly fabricate single, or low volume boards for fairly modest cost. Eagle (or whichever CAD software you are using) outputs a set of files called gerber files. These files can be emailed or uploaded over the web to the board manufacturer who will plug these into their manufacturing tools and then send the finished boards to you in the mail.
As a guitarist with a complete understanding of the vintage instruments he worked on, Novak wasn't completely comfortable with what any one instrument was capable of delivering. He wanted to combine all the features of his old favorites while adding design twists that would give him everything he was looking for in an electric guitar. This led to the invention of his patented fanned-fret fingerboard, which gives an instrument combined scale lengths. 

So I got this kit last week full of hope yet penssive knowing that these kits from over seas have lots of problems. On first inspection the kit was okay, Nothing, I thought at the time, a little TLC couldn't fix. Here I am getting ready to install the electronic today, level the frets, string it in and play. As I opened the pakage with all of the tone and volume pots I noticed one thing super wrong right away.
Note that we paid little attention to the power ratings of these amps. Judging a guitar amp by its power rating is usually a bad idea for many reasons. First, small increases in power have almost no effect on a guitar amp’s maximum volume. All other things being equal, doubling the power gets you only a 3-decibel increase in output, which is barely noticeable. To get double the perceived volume, you need 10 times as much power. A 100-watt amp might be twice as loud as a 10-watt amp, but a 20-watt amp will only be slightly louder than the 10-watt amp.
“I started to get really frustrated, and I said, ‘I know! I’ll fix you!’ I got a single-sided Gillette razorblade and cut round the cone like this [demonstrates slitting from the center to the edge of the cone], so it was all shredded but still on there. I played and I thought it was amazing, really freaky. I felt like an inventor! We just close-miked that in the studio, and also fed the same speaker output into the AC30, which was kind of noisy but sounded good.”
This is a fantastic tool for acoustic solos artists, worship leaders, session players or an acoustic rig that lacks a lot of control or a preamp source. Moreover, the Venue provides the additional functionality of tuning, feedback control, an effects loop and a built in DI box. Its price is usually on the higher end, though you can check used pricing which often dips significantly below retail. However, buying a preamp, tuner, noise gate and DI box separately would run you a lot more than what the Venue costs.
Unlike the piano, the guitar has the same notes on different strings. Consequently, guitar players often double notes in chord, so increasing the volume of sound. Doubled notes also changes the chordal timbre: Having different "string widths, tensions and tunings, the doubled notes reinforce each other, like the doubled strings of a twelve-string guitar add chorusing and depth".[38] Notes can be doubled at identical pitches or in different octaves. For triadic chords, doubling the third interval, which is either a major third or a minor third, clarifies whether the chord is major or minor.[39]
Every decision, action, employee hiring, design of new models, etc.-comes from the C.E.O.-Henry J. He dictates every single decision that happens within the company. His power and control over the company is unimaginable. Nothing will change until he leaves or sells the company. First of all the C.E.O. hires every worker- (which is why you wait an eternity to get hired). He doesn't delegate hiring to other departments like other "normal" companies do. That is why you apply, take tons of tests, wait 3 to 5 months (not weeks!), take a drug screen test, if you pass that, then you are finally hired- for a factory job- not a job at the White house! Managers demean workers- most managers don't even have a high school level of education- while most of the workers have some college experience or a 4 yr. degree (including me). Why do the young (20 to 40 yrs. old) educated guys take the job? (1st)- it looks good on the resume, (2nd)- you get to work on guitars, which seems cool at first, until you realize it's a place you do not want to be -most guys leave after a year on average. There is no chance for advancement or a raise. The attitude from Mngt. is intimidation- to rule by fear. They actually get a thrill from firing people, they actually want you to fail, I have never seen anything like it. Everything is about hitting your daily numbers at any cost. Pay raises have been non-existent for years without explanation of why. H.R. is the worst I have ever seen. The women in H.R. dress extremely inappropriate and unprofessional. When you go to H.R. to ask questions, they literally sigh and roll their eyes like you are bothering them -instead of them actually doing their jobs. Nobody knows anything-when you ask for help, you get annoyed responses because they just want to hit their personal number to get out and go home. Managers do as little as possible to not get noticed, but do just enough to keep their jobs- while the workers do all the work to make them look good. Turnover is constant. Stress levels are off the charts. 2012 was my 1st yr. of 2 yrs. working there. We were doing from 650 to 800 guitars a day- (Massman Dr. plant). In comparison the Custom Shop makes about 50 a day. The Memphis Plant- 50 a day. The Montana plant- 50 a day- us =650 to 800 a day! We made the most guitars in 2012 ever -but for the first time nobody received a yearly bonus?!? Which makes no sense -until you figure out everything is about cutting costs-all ordered from the C.E.O. People will skip all their breaks and even lunch to hit their number to get out on time. Countless times we had no lacquer because Mngt. hadn't ordered on time?!? We would have no parts for the guitars (bridges, tuners, etc.)-because they forgot to order on time?!? Yet no one from Mngt. would take accountability for it. One day, 5 people in my dept. (20-30 in the whole plant overall) were fired with no warning (one lady had been there 18 yrs., one guy-8 yrs., etc.)-yet Gibson's attendance policy in their own handbook states you have to be given a oral warning, then a 1st written warning, then a 2nd written warning- yet all the workers were not given any warning. And the reason why is that it had been a slow Christmas season in sales, so they were all let go (ordered by Henry J. -the dictator) to cut payroll-but didn't follow their very own attendance policy-because they don't have to. There is no union, no protection for your job. They tell you you are fired, and to just deal with it, while the powers-that-be don't have to be accountable for anything. It is a dictatorship. A guy I worked there with has been there 20 yrs. And one day he counted up all the workers he remembered being fired or had quit in the 20 yrs. he had been there - it was 350 to 400! If you fail a drug test, you can keep your job?!? So you take 2 weeks off and go to drug rehab- but if you break the attendance policy - you are gone?!?- It's because the company doesn't have to pay you for 2 weeks, and it's something of a tax write off as well (that's what I was told). So basically you can break the law and do drugs- and still have a job. All in the name of saving money. The back break room refrigerator has not been cleaned in 2 yrs! No clock in the main break room for over 5 yrs. and counting! Gibson charged their own employees and their children to attend the company's (workers!) halloween party!?!? Gibson owns Tobias basses-made them 2 yrs. then stopped. Owns Slingerland drums, but hasn't made them in over 12 yrs (pics of them on the website are from late 1990's)! Baldwin pianos (makes on a on-order basis only, and only in Japan, not America anymore). Valley Arts guitars-stopped making them in 2002-12 yrs. ago. Etc,etc.etc! The point being is they buy up all these brand names- and have them on their website as if they are still being sold - but they are not! But they don't say that on their website. The C.E.O. has them to just build value for the Gibson/Epiphone name - to make it more valuable- to sell the company one day at maximum profit. I know this because managers told me this who had first hand knowledge. Guys have been punched in the face during arguments. One guy took a screwdriver and smashed it through the top of a hollow body guitar out of frustration! Arguments are a daily occurrence. My friend would come into work to start his shift, and be so nervous, he would throw up in the bathroom- because of the stress levels and negative atmosphere. Every day literally felt like you were going to prison! I really wanted to make this job work out for me. I am a musician (as are many who work there, many of us play gigs on weekends or nights). My long-term plan was to use my degree, and move up to a corporate position-until I found out what a nightmare the company is. I found out through everyone that I asked that corporate is run the same way! Many might be surprised by this review, because Gibson guitars are really revered by musicians. And outwardly the company has a reputation of the highest quality. But working there was the exact opposite, you would almost rather dig ditches! I have pretty much done it all- I owned my own business, waited tables, worked out in the heat-landscaping, worked in sales, marketing, management, etc. And I have never had such a negative work experience- ever! It affected my health mentally and physically (standing everyday for 10 hrs. or more). And let me tell you for those of you reading this -no job is worth that!
This gives you a wonderful bass line, and will dramatically improve your sound, as well as helping you to develop a good rhythmic strumming style right from the first. Singing the song is a matter of timing. Listen to the song a few times and you’ll get it. It’s easier than trying to explain time signatures, and timing. You’ll know when you get it right. Just keep listening.
Since they're usually not sure if they'll stick to it I wouldn't spend a ton on it. Make sure it at least plays well. Learning on a poorly constructed guitar can really take the fun out of the whole process and may even convince you that guitar is harder than it really has to be. You can also fix many issues with less-expensive guitars by bringing it to a luthier.
The Guitar Chords: Easy-to-Use, Easy-to-Carry, One Chord on Every Page does one thing extremely well: it is spiral bound. It’s more of a reference than anything else, but one that musicians of all levels will appreciate. It covers the gamut of chords with not just one but two variations of each one. Of course, many have more than that, but it’s good information just the same.

The strings on your electric guitar have a major impact on its sound and playability. If you’ve taken a look at the huge Musician’s Friend guitar string assortment, you’ve likely realized that there’s a lot to consider in figuring out which strings are right for you and your instrument. Keep reading to find the strings that best match your electric guitar, music, and playing style.
By the early ’80s, MTI was importing Westone guitars from Matsumoku, which had made its earlier Univox guitars (and the competitive Westbury guitars offered by Unicord). Wes-tone guitars continued to be distributed by MTI until ’84, when St. Louis Music, now a partner in the Matsumoku operation, took over the brand name and phased out its older Electra brand (also made by Matsumoku) in favor of Electra-Westone and then Westone. But that’s another story…
To finish, here's one damn good last trick: doubling an electric guitar with... anything else. I know that's pretty vague but I must say that I had a hard time putting it any other way. The goal is to listen to your guitar sound and analyze it to find out what it lacks. Then you "only" need to find a sound that can fill this "hole." For instance, a friend of mine once told me he doubled a crunchy guitar sound with a sample of a lightbulb being rubbed on his boot with the goal of emphasizing the strumming sensation. Much less arcane, there's the famous example of the particularly "fat" riff on Radiohead's Airbag. If you listen to the intro, you can hear that the riff is being doubled with a cello, which obviously adds a lot of the breadth to the sound, as I'm sure you'll agree. I would love to keep on giving you more ideas in this regard, but the scope of this method is so wide and open that the only thing I can tell you is to let your imagination fly, experiment and have fun!
To create a thicker rhythm guitar sound, overdub the same part one or more times. Depending on the desired effect, the overdub can be treated as one mono signal and mixed to the same stereo position, or panned left and right for a stereo double-tracked sound. Alternatively, treat the original track with an ADT (Artificial Double Tracking) effect. This can be done with a digital delay set to around 40 milliseconds. Again, the delayed signal can be panned or mixed as one with the original guitar track.
Most people who use this alternate tuning method change the pitch of the sixth string only, the low E, from E to D. This is frequently used for Rock songs when you want a darker tone, such as with Heavy Metal. In addition, dropping the E string two steps to D means that you can play power chords with one finger. Some people also drop the first string (high e) down to D, resulting in D-A-D-G-B-D.
It would not be a lesson on electric guitars and DIs without mentioning Radial’s JDX 48. This DI box, designed to be positioned between an amplifier’s head and speaker, allows for the direct amp sound to travel to the PA and monitors for a more realistic snapshot of the guitar tone. The magic occurs as the JDX 48 is wired to capture both the signal coming from the guitar amplifier head and the back-electromotive impulse from the loudspeaker. The JDX 48 also allows for 100% consistent tone between shows which is impossible with the many variables related to microphones.
Although Ibanez’s S series is designed to be far more versatile than the RG guitars, its Iron Label collection is built for one, brutal purpose: heavy metal. The SIX6FDFM represents exactly what we consider a ‘value-for-money’ guitar: It sports many premium specs, is skewed towards a single use, and, at a little under $1,000, won’t hemorrhage your bank account.
Unlike acoustic guitars, solid-body electric guitars have no vibrating soundboard to amplify string vibration. Instead, solid-body instruments depend on electric pickups and an amplifier (or amp) and speaker. The solid body ensures that the amplified sound reproduces the string vibration alone, thus avoiding the wolf tones and unwanted feedback associated with amplified acoustic guitars. These guitars are generally made of hardwood covered with a hard polymer finish, often polyester or lacquer. In large production facilities, the wood is stored for three to six months in a wood-drying kiln before being cut to shape. Premium custom-built guitars are frequently made with much older, hand-selected wood.
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