: I have a Vox Shadow that's sunburst, white pick guard that surrounds 3 solid chrome face pickups and the middle pick up has "VOX" engraved in it. 3 seperate volume controls and a master volume control. Tuning keys are all chrome, and the green decal on the face of the headstock reads Shadow, JMI Dartford, Kent. Neck is attached withthe help of a chrome plate, on the back side of the 'plank' body is an access plate for the jack that states made in England. Guitar also has the original roller/tremelo tail piece with palm lever. The numbers of 64728 are stamped on the back side of the headstock just below the tuning keys. Finish is beginning to crack a bit but it's all original, right down to the volume pots that have to be cleaned from time to time. It must be a rather unknown line that Vox had as I can't find out much on it either. Had this guitar for many years. Was handed to me in pieces in an old 'cardboard' case, (that has since gone away) put it back together and added it to my "music room".
The switches and jack sockets are important in a reliability sense first and foremost I feel. In a play-ability sense, you want a firm feeling, accurate switch and one that lasts well with regular use. You want a jack socket that doesn't fall apart or get too crackly over the years of years, they take a lot of abuse! So here there's no 'magic vintage tone' secret, I would just recommend quality switches from the brands renowned for their years of producing reliable items. I trust and use those from Switchcraft, Pure Tone, Oak Grigsby & CRL. All very solid, well made items that last really well. In particular, I've been predominantly using a multi contact jack socket made by a company called 'Pure Tone'. Please forgive their brand name, as this isn't some tone transforming jack socket, but it is a common sense improvement of an old design which is great. It features 4 points of contact for the jack connector, two for the hot, two for ground. 100% greater surface area, giving it a firmer seat on the jack connector and a sturdier, more reliable connection which is a no brainer upgrade in my opinion.
Although most of us who participated in this article have years of experience with guitar amps, none of us was particularly familiar with all the latest beginner models. There are few reliable professional reviews of beginner amps, but I sorted through what we found, searched through music stores and websites, and sampled numerous models at the recent National Association of Music Merchants (NAMM) show in Los Angeles. This experience gave me a good idea of what’s available now.

This setup is the same as the first one above, however, the volume pedal has been placed near the end of the chain right before the delay and reverb effects.  This allows you to have full control of the volume of your signal right before the delay and reverb effects. This is useful for fading in a fully overdriven signal without cleaning up the signal at the lower range of the sweep.
Find a local music store to outfit you with a guitar suited to you needs and skill. Chords take a lot of practice and a skilled music teacher will save you a lot of time. I have played publicly with live bands and though each player’s skill levels were different we still made a good sound. Find a simple song with just a few simple chords and practice until you learn the chords and strumming pattern. Then move on to a new song. My catalogue of songs has over 1000 songs at different skill levels. Don’t give up or you will never be happy! The price for a quality instrument will be worth it in the long run!
The Vox Show Room shows the classic amps behind the British Explosion of sound in the 60's. VOX, at one time was one of the largest musical instrument producers in the world and their products were utilized by almost every major music group during the nineteen sixties. From The Shadows to The Beatles to U2, VOX is the "voice" of generations of musicians worldwide.

The most famous Gibson guitar is the Les Paul, which has been a mainstay in the music world for decades. The Gibson Les Paul is a high-end, made-in-the USA instrument, and it comes in a few different variations. Like Fender, Gibson has remained fairly consistent with their styles and designs. In addition to the Les Paul, other famous Gibson electric guitars include the SG, Flying V, Explorer, ES-335, and Firebird. Their classic acoustics include the Hummingbird.


Listen, I realize I’m recommending a lot of Yamahas here, but I swear they are just that good when it comes to QUALITY and PRICE. I don’t know why that is, but it’s something a lot of guitar players have discovered. They’re just really good and very affordable. You’ll find a lot of guitars that are better, but they will cost you. I’m recommending every single guitar here for a reason. Keep that in mind.
A hard-tail guitar bridge anchors the strings at or directly behind the bridge and is fastened securely to the top of the instrument.[20] These are common on carved-top guitars, such as the Gibson Les Paul and the Paul Reed Smith models, and on slab-body guitars, such as the Music Man Albert Lee and Fender guitars that are not equipped with a vibrato arm.
Compressors – The role of these pedals is to lift up quiet sounds and rein in loud sounds, compressing the dynamic range of your signal – that is, the difference between the quietest and loudest sounds. They work wonders for songs with a blend of quiet and loud parts, since they let you play hard without busting eardrums, and the soft sections won’t be drowned out by ringing ears. Compressors also have the nice side effect of increasing sustain, letting your notes sound out longer before dropping off.
A combo amp contains the amplifier and one or more speakers in a single cabinet. In a "head and speaker cabinet" configuration, the amplifier and speaker each have their own cabinet. The amplifier (head) may drive one or more speaker cabinets. In the 1920s, guitarists played through public address amplifiers, but by the 1940s, this was uncommon. A rare exception in the 1990s was grunge guitarist Kurt Cobain, who used four 800 watt PA amplifiers in his early guitar set-up.
Unlike many of the other pedals, which are designed to create dramatic or exciting effects, these units take care of the less glamorous (but still very important) jobs in creating your tone. Sound-conditioning effects are the ones that will give the finishing touches to your sound, making the difference between “amateur garage band” and “international touring guitarist.”
Mike Longworth’s book shows at least three guitar amplifiers carrying the Martin name from the early ’60s. Who made them is unknown… most certainly it wasn’t Martin. In 1961 Martin marketed a pair of combos, the Model 110T and Model 112T. Both had top rear-mounted controls and a very groovy geometrical grillcloths in a sort of M.C. Escher pattern. Presumably the 110 featured a 10″ speaker, while the 112 had a 12″. The “T” suggests a tremolo circuit. In 1962 Martin offered a very cool #700 portable amplifier, a unit ensconced in a leather carrying case, presumably battery-powered.
The headstock is located on the end of the neck opposite the guitar body. It is fitted with tuning keys, also known as tuners, tuning pegs, or machine heads. These adjust the tension of each string, changing their pitches. The nut is a small strip located where the headstock meets the neck, that is grooved to guide the strings onto the fretboard. On an acoustic guitar, the nut is commonly made of plastic, but it can also be bone, graphite, or any number of other materials.
Valve Amp or Solid State Amp? There's no right or wrong here, but, for tone alone, valve amps are way better. If you can afford a valve amp, just go ahead and buy one! They're the amps all the great bands ever used - from Beatles and Rolling Stones to Arctic Monkeys and Radiohead, 99% of all professional musicians simply prefer valve amps, like the Vox AC30 or Fender Hot Rod Deluxe III. But there's nothing wrong with solid state amps - the audience at a gig wouldn't be able to tell the difference.

No-load pots – also used by Fender, these pots have the clockwise lug disconnected from the resistive strip within, resulting in infinite resistance between the wiper and the other outer lug when turned fully clockwise. These are sometimes used as tone controls, to remove the load on the pickup(s) presented by the pot and the tone capacitor when turned to 10.[10]
The STRATosphere is in no way sponsored, endorsed, or affiliated with Gibson Brands, Inc. LES PAUL®, SG®, ES®, EXPLORER®, FLYING V®, GIBSON®, the corresponding body shape designs and headstock designs are registered trademarks of Gibson Brands, Inc. The STRATosphere is not an authorized dealer or reseller of Gibson products. Therefore, Gibson products purchased through The STRATosphere are not covered under warranty by Gibson Brands, Inc.

Reverb sits at the other end of the tonal kaleidoscope, serving usually to add warmth and depth to a clean tone. Practically speaking, reverb simulates the sound of your guitar being played in a larger physical space. Imagine shouting at the top of your voice in a cloakroom. Then imagine doing the same thing in a church and you’re somewhere near there. Ok, that’s an extreme example, but approximating the sound as it reverberates around is quite a seductive thing when applied to a guitar. There are plenty of good examples of it being used to add a bit of life to an otherwise sterile clean tone.


Loaded with a strong basswood body, this fella is the closest you can get to that booming mahogany tone of high-end instrument. The iconic combination of three single-coil pickups is of course there, and so is the three-way pickup selector. The sound is very resonant and articulate, making the guitar very well suited for the realms of classic rock, blues, jazz, and country. Metal is also within its reach, and so is light pop on the clear side.
For several years now Godin have been producing some of the most sonically versatile guitars available with their combination of regular pickups, piezo pickups and synth pickups built into their higher end guitars. Note that the synth pickups are 13-Pin and compatible with the Roland GR series guitar synths - if you want MIDI you have to first plug into a Roland synth then take the MIDI out from the synth.

Primarily, reverb pedals tend to give you a lot more variety and control over the effect than you'll have with an amplifier. In fact, most amps that have reverb will have a single reverb knob that you turn up for more of the effect, or down for less. This can work if you use reverb sparingly, but if you're into the effect and like to use it a lot, that's not enough control to really get the most out of your reverberated tone.
Hand built with the same precision as our larger guitars, just 25% smaller.  Great for travel, ideal for children struggling to get their arms around full size guitars, fantastic second guitar for the office.  Because it has a smaller box design our Travel will have a smaller sound (like any smaller guitar) but our Travel Electric with built in auto tuner allows you to plug into any amplifier or PA system giving you the same power as our full size guitars.
Busker? If you're a busker, you're better off with an amp that does not require a power supply. The Roland Micro Cube is a great little amp, very popular with buskers who require amplification due to its portability, cheap price and the fact it can be powered by batteries! It's pretty loud, too! Here's a great blog on some of the best amps for busking.
The SG Standard is Gibson’s all-time best-selling guitar. It was conceived in 1961 and originally released as the new Les Paul. It featured distinct horn-shaped cutaways, and the neck joint was moved three frets, which made the guitar lighter and allowed easier upper fret access. In addition to these changes, the body was slimmer than the Les Paul Standard and the neck profile was more slender. However, with Mr. Paul preferring the sturdier design elements of his original model and due to contractual complications, his name was ultimately removed. Where Les Paul saw a mutation of his original design, others saw genius—from ’63 on, the Les Paul name was removed and the SG, or “Solid Guitar,” was born.
You'd mentioned that the bridge pickup is substantially louder on Telecasters than the neck. I have an American Standard so the relationship between the two might not be identical but I was able to make the volume levels comparable by raising my neck pickup substantially so that only about a half inch of space remained between the string and the pickup. They're now about equal volume and if anything the front pickup sounds better and more defined as a result.

In 2017, Slash was named Gibson Brands' first Global Brand Ambassador. And to celebrate, Slash has designed his first Signature Firebird for Epiphone! Slash’s Limited Edition Firebird features the classic Firebird profile that has gone virtually unchanged since its debut in 1963 and is made with a AAA Flame Maple top and a 3-piece Mahogany body in a Translucent Black finish chosen by Slash. The traditional Firebird style pickguard is layered white and black and has Slash’s “Skull & Top Hat” log in red. The Mahogany neck is glued to the body with a deep-set neck tenon and has a standard 24.75" scale and a rounded custom "Slash" profile. The Pau Ferro fingerboard has single-ply cream binding with Pearl trapezoid inlays, a nylon nut, and 22 medium jumbo frets along with a 2-way adjustable truss rod. The back of the Firebird's traditional reverse headstock has Slash’s Snakepit logo in gold.
Although they just released the Gibson 2016 line, Gibson's first production electric guitar, marketed in 1936, was the ES-150 model (“ES” for “Electric Spanish” and “150” reflecting the $150 price of the instrument). The ES-150 guitar featured a single-coil, hexagonally shaped pickup, which was designed by Walt Fuller. It became known as the “Charlie Christian” pickup, named for the great jazz guitarist who was among the first to perform with the ES-150 guitar. The ES-150 achieved some popularity, but suffered from unequal loudness across the six strings.
Description: Body: Maple - Flamed - Body Construction: Semi-Hollow (Chambered) - Top Wood: Spruce - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Custom - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Tune-O-Matic - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Diecast, Gold, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Brown
So, you want a guitar that's absolutely packed with tone? One that has the vibe that it's been pulled straight out of the 1950s, but has all the playability, comfort, and stability of a brand-new instrument? Then get your hands on the Godin 5th Avenue Kingpin. This stylish archtop smolders with personality. And with the P90 pickup onboard at neck position, you have an unbelievable vintage/atittude tonal combination working in your favor. You'll notice right away that the Godin 5th Avenue Kingpin has plenty of projection and volume, and moreso in the low/mids than traditional archtop guitars. You'll love it for that. Why does the Godin 5th Avenue Kingpin sound so good? Sure, it's that P90 working with the hollowbody design that gets things going. But the primary tonewoods here are pure North American perfection, including a Canadian Wild Cherry archtop, back, and sides. The finish here is a custom polish that gives each and every Godin 5th Avenue Kingpin a satin sheen that recalls French 19th century craftsmanship. Whatever your musical style, you'll have a friend on your side in the Godin 5th Avenue Kingpin. It is, plain and simple, a great guitar. Godin 5th Avenue Kingpin Archtop Guitar Features at a Glance: Finish: Cognac Burst Archtop hollowbody electric guitar Canadian Wild Cherry archtop Canadian Wild cherry back and sides Silver Leaf maple neck Contoured high-gloss black headstock Custom Polished finish Rosewood Fingerboard Adjustable Tusq Bridge by Graphtech Cream Binding 1 x Godin Kingpin P90 single-coil pickup 1 x Volume, 1 x Tone 16" fingerboard radius 24.84" scale 1.72" nut width

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The Blackheart Killer Ant is for beginners that want a better quality, overdriven guitar tone, but do not want to pay the prices that tube amps usually cost. Unlike the Hot Rod Pro Junior III, the Killer Ant is not loud enough for live performance, but it makes a solid practice amp. The Killer Ant is for beginners that want to start playing on an amp with a really good tone and are willing to pay a little more money for that. It’s a solid choice, even with the limited amount of built in features.
Instruments with built-in effects include Hammond organs, electronic organs, electronic pianos and digital synthesizers.[19] Built-in effects for keyboard typically include reverb, chorus and, for Hammond organ, vibrato. Many "clonewheel organs” include an overdrive effect. Occasionally, acoustic-electric and electric guitars will have built-in effects, such as a preamp or equalizer.[20][21]

If you haven't tried a higher end Yairi then you have missed it. These are great hand crafted guitars with a very good neck and great sound. They are branded Alverez in the US but be sure it is one of the Yairi made. There are not lots of them made due the the complete hand crafted design. You don't find them in the music stores much but they should be there. I have owned one for many years and have yet to pick up any other guitar that can match it in my opinion

On the back of soundboards is a pattern of struts and braces that provide stability to the soundboard, while allowing it to vibrate as uniformly as possible. The choice of wood used for these struts and braces is much less critical than it is for the soundboard. However, the bracing pattern can have a significant impact on the sound of the instrument. Guitar makers have tried many different bracing patterns in attempts to add distinctive tonal qualities to their instruments. In addition to bracing patterns, hardwood plates designed to add support to the bridge and soundhole areas are also commonly attached to the underside of soundboards. Though the acoustic impact of these plates are minor compared to the bracing patterns, their size, shape and wood type can also affect the tone of the guitar.
Is there a correct guitar pedal order? Every guitarist will move into using effects pedals in their signal chain, which is when the chaos starts. What the heck is an effects loop? Why is there more than one output on a pedal? This is the same plight mix engineers and keyboardists deal with. But thankfully, with a decent explanation, you'll find there is a logical sequence your effects should be in. Today we explain what that order is and why...

Fusion players such as John McLaughlin adopted the fluid, powerful sound of rock guitarists such as Clapton and Jimi Hendrix. McLaughlin was a master innovator, incorporating hard jazz with the new sounds of Clapton, Hendrix, Beck and others. McLaughlin later formed the Mahavishnu Orchestra, an historically important fusion band that played to sold out venues in the early 1970s and as a result, produced an endless progeny of fusion guitarist. Guitarists such as Pat Martino, Al Di Meola, Larry Coryell, John Abercrombie, John Scofield and Mike Stern (the latter two both alumni of the Miles Davis band) fashioned a new language for the guitar which introduced jazz to a new generation of fans. Like the rock-blues icons that preceded them, fusion guitarists usually played their solid body instruments through stadium rock-style amplification, and signal processing "effects" such as simulated distortion, wah-wah, octave splitters, compression, and flange pedals. They also simply turned up to full volume in order to create natural overdrive such as the blues rock players.


Unless you get the guitar that is great for all types of venue, knowing your venue is highly recommended as you might be buying a guitar that has features not suitable or useless to your venue, not only will you be wasting great features for not using it, but you will also be paying for the said features which you will not be using anyway—not practical at all.


The Thunderhead had two humbuckers, gold hardware, a master volume with two tone controls, a pickup blender knob, and a phase reversal switch. Some had DeArmond pickups with metal covers, a large black insert with nonadjustable poles, plus six tiny adjustable pole screws along one edge. The ebony fingerboard was bound with diamond inlays and had the characteristic “mustache” on the end of the fingerboard. The tops and backs featured figured maple laminates. Colors options included a wine red, sunburst natural, and green (on Thunderhead only). The Thunderhead K-1360 had a trapeze tail, the K-1460 a vibrato. The Tornado (K-1160 with trapeze, K-1260 with vibrato) was a downscale version with plain top, chrome hardware, two volume and two tone controls (no phase), and the Schaller pickups.
The prototype was introduced at the 2011 NAMM exhibition. Bolan is seen holding the instrument on the outer gatefold jacket of T. Rex, his first album after shortening the band name from “Tyrannosaurus Rex”. The guitar was stolen from Bolan in London, and for the last months of his career he was using a wine-red 1970s Les Paul Standard. Gibson announced the availability of the Marc Bolan signature Les Paul in February 2011.
Acoustic guitars were always subjected to various limitations. Since the body of the guitar is its own source of sound amplification, we had to find other ways to get the sound out there. One of the most popular ways was to put a microphone in front of the instrument. This is a method that is still heavily used today, although it's cumbersome and inconvenient in a lot of applications.
Double-coil or "humbucker" pickups were invented as a way to reduce or counter the unwanted ambient hum sounds (known as 60-cycle hum). Humbuckers have two coils of opposite magnetic and electric polarity to produce a differential signal. Electromagnetic noise that hits both coils equally tries to drive the pickup signal toward positive on one coil and toward negative on the other, which cancels out the noise. The two coils are wired in phase, so their signal adds together. This high combined inductance of the two coils leads to the richer, "fatter" tone associated with humbucking pickups.
Taylors have a "happier" sound and I like the feel of them. I am a novice but from what I have seen for a beginner with an acoustic guitar, they felt and sounded warmer and less tinny than the laminated wood ones. A good rosewood taylor isn't on the cheap side of things but it feels like you can play better than you can. And the model I looked at had strings that were nice and close to the frets so you didn't feel like you were pushing in deep like the keys of an old typerwriter. Go into a Guitar Center or somewhere you can actually feel what you are getting before you buy anything. I got a cheap Gibson online less than a month ago and got what I paid for when it came with the bridge completely missing and a brassy sound when it was played. Buy your stuff in person. I think that Gibson is probably still a good brand, but the quality control of the cheaper models they put their name on is something I might question from my first experience with them...
Guild acoustic guitars are played by some of the best professional musicians in the business. From this standpoint, Guild is on par with Martin and Taylor, and completes the triumvirate of American acoustic guitar titans. As you’d expect, the prices follow suit. However, the GAD series offers a way for intermediate players to get a Guild acoustic for a reasonable price.
So, we’re just over £100 here with the Fender Mustang I V2 Guitar Amplifier Combo, but we had to include the new version of the world's best-selling amplifier series. At just over £100 you get 18 amp models, 37 effects, and 24 onboard factory and user presets – which is a lot of features for such a small price tag, definitely making it one of the best cheap amps money can buy. With 20 watts of power at your disposal pumping out through an 8" Fender Special Design speaker, it won’t blow the windows out, but it will certainly stand up on its own on stage and when used in a rehearsal or practice situation.
Few non-American guitar brands have meant so much to so many American guitar buffs as Teisco guitars. Indeed, through their mid-’60s connection with the Sears and Roebuck company, many a modern guitar player learned his or her first chops on a Silvertone made in Japan by the Teisco company. Nevertheless, for years Teiscos were the object of ridicule, the penultimate examples of “cheap Japanese guitars” (a reputation more based on cultural chauvinism than objective analysis, truth to tell). Even Dan Forte, who essentially began the category of writing about off-brand guitars (and who has given me many an entertaining moment in my life), chose Teisco Del Rey as his nom de plume, with more than a little tongue-in-cheek humor in the selection, no doubt.
Intonation is difficult since the bridge is a bar of metal with grooves cut into the top. The whammy bar works and provides a nice warble in a limited range. Action is a bit high at the moment, and adjustment is limited to bridge height unless I shim the neck (no truss-rod adjustment is obvious). Still, the short scale and light strings make it easy to play anyway.

The microphone set up I described earlier will give you a similar effect. The close mic gives you great detail (in audio terms, top-end, treble) and warmth. The mid-distance mic will give you the perspective that the amp is in a room, but without too much loss of detail. The far mic will tell you in no uncertain terms that you are definitely in a room, and with any luck, the listener's brain will process that information and tell the listener what size the room is (I'm not talking exact measurements here--just rough approximations). There will be a fairly significant loss of detail though. The combination of any of the mics will give you varying degrees of perspective and detail.
The materials and the methods of classical guitar construction may vary, but the typical shape is either modern classical guitar or that historic classical guitar similar to the early romantic guitars of France and Italy. Classical guitar strings once made of gut are now made of such polymers as nylon, with fine wire wound about the acoustically lower (bass side) strings.

I Shopped for a long time looking for a suitable nylon for both around the house and live performing. I ordered this Yamaha sight unseen and couldn't be happier with it. Fit and Finish is top notch. Price for value is incredible. playability is remarkably nice. Sound is great. I love the 14th fret to the body configuration vs my other nylons. The dual volume controls on the preamp give me a chance to glisten the high end in a band situation when my lines call for it. Honestly, i am a big fan of the Fishman electronics in my other acoustics, but this yamaha system leaves little to be desired. I did call yamaha support tto order a fitted soundhole cover and it took them a couple of days to get to me, but eventually called me until i

Washburn is an EXCELLENT brand. I have owned an N4, 2 N2's, and their latest, cheapest Nuno model for my daughter. My daughter's guitar is amazing for the price I wish I had such quality for my starter guitar. I would put my N4 up against ANY guitar- period. Plus, whenever I have contacted the company, they have top notch customer service. I know this isn't about amps, but I wrote them about an issue I had with my Randall amp ( a division of Washburn). Without me asking, they mailed me an amp part with an apology. Top notch.
Still not ready to give up, in ’87 Ovation contracted with a Korean manufacturer to bring in a Celebrity line of solidbody electrics. These were Strat-style guitars again, with bolt-on necks, pointy/droopy six-in-line headstocks (with a bi-level carved relief along the bottom, per style), two-octave rosewood fingerboards, triangular flag inlays, and a double-locking vibrato system. We’re not sure what the pickup brand was, but there are models with two XK-110 single-coils and one XK-120 humbucker, plastic-covered with no exposed poles.
Fun !...Top 5...Such a good game I love it I would defiantly reccomend this game to all console users the graphic las the entertainment is just great you can play either online or offline so that's good so many different missions to play all at different difficulty so they ain't too easy but they also ain't too hard I ate this 5 stars for everything of people like shooting games car games then go get this game coz it is all of those things it is just excellent....The graphics are amazing though but I'm going to trade it in for something I enjoy more if this is your type of game I would recommend it but I mostly play games like Diablo and wolfenstein thought I might like it but don't and I don't have anything negative to say about it because it looks and plays great just not my cup of tea
Guild is an American guitar company that makes some amazing semi-hollow electric guitars such as the Starfire and the Aristocrat. These are guitars that nail the retro-rock sound and have the looks to match. Many classic Guild models have been revived through the Newark Street collection. While these guitars are cool beyond words, where Guild really shines is in the acoustic arena.
Beginners want to hear the changes in their sound and get the blues, funk, and rock genres on their guitar. The DigiTech Element XP comprises essential features that enable a beginner guitarist to get more out of their guitar while still maintaining quality. These units also have durable metal foot-switches and an inclusive power supply. Other features include:

The Epiphone Broadway is a hollow body archtop guitar that has been in the Epiphone guitar lineup since 1931. The Broadway was initially an acoustic archtop, but after Gibson took over Epiphone in 1957 the “Broadway” designation was given to a new electric archtop. The electric model was reissued in 1997 and continues to be in production, and we’ve selected it for this list of best electric guitars.
Another relatively drastic but easy and cheap way to hot-rod your guitar’s sound with its current components is to alter how and where its volume and tone pots are connected to each other. The difference can be subtle—and it’s more a matter of preference than what’s “correct”—but it can make the difference between a guitar that is just OK and one that really is a joy to play.
When it comes to guitar amps, American Musical Supply carries iconic cornerstone brands such as Fender, Marshall, Vox, and Orange. These are the names that have formed the foundation of guitar rigs worldwide for decades. We also stock the most innovative new models from such brands as Blackstar, Fuchs, Line 6, Paul Reed Smith, Supro, and a host of other incredible companies anchored by passionate engineers, technicians, and designers. With the myriad of choices available from AMS, how does one decide? All it takes are a few questions to get started.
Les Paul DID NOT design the guitar that bears his name! Ted McCarty and his team at Gibson came up with it and took it to Les at Delaware Water Gap where he was living and recording (no planes flying over). Ted showed it to Les and he said, "They're getting too close to us, Mary, we better join 'em." The only contribution that Les made to the original guitar was that lousy wrap around the bottom trapeze tailpiece that was quickly dumped...
Whoever first got the sound down on tape, vinyl, acetate or whatever, it’s hard to imagine that adventurous, pioneering electric guitarists like Charlie Christian, Lonnie Johnson, T-Bone Walker and others didn’t crank up that brown electric suitcase to see just what it could do. Even if they were banned from such sonic mayhem on the bandstand or in the recording studio, you can bet a few juke joints and basement jams rang with the sound of distorted guitar right back into the 1940s and even the ’30s. Do you doubt it? Plug a fat-sounding Gibson ES-150—with its beefy ‘blade’ pickup—into an EH-150 or BR-1 amp wound up to max. Dirty? Damn straight. As for distortion, there are no more ‘firsts’ to be claimed. For sheer variety of sounds, however, the modern guitarist has it all over his predecessors.
Don't just slap an effect on a track: why not try using automation to apply effects (in this case delay) on single words or phrases to make them stand out? Modern audio sequencers make it very easy to play around with spot effects — that is, effects which are applied to single notes or phrases within a track, rather than to a pattern or track as a whole. Try using different reverb styles on the snare within drum patterns: a short decay on the '2' and a long decay on the '4' for example. Another idea is to apply spot chorus to individual words within a vocal line, as a way of adding emphasis to the lyrics. The 'freeze' or audio bounce-down function of a typical sequencer allows you to get around any problems your computer might have in running lots of instances of a particular effect. Stephen Bennett
This old Nickelback hit is made up of only four different chords, written in the Key of G. During the verses only use G – C – F to progress, while the chorus of the song will add an Am (A minor) to change things up a little bit. This is a fun song to listen to and play along with, especially since the song is set a slower tempo, especially for a rock song.
Pedals of this template offer a sound that’s considered “natural,” “warm” and “tubey” partly by achieving smooth, symmetrical clipping, and partly by reining in harsher high harmonics that can result in sounds that are heard as jagged and spikey in other pedals. The truth is, opamps really don’t clip in the same way that tubes do, but they are manipulated in these designs to simulate a generally “tube-like” sound. Other early overdrive pedals were designed around discrete transistorized clipping and boosting circuits, though many leaned toward distortion units as properly defined, and added more artificiality to the sound—hence the Tube Screamers’ near-instant popularity when it was introduced.
I suspect this has been done by someone but I can't find any such tests in my quick internet search. Seems to me this is the only way to really settle the debate; the differences may be too small to hear, but regardless if there is differences then the tone is being affected by the instrument. In that case the wood and body design is making the string vibrate differently, which is what the pickup...picks up.
It is a common misconception that a new guitar player should start with nylon strings, because they are easier on fingers or easier to play. But nylon strings and steel strings are not interchangeable on the same guitar, so it’s not a matter of progressing from one kind of string to another with experience. What should really drive your decision is what kind of music you want to play.
Another Martin creation, the 000 shape guitar is almost the perfect halfway house between a dreadnought and a parlour. Its classic hourglass figure meant it sat comfortably on the knee, endearing it to players of folk and other fingerpicking-heavy styles of music. The shape ensured it had the perfect balance between playing and comfort, and was often seen on the lap of no less a player than Eric Clapton. However it wasn’t averse to a bit of heavy strumming when the occasion called, and it’s large bottom end ensured it could keep pace when playing with others.
So, learn chords, along with their related chords, and many, many songs will be at your fingertips, even songs you don't know or haven't played yet. As a teacher, I've shied away from teaching songs for learning the particular song's sake. There are many guitarists out there who 'haven't learned the chords to that song,so I can't play it'. Usually they actually have, but don't understand how to put them together to make that song. Also, learning a song generally means putting the particular set of chords in one order. Change key, and the fumbling starts.
For better or worse, by 1982 the taste for natural-finished, neck-through guitars with lots of switches and active electronics had begun to move on. On the horizon were the brief affair with weird-shaped “heavy metal” guitars and the impending first Strat-mania and the rise of Superstrats which would pretty much define the remainder of the decade. 1982, and the 18 and 28 Series, marked the end of Martin’s direct manufacture of electric solidbody guitars.

If you just want to send that current through to the amplifier unchanged, that would mean keeping all volume- and tone knobs turned all the way up. But the knobs can be useful. Underneath the volume knobs, the electrical signal is hooked up to two places; one line goes out towards the amplifier, and the other is effectively contained without being sent to the amplifier. The more you turn down the volume knob, the more of the signal you contain instead of sending it through the amplifier.


Judging by the tag in the sound hole, headstock logo, and general construction of the guitar I would think it's definite made earler than '86. Mine has a tag identical to this one but the date 16 5 78 is stamped onto it and it also has the name of the person who inspected it stamed on it. Interestingly I did notice your guitar has a different truss rod construction than mine. looks like yours adjusts from the head stock under the cover and mine is an allen adjustment through the sound hole. Don't know if they switched over to your style at a later date... food for thought. I have heard of some poeple reffering to these as Yairi built guitars even though they don't carry the Yairi headstock logo.
Softer Delays: I'll usually have at least a couple of delays as auxiliary effects in a rock or pop mix, but I often find that bringing the general level of the delay as high as I want it makes any transients stand out too much. When I'm sending single notes on a clean electric guitar to a delay line, say, I tend to want to hear a wash of sound, not the rhythmic 'CHA-Cha-cha-cha-cha' of a repeated note attack. For this reason, I'll often put a gate or expander before a delay, with an attack time set to 10ms or so. This is enough to 'chop off' any abrupt transients, and makes the delay sound much smoother. Sam Inglis
At its core is a combination of solid spruce and maple, which gives it a subtly brighter tone when compared to conventional spruce and mahogany body acoustics. To retain as much of the guitar's acoustic body as possible, Epiphone equipped the Dove Pro with discrete Fishman electronics, with controls that are mounted on the underside of the sound hole.
More recently, many boutique pedal manufacturers, such as the Z.Vex and Death by Audio series, have attempted to revive the analog strangeness of germanium transistors and diodes. Not bound by imitation, they continue to innovate with analog materials as if the technical innovations of the 70s and 80s had never happened. The mid-90s Z.Vex Fuzz Factory is notable for establishing internal feedback loops that are inadvertently tied to the logic of circuit bending. This means that the pedal self-oscillates, producing an absurd yet controllable noise, akin to an air-raid siren.
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Since the early days of the electric guitar, blues musicians searched for different ways to overdrive their amplifier's signal. Of course, when rock'n'roll took off, the process of "distorting" a guitar tone became a lot easier thanks to new amp and pickup designs. Soon, musicians like Link Wray were making a name for themselves with the use of distortion. By the mid-60s, fuzz pedals were being used by teenage garage rockers around the world while performers like Dave Davies and Pete Townshend made distortion and overdrive a part of their signature sound. Today, distortion and overdrive effects pedals are a dime a dozen, and a quick glance at this section will make that obvious.
The 85/15 “S” humbuckers here—again, they’re affordable versions of the Custom’s 85/15—are transparent, ‘hi-fi,’ articulate and high-output. Lush while clean and thick when clipped, the pickups have also been coil-split to take you into glassier, single-coil territory. However, you can’t coil-split them individually to form HS or SH combinations, for instance.
Can be useful after the distortion pedals to shape the sound, and they can also be used as a boost pedal. Remember that boosting here will increase the signal going into the following pedals, and in some cases this may cause 'clipping' (unwanted distortion if the input to a pedal is too high). I don't tend to use EQ much these days, but this is where I placed it when I did, just be careful with how much you boost.
In this article you will learn the basics of guitar effects pedals so you will be better prepared to choose the right analog stomp boxes and digital effects to complement your sound. I’m not going to spend too much time on the science of how effects boxes do what they do. But I will do my best to explain, in plain English, the basics of each effect.
The PRS SE Standard 24 is one of the stand outs in this line, a straightforward dual humbucker guitar with the same attention to detail as more expensive PRS instruments. It starts off with a mahogany body that is elegantly carved double cutaway shape that PRS has made their own, paired with a 25" scale length mahogany neck. The 24-fret rosewood fingerboard has a slightly wider nut width of 1.6875", while PRS' distinctive bird inlays serve as fret markers. Other features include PRS-Designed Vintage humbucker on the neck and PRS-Designed HFS humbucker on the bridge, both of which are wired to a volume and tone knob, as well as a 3-way pickup selector.

Fender had an electronics repair shop called Fender’s Radio Service where he first repaired, then designed, amplifiers and electromagnetic pickups for musicians—chiefly players of electric semi-acoustic guitars, electric Hawaiian (lap steel) guitars, and mandolins. Players had been ‘wiring up’ their instruments in search of greater volume and projection since the late 1920s, and electric semi-acoustics (such as theGibson ES-150) had long been widely available. Tone had never, until then, been the primary reason for a guitarist to go electric, but in 1943, when Fender and his partner, Clayton Orr “Doc” Kauffman, built a crude wooden guitar as a pickup test rig, local country players started asking to borrow it for gigs. It sounded shiny and sustaining. Fender got curious, and in 1949, when it was long understood that solid construction offered great advantages in electric instruments, but before any commercial solidbody Spanish guitars had caught on (the small Audiovox company apparently offered a modern, solidbody electric guitar as early as the mid-1930s), he built a better prototype.
The body was perfectly flat and the sanding sealer that was on it was great. I however in wanting a finish that was like a mirror used a enamel filler primer. The body was then shot with 6 coats of enamel black, wet sanded, and hung up to cure for 2 weeks. After curing the body was then shot over a matter of another couple of weeks with 10 coats of clear (remember that temperature and humidity have an effect ... full review
Orville Gibson patented a single-piece mandolin design in 1898 that was more durable than other mandolins and could be manufactured in volume.[10] Orville Gibson began to sell his instruments in 1894 out of a one-room workshop in Kalamazoo, Michigan. In 1902, the Gibson Mandolin-Guitar Mfg. Co. Ltd. was incorporated to market the instruments. Initially, the company produced only Orville Gibson's original designs.[11] Orville died in 1918 of endocarditis (inflammation of the inside lining of the heart chambers and valves).[10]
Back in the control room, audition each mic, preferably as the guitarist plays along with the other instruments. Listen carefully to how each microphone sounds on its own and, more importantly, to how it works in the mix. Usually, one microphone will come up a winner on the first pass. Don't stop there, however. Instead, leave the "winning" microphone where it is and experiment with the placement of the other two mics. Time-and mic selection-permitting, you may also wish to do a second round of testing with other microphones.
Guitar effects pedals offer a huge range of possibilities for guitar-sound manipulation―there are literally hundreds of pedals from scores of manufacturers. If you or someone you know is not completely satisfied with the clean, unprocessed sound coming from their guitar and they want to experiment with and modify or color that sound, a great way to tweak it is with effects pedals, also called “stompboxes.” An effects pedal, depending upon its configuration, modifies the sound of a guitar through electrical circuitry or digital modeling via computer chips, either giving it subtle color or dramatic shift. All pedals include knobs on the enclosures that allow the player to adjust the intensity, speed, depth, and shape of the effect in increments, from nuanced color to ear-splitting crunch.

The Mahogany body and neck with rosewood fretboard makes it a highly resonant and great sounding guitar whilst the dual Alnico Classic pickups with push pull coil tapping provide a world of tonality. A SlimTaper D Shape neck profile makes it comfortable for beginners to learn on, whilst pro players will enjoy the ergonomic design 2 hours into their set or rehearsal! Available in more finishes here.
The characteristics of your Kingston are very similar to what other owners have reported: occasional scratchy and erratic performance of the electronics, intonation problems, and action that is hard to control (notably due to the lack of a truss rod). Although I can’t verify this, one estimate indicates that over 150,000 Kingston guitars were sold in the U.S. during the 1960s! It’s obvious that quantity trumped quality when it came to producing the guitars, and it isn’t surprising that the electronics have some issues after all these years.

Wiring: If you chose the optional snap together wiring, then all of our instruments come pre-wired and pre-soldered, so that you can assemble the instrument without needing to do any soldering. You simply snap a few connectors together to complete the electrical connections before you screw down the pickguard, control panel, and output jack plate. This is detailed on the guitar kit wiring and hole drilling description page. If you would prefer to not have your kit pre-wired and pre-soldered, please let us know.
Sounds cool! You’re right that flats are a key to the ’50s Nashville sound. But a lot of guitarists forget that almost EVERYONE used flats until the latter part of the ’60s. Early Beatles, Stones, Who, Kinks, Motown and other R&B, surf, and of course anything jazz-related — it’s all flatwound guitar work till ’66, ’67 or so. Also, the main reason we migrated away from nickel is because the material became markedly more expensive at the end of the decade. (Though yes, some did prefer the brighter tones of replacement materials.)
Im wanting to build my own 8 string fanned fret with a 30" scale length and a bit more string spacing than a standard 8 string. My Ibanez rg8 has about 9mm from center of string to center of string. I figure I will build a few with cheap lumber from home depot without expecting to play it at all. I want a neck through style as well. Does anyone know where to find some info on building something like this and specifically how to properly set up the frets?
Made most famous with the release of Bon Jovi’s 1986 Top 10 hit song, “Wanted Dead or Alive,” Richie Sambora’s double neck Ovation became one of the world’s most instantly recognizable guitar models. The all-new acoustic/electric Richie Sambora Signature Series Elite Double Neck model features a Sitka Spruce top in Gloss Black, Ebony fingerboard inlaid with mother of pearl stars, Teak/Paduk/Walnut/Mesquite inlaid rosette/epaulettes, gold hardware, a mother of pearl star inlay on the body and finished with Sambora’s signature in gold on the headstock.

We’ll talk more about the sound quality shortly. To give you a gentle introduction, Line 6 has been in the amp and effects modeling game for a long time. Their POD line of guitar effects processors has been around for a while, and you might be familiar with their Pocket POD. Some of you might also know them for their extremely popular digital delay pedal and looper, the DL4 (an absolute mainstay on pedalboards everywhere). Line 6 makes several multi-effects units, and according to the research we did the POD HD500X (from their POD HD X series) is the one mentioned and recommended most often. They make a rack-mountable version of it, but we’re more interested in the floor pedal unit. This is a multi-effects pedal, amp simulator, incorporates an expression pedal, tuner and looper, and doubles as a USB audio interface, just to name the basics.
The Epiphone LP Special II has a mahogany body and neck. The fretboard features dotted inlays and is made of traditional, unfinished rosewood – a standard choice that yields a sound consistent with the aesthetic standards of a Les Paul. If you want a Les Paul but you don't want to pay a fortune for it, this mahogany beauty is worth your consideration.
What was listed above was just the tip of the iceberg, and many many other pedals are waiting for you: why not check out our huge guitar pedal selection, by clicking here? You will find Multi-effects (a clever way to have all your effects in a single and practical format), looper pedals (in case you want to record a short phrase and start playing over it and layer some guitar parts), fuzz pedals (made famous by the good ol’ Jimi Hendrix and many others), Phaser, Flanger etc.
This deal leapt out of the page at me straight away. The Fender Squier series has been around a while and even though it’s a budget guitar, you can always rely on Fender for great quality. But what I like the most about this package is that everything you need is included (apart from a guitar stand) and the Frontman 10G amplifier has some extra features that are excellent. The amp has an input for a playback device to jam along to (like your iPad or Smart phone, or even a CD player) plus a headphone output for when the neighbours get too annoyed. A Gain control and Overdrive switch let you grunge everything up, or you can dial it back to a classic, clean Fender sound.
An Octaver is a cool little effect that will tune your original sound several octaves up or down in pitch. This effect can give you the ability to fill up the bass frequencies with your guitar. You can often see Jack White using this effect when he plays live with only one other drummer. He will turn on his octaver at certain points of the song to play bass lines.

The body and neck are also slimmer than other Spanish guitar models, as well, so if you’re used to a steel-string, but gearing up to try a classical guitar, the Kremona Sofia is one to put on your list to try. The strings are Royal Classic Sonata strings, made in Spain, so add this to the guitar body’s manufacturing origins, and you will have a sound that is worthy of a professional, but affordable for just about everyone.
We round off this list with a relatively modern innovation in the world of acoustic guitars; the ‘baby’ acoustic. As usual, Martin and Taylor have led the way with these particular guitars, which are effectively shrunken down dreadnoughts which focus heavily on their portability and the wide range of musical scenarios in which they can be used. Martin had dabbled in this world before, with its rather odd looking Backpacker, but it was with the LX1 – and Taylor’s subsequent Baby Taylor – that the world began to take note.

The world is full of amps. It is so full of them in fact that it is somehow hard to choose not because there is not enough good ones, but too many of them. Which is very unfortunate, as it raises the entry level requirement for understanding what you are buying. This means that a whole lot of people get intimidated when trying to pick an amp. Like if they want a mini amp that they would want to carry with them when they go somewhere. Which is why I sat myself down the other day, bargaining all the while, and compiled a list of the best small guitar amps, for the sake of all the big musicians trying to play them. Hopefully at least some of you will find it more or less useful, since I had to categorize these according to price, sound quality, tone quality, comfort of use and even the general usefulness. What I am trying to say is, it was a lot of work.
Naturally, if a seller can get more money by calling what they have a “lawsuit guitar”, they’re going to do it. Unfortunately, some writers who should know better have taken to using the term for any old Japanese lookalikes, copys, knockoffs, etc, of (mostly) American guitars. Some sellers are using terms like “lawsuit era” or “pre-lawsuit” which don’t mean anything at all.
Twelve and fourteen fret steel string models from the mid 1920's to 1944 are the most collectible of all Martin instruments. They have excellent craftsmenship, sound, and playability, and these model are of great interest to collectors and players. Some musicians prefer the sound and feel of 12 fret models, and these are close in value to 14 fret models of the same size and period. The larger size 14 fret 000 and "D" sizes from the 1930's are considered by most collectors and musicians to represent the golden era of the flat top Martin. Note war-time models (1941 to 1944) aren't quite as desirable as the 1930's models. Lack of materials, manpower, and general social uncertainty during the war contributed to this.
Washburn started in Chicago in 1883. They manufactured guitars and various other string instruments. Now they’re a division of the US Music Corp and owned by JAM Industries USA, but they continue to produce quality guitars. In the beginning, they mostly focused on banjos and mandolins. Starting in the 80s, they branched off into producing signature guitars. Now days they make a wide variety of instruments and are very beginner friendly. Washburns are made from fine-quality wood. This means they can get pricey. But the quality the solid wood offers is well worth the price increases. They’re a decent american company that make very consistent instruments. 
Accompanying the Tempo guitar was the Merson Tempo Guitar-Amp. This was a tube amp with two instrument and one microphone input, heavy-duty 8″ Alnico 5 speaker, volume and tone controls, and a pilot light. The cabinet was covered in two-tone leatherette. The picture is in black-and-white, but the look is remarkably like Premier amps of the time, so a tan and brown color would not be a bad guess. The speaker baffle featured a classical guitar design (!) with “Tempo” written in little circles on the bridge! Substitute a lyre for the classical guitar and you’d swear this was a Premier, made by Manhattan neighbor Multivox, so that might, indeed, be the story there.

Teisco first began importing guitars to the United States under their own brand in 1960. In 1964, the company then switched the name of their U.S. brand to Teisco Del Rey. The company was then sold in 1967, and the Teisco brand name stopped being used for guitars sold in the United States in 1969. Guitars were still sold under the Teisco name in Japan until 1977.
By 1970, however, market conditions were changing rapidly. Japanese manufacturers had greatly improved their quality as well as their range of product offerings. Japanese labor at the time was much cheaper than American, and the imported guitars offered more "bang for the buck" than American ones. In a relatively short time, brands such as Yamaha and Ibanez were outselling Harmonies and Kays. The Japanese guitars had more comfortable neck contours and had truss rods that actually worked. The Japanese rapidly improved the quality of their instruments as well as the variety of their offerings such that by the mid 1970s, Harmony, Kay and Danelectro had all ceased operations, and Martin, Fender and Gibson had eliminated most of the low-end student models from their lines to concentrate on a price range well above any of the Japanese imports. I went to Japan in 1974 and attended a music trade show there as well as visited numerous factories and music stores. I was absolutely astonished at the variety of offerings available. Whereas in 1970 most Japanese guitars were low-end student models which often copied currently available new American products, by 1974 the more progressive Japanese manufacturers were well aware that many vintage American instruments were far superior to the new ones of that time. As a result some of these Japanese manufacturers stared to concentrate on studying vintage American originals. Fuji Gen Gakki and Tokai started producing extremely detailed copies of old Les Pauls, Stratocasters, Mastertone banjos and other vintage American acoustic and electric guitars and mandolins.

Buying an electric guitar is a very personal process, with many things to consider before you make your final choice. It’s not just a case of picking something with a nice color – you are usually parting with a substantial chunk of hard-earned cash, ranging anywhere from $100 to $2000 – or more – for some guitars, and therefore patience is required to find something that really suits you.
Bracing affects the way the guitar sounds because it changes the pitch or tune that the guitar produces out of the sound hole. Personally I think X bracing is the b est because it produces a more even and better more balance for mids and high notes and just enough bass on the E and A strings that gives a brighter more even tone. Blinded or pessed bracing gives a much deeper sound than x bracing which =less versatility but if you bought a pressed dread knot or anything else you'll still be okay just remember strings make a huge difference and running your guitar to the right amount of tone for any song will work it's just that Taylor produces the best over all guitar itself by better quality woods and they go through ver strict and rigorous testing and inspections before they are sold to retailers and customers. Higher grade parts attention to detail and style of music versatility is why one guitar can cost 3 times as much. Most companies like Taylor is know give warranties or $ back
Because of this, the VI opens the door for critique at the smallest degree, but I couldn’t even get that far before finding problems. The strumming is so terribly robotic out of the box, and the sounds divided among the four guitars (Fender Stratocaster and Telecaster, and “bright” and “normal” versions of a Duesenberg StarPlayer) aren’t screaming authenticism either.  
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Personally, I don't like the fender and gibson knockoffs, and squire's aren't the best brand, but I have a squire telecaster, which is actually great quality, better than I expected, and it has a slightly more drier, shaky tone that an actual tele, which is a nice feature. My friend has a squire precision bass, and upon hearing it, I honestly thought it was an actual precision bass at first, so, if you must get squire, than consider either the tele or the precision.

The AF75 also has an ART-1 bridge and a VT60 tailpiece for increased resonance, improved tuning stability, greater sustain and an enhanced tone. It is also equipped with Classic Elite humbucking pickups at the neck and bridge, producing a rich and nuanced tone with just the right low-end heft. Tone shaping is an easy affair with the Sure Grip III control knobs, which are designed for non-slip, precise control.

Try different gauge strings. As you know, guitarists can be creatures of habit. But heavier strings can help both your tone and fingering strength, while lighter strings may suit bigger bends. Experiment! Billy F Gibbons has the thickest tone but his top E is only a .007. Stevie Ray Vaughan’s top E was a .013. Changing string gauge may just bring out your best inner-self.
Throughout the 40’s, racial segregation was still in force across America, however within the music community, (both listeners and musicians) race boundaries were beginning to disappear. African American music (a.k.a ‘Race Music’) was popular with white communities too and with the vast melting pot of musical styles by that point including Folk, Country, Jazz and Delta blues, something exciting started to take shape.
Fender’s legendary tone is enough to win just about anyone over, and they cater to a wide range of customers by offering the more cost friendly Squier series. While their classic electric guitars are favored by plenty of players, their acoustic selection and Jazzmaster offerings have their fair share of supporters as well. No matter what you’re looking for in a guitar or what price range you’re shopping in, you’re likely to find a good fit with Fender.
Besides its classic vibe, the best part about this guitar may be its Broad’Tron pickups. These were designed specifically for the Streamliner, and are known for their throaty midrange, booming lows and sparkly highs. They’re also louder than Gretsch’s other popular pups, the Filter’Tron, so push them hard and they’ll snarl and scream. Dial back the volume knob, however, and you’ll encounter the warmth and rounded tone for which Gretsch hollow-bodies are known.
My first electric was a Decca, and a friend had one too. Mine was the one pickup style and his had two pickups. This was back in 1972. These were cheap but played very well and I wish I still had mine. There's one on Ebay right now that's just like the one I had, only ten bucks so far. I remember the great sustain and feedback I could get through it playing Hendrix songs!

Soft and soulful is the second name of Fender guitars and basses. They are famous for their fruitful and enchanting tone. It is one of the most recognized brands in the world. Every note that is played on this guitar is pleasant and pure. There are two factors that contribute to such a thrilling tone. Firstly, the majestic shape of the 'strat' in resonating wood and secondly, the perfect configuration of three pick ups. The pick ups are usually singe coiled. However, there are cases where double coiled third pick ups have been used. Fender is a very popular guitar brand, and artists like Eric Clapton who plays extremely soft music, and heavy metal bands such as Iron Maiden have also used the same brand. Models like Stratocaster and Telecaster have etched their names among the greatest guitars ever made. Fender offers myriad of designs, styles, and configurations. If you are a beginner, then go for any Fender model, it's probably the best guitar for novices or amateurs.


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Bass combo cabinets and speaker cabinets are typically cube- or rectangle shaped. However, some small- to mid-sized combo amp cabinets have a wedge shape, like a keyboard amp or a stage monitor speaker cabinet. The wedge shape, also called a "rock back" feature, enables a bassist to point their speakers up towards themselves, to make it easier to hear their sound.

Does anyone know anything about Palmer based Magnum Series PGA-65 guitar amps? I live in Costa Rica and bought one new from a music shop but with the amount of moisture here the original box was destroyed along with any manuals, paperwork, etc.. The amp says it is manufactured in China and is solid state. It is supposedly 65 watts with 2 channels, clean and dirty with EQ sections on both channels. It also has send and returns and a spot to plug in your Cd player, etc.. It has a big badge on the front saying Magnum Series, Palmer Guitar Company, Fl Usa. I didn't pay alot for it and for the price it is a decent sounding amp although I probably will replace the speaker with a Celestion.

A very, and in my opinion (from experience), the most difficult technique to learn and one of the most versatile. From simple single string transitions (a term I use to describe it I don't know the actual term) and used in jazz to quick shredding in rock. Learning this skill was not only a task, but helped me more fully understand a lot of musical theory.
A Japanese company which is renowned for its amazing guitars, Ibanez is a great brand for beginners. Since the Ibanez RG450DX RG Series Starter Electric Guitar has a maple neck, mahogany body, and a rosewood fretboard. Together, these give this guitar a great sound. The Ibanez RG450DX RG Series Starter Electric Guitar is a pretty fine looking guitar with amazing sound to boot.
Guitar tabs (which is short for tablature) is a type of musical notation for stringed instruments that show you which fret to play on each string, as opposed to standard staff notation, which shows you the pitch of a note. Beginner guitarists have a much easier time learning from tablature, but in the long run, it’s a good idea to learn the standard musical notation as well.
Want to visit our guitar shop? We electric and acoustic guitars in a comfortable laid back environment steps away from the Damen Brown Line, 81 and 50 CTA bus. The guitars we carry are more than just used guitars. Each guitar has a story - whether it’s where it was played, when it was built or how it was treated. Our guitar shop specializes in guitars for players and collectors. Vintage guitars and used guitars are inspected and set up by our Luthier before leaving our shop. Stop by our showroom often as our inventory changes frequently.
Sounds cool! You’re right that flats are a key to the ’50s Nashville sound. But a lot of guitarists forget that almost EVERYONE used flats until the latter part of the ’60s. Early Beatles, Stones, Who, Kinks, Motown and other R&B, surf, and of course anything jazz-related — it’s all flatwound guitar work till ’66, ’67 or so. Also, the main reason we migrated away from nickel is because the material became markedly more expensive at the end of the decade. (Though yes, some did prefer the brighter tones of replacement materials.)
My brother owns a Norma acoustic guitar modeled on the Gibson Hummingbird. He bought it used in the mid 70s. Solidly built but only average sound. I would guess that like many Japanese made guitars from the 70s, Norma was not a "company," but simply an American sounding brand name chosen by a larger Japanese instrument manufacturer to market their guitars in the USA. I own a mid 70s Penco acoustic, same deal, name was used on Japanese made guitars marketed through the Pennsylvania Music Company, thus Penco.
To capture two speakers in a multi-speaker cab or record a bigger sound that delivers the response of two different microphones in similar positions on one speaker, you can try using two mics in a close or semi-close placement. If you’re using two different mics on a single speaker, place the capsules of each as close together as possible, without touching, in order to minimize phase cancellation. This technique might seem redundant, but can often yield outstanding results, allowing you to blend the characteristics of two different microphones to capture one amp sound – a bright, detailed condenser and a punchy, midrange-heavy dynamic, for example. On guitar cabs carrying two or more speakers, try miking each speaker separately, placing each of two mics – same type or different – at the same distance. Some amp makers use different types of speakers in cabs to enhance sonic complexity, and this miking technique will make the most of those. Even two speakers of exactly the same type, however, will often sound slightly different, and blending them might yield great results.
Meanwhile, in Sepulveda, Thomas Organ, after importing JMI's British-made amps for a short period in 1964–65, began to produce a line of mostly solid-state amplifiers in the United States that carried the Vox name and cosmetic stylings. With some assistance from Dick Denney, these amps effectively paralleled JMI's own transistorised amplifiers but were different from the British and Italian made Voxes in sound and reliability. To promote their equipment, Thomas Organ built the Voxmobile, a Ford roadster dressed up to look like a Phantom guitar, complete with a Continental organ and several "Beatle" amplifiers. Despite the huge marketing effort, Thomas Organ's Vox products did much to damage the reputation of Vox in the North American market for many years. By 1968, the company had also marketed a line of Vox drum sets (actually made by a German drum company, known as Trixon), which included a kit that featured a conical-shaped bass (kick) drum, that looked more like a wastepaper basket left on its side, and another with a bass (kick) drum, that looked like a flat tire. Such gimmicks did not help sales, and by the early 1970s Vox's American presence was virtually nonexistent.
Nice list but how did the Hagstrom Ultra Swede not make the cut? Not only does its quality exceed most of what Epiphone has to offer (not knocking Epi, just sayin) and match many other brands 3x+ its price, it is (in my opinion) also one of the most versatile guitars I can think of. Actually, it seems Hagstrom is ignored or forgotten in what seemingly appears to be every comparison or "top ten" list available... What gives?
The lotus had a plywood body and was pretty cheap, I wouldn't pay a 100 bucks for one today, if anything. But, back then, it was as good as any, we worked with what we could get. I know we played some excrutiating unison leads (ala Blackfoot, Molly Hatchet,etc) he with his souped up Lotus, me with my Memphis Strat copy, both plugged into my bitchin solid state Crate (looked like a real wooden crate!) amp.
20 pages, black and white with color front cover. In the middle of 1981, Rosetti took over distribution of the Gibson line in the UK. Rosetti were a very big name in Britain, having distributed Epiphone since at least 1963, as well as Hagstrom and others. This catalogue was produced at the tail end of 1981, and introduces a number of models to the UK, such as the MV-II, MV-X guitars and the Victory basses, the GGC-700 and the Flying V bass. Some of these models were so short-lived that they were actually never included in US brochures. The cover image (reproduced in part here) showed some of the earliest demonstration models, including a Victory with a highly unusual white scratchplate.
A half-century later, effects are everywhere. Whether they’re built into your amplifier, a single pedal, multi-effects processor, rack-mounted, or controlled through an iOS device, there’s a vast array of tones at your disposal, ready to add sonic magic to your performances or recordings. Most recording and performing guitarists have come to depend on effects to add flavors both subtle and flagrant to their sound, helping them to carve out the signature tones with which they’re identified.

In the years following Electric Mud and Muddy's Death in 1983 from heart failure , the record itself started building a cult around it, comprised of acid rock fans, record collectors and curious people. By 1996, the resurgence of popularity in the record matched with its scarcity led it to being reissued in a deluxe edition by Chess with new line notes by Mark Humphrey and Marshall Chess. Despite all the bad press Electric Mud received, Marshall Chess never stopped claiming it was a brilliant, misunderstood record.
Loved this guitar a lot😘, been going back and forth to our nearest guitar center and to he honest with you, I tried the Taylor gs mini, MartIn Black electric acoustic, Breedlove electric acoustc, but man, when I tried and started playing this awesome Ibanez AW54CEOPN, I was blown away!!! The sound was loud and cleat the tone was awesome, the color was fantastic! For the price of $299.00 was very cheap for the quality and sound that this guitar can offer👍🏽👍🏽👍🏽
It was founded by Orville Gibson in 1902 as “The Gibson Mandolin-Guitar Mfg. Co., Ltd.” in Kalamazoo, Michigan.    Gibson is known for its innovation and supreme quality. Gibson’s Les Paul is very famous Guitar which creates the wildfire in the hearts of million fans. Gibson is always committed to provide the best quality with minimum disorder in all over the world. To enrich your experience the can prefer this wonderful Guitar.

The top of the archtop line featured two very nifty new models called the Vegas 40 and Vegas 66. The Vegas 40 (Teisco Del Rey EP-11T) double-cutaway thinline was promoted both in Japan and the U.S. It was a full size ES-335-style with two pickups (the large rectangular type with chrome sides and black insert, square poles), bound f-holes, volume and tone controls on the lower bout (no plastic plate) and a fancy new angular archtop Bigsby and roller bridge. The pickup selector was a rotary switch on the lower horn with a new round knob with a lever (versus the old chicken beak). The bolt-on neck had a new three-and-three head with a flared “check mark” indentation in the top, with wide wings on either side, a shape that would characterize a number of other models later in the decade. The fingerboard was bound, with dots. On the Japanese version, the headstock carried a zippy new typeface proclaiming “Vegas 40,” while the pickguard used a similar angular script for the Teisco logo. The Teisco Del Rey carried its regular sticker.


The $300-$500 price range of acoustic guitars is perfect for all levels of players. Whether you are a beginner, intermediate or advanced player, this price point gets you a good guitar that will sound great while not breaking the bank. While you won’t find any American made acoustics under $500, you will find some by popular American brands offering cheaper versions of their high end guitars that are made in Mexico or China.
For quite some times now, many musicians have been making use of the distinctive sound and look of Koa wood construction on instruments. Designed to meet the taste of Hawaiian culture and tradition, the Koa wood on the ESP LTD EC-1000 is native to Hawaiian island, boasting a remarkable history and well-deserve popularity for its recognizable natural reddish and grain pattern eliciting a well-balanced sound while adding tone brightness without affecting the guitar’s warmth.
However, 50 x does not mean that the two pickups wired in parallel are only half as loud as a single pickup, nor does 200 x mean that the two pickups wired in series are twice as loud as one pickup. Our human hearing does not work this way. Why that’s the case is beyond the scope of this column, but for our guitar-wiring purposes, it’s enough to know that the human ear doesn’t operate in a linear way.

In the early 1970s, Southland Musical Merchandise Corporation apparently acquired the Kent name and shifted manufacturing to Korea. The font for the logo changed and emphasis was placed on lower prices with a higher profit margin at the expense of quality. Most of those guitars were knock-offs of Gibson Les Pauls and ES-335s and Fender Stratocasters. I'm not watching those.
Indeed, pros can be picky. Of course, they’ve heard, played and tried out innumerable electric guitars over the years and often have a high standard when it comes to the build, tone, playability and overall quality of the instrument. Many professional guitar players already consider themselves collectors, taking pride in what they have in their guitar arsenal.
In 1971 Larrivee began adding inlay designs to their guitars and in 1977 inlays became a standard for their guitars. Beginning in 1978 their inlay designs took on a more romantic style. Since 1979 all engravings were designed by Wendy Larrivee except for a 1998 inlay called the “Joker.” In 2007 Larrivée began using laser engraving for their inlays.

One day I went over to hang out with a friend on Long Island’s prestigious, luxurious north shore. He was also an amateur, aspiring, guitarist, and perhaps slightly more advanced than me – after all, he wrote a solo, even if it didn’t belong to a song yet. But he was very excited when I arrived and wanted to show me something cool in the family room. When I stepped inside, what did I see strewn about the floor but a whole bunch of effects pedals surrounding his electric guitar like a battalion about to march on and conquer a fierce enemy.


The earliest extant six-string guitar is believed to have been built in 1779 by Gaetano Vinaccia (1759 - after 1831) in Naples, Italy; however, the date on the label is a little ambiguous.[37][38] The Vinaccia family of luthiers is known for developing the mandolin. This guitar has been examined and does not show tell-tale signs of modifications from a double-course guitar.[39] The authenticity of guitars allegedly produced before the 1790s is often in question. This also corresponds to when Moretti's 6-string method appeared, in 1792.
The C-series archtops were long scale until mid-1934, same as the 000 models. Sometimes a C model is converted from an archtop to a 000 style flat top. A conversion of a short scale C-2 (mid-1934 and later) won't exactly be a 000 either. The neck must be shortened to get the shallower angle required for a flat top. This amounts to about 1/3 of a fret, so the guitar ends up having a 13 2/3 fret neck. This puts the bridge position a little lower on the top, closer to the OM bridge position (but not exactly the same). The other feature on the C models that is different from a 000 is the back arch and the back braces. The archtops have more arch in the back and taller #3 and #4 back braces. Note the 1939 and later C-2 models have no abalone, the neck inlays are pearloid.
The four-string guitar is better known as the tenor guitar. One of its best-known players was Tiny Grimes, who played on 52nd Street with the beboppers and played a major role in the Prestige Blues Swingers. Multi-instrumentalist Warren Ellis (musician) of Dirty Three and Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds is a contemporary player who includes a tenor guitar in his repertoire.
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