The Electro-Spanish Ken Roberts was additionally, the first instrument to feature a hand operated vibrato, as a standard appointment found on every model.[12] The vibrato device was called the "Vibrola" and was invented by Doc Kauffman.[12] [13] It is estimated that fewer than 50 Electro-Spanish Ken Roberts were constructed between 1933 and 1937; fewer than 10 are known to survive today.[7][8][9][10]
A tung oil-finished rock maple neck, and a slightly more curved fretboard radius of 13.75 inches are the other small modifications to the ‘speed’ features on the MD200. However, it has a thinner bolt-on neck as compared to the MD400’s wider mahogany set neck. That said, both neck profiles remain a shallow “C” shape, and the guitars’ dramatically beveled cutaways give you ample room to reach the high notes.

There are many, many variations of the electric guitar. Science has told us that in order for sound to be naturally amplified, there needs to be a chamber in which sound can resonate. Just look at the construction of the ancient amphitheaters, or the way that the human body has natural resonating chambers that allow us to use our voices, or a stand up bass, with its large, chambered body designed to amplify the resonating strings.
Instead of thinking about the different woods (mahogany, maple, rosewood, etc), all the different pickups, necks, scale lengths, bridges, body types… all you have to worry about is getting the STYLE right. 95% of the time, that will get you the SOUND you want as well. Of course, that being said, get the highest quality wood you can. For example, most players agree that a “solid sitka spruce top” is probably the highest quality wood you can get for a “beginner” level acoustic guitar, without compromising tone.
The question is now - do you need the entire bundle? When it comes to the presets, the guitars are all very unique, but because of the mass amount of tone-shaping available once you start twisting and manipulating away there becomes less and less of a distinction — the bundle being over a third less than individually purchasing them doesn’t help the decision making factor at all.   
{ "thumbImageID": "GRX20-Electric-Guitar-Black-Night/519417000787000", "defaultDisplayName": "Ibanez GRX20 Electric Guitar", "styleThumbWidth": "60", "styleThumbHeight": "60", "styleOptions": [ { "name": "Black Night", "sku": "sku:site51275776901849", "price": "149.99", "regularPrice": "149.99", "msrpPrice": "214.27", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Ibanez/GRX20-Electric-Guitar-Black-Night-1275776901849.gc", "skuImageId": "GRX20-Electric-Guitar-Black-Night/519417000787000", "brandName": "Ibanez", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/GRX20-Electric-Guitar-Black-Night/519417000787000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Jewel Blue", "sku": "sku:site51275776902065", "price": "149.99", "regularPrice": "149.99", "msrpPrice": "214.27", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Ibanez/GRX20-Electric-Guitar-Jewel-Blue-1275776902065.gc", "skuImageId": "GRX20-Electric-Guitar-Jewel-Blue/519417000085000", "brandName": "Ibanez", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Rated", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/GRX20-Electric-Guitar-Jewel-Blue/519417000085000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } ] }

MAKE YOUR OWN BODY BLANK Another neat trick to create your own body blank for $10 is to get a 3/4" thick peice of Birch Plywood that comes cut into a 4' by 2' board. Simply cut out two rectangular sections of the board that will accomodate your desing and wood glue them together. Be generous with the glue to make sure there aren't any spaces between the boards when you press the two together, clamp and stack weights on top of it so the two peices are joined firmly and let dry overnight. This gives you a a 1 1/2" thick body blank that is rigid and works great for electric guitars. You will have to go with a solid color paint when you finish it but you won't be able to tell the difference between it and the solid wood blank. Plus you'll save a good chunk of change that you can use towards good pickups and hardware. If you want to make the body a little thicker, you can get a 1/4" peice of birch and glue it between the two thicker peices. It's also a good idea to prerout any wire cavities in that 1/4" peice before you glue them together. That way you don't have to worry about drilling them later and ruining the top of your guitar body with the drill.
A good guitar builder can pick materials that provide a predictable result. The process of making a  guitar that costs $10,000 and one that costs $1,000 is identical, or at least very similar. The big difference is likely that in the more expensive one, personal attention has been put into selecting, drying, storing, and cutting the tonewood. The cheaper, which is mass produced by less skilled labor, consists of the same species of wood, but from a pile that came out of a container, in the order it was stacked. This means that two guitars from the same batch can sound quite different. They can sound exactly like the expensive guitar, but they can also sound different.

There are any number of different variations which can give a guitarist his or her tone. The combinations and possibilities are mind-blowing. You can take your pick from the type of guitar used, the hardware and technology used in the guitar, the amplifier you’re plugged into, the room in which you’re playing, the level of technique within your fingers. The list goes on. Typically any one of these factors could make the exact same rig sound completely different in the hands of another player. Yet technical mastery and high-end or vintage equipment are usually a by-product of having played the instrument for A Very Long Time. What about when you’re at the start of your playing career, and you’re looking for a quick shot in the tonal arm? Or you’re more accomplished and looking to experiment with different sounds and textures. It’s here that guitar effect pedals start becoming more and more attractive. But what are they?
Ihave a 12 string dorado. I found a guitar that was sold for $299. It's a 12 string acoustic, Gretsch, 1971. Seems like the right period. The problem is that it is called doraldo. One letter out. Rosewood fret board, dot inlays. Exactly the same as mine but different name. Maybe it could be the same? Go to http://www.rabbithillmusic.9cy.com/id2.htm
While electric guitar manufacturers like this are often more expensive, they do provide a level of customization that isn’t available with several mainline models. Most companies of this size can have a casual email or phone conversation with you, take a few notes about how you want your guitar setup (probably jotting it all down with pen and paper) and then making a guitar to your exact specifications.

Now that you know a little bit of history behind the electric guitar, let’s dive into some of the different types of electric guitars that you can find at Sam Ash. You may be thinking to yourself, “Why are there so many different types of electric guitars?” The reason is this: each and every type of electric guitar serves a unique purpose and will cater to various types of playing styles and musical genres.
×