If you want to splurge just a bit more and opt for an instrument with a little more stylistic range, the Ibanez Talman guitar vault accessory kit might be right up your alley. It includes a lovely seafoam green Ibanez TM302SFG, 12 high-quality Dunlop Tortex picks, a strap, a gig bag, a Kyser capo, a polishing cloth, and a tuner. This is off the beaten path a bit, but for some players, that’s going to be absolutely perfect.

Controls were volume and tone. A little elevated pickguard sat on the upper treble bout. The earliest examples of these had the little plastic logo on the head. By ’71, these had changed to an outlined block letter decal logo. A fretless version was also available by ’71. The U1970 with frets, and fretless U1970F, were both $220 with case. How long these were available is uncertain, but they were probably gone by ’73 or ’74.

Some effects produced dramatically weird sounds that were largely impossible to pull off. The peculiar 1948 DeArmond Trem-Trol (used extensively by rock-and-roll pioneer Bo Diddley) altered the volume of the guitar signal by exposing the connecting pin to a brass-and-glass canister half-filled with shaking, water-based electrolytic “Hydro-fluid.” The shaking—and often leaky—fluid washed over the pin and would bend the signal’s volume, causing an oscillating, watery tone. In the words of Chris Gray, one of its few remaining owners, “This is not a subtle effect—it adds all its personality to your sound whether you’re ready for it or not.”
Most users are happy with what they got for the money, from its wood quality, to the included hardware and electronics. As expected, many of its buyers are fans of the Les Paul Jr who want to try their hand at customizing their own straightforward rock machine. Surprisingly, there are some who are happy with its default configuration, including the feel of the neck, the sound of the P-90 pickup and the quality of the tuners.
I have been playing guitar, banjo, and harmonica for 60 years. I started when I was ten-years-old. I have taught guitar and banjo for a number of years. My guitar of choice is a Martin D-41, an affordable guitar that is much like the D-45. The woods and construction are famous. There are other makes but none surpass Martin. My harmonicas are Hohners given to me by my father when he passed-on. Anyone can learn. I learned the fiddle after I reached my 70's. Just listen, play, and learn. Don't give-up. There are many good guitars, and banjos. Martin makes the best, and Stelling makes the best banjos. I started-out with a japanese banjo in the 1970's. A white Eagle, distributed by Alvarez.

What started as an aftermarket parts company has grown into a real giant. ESP is a brand that is currently building some of the best guitars in the mid range segment of the market. Even though they are often associated with metal scene, ESP offers a wide variety of models. In all honesty, you will rarely find the same bang for the buck that ESP is capable of delivering. On top of that, their guitars are good looking as well.
Now imagine the puddle again, but this time imagine some wood blocks (12 inch long 2x4's for those of you with rusty imaginations) that are placed on their sides in the puddle in the shape of a three-sided box with the open side facing the pebble's point of impact. The radiating lines go in to the box and bounce back or reflect off the walls. Soon, there are so many lines radiating around in that imaginary box that they all collide with each other and become a random, jumbled mess. Eventually, the size of the lines and the number of them diminish. That my friends is reverb.
The assets of Kay/Valco were auctioned off in 1969. The upright bass and cello lines were sold to Engelhardt-Link, a new company formed by a previous Valco member, which has continued production (see #Kay basses for details). The Kay name (and some of its trademarks, such as Knox[citation needed]) were acquired by Teisco importer, Weiss Musical Instruments[2] (W.M.I., Sol Weindling and Barry Hornstein), who put the Kay name on the Teisco products beginning in 1973, and continued on through the 1970s.[11][12]
Williamson went on to produce and play on Iggy’s classic solo 1979 album New Values, which features gems like “I’m Bored” and “Five Foot One.” The guitarist also played a key role on the follow-up disc, Soldier, anchoring a punk rock all-star lineup that included ex-Pistol Glen Matlock, Ivan Kral from the Patti Smith Band and Barry Adamson from Magazine. Shortly after Soldier, Williamson took a hiatus from rock to study electronic engineering, becoming Vice President of Technology and Standards for Sony.
Popularity also was a critical factor in our choices, although we generally passed over a few best-selling reissues or boutique clones in favor of the real deal. So even though the Bubba Bob Buttcrack Tube Overdrive may sound more soulful than an original Tube Screamer, if it’s little more than a copy with slightly upgraded components, it didn’t make the cut.

The 2008 Les Paul Standard debuts Gibson’s newest neck profile—an asymmetrical design that makes it one of the most comfortable and playable necks ever offered on any guitar. The new ergonomically-correct profile is tapered, and designed to be thicker on the bass side, and thinner on the treble side, closely outlining the natural form of the hand as it grips the neck. The 2008 Standard necks are machined in Gibson’s rough mill using wood shapers to make the initial cuts. Once the rosewood fingerboard gets glued on, the rest—including the final sanding—is done by hand. That means there are no two necks with the exact same dimensions. So while it still has the basic characteristics of its respective profile, each neck will be slightly different, with a distinct but traditional feel.
This years new Guitar World Magazine Holiday Buyers Guide issue is full of great gear for the upcoming holiday season. The amazing new FU-Tone Design Your Own & the Titanium Bridges are featured and well worth checking out. Make sure you pickup a copy of the new Buyers Guide on news stands today and all of the beautiful women photographed don't hurt either!
In rock music (and even in some pop music), guitarists often substitute power chords for full chords to enable the vocal part to stand out more from the music. You can hear this kind of power chord sound in old songs such as “Johnny B. Goode” and “Peggy Sue.” The following figure shows the power chords that you use to produce this kind of sound. Play this progression by using either two- or three-string power chords.
This company specializes in guitars meant for heavy metal and hard rock lovers. It is the proud manufacturer of some of the most outstanding designs in the history of metal such as Warlock, Bich, Virgin, and Mockingbird. It molded and influenced hard rock and thrash revolution of the 1980s. It is a great choice if you are looking for some edgy designs for your guitar. The guitars are available in 6, 7, or 8-string models that are suitable for players of all genres. Their recent introduction was the Villain series that has incredible designs and has a body of basswood or mahogany.
Although most of us who participated in this article have years of experience with guitar amps, none of us was particularly familiar with all the latest beginner models. There are few reliable professional reviews of beginner amps, but I sorted through what we found, searched through music stores and websites, and sampled numerous models at the recent National Association of Music Merchants (NAMM) show in Los Angeles. This experience gave me a good idea of what’s available now.

Clarence Leonidas “Leo” Fender was established this brand in 1946. The Fender Musical Instruments Corporation (FMIC) manufactures the stringed instruments and amplifiers, such as solid-body electric guitars, including the Stratocaster and the Telecaster. This brand is the kings of hearts and getting the popularity from blues to quick rock tempo. Fender’s Precision and Jazz Bass models are now considered to be the standard to which most other electric bass guitars are measured. It’s famous for best guitars which are made ever in the history.

Ibanez Artcore AF75 Electric Guitar Another hollow body guitar to whet your appetite! The Ibanez Artcore AF75 isn’t as “old” as the other models here but it has earned a huge following because of its affordability, quality workmanship and versatile sound. Suitable for a variety of music styles, the Ibanez AF75 Artcore is also perfect for beginners eager to get started on a moderate budget.
{"id": "112131968", "categoryId":"site5AAG", "name":"Vintage Vintage 1960s DECCA DMI 207 1 PICKUP Sunburst Solid Body Electric Guitar", "pageUrl":"/Used/In-Store-Vintage/Vintage-Vintage-1960s-DECCA-DMI-207-1-PICKUP-Sunburst-Solid-Body-Electric-Guitar.gc", "thumbnailUrl":"https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/NonExistingImage-00-180x180.jpg", "hasFeatures":"0", "isAccessory":"0", "message":"", "value":"", "priceMin":"", "priceMax":"", "msrp":"", "productVisibilityMSRP":"1", "restockPrice":"", "openBoxPrice":"", "clearancePrice":"", "isPlatinum":"0", "priceSavingsMaxPrice":"0.00", "priceSavingsMaxPercent":"0", "inventory":"0", "brand":"In Store Vintage", "reviewStarImageUrl": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/brand/gc/cmn/Sprit-Sm-Stars.png", "reviewStarRating":"0.0", "reviewStarRatingInteger":"0", "reviewHowManyReviews":"0", "usedOrNew":"new", "discontinued":"1", "onOrder":"0", "clearance":"0", "canBeSold":"0", "accessoryCategories":"site5LFMIC,site5LAAA,site5HBA", "stickerText": "", "isVintage": "1", "outletonly": "", "checksum":"", "priceVisibility": "", "itemType": "Vintage"}

Harmony Hollywood H38- OK, here's the one we will sell. She's about the same as above but with opposite color combo. This one has a nice vintage DeArmond Gold Foil Pickup. Action is medium, but if you would like a lower action, we will be happy to cut that bridge a bit down. Guitar is in  nice vintage condition. All original except the period style Rosewood Bridge and reproduction Harmony Pick Guard. SOLD
In 1945, Richard D. Bourgerie made an electric guitar pickup and amplifier for professional guitar player George Barnes. Bourgerie worked through World War II at Howard Radio Company making electronic equipment for the American military. Barnes showed the result to Les Paul, who then arranged for Bourgerie to have one made for him. (info from Wikipedia, photo of Jimi Hnedrix from bassmiddletreble.files.wordpress.com)
Though not much is known about the production of the Hi-Flier after about 1977, it clearly came to an end — and clearly has had an impact on players in the vintage market. Used by guitarists like Cobain and Lee Ranaldo of Sonic Youth, as well as many others in a variety of bands, the Hi-Flier gained notoriety as a unique guitar with a sound as striking as its looks.
Maple is the most common wood used to make guitar necks. It is very hard and dense, and often has attractively detailed grain patterns referred to as figuring. Maple also has a very bright overall tone. Due to it’s figuring and its tonal characteristics maple is often used for a veneer or top laminate on more expensive solid body guitars. It is also used as a top wood in some archtop guitars, where it is usually laminated. Its hardness brings out the trebles in a guitar's sound. It is also often used for the fretboard where it adds definition to the sound. 

My brother had the single-pickup (neck) version of this exact guitar c. 1969, badged as a Tempo. I wound up with it but in the ’80s I butchered it into a four-string “piccolo bass” with a sawed-down Badass II bridge, a Bigsby, a Seymour Duncan stacked-coil J-bass pickup, and a set of phase/split switches. I sent it back to him in the mid-’90s and he tossed it. Now that I’ve gotten into guitar over the past few years, I’m sorry I don’t still have it in its original condition. I don’t believe it was ever plugged into a proper tube guitar amp.
Another cool place I just found was Madison Guitar Repair out of Fridley. I went there a couple weeks ago. It's a little hole in the wall place where they just work on guitars and have tons of parts. Really nice guys that seem like they know their stuff pretty dang well. Never used them but considering that all they do is luthier work I'd give them a shot.
A free, guided tour of the Taylor Guitars factory is given every Monday through Friday at 1 p.m. (excluding holidays). Taylor’s expansive 145,000 square foot manufacturing facility is located east of San Diego (about 20 minutes from the downtown area) in El Cajon, California. No reservations are necessary for the tour, although the company asks that large groups (more than 10) call in advance at (619) 258-1207. Taylor encourages guests to arrive at its Visitor Center, where the tour begins, 10-15 minutes prior to tour time to sign in at the reception desk. The tour lasts approximately one hour and 15 minutes. While not physically demanding, it does include a fair amount of walking.
Vintage guitar amps are older guitar amplifier "heads", speaker cabinets and combo amp/speaker cabinets, which guitarists, record producers and bandleaders seek out for their unique tone. Some[which?] recording studios have a selection of the most popular vintage guitar combo amps, amp heads and speaker stacks, so that performers can get a retro sound. During the 1980s, when most guitar amps being manufactured used "solid state" semiconductor technology, many musicians seeking an older style of sound (for blues, roots rock, etc.) favored older amps that used vacuum tubes (called "valves" in the UK).[23] Popular vintage models include the Fender Showman, Bassman and Vibroverb amps, and older models made by Ampeg, Gibson, Marshall, and Vox,[24] as well as other smaller companies such as Valco, Danelectro, and Premier.
However, Class D amplifiers (also called "switching amplifiers" or confusingly, "digital amplifiers") are more efficient than conventional Class-AB amplifiers, and so are lighter in weight and smaller. The Acoustic Image Focus head, for example, produces 800 watts of power and weighs 2.2 kilograms (about 4 pounds). Class-D amplifiers use MOSFETs (Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors) rather than 'ordinary' (bipolar) transistors, and generate a pulse-width modulated signal that is filtered before it reaches the speaker.[15] In the 2010s, the availability of Class D amplifiers has enabled amp manufacturers to produce very lightweight and small, yet very powerful amp heads and small, lightweight combo amps.
I purchased a Lyle model A690 recently from an old man in northern California who had gone blind and developed arthritis and didn't feel like playing anymore. He mentioned in passing that he had found (?) The guitar somewhere. The case was thickly covered in dust and pretty much rusted toast, but the guitar is immaculate, looks brand-new with the exception of the tuners, rusted tight. The serial is #480 so I guess its fairly old, but how old is my question? A weird aside; in the case was a handful of fender-style medium tortoise-shell picks monogrammed Eddie Kramer. Does that ring a bell for anyone? Any and all information would be appreciated! Thanks!
Clarence Leonidas “Leo” Fender was established this brand in 1946. The Fender Musical Instruments Corporation (FMIC) manufactures the stringed instruments and amplifiers, such as solid-body electric guitars, including the Stratocaster and the Telecaster. This brand is the kings of hearts and getting the popularity from blues to quick rock tempo. Fender’s Precision and Jazz Bass models are now considered to be the standard to which most other electric bass guitars are measured. It’s famous for best guitars which are made ever in the history.
I could not afford an American or European guitar when I was 12, but Sam Ash sported a Japanese stratoslabber, with 1, 2, 3, or 4 pickups. Each extra pick up was another eight dollars! I bought the 2 pick up model for $24 and brought it home. What a square slab. The wood had the aspects of cardboard, it was probably what is called basswood. The pickups were single coil, chrome covered, and no better than a deArmond harp mike. My brother returned it, and bought a better looking tele style Japanese guitar I believe by Kent, with tin foil inserts in the pick ups. It went from Kandy apple red, to natural, to white, and finally to trunk-splatter grey with Seymour Duncan pickups and Grover tuners. I finally sold it in 2009.

Like a door that's repeatedly opened and closed, you'll sometimes need some basic maintenance. Ensure everything is tight, and get some electronic contact cleaner (available at any electronics store), various screwdrivers and wrenches and you can often solve your own problems. It's easier on a Gibson Les Paul (with backplate access to the controls) than on a Gibson ES-335, but it can be done.


Lastly, but not leastly, Univox offered a super amp head, the C Group, or UX Series, available with either a guitar or bass cabinet. These were promoted with a flyer that sported a muscular black model with naked torso looking for all the world like Isaac Hayes, the man behind the popular movie Shaft. The UX actually consisted of a UX-1501 Amplifier head and either a UX-1516 speaker cabinet for guitar use or a UX-1512 cabinet for bass. The amp was a mean two-channel S.O.B. with blue vinyl and handles. It was set up for lead guitar, bass or PA use, with two guitar inputs, two bass inputs and two mixer inputs. Its 140 watts were obtained with eight tubes – four 6550s, two 12AU7s and two 12AX7s. It had two volume and a master gain controls plus bass, middle, treble and presence controls. Power on and separate standby switches. Four speaker output jacks. The coolest feature was a “tunneling circuit” that allowed, near as we can tell, blending of channels, which meant you could pump up the bass on one and hyper the treble on the other, and combine them. For a little extra punch, you could throw a hi-boost switch, too. The UX-1516 guitar cabinet was a 150-watter. For bass, the UX-1512 was a 200-watt Reflex Speaker Cabinet. Cost for the guitar outfit was $1,400, for the bass outfit $1,450.


Godin (pronounced Go-dan) was founded in 1972 by Robert Godin in Canada and now owns a number of highly respected acoustic guitar brands including Art & Lutherie, Simon and Patrick, La Patrie and Seagull. Their electric guitars, produced under the Godin brand, have been played by greats including Roger Waters, Elliott Sharp and John McLaughlin. Many of their high-end models come with 3 types of pickups - regular electric guitar pickups, piezo pickups for producing an acoustic-like sound, and Synth/MIDI pickups for making any kind of sound you want.
Though Dennis Hartnett took good care of his ViVi-Tone instruments (mandola NMM 10809, mandocello NMM 10810, and this guitar), all three show signs of extensive use. Indentations on the bar-armature and wear to the screw-ends of the posts on the guitar pickup indicate that Hartnett also used the instrument for electric-only amplification, in addition to the electric/acoustic set up in which he left it. Hartnett's guitar is preserved with an amplifier (NMM 10812) by Webster Electric Company of Racine, Wisconsin, and an accompanying foot pedal.
While it might seem unnecessary, an EQ pedal is a very handy effect to have. Many amps have very specific voicing that can only be adjusted so far with their tone stack. Also, many small amps have limited on board tone-shaping options. For example, the popular Fender Champ 600 or the Blackstar HT-1, which only have one knob for tone shaping. With an EQ in your chain, you can fine-tune the amp to your liking, or you can perfectly dial in a distortion or fuzz that normally won't cooperate.

For the most part, you might want to get a preamp that has at least some type of EQ on it. Tone shaping on an acoustic electric guitar can really give you an edge or at least a semblance of control before the sound guy butchers it during your gig, although you can do this with an effects pedal. Even though this is something that takes the time to learn, it's better to have the option readily available when you decide to step up to that level.


@Michele – Thanks for checking out our blog! 🙂 If you are going to be using both multi-effect units in your setup, you will need to decide which of these has a better compressor that you will be using. If you like the PEU5’s Compressor and Overdrive, I would place it near the beginning of the chain in front of your existing MojoMojo overdrive. This way, you can use the RP100A’s Delay and EQ within the effects loop of your amp. But keep in mind, there is no wrong way to set this up. I encourage you to place them in different locations of your signal chain to find what sounds best for you.
Hugh Padgham adopted a similar tactic for recording Andy Summers' Roland JC120 when working with the Police: "The chorus [was] always switched on in order to produce the slightly out-of-tune guitar sound that was all the rage during the early '80s. The amp's two 12-inch speakers would each be close-miked with a Sennheiser MD421, panned left and right — one speaker would produce a straight signal while the other would be chorused, and these would sometimes be double-tracked the other way around in order to produce an especially wide stereo picture."
Firs, I'm a tube guy - 68 Vibro Champ, 57 Deluxe, Falcon. Next, I have hand wired boutique pedals. And C, I have owned previous Zoom iterations of this pedal, my favorite is the MS100 BT. With all that said this unit is awesome!! It's all metal and a solid build. The onboard tuner is easy to get to and has more options than I expected. I love that it is stereo out and has an aux in for my iPhone backing tracks. Now the sound - the word is the started from the ground up on modeling amps, cabs and effects. I can tell you the rocks my sox. Whether I'm going through it with my SG or my Les Paul this thing screams. From trippy ambient delays and reverb to 50's rock. The acoustic guitar tones are very convincing. All this for $200 is a steal. I would ... full review

I won't lie, I was VERY skeptical ordering this. But I figured that isfits not great, I could sell it. After getting it, this package is amazing for the money. I am definitely keeping it! I own/have owned $5,000+ models and some $100 "disposable" axes and I was shocked at this beautiful guitar. First off, the flamed top is gorgeous. It doesn't have a cheap look to it. The fret board is so so but you cant expect too much here. The frets don't have sharp edges and nicely done. The sealed tuners are smooth and after a minute of the inital tuning (with the included chromatic tuner), I played it for a few hours and it kept proper tune. The overall tone of the guitar is warm and projects well. I got absolutely no rattle or vibration. Then I plugged into the included amp. I will admit, the amp isn't great but but its a free practice amp. So I plugged into my Peavey and man....it sounds awesome. It also came with a so so gig bag, few picks, a strap, a truss rod key, sorta cheap guitar cord, an extra set of strings, and batteries for both the tuner and for the preamp on the guitar. Speaking of that, its a 3 band EQ with a gain control, volume and a battery checker. I paid $140 for all of this and I will say that this is one of the best deals I have gotten in almost 37 years of me playing. If you want a good practice guitar and can even play a show, don't pass this one up. The guitar alone is worth 3x of what the whole package costed me. I think I'll check out more Glen Burton guitars.
Since real knobs occupy space, this multi-effects processor is quite bulky, a welcome compromise that makes it easier to setup and adjust on the fly. The pedal comes with 59 effects and includes 9 amp models that feature Boss' COSM technology, the standard tech that they now employ on many of their effects and amps. You can combine up to 8 of these to craft your preferred tones, which you can then save into its 36 user presets. Other features include a built-in tuner, a 38-second looper and the ability to record your guitar sound directly to a computer via USB.
Let’s face it, without people listening and responding to your music, there’s not much point in you throwing all you have into that hobby or business. Furthermore, it is relatively hard to be a passionate musician and to work in a more reliably financial-rewarding job alongside it, so one of your primary goals as a musician is bound to be to crack the music business and start making millions.
Another thing to bear in mind is pot taper. Two most commonly used tapers are linear and logarithmic. Linear taper, as name suggests, linearly increases resistance throughout it’s range. That’s ok for some applications, but not for volume pots. Our humanoid ears work in logarithmic fashion, so volume pots need to have logarithmic taper in order for us to hear smooth transition between quieter and louder settings. If volume jumps suddenly in the first 20%-30% of volume pot range and then does almost nothing in the rest of the range, it’s likely that you got a linear pot instead of logarithmic.
Praises and recommendations continue to flood the reviews of the Fender Super-Champ X2 HD, pointing to its great value for money as its main selling point. Even users who are not happy with some of the extra features agree that the amp gives you more than what you pay for. As expected from a Fender tube amp, clean tone is well received, while others are equally happy with the other voicings. Another plus for the Super-Champ X2 HD is that it gets good feedback from guitarists of different playing styles and instruments, be it single-coil equipped or even those with active humbucker pickups.
Some solid-bodied guitars, such as the Gibson Les Paul Supreme, the PRS Singlecut or the Fender Telecaster Thinline, among others, are built with hollows in the body. These hollows are designed specifically not to interfere with the critical bridge and string anchor point on the solid body. The motivation for this can be to reduce weight, to achieve a semi-hollow tone, or both.
×